Author Archives: Arizona State University

Top Ten Sports Bars, Photo: Clintus McGintus, Flickr

ASU unveils innovative sports law programs

If you want to work with professional sports teams, big sporting events or promising student athletes, then you may be interested in the innovative new sports law and business program officially being launched this week by Arizona State University. The highly ranked Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU are collaborating on two new sports law graduate degrees you can earn in just one year. Classes begin this fall.

“I’ve worked in the sports law field for three decades, and can see we need professionals who have training in both law and business to help work on regulatory and revenue issues in the sports industry,” says professor Rodney K. Smith of the College of Law, director of the new programs. “I don’t know of any other program in the country that offers a master’s degree like this with just a single, intensive year of study.”

The two new one-year degrees are a master of legal studies (MLS), for those without a law background, and a master of laws (LLM), for those who already graduated from law school. In each program, students will work on 18 to 21 credits from the law school, and six to nine credits from the W. P. Carey School. This includes an externship, which might be for a professional sports team, a sports law firm or even a big event like a college bowl game. The programs are going to be small and personalized, accepting fewer than 30 people each in their first year. They will also focus on team-based learning and look at real-world issues, such as stadium problems, player unionization and contract negotiations.

Ray Anderson, ASU vice president of university athletics and a former executive vice president of football operations for the National Football League, will be a professor of practice in the programs. He wanted to be part of a high-quality sports offering, and this one is located in a metropolitan area with three professional sports teams, major golf events, college football bowl games and even next year’s Super Bowl.

“I am proud to be a part of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Sports Law and Business Program because it is the only one of its kind to offer a sports-focused graduate program that combines the strengths of a top law school with a top business school as its foundation,” Anderson says. “One of the reasons I came to Arizona State University from the National Football League is because of the vibrant Phoenix sports market, with its combination of sporting events representative of all major sports leagues and organizations. This fact, combined with a premier research university, will produce top-quality learning experiences for students in the curriculum.”

Courses in the new program will encompass both law and business areas, including “Sports Business Strategy and Industry Dynamics,” “Negotiations and Drafting in the Sports Industry,” and “Problems in Professional Sports Law and Business.” Big-name speakers from the world of sports are expected to participate, as well.

“The sports industry is complex and expanding,” says marketing professor Michael Mokwa of the W. P. Carey School. “The new program will provide skills and savvy for individuals seeking to make a real difference in the field.”

For more information about the new one-year degrees, visit law.asu.edu/sportslaw. A three-year juris doctorate program will also be added this fall for those who want to pursue their law degree with an emphasis in sports law and business.

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ASU’s engineering schools merge

Arizona State University is merging its two successful engineering schools. The move will enhance and expand engineering education opportunities, lead to growth in the number of engineering and technology graduates, strengthen and increase the impact of research and simplify engagement for industry.

This is a natural next step for ASU’s successful College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) and the Polytechnic campus, where the college is located. Both are now about a decade old.

CTI will be renamed the Polytechnic School, and will be housed within ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. The school will continue to have unique programs, and the engineering and technology programs will be expanded at the Polytechnic campus.

The Arizona Board of Regents approved the change Feb. 5.

“For ASU to pursue its mission of innovative education and research, there needs to be continuous evolution and improvement of the university’s schools and campuses,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “By incorporating the Polytechnic School within Fulton Schools of Engineering, a top 50 nationally ranked engineering school, Poly will attract more students and expand research possibilities faster than could have been done otherwise. The Polytechnic School brings to Fulton a number of high-quality applied engineering programs and additional research facilities and programs.”

In recent years, ASU has constructed new academic facilities at Poly, built a residential life academic village, and added new recreation facilities. The goal remains to have 15,000 to 20,000 students there.

“The merger of CTI and the Fulton Schools represents a logical fusion of two very successful programs,” said ASU Provost Robert Page. “It will provide our students with a better-defined set of program options and allow new synergistic connections among our faculty.”

Both CTI and the Fulton Schools share a strong interest in innovative, experiential education, student success and use-inspired research directed toward solving societal challenges in areas such as energy, health, sustainability, education and security.

The Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering is one of the largest engineering schools in the United States, with more than 10,000 students. CTI has more than 3,500 undergraduate and graduate students. The Fulton Schools undergraduate program ranking from U.S. News & World Report puts them in the top 25 percent of ranked programs. Both schools have faculty that have been honored with the highest awards in their fields.

Mitzi Montoya, who has served as vice provost and dean of ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation since 2011, has been promoted to vice president for entrepreneurship and innovation in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development and university dean for entrepreneurship and innovation. In this new role, Montoya will synthesize activities across campuses and continue to enrich the entrepreneurship and innovation ecosystem.

During her time as dean of CTI, Montoya spearheaded several initiatives designed to promote and support entrepreneurship. She was pivotal in bringing TechShop – a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio with locations nationwide – to the ASU Chandler Innovation Center. She also launched iProjects, which connects ASU students with industry to solve real business problems.

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New ASU program provides grants to nonprofits

In recognition of #GivingTuesday, the Howard G. Buffett Foundation today announced a new program to engage young people in identifying innovative and impactful efforts to address hunger, conflict and poverty. In partnership with Arizona State University’s Lodestar Center for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Innovation, the Buffett Foundation will solicit proposals through the 40 Chances Seed Grants program.

The new program will provide forty $10,000 grants to the most innovative nonprofit organizations using strategies built on the effective philanthropic principles described in the New York Times bestselling book 40 Chances: Finding Hope in a Hungry World, authored by Howard G. Buffett with Howard W. Buffett.

Through the partnership, students and faculty at Arizona State University will identify the organizations with the highest potential for impact and the Howard G. Buffett Foundation will make the final determinations on all grant recipients.

Seed grants will be awarded twice per year, and winners for the first round of grants will be announced in the spring of 2014. Organizations must have U.S. 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status or be sponsored by an organization with U.S. 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status to be eligible for consideration. Forty grants will be awarded over four years, for a total of $400,000. Recipients of seed grants will be expected to provide a report on the grant’s impact following the implementation of funds.

#GivingTuesday was created to designate the Tuesday following Thanksgiving, Black Friday and Cyber Monday as a national day of giving.

Find out more information about the 40 Chances Seed Grants program by visiting http://www.40Chances.com/SeedGrants.

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8 ASU grads lead companies on Fast 500 list

Eight Arizona State University alumni are CEOs of companies named to Deloitte’s 2013 Technology Fast 500™ list, according to information released by Deloitte on Nov. 12.

The ASU alumni whose companies made the list include:

  • Sean Barry ’93 B.S., of Bridgevine, Inc.
  • Thomas  R. Evans ’76 B.S., of Bankrate, Inc.
  • Diana P. Friedman ’84 M.A., ’89 M.B.A., of Sesame Communications
  • Brian Gentile ’92 M.B.A., of Jaspersoft Corporation
  • Chet Kapoor ’90 B.S.E., of Apigee Corporation
  • John McDermott ’83 B.S., of Endologix, Inc.
  • Tim Miller ’89 M.B.A., of Rally Software Development Corp.
  • James Triandiflou ’92 M.B.A., of Relias Learning

The Deloitte Technology Fast 500 is the pre-eminent technology awards program in United States and Canada. Combining technological innovation, entrepreneurship and rapid growth, Fast 500 companies – large, small, public and private – span a variety of industry sectors, and are leaders in hardware, software, telecom, semiconductors, life sciences and clean technology.

For more information on the Technology Fast 500 list, visit www.fast500.com.

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ASU top university for international students

Arizona State University is ranked 11th in the nation as a top choice for international students among all colleges and universities, according to a report released today by the Institute of International Education.

ASU increased its appeal among international students during the 2012-13 academic year, with 6,645 international students attending the university, up 29.6 percent from the previous year’s 5,127 students when ASU was ranked 15th in the nation.  ASU is also ranked 11th among top doctorate institutions.

The university attracts students from more than 120 nations throughout the world. China, India and Saudi Arabia are the top three countries represented at ASU. Students are enrolled at each of ASU’s four campuses across the Phoenix metropolitan area.

“We’re very strong in the academic areas that are in demand among international students, and our ranking of top 100 universities in the world appeals to international students,” said David Burge, executive director of admission services at ASU. A majority of international students choose engineering as their major with 2,060 students studying the field. Business degrees are the second most sought after with 1,102 students. Additional programs include intensive English with 855 students, computer and information sciences with 578 and social sciences majors with 274 students.

International students choose ASU because the university offers an excellent academic experience and they discover a sense of community when they connect with other students from their countries.

“Students who are already here take care of those coming to the university after them. They make sure they have connections to people from their country, cultural traditions and even places to eat. It’s really nice to see,” said Jennifer Glawson, ASU International Student and Scholars Center director.

The university is reaching across borders to bring ASU to students abroad through recruitment fairs, programs that allow students to take classes in their countries and transfer seamlessly to ASU and partnerships throughout the world that ensure that ASU meets the needs of a global community.

Benjamin Liu came to ASU from China to take classes at the W.P. Carey School of Business. He chose ASU since it was a large university that offers plenty of opportunities for students. He’s majoring in supply chain management and management entrepreneurship.

“ASU has a great business school. The program is great,” Liu said.

As the president of the Coalition of International Students, he is able to meet students from around the world as the organization offers resources and hosts events such as a welcome event, career fair and Football 101 for students from other countries.

Combined with opportunities offered by the university, there are plenty of activities to keep students busy.

”There are a lot of options like research projects and other opportunities at ASU that other places couldn’t offer,” Liu said.

Nusret Ipek is an engineering management major from Turkey who found that ASU offers a university experience where students can always find something to suit their interests.

“You can find anything that you want through many clubs and activities,” he said.

Mariana Delacerda came to ASU from Brazil to major in architecture and landscape architecture with a minor in sustainability. The university’s technological classrooms, size and academic programs immediately appealed to her.

“I had no doubt that I wanted to come to ASU,” she said. “I saw that the School of Sustainability was the first of its kind. They have so many programs and it is amazing.”

Working toward her academic goals at a university with so many other international students enriches the experience and has helped her grow academically.

“I love that ASU is huge in international students. For my program, that is amazing to be in a classroom with people from all around the world. We come up with so many great ideas,” Delacerda said.

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ASU Polytechnic Students Take $2 Challenge

More than 30 students at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa, located at 7001 E Williams Field Rd, will abstain from modern-day luxuries and challenge themselves to live on two dollars a day and in cardboard-box houses from Nov., 12-15, 2013.  Students will convene outside the Student Union and begin building their homes at 10:30 a.m. on Nov. 12th.

The Two Dollar Challenge, a national experiential learning exercise and poverty action program, is designed to give students an opportunity to step out of their daily lives and more tangibly reflect upon the daily and prolonged challenges of living in poverty while raising awareness and funds to support economic development organizations.

This Challenge is distinct from your average charity drive for three reasons. First, it asks students to restrict their consumption and live by other rules designed to simulate poverty. This experience gives students a glimpse of how nearly half of the world’s population lives every day. Second, the Two Dollar Challenge participants will raise funds for the cause of their choice. Third, through the experience and accompanying discussion students are educated about the complexity of world poverty. Student groups can become immediate actors in the eradication of global poverty and gain the experience to become passionate leaders in the field for the future.

“This is our second year partnering with Esperança and our students are looking forward to the challenge,” said Mark Henderson, engineering professor and co-founder of GlobalResolve at ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation.  “During the three day Challenge, the students will clean dorm rooms, hold car washes and do other odd jobs to make money to purchase food and live.  It will be an eye-opening experience for them to see what poverty feels like.”

The students will also be holding a shoe drive to help fund Esperança’s programs.  Esperança is a nonprofit that improves health and provides hope for families in the poorest communities of the world through sustainable disease prevention, education and treatment.  The general public can drop off their gently used shoes at the Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa anytime during the three day challenge, Nov., 12-15, 2013.

“We’re excited to be a part of ASU’s Two Dollar Challenge,” said Tom Egan, executive director, Esperança.  “We offer programs and services in five countries and our volunteers are always surprised by the living conditions.  People in Bolivia and Nicaragua don’t always have access to clean water and food, they are disease stricken and don’t have stable homes to live in.  The Two Dollar Challenge is an opportunity for us to bring awareness to poverty locally, as well as nationally and internationally.”

NASA Star Vista

ASU engages with NASA’s Solar Research Institute

Arizona State University Foundation Professor Kip Hodges is co-investigator and ASU principal investigator for a node of the new NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI). SSERVI brings nine teams of researchers from NASA laboratories, universities, research institutions, and commercial enterprises together in a collaborative virtual setting to focus on questions concerning planetary science and human space exploration in the inner Solar System.

Through Hodges participation, ASU is affiliated with “Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration” team that is led by Jennifer Heldmann of NASA’s Ames Research Center. Other nodes of the virtual institute are based at Brown University, the Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory, the Lunar and Planetary Institute (Houston, Texas), NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center, the Southwest Research Institute (Boulder, Colo.), Stony Brook University, the University of Central Florida, the University of Colorado. All together, the new virtual institute embraces the research of nearly 200 scientists nationwide, providing them with a total of roughly $12 million per year over the next five years.

“I’m very pleased that, through Jen’s leadership, the NASA Ames node was selected to be an inaugural part of SSERVI”, said Hodges. “I think we have assembled a great team of researchers that cross the boundaries between planetary science and the engineering and implementation of new technologies to enhance our ability to do science on other worlds.”

In addition to researchers from the Ames Research Center and ASU, the NASA Ames team includes participants from: the BAER Institute; the Canadian Space Agency; Cornell University; Evergreen Valley College; Honeybee Robotics; Idaho State University; the Korean Institute of Geoscience & Mineral Resources; Los Gatos Research; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Purdue University; the SETI Institute; Studio 98; the University of Toronto; the University of Western Ontario; Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering; and NASA’s Goddard, Johnson, Kennedy, and Marshall Space Flight Centers.

The NASA Ames team will focus on the development of innovative strategies for scientific research on asteroids, the Moon, and the moons of Mars – as well as on samples returned from those bodies – through studies of planetary analog sites on Earth. Hodges notes that it is important to establish best practices for human and robotic exploration of space prior to the launch of real missions so that we can maximize the quality and quantity of science that can be done at our exploration targets.

“By studying geologic features on Earth that are similar to those we will encounter on other bodies, we better prepare ourselves for future explorations.” The NASA Ames node will be conducting such studies on volcanic landscapes in Idaho and at meteorite impact craters in northern Canada.

Hodges was recruited for participation in SSERVI as a consequence of his research group’s work on determining the ages of impact events on Earth and the Moon.

“On coming to ASU in 2006, it was one of my goals to establish a world-class center for noble gas geochronology and geochemistry in the School of Earth and Space Exploration. Thanks to investments by ASU, the National Science Foundation, and NASA, the laboratory my research group has worked hard to put together enables some very creative work, including our pioneering use of laser microprobe technologies for dating impact events”, Hodges says.

Recent work of this kind has focused on a variety of terrestrial impact sites and on lunar impact rocks brought back during the Apollo 16 and 17 missions. Many members of Hodges’ research group – research scientists Mathijs van Soest and Jo Anne Wartho, postdoctoral associates Marc Biren, Frances Cooper, and John Weirich, and graduate students Cameron Mercer and Kelsey Young – have contributed to building the laboratory’s reputation as a leading facility for impact dating.

“Our participation in the work of the NASA Ames node of SSERVI permits us to expand our work on terrestrial impact sites in a way that will feed forward into future studies of samples returned from exploration targets like near-Earth asteroids, our Moon and the moons of nearby planets, or Mars. We are excited to be part of such a great effort, and look forward to helping NASA write the next chapter in the history of space exploration,” states Hodges.

JohnCreer

John Creer to lead ASU real estate activities

John P. Creer was named Assistant Vice President for Real Estate Development at Arizona State University (ASU). Creer comes to ASU from Coldwell Banker Commercial in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he has worked as a commercial real estate broker since August 2011. Morgan R. Olsen, ASU’s Executive Vice President, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer, announced Creer’s appointment.

“With his nearly 30 years of experience in commercial real estate development, consulting, property and asset management and venture capital, John Creer possesses the expertise to lead the university’s complex real estate activities,” Olsen said. “His skill set will be of great value to our Real Estate Development Office as ASU continues the development of the athletic facilities district and other strategic real estate initiatives.”

Creer’s most recent professional accomplishments with Coldwell Banker include brokering transactions with national and regional companies such as UPS, US Bank and Obagi Medical Products, Inc. He is a licensed real estate broker in Utah and is a licensed real estate agent in California. Creer holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting, with an emphasis in corporate and partnership taxation from the University of Utah.

“I’m excited to work with Dr. Olsen and the real estate team to develop and maximize the value of real estate assets to benefit Arizona State University,” Creer said. “President Crow and Dr. Olsen have created a refreshing atmosphere in a public institution that is on the leading edge of public-private partnerships. I believe my public and private development experience will bring an added dimension to ASU’s growth trajectory in relation to its real estate development initiatives.”

Prior to his Salt Lake City relocation, Creer worked for Grandview Advisors, LLC, Vanir Construction and the Trammell Crow Company on professional service contracts with the Los Angeles (California) Unified School District. One of his notable ventures with his partners at Grandview Advisors was the development of a master planning process and protocol to support a $7-billion, voter-approved capital investment program for 585 public school sites across the Los Angeles area.

Earlier in his Los Angeles work, Creer was responsible for the development and execution of a $2.3 billion master plan for 41 new San Fernando Valley K-12 school sites. He managed a $200-million charter school development program and started an asset management division to monetize underutilized real estate owned by the school district through public-private partnerships.

Previously in his career, Creer was chief financial officer for a Los Angeles venture-backed technology transfer company. He formerly served as managing partner of a Salt Lake City commercial development firm and was the chief financial officer of a Salt Lake City technology start-up company. Creer also performed various development, leasing and property management roles for a Salt Lake City commercial and industrial real estate development firm.

“With his wealth of knowledge and history of success in a broad range of real estate development ventures, I’m confident that John Creer can build on our achievements in the real estate arena,” Olsen said. “We are pleased to welcome him as part of the ASU Business and Finance team, and look forward to working with him in meeting the university’s complex real estate needs and developing new revenue streams to support ASU’s evolution as a New American University.”

Visit https://cfo.asu.edu to learn more about the office of ASU Business and Finance.

Earthfest Provides Free Resources to Teachers

ASU partners with India to transform teacher preparation

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College faculty are sharing a path of teacher development they hope will lead to a better education for India’s burgeoning population of school-aged children.

Called the India Support for Teacher Education Program (In-STEP), the year-long project funded by a $4.3 million grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development is bringing 110 India teacher educators to ASU for an intense, semester-long immersion in a world-class teacher education program. Teachers College also is collaborating closely with India’s Ministry for Human Resources Development to implement the program.

The coveted project was awarded to Teachers College over other U.S. education institutions due to its large-scale program of teacher preparation, close partnerships with more than 180 diverse, preK-12 schools and proven ability to manage complex international programs, according to Ara Barsam, senior director of grants and associate research professor.

“Engaging globally is a key ASU aspiration,” he said. “The In-STEP project provides a tremendous opportunity for us to expand our impact beyond metropolitan Phoenix and the United States to where our Teachers College model is being recognized worldwide.”

Barsam wants the program to equip and inspire the 53 Indian teacher educators who converged on ASU this fall, and the 57 coming next September, to new levels of professional performance. In preparation, he traveled to India in July to assess the needs and strengths of the Indian participants through focus groups and interviews before they arrived in the U.S.

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ASU expands reach of innovative financial literacy scholarship

Arizona State University recently was awarded a second round of funding for the ASU Earn to Learn program – more than doubling the program’s funds and reach.

Part of the AZ Earn to Learn (AZEL) program – a collaboration of the Arizona Board of Regents, the University of Arizona, Arizona State University, and Northern Arizona University to help limited-income Arizonans save for college – ASU Earn to Learn will now be able to serve more than 500 potential students through the new grant.

“Arizona State University was awarded the largest amount of grant money among the three state universities and we are confident that these funds will make a huge impact in the lives of hundreds of Arizona high school students,” said Beatriz Rendón, associate vice president of Educational Outreach and Student Services for ASU. “This scholarship opportunity not only provides funding to attend the university, but also helps educate the entire family about financial literacy and the importance of saving for college.”

ASU Earn to Learn is funded through a matching grant from the United States Department of Health and Human Service/Assets for Independence that provides matching funds to ASU’s contribution of $1.25 million for a total of $2.5 million.

ASU, in partnership with the Arizona-based nonprofit organization Live the Solution, launched this innovative need-based financial aid program in January 2013. Last year marked the first time in the federal agency’s history that a state university applied for and received matching funds for a scholarship program of this nature.

“The first step to moving forward in life is realizing that our dreams will only be dreams until we decide to make them to reality,” says one AZEL program participant. “I am one of four kids in my family, and I understand that education is a treasure that no one can ever take away from you. I will be the first in my family to attend college.”

To be eligible for ASU Earn to Learn, students’ and their families must earn less than 200 percent above the federal poverty level. Participants must save at least $25 per month in a special Individual Development Account (IDA) for a minimum of six consecutive months after enrolling in the program, complete financial education classes, and receive one-on-one financial coaching and college readiness training.

Eligible students will then qualify to receive $8 for every $1 they save, up to $4,000 in matching funds – $2,000 from the federal grant and $2,000 from the university. These funds can be used for tuition, fees and other approved education-related expenses at Arizona State University.

Students and families can visit participantsurvey.org to see if they qualify for ASU Earn to Learn. Eligible participants can begin enrolling in AZEL immediately.

Participants interested in starting college in the fall of 2014 should complete the Participant Survey no later than Nov. 15. For complete eligibility guidelines, program requirements and a step-by-step application, visit www.AZEarnToLearn.org.

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ASU freezes tuition for Arizona undergraduates

Arizona State University will not increase tuition for Arizona undergraduate students for the academic year that begins in fall 2014. This applies to both current students and those entering that year. No determination has been made yet regarding tuition levels for out-of-state students or for graduate students, whether in-state or out-of-state.

“ASU is focused on providing an exceptional education,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “Our commitment to the people of Arizona is to use innovation and operational efficiency to make access to such an education available to all who are able and willing to do the work.”

ASU will deliver a formal proposal to the Arizona Board of Regents in the spring as part of the regular process for setting tuition. The university is making this announcement early in order to give Arizona undergraduate students and their families as much planning time as possible.

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ASU welcomes record freshman class

This fall, Arizona State University welcomes a freshman class that sets new records on many levels.

Testament to the outstanding reputation of the university, 38,701 students applied for admission as first-time freshmen. At the end of today’s registration for classes, ASU will enroll 10,149 academically distinguished students, who also strive for excellence outside of the classroom, from around the globe.

Incoming Sun Devils include a concertmaster of a chamber orchestra, a global humanitarian who raised more than $250,000 for orphans in North Korea, and a member of the Running Start Young Women Political Leadership Program in Washington, D.C.

“ASU is increasingly becoming the school of choice for Arizona students, as well as for students from outside the state and other nations,” said Elizabeth D. Phillips, executive vice president and provost. “The message is carrying far and wide that Arizona State University is a place that embraces and champions excellence and opportunity for all academically qualified students. Come to us with your dreams, and your commitment to work hard, and we will help you make those dreams a reality.”

The new Sun Devil class is academically strong, with an average high school GPA of 3.4 and average SAT score of 1116. Forty-nine percent are New American University Scholars at the Dean, Provost and President Scholarship levels, the most prestigious scholarships for first-time freshmen.

Among this year’s class are 5,747 Arizona residents, 63 percent of whom will graduate in the top 25 percent of their high school class.

For Brandon Deatherage, of Phoenix, ASU was his only choice. While he is just beginning his college years, he has his eyes set on becoming a pediatric neurosurgeon.

“I chose ASU because I’m a pre-med student and I heard they teamed up with Mayo Clinic, so that’s pretty motivating,” said Deatherage.

Rayann Chee, of Cedar Creek, was considering Dartmouth College when she was there for a business program last summer. When it came down to choosing where to apply, however, she chose ASU to carry on her family’s Sun Devil tradition — her mom attended ASU, her aunt graduated from ASU and her grandmother got her doctorate degree from ASU.

A Gates Millennium Scholar, Chee is majoring in criminal justice and is a student in Barrett, The Honors College. She is one of 1,000 talented students nationwide to receive the prestigious scholarship, which covers unmet financial need through graduation and can be used at any US university. Her dream is to help reduce the rate of juvenile delinquency on her reservation.

ASU continues to honor its longstanding commitment to socioeconomic diversity and access to education, with more than 31 percent of admitted Arizona residents reporting they will be the first in their family to graduate from a four-year college and 25.6 percent coming from low-income families.

The freshmen class includes the largest number of non-resident students, 4,244, a 29 percent increase from last fall’s incoming freshmen. With non-resident students representing all 50 states and 71 different countries, the largest number, 1,314, come from California. ASU is increasingly becoming the school of choice for students from the Golden State, seeing a 13 percent increase in enrollment since last year.

Melanie Abramoff, from Agoura Hills, Calif., considered the University of Southern California, but only applied to ASU. She said she “fell in love with” the Downtown Phoenix campus after she visited.

“I wanted to be part of the Cronkite journalism and mass communication program,” said Abramoff, who aspires to work for the Food Network or Entertainment Tonight. “They have excellent teachers, and they’re hands-on and looking out for the best interests of their students.”

Collectively, this year’s freshmen make up ASU’s most diverse class to date in terms of their racial, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. 39.6 percent of the class is racial and ethnic minority.

More international students will call ASU and the Phoenix-area their home than ever before, with nearly 900 new freshmen hailing from outside of the United States – a 66 percent increase from last year’s class of 529 international freshmen. ASU has set the record for number of new international students each of the last five years, in part a reflection of the institution’s recognition as a top 100 university in the world by both the Center for World University Rankings and the Academic Ranking of World Universities.

ASU continues to attract vast numbers of students interested in studying in the high-demand STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields. The top 10 majors of choice for newly admitted students include biological sciences, mechanical engineering, biochemistry, computer science, biomedical engineering and health sciences. Rounding out the top 10 are business — the most popular major — psychology, and journalism and mass communication.

asu skysong collaborates with Taiwan's ITRI

Crow explores potential of new educational technologies

Arizona State University President Michael M. Crow is among more than a dozen leaders from a diverse group of colleges and universities examining the disruptive potential of new educational technologies, such as massive open online courses (MOOCs), to boost the number of Americans earning a college degree. The launch of the Presidential Innovation Lab was announced recently by the American Council on Education, the nation’s largest higher education organization.

“I look forward to helping lead a national dialogue about how newer educational innovations could be used by particularly older, post-traditional students, low-income young adults and other underserved students toward degree completion,” Crow said. “This opportunity aligns directly with our ASU vision as the model for a New American University – measured not by who we exclude, but rather by who we include and how they succeed.”

According to ACE, the Presidential Innovation Lab will bring together higher education leaders to engage in proactive thinking about this new learning space. The lab is part of a wide-ranging research and evaluation effort examining the academic potential of MOOCs announced by ACE in November 2012.

Initially, the lab will meet July 21-23 at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, Calif., an independent, nonprofit research organization that will help guide the work of the university leaders. A second two-day meeting is scheduled for October 2013 in Washington, D.C.

The new think tank of higher education CEOs will consider questions such as how newer educational innovations could be used by students toward degree completion and the potential impact of such innovations on the fundamental design and delivery of instruction. The lab participants also will examine how institutions recognize learning and which financing models underpin all of higher education.

Findings from the lab will be shared with ACE membership, policymakers and the media. Its work is being supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

In addition to Crow, other higher education leaders taking part in the lab include the following:

•           Joseph E. Aoun, president, Northeastern University (Massachusetts)
•           Chris Bustamante, president, Rio Salado College (Arizona)
•           Scott S. Cowen, president, Tulane University (Louisiana)
•           John F. Ebersole, president, Excelsior College (New York)
•           Renu Khator, president, University of Houston, and chancellor, University of Houston System (Texas)
•           Robert W. Mendenhall, president, Western Governors University (Utah)
•           Mohammad H. Qayoumi, president, San Jose State University (California)
•           Vincent Price, provost, University of Pennsylvania
•           L. Rafael Reif, president, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
•           Kevin P. Reilly, president, University of Wisconsin System
•           Clayton Spencer, president, Bates College (Maine)
•           Linda M. Thor, chancellor, Foothill-De Anza Community College District (California)

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ASU recognized for American Indian education

A new study, “For Our Children: A Study and Critical Discussion of the Influences on American Indian and Alaska Native Education Policy,” cites Arizona State University as one of the most influential universities in American Indian education and recognizes American Indian Studies Director and Professor John Tippeconnic as one of the most “influential people in American Indian/Alaska Native Education.”

The study by Hollie J. Mackey, University of Oklahoma assistant professor of education, and Linda Sue Warner, special assistant to the president on Indian affairs at Northeastern A&M College in Miami, Okla., determined and described influential studies, organizations, information sources and people for American Indian/Alaska Native education policy. The “Journal of American Indian Education” that is published by the ASU Center for Indian Education was also identified as one of the most influential sources of information in the study.

Arizona State University was cited as an influential university with five other institutions across the United States, including Northern Arizona University. Arizona is home to 22 tribes and 28 percent of the state is comprised of tribal lands. Tippeconnic is recognized as one of the most influential professors in American Indian/Alaska Native education among a cohort of 20 professors from throughout the nation.

Tippeconnic is an accomplished scholar who was awarded the National Indian Education Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award last year. He is the former director of the U.S. Department of Education Office of Indian Education and past director of the Office of Indian Education Programs for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of Interior.

Tippeconnic, who is of Comanche and Cherokee heritage, was instrumental in bringing higher education to American Indian students in Oklahoma when he helped start a college there. Emphasizing the tribe’s native language and culture, the Comanche Nation College will soon achieve accreditation status.
ASU has one of the highest American Indian/Native American student populations in the nation with approximately 2,000 Native American students currently enrolled at the university. A new American Indian Studies master’s program that Tippeconnic was instrumental in creating began last year, offering a comprehensive view of Native American life with the opportunity to work directly with tribes.

ASU is also home to the American Indian Policy Institute that serves as a resource for research, partnerships and entrepreneurial endeavors that involve Arizona’s tribes and tribal nations throughout the United States.

American Indian Studies faculty at ASU are all American Indians and members of tribal nations while  American Indian Student Support Services supports the academic achievement and personal success of American Indian students while promoting traditional culture at Arizona State University.

A new course to be taught by Professor Donald Fixico at the university in the fall, “AIS 191: Preparing for Academic Success,” will mesh American Indian views and values with tools to succeed academically at ASU.

Website helps users make more sustainable decisions

The number of opportunities to make “clean, green and well” decisions continues to grow rapidly. In the last decade alone, more than 460 “eco-labeling” schemes have emerged, providing a vast amount of information on consumer products and services. But paying attention to detail reveals a web of complex, sometimes conflicting information that can be hard to decipher and even harder to put to everyday use.

Enter Andrew Krause, a recent graduate of ASU’s School of Sustainability (SoS) master’s program who has been working on simplifying, as well as customizing the concept of sustainability to suit everyone’s needs. Krause, along with his mentor and senior scientist at ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability George Basile and two former classmates, has launched the action-oriented online social platform eEcosphere.

Krause, a native of Sonoma, Calif., joined SoS because its unique approach integrates the new field of sustainability science with behavior change – two vital elements when it comes to budging the needle on sustainability and key principles that ultimately inspired the creation of eEcosphere.

He says the social web platform is underpinned by years of scientific research, conducted by Basile and other scientists, which focuses on sustainability planning and tools that help individuals and businesses take action across the globe. He hopes the website will help people adopt a more eco-conscious lifestyle by making it fun, easy and effective.

“Everyday, the person makes a variety of decisions, driven by default, often outdated habits,” Krause says. “Take, for example, the way we choose to do laundry. There are a number of emerging opportunities to be smarter – like using less water and a non-toxic detergent during the process – but changing habits may be hard.”

According to Krause, who has led various sustainability-related ventures in the past, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to making the world a better place.

“A person may already be saving energy but might need help with water conservation; someone else might need help with both,” Krause elaborates. “eEcosphere helps people identify and adopt ideas that match their personal sustainability goals. It embeds a scientific approach in the decision-making process and encourages people to take action as a group using the social web.”

In 2011, ASU’s Edson Student Entrepreneur Initiative awarded Krause and his team $18,000 to develop the eEcosphere venture. The award enabled the start-up to incorporate as a legal business and reach key fundraising milestones. Krause assumed the leadership role and spent early days hiring software developers and copywriters, and networking with sustainability experts.

“The Edson grant helped our vision come to life faster,” Krause says. “We’ve built eEcosphere multiple times to make it more compelling to individuals and clients who’ll ultimately use our product.”

Krause and Basile are now putting the online platform through the ultimate user test: the ASU community. eEcosphere is playing a key role in ASU’s various sustainability campaigns, including the Zero-Waste Initiative. A preview of the website has been unveiled this week in hopes of collaborating with nearly 82,000 members of the Sun Devil family to help the university meet its goal of becoming a zero-waste campus by 2015.

“Modifying waste management habits at such a huge scale requires collective action on the part of students, faculty and staff,” says Krause. “eEcosphere will engage with the university community, collect and analyze detailed insight regarding user preferences, and provide new updates and incentives to help people stay motivated and informed.”

Krause says ASU is the perfect live laboratory for eEcosphere.

“This institution is leading sustainability efforts internationally,” Krause explains. “If we can facilitate good ideas at ASU, we can help other large-scale enterprises do the same with their customers as well.”

Basile adds to that thought.

“The ASU platform has been vital to the evolution of eEcosphere,” Basile says. “The institution has helped us incubate forward-thinking ideas, and permitted us to take risks and embark on adventures.”

Krause credits Basile, an internationally recognized sustainability veteran himself, for much of his drive and success as a student entrepreneur. Basile, in return, has nothing but high praise for his pupil.

“At 26, Andrew has already proven his ability to help innovative new ventures get off the ground,” Basile says with pride in his voice. “He has also passed along business finance, internship and job opportunities to fellow students. I’ve waited for a generation of students who’d align themselves with the concept of sustainability and find ways to take action. Andrew represents that generation. He is an informed, driven millenial.”

Krause says the time has come for a concept such as eEcosphere to be successful in the marketplace of ideas.

When asked what the future looks like to him, he asks:

“Is it cliché to say, ‘bright?’”

Join the live preview of eEcosphere by becoming an early user at www.eEcosphere.com.

Sustainable Energy in Arizona - AB Magazine November/December 2011

Boone named interim dean of School of Sustainability

Christopher Boone, professor at Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability (SOS) and School of Human Evolution and Social Change, has been named the interim dean of the School of Sustainability, effective July 1, 2013. Boone has served as the associate dean for education of the school since July 2010.

“Chris Boone is an outstanding scientist and scholar whose extensive work in urban sustainability and world poverty exemplifies the very mission of the school,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “As associate dean he has helped lead the efforts to educate a new generation of students whose passion is to find solutions to some of the most pressing environmental, economic and social challenges of the world. With Chris as interim dean the school is well-positioned to further enhance its academic programs and help students create solutions that will reshape our quality of life.”

Boone succeeds Dean Sander van der Leeuw, who will continue to further the school’s research and academic interests. Van der Leeuw will return as a member of the board of directors for the Global Institute of Sustainability and continue to serve as co-director of the Complex Adaptive Systems Network, as well as chair of the Consortium for Biosocial Complex Systems. He also retains intellectual responsibility for the Global Institute of Sustainability Climate Impact and Adaptation Center.

“Chris Boone has been an important figure in the development of the School of Sustainability, the first such school in the country, and he will be an important leader of the next stage of development of this unique academic unit,” said Elizabeth D. Phillips, ASU executive vice president and provost.

Boone joined ASU in January 2006 as an associate professor and gained full professorship in April 2010. His research centers on urban sustainability, environmental justice and vulnerability, urban socio-ecological systems, global environmental change, human-environmental interaction, geographic information systems (GIS) and public health.

“I’m honored to have the opportunity to serve the School of Sustainability,” Boone said. “I see this as a really important continuation of the work Professor Van der Leeuw did to strengthen the school. ASU serves as an international model for blending sustainability education and research with practice. I am confident we will continue to be a leader in sustainability.”

Gary Dirks, director of ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability, said he is excited about working with Boone, having “enjoyed working with him previously on sustainability concepts. I consider him to be a scholar of the highest caliber and deeply committed to sustainability and sustainability education. He, Rob Melnick and I will make a great team to lead GIOS and SOS in the coming years.”

Boone is the recipient of grants from prestigious organizations, including the National Science Foundation and the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. In addition to his academic pursuits, he is a member of the executive committees of SOS and GIOS.

In 2009, Boone headed a provost’s committee to develop a minor in sustainability. He also serves on the supervisory board for the Social Sciences and Health, and Global Health programs. He is a member of the Scientific Steering Committee of the Urbanization and Global Environment Change program, and the Steering Committee of the Workshop on Climate Change in U.S. Cities in Support of the National Climate Assessment.

Boone currently serves on the editorial boards of journals such as International Journal of Sustainable Urban Development and Environmental Justice. He is also the associate editor of the nature-society section of the journal Current Research on Cities and co-editor of a new book series called New Directions in Sustainability and Society.

Boone received his graduate and doctoral degrees in geography at the University of Toronto before pursuing a post-doctoral fellowship at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability is the first comprehensive degree-granting program of its kind in the United States with a focus on finding real-world solutions to environmental, economic, and social challenges. Established in spring 2007, the School is part of the Global Institute of Sustainability, which is the hub of ASU’s sustainability initiatives. The institute advances research, education and business practices for an urbanizing world. The School of Sustainability offers undergraduate and graduate programs and minors, as well as doctoral and professional leadership programs. Visit http://www.schoolofsustainability.asu.edu.

jon-kyl

ASU names Kyl Distinguished Fellow, Scholar

Former United States Senator Jon Kyl has accepted a part-time appointment at Arizona State University as Distinguished Fellow in Public Service in the ASU College of Public Programs and as O’Connor Distinguished Scholar of Law and Public Service in the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at ASU.

The Senate’s former No. 2 Republican leader will work primarily in Washington, D.C. and will begin this new role with ASU immediately.   Recognized in 2010 as one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time magazine, Kyl was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1994 and retired at the end of his third term In January of this year.  Before serving the Senate, he was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1987 to 1995 and earlier worked as a lawyer and lobbyist in Phoenix.

Kyl, who received his bachelor’s degree and law degree from the University of Arizona, recently joined Covington & Burling, the largest law firm in the nation’s capitol.

“Jon Kyl has long been one of the nation’s most important political leaders,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow.  “He has taken a thoughtful approach to important issues and has been a statesman at time when statesmanship was sometimes lacking.  ASU students will benefit greatly from his experience and perspective.”

At ASU he will teach classes and convene discussion groups on a range of issues, including immigration reform, sequestration and the debt ceiling, tax and entitlement reform, and national security and foreign policy.  Other topics will involve internal Congressional issues such as the role of politics and compromise, party discipline, lobbying and why Congress is so contentious.

“ASU has made tremendous progress in the last decade,” said Kyl. ”I am excited to work in such a dynamic environment. Twenty six years in Congress taught me a lot, and much of it is not quite what the textbooks teach.  Hopefully, I can impart some ‘real life’ lessons about our national government and major policy issues to students at ASU.”

“We are delighted that Senator Kyl will be joining us as O’Connor Distinguished Scholar of Law and Public Service,” said Douglas Sylvester, dean of the O’Connor College of Law.  “He is one of Arizona’s most respected and experienced public servants, and we are looking forward to the invaluable perspective he will bring our students and our law school community through his years of distinguished leadership and government service.”

Added Dean Jonathan Koppell, dean of the College of Public Programs, “What a great opportunity for ASU to learn from a legislator who has been a key player on issues that affect every Arizonan.

“At a time when the political process is widely disparaged, ASU students who already are drawn to public service will get the chance to see how one person can make a difference by following the path to elective office.  Senator Kyl has shown himself equally passionate about opening students’ eyes to the realities of policy making in Washington and the substantive issues, like water policy and immigration, that will shape the future of Arizona.”

paying_for_online_education

Cronkite School Announces Online Media Studies Program

The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University announced plans to offer a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mass Communications and Media Studies – entirely online. The new program will provide students anywhere with access to the Cronkite School’s internationally renowned and award-winning faculty, including a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist. It is the first online degree program offered by the Cronkite School and will begin in the fall semester.

“This innovative program provides a new option for students who want and need the flexibility offered by a fully online program,” said Cronkite Dean Christopher Callahan. “It will enable students around the world to take advantage of the world-class education offered by the Cronkite School and ASU, giving a broad-based liberal arts education with a focus on mass communication and media studies.”

The program is designed to give students a deep and nuanced understanding of the growing importance, power and influence of mass media, as well as the evolving nature of today’s media landscape. Students will explore global mass communication issues from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including societal, cultural, historical, political, economic, technological and legal.

Equipped with a sophisticated understanding of mass communication, graduates will be prepared for careers in business, government and nonprofit organizations, as well as for graduate study. The online program is differentiated from the Cronkite School’s highly hands-on program, which has achieved national recognition for training the next generation of multimedia journalists and public relations practitioners at its state-of-the-art Phoenix facility.

In addition to the general education courses required by ASU, students in the program will be required to take a core class on media and society and choose from a wide range of program-specific electives, including International Mass Communication, Political Communication, Sports and Media and Visual Communication.

Cronkite faculty members teaching in the new program include Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Steve Doig, the school’s Knight Chair in Journalism; associate professor Mary-Lou Galician, an award-winning researcher and educator with an expertise in media literacy; assistant professor Dawn Gilpin, a prolific public relations practitioner and researcher with global expertise in social media; and Dan Gillmor, internationally renowned thought leader on new media.

For more information, please visit http://asuonline.asu.edu/degree-programs.

videogames

Video Games Go to College for groundbreaking ASU Program

Much is being made over the explosion of video games in the classroom to teach a future generation of K-12 students. But what about the future teachers who will be teaching them?

At Arizona State University, education students are reaching into their virtual future with the click of a mouse to test their teaching skills in typical school scenarios. Playing the video game is part of a first-semester course requirement for undergraduate students in ASU’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. Focused on professional success, the video game is being played by 277 teaching students in 396 field experience courses at the university this semester.

“This cutting-edge preparation for future teachers is the first of its kind in the nation,” said Mari Koerner, dean of Teachers College. “Our students may have grown up with technology, but using it to role play as real-life teachers is something new.

“The game is used to enhance their experiences in real classrooms. Our students practice in the virtual world, so they can be more successful in the real world.”

“Teacher Leader: Pursuit of Professionalism” is the first in a series of interactive, three-dimensional video games being designed by the Sanford Inspire Program and ASU’s Center for Games and Impact. Field experience educators and clinical staff recognized the importance of preparing novice teachers with the professional skills they need to be successful in the workplace. Content for the game is rooted in Teach For America’s professional values. A video trailer of the game is available at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nD1b9Ktf9hY&feature=player_embedded.

As this initial version of the game is implemented in ASU classes, educators and staff are evaluating its success. The public is invited to the official launch of the video game at 8 a.m. March 26 at ASU SkySong in Scottsdale. Those interested can register at
http://sanfordinspire.eventbrite.com/#. This fall, a second video game featuring a different topic but also directed toward teacher candidates is expected to be rolled out.

An ASU student playing “Teacher Leader” first creates a student teacher avatar, selecting the color and style of hair, clothing and shoes. Next, the avatar encounters a couple of scenarios at school and the student has to respond. One scenario involves an uncomfortable situation with the student teacher’s mentor, while the other addresses being diplomatic in the teachers’ lounge. That evening, the avatar must choose how to spend time preparing for the next day’s lesson.

The student is scored as he or she plays, with choices having consequences later in the game as the avatar implements the lesson plan. A video of students playing the game is available at https://asunews.asu.edu/node/26765.

“It’s a different application compared to how we normally are taught,” said Marcy Steiner, an ASU student from Peoria, Ariz. “With the video game, you can see how your decisions shape your image as a teaching professional. There are options that are good and options that are better. It really makes you think.”

During the lesson, teaching students receive immediate feedback on their performance in various situations based on four areas or competencies. The professional competencies were adapted from the Teach For America teacher preparation curriculum:

*    Suspending judgment: Identifying moments when they might be unfairly judging someone
*    Asset-based thinking: Consciously seeking out the positive aspects of a person or situation
*    Locus of control: Focusing on what is within their own ability to control
*    Interpersonal awareness: Recognizing the limits of their own perspective and trying to understand the viewpoints of others

At the same time, the course is designed so that instructors of the field experience courses can build on lessons learned through the video game as part of their classroom instruction. Teachers also can access data on student progress and decision-making.

At the end of the game, the students receive their scores and get a chance to re-play the game so they can improve their responses, Koerner explained.

“The game-based technology allows these students to take their teaching for a test drive, even make mistakes, without causing negative consequences they might experience in a real-life situation,” she said.

The partnership that created the video game underpins a broader effort to refine best practices in teacher education. The end goal is to improve America’s public schools. Known as the Sanford Inspire Program, funding comes from entrepreneur and philanthropist T. Denny Sanford who invested $18.85 million in 2010 to launch the Teachers College-Teach for America partnership. The program has garnered national attention for its innovative approaches to preparing teacher candidates. More information is available at http://sanfordinspireprogram.org/.

Despite its effectiveness in readying future teachers for the classroom, the new technology will not take the place of traditional methods anytime soon, Koerner said.

“It’s not replacing, it’s not instead of,” she said. “It’s enhancing how we teach our students to become professionals.”

asu

ASU faculty exemplars earn highest honor as Regents’ Professors

Three Arizona State University professors have been named Regents’ Professors for their extraordinary contributions in the classroom and in their fields of expertise.

Regents’ Professor is the highest faculty honor awarded at ASU, conferred on faculty who have made pioneering contributions in their areas of expertise, who have achieved a sustained level of distinction, and who enjoy national and international recognition for these accomplishments.

Honored with the distinction of Regents Professors in 2012 are:

•  Ron Adrian, professor in the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, is a pioneer in the field of fluid mechanics, winning essentially every major award within the field. In addition to being elected to the National Academy of Engineering, he is a fellow of the America Physical Society, American Society of Mechanical Engineers and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics among others.

Adrian has made major contributions to the study of turbulent flows (chaotic or unstable eddying motion in a fluid) through his groundbreaking experiments, by his development of new instrumentation for studies of turbulence, and capitalizing on the understanding gained by these measurements to advance theories and models of fluid flows. He has created advanced experimental and mathematical methods that have revealed new aspects of turbulent flow and inspired novel lines of research in the fluid mechanics community.

Adrian’s research has resulted in seminal contributions to the development of diagnostics used to measure turbulent flows and to mathematical models used to understand and predict their underlying structure. Most labs today that specialize in fluid mechanics use systems based on his work. Adrian’s research has been cited more than 8,000 times and has resulted in eight patents, new technologies and many students and researchers who have benefited from his mentorship. Almost all of the 35 doctoral students mentored by Adrian have moved into prominent positions in academia, the national labs and industry. Others have used their education in turbulence to pursue interesting careers outside of engineering, including international banking and Oscar Award winning independent film production.

•  Sudhir Kumar, Biodesign Institute Center for Evolutionary Medicine & Informatics and School of Life Sciences foundation professor, has developed many methods and tools that are indispensable in the genomic medicine, evolutionary biology and functional genomics fields. In addition to being president of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution, he is an American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow.

Kumar is a renowned expert in the evolutionary bioinformatics field who developed MEGA (Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis), a software package that provides evolutionary analysis of gene sequences across individuals, populations and species, with colleagues Koichiro Tamura and Masatoshi Nei. The software has been downloaded more than 750,000 times and papers documenting this analysis infrastructure are among the mostly highly cited in biology and computer science literature with six papers cited more than 42,000 times.

Kumar inspires the next generation of scientists through inquiry-based biology and informatics classes such as “Introduction to Comparative Genomics” that offers students a hands-on approach using real-world examples of evolutionary genomics concepts and approaches and relevant applications in biomedicine. He has mentored 17 postdoctoral associates/research scientists, many of whom have gone on to successful positions in academia or the private sector.

Kumar is working on a new field of “phylomedicine” where evolutionary knowledge and powerful bioinformatics tools are used to identify the underlying genetic basis for many human diseases, providing a step toward individualized medicine. Recognition of his achievements also includes: Arizona Governor’s Celebration of Innovation finalist (twice); ASU Faculty Exemplar; and the Innovation Award in Functional Genomics.

• Rebecca Tsosie, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law professor, is one of the most highly regarded scholars of Indian law in the world, authoring more than 40 law review articles and book chapters during the past 15 years. She is co-author of the nation’s leading treatise on Indian law, “Indian Law: Native Nations and the Federal System.” Her work is widely cited and she has contributed chapters to almost every leading volume on American Indian law published since 2001.

Among the many awards she has been granted include the Native Nations Distinguished Alumnus Award from the UCLA School of Law. She is a past recipient of the American Bar Association’s 2002 Spirit of Excellence award and she was honored as Professor of the Year in 2009 at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. The University of Oregon awarded her its inaugural Oregon Tribes Professor of Law position.

As executive director of the ASU Indian Legal Program for 15 years, Tsosie was instrumental in transforming the program into one of the nation’s best and she helped in the formation of the law schools master’s degree program in Indian Law. A graduate student mentor, she also serves on many law school and university committees and she aided in the formation of the Indian Legal Clinic that was recently awarded the President’s Award for Social Embeddedness.

As a valued member of the American Indian community, she is a Supreme Court justice for the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation and San Carlos Apache Tribe. She is also engaged in public education efforts and training Indian law attorneys.

smoking

ASU goes tobacco-free Aug. 1, 2013

Effective Aug. 2, 2013, Arizona State University will join more than 800 universities nationwide in becoming 100 percent tobacco-free.

The initiative, spearheaded by students and supported by the University Staff Council and the faculty Academic Senate, is part of a larger ASU effort to promote health and wellness in the ASU community.

ASU already prohibits smoking inside its buildings. The new policy will prohibit all manner of smoking as well as the use of smokeless tobacco products and will apply to all properties owned, leased or controlled by the university, whether indoor or outdoor.

“Tobacco use is a documented public health hazard and the university is dedicated to providing a healthy, comfortable and educationally productive learning environment for faculty, staff, students and visitors,” said Kevin Salcido, associate vice president of Human Resources and a member of the tobacco-free working group.

In addition to contributing to better health, increased productivity and decreased use of sick time, prohibiting tobacco use on ASU campuses will result in decreased maintenance expense for facilities and grounds in managing related litter.

The university offers education, information and support for those wishing to quit tobacco, and will frequently communicate details about available programs and opportunities between now and when the policy is implemented next year.

ASU will pursue a “community enforcement” approach when it comes to the new policy, whereby university community members will help to educate others. This strategy has proven to be effective at other universities that have gone tobacco-free. Students, staff and faculty members who repeatedly violate the policy, however, could face sanctions through pre-established administrative practices in such departments as the Office of Human Resources or Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Additional information about the policy change; a listing of available educational programs and resources to help successfully quit tobacco; tobacco-free zone maps; and a supervisor’s toolkit are available, along with other items, at http://www.asu.edu/tobaccofree.

recycling

ASU joins EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge

Arizona State University adds a composting program and joins the Environmental Protection Agency’s Food Recovery Challenge. The EPA’s voluntary program kicks off Nov. 15, 2012 in celebration of America Recycles Day. According to the EPA, food is the single largest material sent to landfills and accounts for 25 percent of all waste sent to landfills.

“This year, ASU sent 6,778 tons of waste to the landfill and 25% of that total tonnage was meal scraps,” said Nick Brown, director of university sustainability practices at ASU. “In celebration of the EPA Food Recovery Challenge kick-off, we are introducing ‘back-of-the-house’ composting at two dining halls on the Tempe campus.”

Food-service workers at the Hassayampa and Barrett, The Honors College dining halls are using “Green Bins” to compost the following:

•    All food (including dairy and meat products)
•    All paper food-service items (including boats, clamshells, napkins and cups)

The food-service workers collect the compostable items at both Tempe campus dining halls, and no action from diners currently is required.

“Composting at both the Barrett and Hassayampa dining halls enable the facilities to essentially become zero waste because all items handled there can either be composted or recycled,” Brown said.

ASU will expand its composting efforts through its Green Bin program beginning in January 2013. Students, faculty and staff will be able to put all food scraps and all paper food-service items in Green Bins placed throughout ASU’s four campuses. The Green Bin program will support ASU’s Zero Waste by 2015 goal, which aims to reduce all waste destined for the landfill by 90%. Learn more about the ASU Green Bin program at: https://cfo.asu.edu/compost.

ASU joins nearly 60 colleges and universities across the country in the Food Recovery Challenge to limit the 34 million tons of food wasted each year by reducing unnecessary consumption, increase charity donations and composting. By participating in the three-year challenge, the academic institutions pledge to reduce food waste by five percent in one year. Read more about the EPA Food Recovery Challenge at: http://www.epa.gov/foodrecoverychallenge.

speakers

Hear from Top Business Leaders in the New ECP Season

Top leaders from Sam’s Club, Intel, the United Services Automobile Association (USAA), and the Arizona Diamondbacks are among those taking the stage during the current season of the Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series. Every year, Phoenix-area audiences are invited to attend the club’s luncheons and hear from some of the biggest names in the business world.

“We want Valley businesspeople to be able to hear from the heads of major local companies and top executives from international firms,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “This series brings leaders from a variety of industries to talk about what’s happening in their own companies, as well as in the business arena as a whole.”

The Economic Club of Phoenix (ECP) was founded by a group of prominent business executives called the Dean’s Council of 100, in conjunction with the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. The club is now the preeminent Arizona forum for the exchange of ideas about business and the economy. Its monthly luncheons and other activities offer business leaders and others opportunities to network and engage.

This season’s speaker lineup (subject to change) is:

Thursday, Nov. 8 – William Toler, chief executive officer, AdvancePierre Foods; Matt Wilson, managing director, Oaktree Capital Management
Wednesday, Jan. 23 – Derrick Hall, president and chief executive officer, Arizona Diamondbacks
Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 – Charles Redfield, executive vice president of merchandising, Sam’s Club
Tuesday, March 19 – Doug Davis, vice president and general manager, Arizona fab/sort manufacturing site, Intel Corporation
Thursday, April 25 – Maj. Gen. Josue Robles Jr., president and chief executive officer, United Services Automobile Association (USAA), Dean’s Council of 100 Executive of the Year
Thursday, May 16 – Annual Economic Outlook Luncheon

All luncheons run from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The November event will take place at JW Marriott’s Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, with the rest of the locations still to be announced.

Non-members are welcome for a $75 luncheon fee. Funds in excess of the cost of lunch are used to support scholarships and faculty research at the W. P. Carey School of Business.

For more information about the club or to reserve seats, call (480) 727-0596, e-mail wpcarey.ecp@asu.edu or go to www.econclubphx.org.

books.old

ASU Libraries gets Manuscripts of Nicaraguan Poet Darío

Arizona State University Libraries has acquired a privately-held collection of manuscripts created by Nicaraguan poet Rubén Darío.  Darío (1867-1916) is considered one of Latin America’s most famous poets, and is recognized widely as the founder of Spanish American modernism.

This distinctive collection of archival material contains documents pertaining to Darío’s life and work as a poet, journalist and diplomat.

“The collection is remarkable in its breadth; it encompasses many facets of the professional and personal life of Nicaragua’s most revered cultural figure,” said Melissa Guy, Latin American Studies specialist at ASU Libraries.

The collection consists of approximately 900 handwritten pages of poetry, essays, short stories, diplomatic notes and personal letters spanning more than three decades, from approximately 1882 to 1915. It chronicles Darío’s activities as he travelled the world from Nicaragua to Europe, South America and the United States.

The comprehensive collection contains hundreds of pages of Darío’s poetry and other creative works.  Several of the manuscripts are signed transcripts, written in Darío’s hand, of some of his most important works including “Coloquio de los Centauros,” two versions of “Los motivos del lobo” and “Canto épico a las glorias de Chile,” a manuscript of 76 pages, which was one of Darío’s first long poems.

According to Professor Alberto Acereda, a world-renowned expert on Darío and former Faculty Head of Spanish and Portuguese at ASU’s School of International Letters and Cultures, and Research Affiliate of the ASU Hispanic Research Center,  it was not uncommon for Darío to create transcripts of his own writings.

“The discovery of these copies confirms that Darío was very aware of his own literary value and these transcripts are an important contribution to literary scholarship,” Acereda said.

Of particular interest to Darío scholars and enthusiasts, the collection contains a previously-unknown version of “Sonatina” written in English, as well as a transcript of “Marcha triunfal” that illuminates for the first time the exact date it was written on May 4, 1895.

The documents have already begun to alter the scholarship on Darío. The peer-reviewed “Bulletin of Spanish Studies,” a prestigious academic journal from the United Kingdom, has published an article by Professor Acereda in its August 2012 issue based on letters found in ASU’s collection. The article, “‘Nuestro más profundo y sublime secreto’: Los amores transgresores entre Rubén Darío y Amado Nervo,” reveals for the first time a secret romantic relationship between Darío and famed Mexican poet Amado Nervo (1870-1919.)

“The exact nature of this relationship is evidenced in a series of intimate letters exchanged between the two poets and they help us to better understand the respective works of these modernist authors, as well as to establish a rereading of certain texts,” Acereda said.

David W. Foster, Regents’ Professor of Spanish and Women and Gender Studies at ASU, notes that “the acquisition of such a collection, which has the possibility of suggesting a major revision in our understanding of Rubén Darío’s sexuality, is only possible through the efforts of outstanding senior faculty like Acereda, who have the advanced (and often anonymous) contacts necessary for such material to become part of ASU’s superb research collections.”
The Spanish Program in the School of International Letters and Cultures has several faculty members who specialize in 20th-century Latin American literature and culture who will be able to incorporate this important collection into their research and teaching.

“Great authors survive the test of time because their work continues to engage the passing generations.  This extraordinary collection re-energizes scholarship on Darío’s production from a cultural studies perspective,” said Cynthia Tompkins, Director of ASU’s Spanish and Portuguese Department.

School of International Letters and Cultures Professor Emil Volek is especially enthusiastic about the new addition to ASU Libraries’ collections. “Acquiring this priceless trove highlights the maturing of ASU as an important national cultural institution and will further help advance the already excellent national and international standing of ASU’s Spanish program. This is a great resource for a multicultural Arizona,” he said.

As a result of this acquisition, ASU Libraries stands to be recognized as one of the primary centers in the world for the study of Darío.  Faculty and students at ASU will have access to an unprecedented wealth of research materials.

“ASU Libraries is pleased to bring these important manuscripts to a wider audience and to contribute to furthering the understanding of one of Latin America’s most important cultural figures,” said University Librarian Sherrie Schmidt. “This acquisition is an example of the positive outcome of collaboration among librarians and faculty that takes place on a regular basis at ASU.”

The Rubén Darío Collection is made accessible by Special Collections at the Hayden Library Luhrs Reading Room. Go to http://www.asu.edu/lib/archives/for additional information. The finding aid to the collection is available online at:  http://www.azarchivesonline.org/xtf/view?docId=ead/asu/dario.xml