Business Of Running For President

The Business Of Running For President

Much like running a corporation, running for president is an expensive and time-consuming undertaking. Just like a corporation, a campaign involves employees, money management, public relations, advertising and the selling of a product or service. Which in this case is the person running for office. In this graphic, we take a look at just what all it takes to run for president, and how big of a business doing so has become.

Like all businesses, you have better success in some states than others. Below is a look at how effective each candidate has been state by state in fundraising.

  • Overall Fundraising: Obama has raised $556M and Romney $340M.
  • State-by-State Breakdown:  A few examples…
    • NY: $11.2M Obama vs. $8.9M Romney
    • Ohio: $.8M Romney vs. $.6M Obama
    • CA: $68.3M Obama vs. $33.8M Romney
    • FL: $24.8M Romney vs. $16.9M Obama
  • Average Contribution: Romney has raised $170M from those contributing $2,000 or more vs. Obama who raised nearly half of that from larger donors at $92M.  See the graph for the entire breakdown!
  • Rising Influence of Super PACs: RNC has raised $273M from Super PACs vs. DNC which raised $70M.  This has dramatically impacted the race as they need no involvement from the candidates themselves.
  • Breakdown of how they spend their funds: Obama spent 51% on advertising vs. Romney 45%.  See breakdown by payroll, travel, polling, etc.
  • History of Presidential Campaign Costs: Lincoln spent just $2.8M in 1860; Reagan and Carter spent approx. $300M, see breakdown of major campaigns from history.

Business Of Running For President

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Infographic Credits, courtesy of Best Degree Programs:

Source: Bestdegreeprograms.org

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