Author Archives: Kristine Cannon

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True Music Festival is Arizona's 1st multi-genre fest

The Tostitos Fiesta Bowl, Barrett-Jackson, Cactus League Baseball… and a music festival?

Plenty of events attract visitors to Arizona, but one in particular is new to the state: True Music Festival, a one-day, multi-genre event. Founder Jarid Dietrich taps into the rich, cultured music scene of the area — one that, he says, just doesn’t get enough credit.

“For whatever reason, people just don’t think of the Phoenix music scene on a national level,” Dietrich says. “It’s the sixth most populous city in the nation and is made up of a lot of people who are first- and second-generation Phoenicians. What that means is there are people from all over, bringing their music culture with them from across the world. If nothing more, I want this event to be a vessel for them to shine in the national spotlight. Let’s put them on stage with the biggest acts in the world and let them share their gift.”

True Music Festival is a first of its kind in the state, embracing and showcasing both local and national acts ranging from electronic dance music (EDM) to rock and hip-hop.

“I think the caliber of artists we are selecting from each genre is incredible,” Dietrich says. “These artists are well respected, not just by fans, but the music community in general.”

On the lineup so far is Bassnectar, Wiz Khalifa, The Flaming Lips, Lord Huron and Capital Cities, who have skyrocketed to success with their single “Safe and Sound.”

“We love festivals because of the energy you feel there,” Ryan Merchant of Capital Cities says. “This is a result of bringing together a bunch of bands in one place. It creates an excitement you don’t find in other concert settings.”

The artist Merchant looks forward to seeing the night of the festival?

“I’m a huge Flaming Lips fan,” he says. “[I'm] looking forward to their set.”

Securing these artists may not have been the simplest task, but Dietrich says as soon as he revealed details on what he had planned for the festival, musicians started listening.

“It can be very difficult to get major artists to Arizona for a number of reasons, including political,” he says. “But when we started discussing with the artists, I think the concept spoke for itself, and they jumped at the opportunity.”

In addition to live music, the festival will also include live, interactive art installations and roving performers, so attendees are able to watch artists work, and in some cases, create their own.

“We want our first year to have a major impact on our guests and are working on some new experimental concepts that will really blow people away,” Dietrich says. “We’re working heavily on dimensional entertainment — things going on around you, beneath you and above you… I can’t say much more without giving too much away, but there are some really cool things we’re working on.”

True Music Festival’s goal is to provide a bit of everything, but just how did the name come about?

“We spent months discussing internally on what we thought would be appropriate,” Dietrich says. “We also wanted something that would get our message across right off the bat and keep in line with what we set out to accomplish — an authentic, genuine music experience.”

And it’s this experience that Dietrich hopes will draw thousands of attendees to the Salt River Fields at Talking Stick in Scottsdale.

“Since it’s such a trek for people in Arizona to get to a major festival,” he says, “a lot of them have never even had that incredible, grandiose feeling of being part of something larger than themselves. People have been waiting a long time for something like this.”

For more information about True Music Festival, head to truemusicfestival.com.

True Music Festival

Where: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, 7555 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale

When: December 14, 2013

Web: truemusicfestival.com

AMAZAGING_BS_edit

True Music Festival is Arizona's 1st multi-genre fest

The Tostitos Fiesta Bowl, Barrett-Jackson, Cactus League Baseball… and a music festival?

Plenty of events attract visitors to Arizona, but one in particular is new to the state: True Music Festival, a one-day, multi-genre event. Founder Jarid Dietrich taps into the rich, cultured music scene of the area — one that, he says, just doesn’t get enough credit.

“For whatever reason, people just don’t think of the Phoenix music scene on a national level,” Dietrich says. “It’s the sixth most populous city in the nation and is made up of a lot of people who are first- and second-generation Phoenicians. What that means is there are people from all over, bringing their music culture with them from across the world. If nothing more, I want this event to be a vessel for them to shine in the national spotlight. Let’s put them on stage with the biggest acts in the world and let them share their gift.”

True Music Festival is a first of its kind in the state, embracing and showcasing both local and national acts ranging from electronic dance music (EDM) to rock and hip-hop.

“I think the caliber of artists we are selecting from each genre is incredible,” Dietrich says. “These artists are well respected, not just by fans, but the music community in general.”

On the lineup so far is Bassnectar, Wiz Khalifa, The Flaming Lips, Lord Huron and Capital Cities, who have skyrocketed to success with their single “Safe and Sound.”

“We love festivals because of the energy you feel there,” Ryan Merchant of Capital Cities says. “This is a result of bringing together a bunch of bands in one place. It creates an excitement you don’t find in other concert settings.”

The artist Merchant looks forward to seeing the night of the festival?

“I’m a huge Flaming Lips fan,” he says. “[I'm] looking forward to their set.”

Securing these artists may not have been the simplest task, but Dietrich says as soon as he revealed details on what he had planned for the festival, musicians started listening.

“It can be very difficult to get major artists to Arizona for a number of reasons, including political,” he says. “But when we started discussing with the artists, I think the concept spoke for itself, and they jumped at the opportunity.”

In addition to live music, the festival will also include live, interactive art installations and roving performers, so attendees are able to watch artists work, and in some cases, create their own.

“We want our first year to have a major impact on our guests and are working on some new experimental concepts that will really blow people away,” Dietrich says. “We’re working heavily on dimensional entertainment — things going on around you, beneath you and above you… I can’t say much more without giving too much away, but there are some really cool things we’re working on.”

True Music Festival’s goal is to provide a bit of everything, but just how did the name come about?

“We spent months discussing internally on what we thought would be appropriate,” Dietrich says. “We also wanted something that would get our message across right off the bat and keep in line with what we set out to accomplish — an authentic, genuine music experience.”

And it’s this experience that Dietrich hopes will draw thousands of attendees to the Salt River Fields at Talking Stick in Scottsdale.

“Since it’s such a trek for people in Arizona to get to a major festival,” he says, “a lot of them have never even had that incredible, grandiose feeling of being part of something larger than themselves. People have been waiting a long time for something like this.”

For more information about True Music Festival, head to truemusicfestival.com.

True Music Festival

Where: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, 7555 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale

When: December 14, 2013

Web: truemusicfestival.com

AMAZAGING_BS_edit

True Music Festival is Arizona’s 1st multi-genre fest

The Tostitos Fiesta Bowl, Barrett-Jackson, Cactus League Baseball… and a music festival?

Plenty of events attract visitors to Arizona, but one in particular is new to the state: True Music Festival, a one-day, multi-genre event. Founder Jarid Dietrich taps into the rich, cultured music scene of the area — one that, he says, just doesn’t get enough credit.

“For whatever reason, people just don’t think of the Phoenix music scene on a national level,” Dietrich says. “It’s the sixth most populous city in the nation and is made up of a lot of people who are first- and second-generation Phoenicians. What that means is there are people from all over, bringing their music culture with them from across the world. If nothing more, I want this event to be a vessel for them to shine in the national spotlight. Let’s put them on stage with the biggest acts in the world and let them share their gift.”

True Music Festival is a first of its kind in the state, embracing and showcasing both local and national acts ranging from electronic dance music (EDM) to rock and hip-hop.

“I think the caliber of artists we are selecting from each genre is incredible,” Dietrich says. “These artists are well respected, not just by fans, but the music community in general.”

On the lineup so far is Bassnectar, Wiz Khalifa, The Flaming Lips, Lord Huron and Capital Cities, who have skyrocketed to success with their single “Safe and Sound.”

“We love festivals because of the energy you feel there,” Ryan Merchant of Capital Cities says. “This is a result of bringing together a bunch of bands in one place. It creates an excitement you don’t find in other concert settings.”

The artist Merchant looks forward to seeing the night of the festival?

“I’m a huge Flaming Lips fan,” he says. “[I'm] looking forward to their set.”

Securing these artists may not have been the simplest task, but Dietrich says as soon as he revealed details on what he had planned for the festival, musicians started listening.

“It can be very difficult to get major artists to Arizona for a number of reasons, including political,” he says. “But when we started discussing with the artists, I think the concept spoke for itself, and they jumped at the opportunity.”

In addition to live music, the festival will also include live, interactive art installations and roving performers, so attendees are able to watch artists work, and in some cases, create their own.

“We want our first year to have a major impact on our guests and are working on some new experimental concepts that will really blow people away,” Dietrich says. “We’re working heavily on dimensional entertainment — things going on around you, beneath you and above you… I can’t say much more without giving too much away, but there are some really cool things we’re working on.”

True Music Festival’s goal is to provide a bit of everything, but just how did the name come about?

“We spent months discussing internally on what we thought would be appropriate,” Dietrich says. “We also wanted something that would get our message across right off the bat and keep in line with what we set out to accomplish — an authentic, genuine music experience.”

And it’s this experience that Dietrich hopes will draw thousands of attendees to the Salt River Fields at Talking Stick in Scottsdale.

“Since it’s such a trek for people in Arizona to get to a major festival,” he says, “a lot of them have never even had that incredible, grandiose feeling of being part of something larger than themselves. People have been waiting a long time for something like this.”

For more information about True Music Festival, head to truemusicfestival.com.

True Music Festival

Where: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, 7555 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale

When: December 14, 2013

Web: truemusicfestival.com

AMAZAGING_BS_edit

True Music Festival is Arizona's 1st multi-genre fest

The Tostitos Fiesta Bowl, Barrett-Jackson, Cactus League Baseball… and a music festival?

Plenty of events attract visitors to Arizona, but one in particular is new to the state: True Music Festival, a one-day, multi-genre event. Founder Jarid Dietrich taps into the rich, cultured music scene of the area — one that, he says, just doesn’t get enough credit.

“For whatever reason, people just don’t think of the Phoenix music scene on a national level,” Dietrich says. “It’s the sixth most populous city in the nation and is made up of a lot of people who are first- and second-generation Phoenicians. What that means is there are people from all over, bringing their music culture with them from across the world. If nothing more, I want this event to be a vessel for them to shine in the national spotlight. Let’s put them on stage with the biggest acts in the world and let them share their gift.”

True Music Festival is a first of its kind in the state, embracing and showcasing both local and national acts ranging from electronic dance music (EDM) to rock and hip-hop.

“I think the caliber of artists we are selecting from each genre is incredible,” Dietrich says. “These artists are well respected, not just by fans, but the music community in general.”

On the lineup so far is Bassnectar, Wiz Khalifa, The Flaming Lips, Lord Huron and Capital Cities, who have skyrocketed to success with their single “Safe and Sound.”

“We love festivals because of the energy you feel there,” Ryan Merchant of Capital Cities says. “This is a result of bringing together a bunch of bands in one place. It creates an excitement you don’t find in other concert settings.”

The artist Merchant looks forward to seeing the night of the festival?

“I’m a huge Flaming Lips fan,” he says. “[I'm] looking forward to their set.”

Securing these artists may not have been the simplest task, but Dietrich says as soon as he revealed details on what he had planned for the festival, musicians started listening.

“It can be very difficult to get major artists to Arizona for a number of reasons, including political,” he says. “But when we started discussing with the artists, I think the concept spoke for itself, and they jumped at the opportunity.”

In addition to live music, the festival will also include live, interactive art installations and roving performers, so attendees are able to watch artists work, and in some cases, create their own.

“We want our first year to have a major impact on our guests and are working on some new experimental concepts that will really blow people away,” Dietrich says. “We’re working heavily on dimensional entertainment — things going on around you, beneath you and above you… I can’t say much more without giving too much away, but there are some really cool things we’re working on.”

True Music Festival’s goal is to provide a bit of everything, but just how did the name come about?

“We spent months discussing internally on what we thought would be appropriate,” Dietrich says. “We also wanted something that would get our message across right off the bat and keep in line with what we set out to accomplish — an authentic, genuine music experience.”

And it’s this experience that Dietrich hopes will draw thousands of attendees to the Salt River Fields at Talking Stick in Scottsdale.

“Since it’s such a trek for people in Arizona to get to a major festival,” he says, “a lot of them have never even had that incredible, grandiose feeling of being part of something larger than themselves. People have been waiting a long time for something like this.”

For more information about True Music Festival, head to truemusicfestival.com.

True Music Festival

Where: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, 7555 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale

When: December 14, 2013

Web: truemusicfestival.com

Photo: Poggenpohl

Kitchen Trend For 2013: Untraditional Cabinetry, Wood

Wild, wild wood: Cleaner, streamlined kitchens call for modern, untraditional cabinetry.


When times get tough, spice up your kitchen.

And over the past two years, both Steve Johnson, owner of Atelier Inc. in Scottsdale, and Allan Rosenthal, owner of Linear Fine Woodworking in Phoenix, have seen homeowners do just that — breathing life into their antiquated kitchens.

“They just want something different,” Johnson says. “Every few years, people get sick of seeing the same thing, so they push the envelope, wanting something different.”

Creating drama

As homeowners streamline their kitchens, integrating their appliances for a more clean, organized look, they are honing in on an important element of the overall design — the cabinets.

“Cabinets set the mood of the home,” says Tina James, sales and marketing manager of Custom Creative Marble and Granite.

And according to Rosenthal, homeowners are moving away from the mainstream woods and gravitating toward the untraditional, including tamo ash, macassar ebony and block-mottled makore.

“They’re holographic, so when you walk by them, they actually move,” says Rosenthal. “They have a beauty to them unlike anything else, and they’re just spectacular materials.”

Tamo ash, from Japan, has an unusual, swirly-grain pattern and is famous for its “peanut” figure. Macassar ebony is somewhat similar to Zebrawood with a reddish-brown body and darker brown to black stripes. Block-mottled makore is deep reddish brown in color with a block-pattern figure. All three types of wood give off a dramatic effect.

Rosenthal goes on to say that not only can these untraditional woods last forever, but they can also handle moisture well, especially the areas around the sink.

The laminate look

Johnson, on the other hand, says he’s seen much more movement away from the woods altogether, with homeowners opting for laminates that look like wood. These laminates give kitchens a simple look; plus, they’re easy to clean, maintain and repair.

“If a wood door got damaged, and you had to replace it several years later, it’s very difficult to find one to match 100 percent,” Johnson says. “Whereas with the lacquer finishes, you could change it up 10 years later, and it’s still going to match.”

Laminates are also a great element for creating what Johnson says continues to gain popularity: an all-white kitchen.

“People are going more and more to white kitchens in the last two years,” Johnson says. “People just want that clean, crisp, white look. They’re tired of the down economy, and they don’t want their home to look heavy and dark, and they just want light, bright white — clean and uplifting. White never goes out of style.”

James agrees, saying she’s seen a growing trend in white. “But my favorite that I think will catch on more next year is grey. Contemporary,  more modern styles are getting to be more popular.”

What has gone out of style, according to Rosenthal, is the Tuscan-inspired design. “Tuscan is gone for the most part, and modern will be around for a long time because it’s timeless. You never get tired of it.”


View more photos:

Poggenpohl's +MODO kitchen is centered around the island, which has plenty of surface area and storage. Photo: Poggenpohl untraditional cabinetry untraditional cabinetry

For more information about untraditional cabinetry:

Linear Fine Woodworking
2825-2831 S. 46th St., Phoenix
(480) 968-1223
linearfinewoodworking.com

Atelier Inc.
4242 N. Craftsman Court, Scottsdale
(480) 424-7900
scottsdale.poggenpohl.com

Custom Creative Marble and Granite
8260 E. Raintree Dr., #216, Scottsdale
(623) 570-5386
customcreativegranite.com

Scottsdale Living Magazine Winter 2013

woman pinching stomach

Are The Symptoms You're Feeling Early Signs Of Cancer?

Reading the signs: Are the symptoms you’re feeling early signs of cancer? Why women ignore the signs, and what they may mean.


While women are busy caring for their children, their clients or both, there’s one important individual they tend to neglect — themselves. More frequently than not, women don’t make their own health a priority, ignoring symptoms that could be early signs of cancer.

“Women frequently ignore symptoms because they are simply busy,” says Dr. Daniel Maki, M.D., director of breast imaging at Scottsdale Medical Imaging (SMIL). “They are head of the household, often responsible for so many others that they put their own health on the back burner.”

What’s worse is some women believe the symptoms will just go away, so they ignore or deny the symptoms, according to Dr. Clayton Palowy, M.D., medical oncologist with Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers in Chandler.

“It’s human nature to ignore symptoms because you don’t want to view the worst, and you start rationalizing them as natural causes,” says Dr. Mike Janicek, M.D., medical director of the Cancer Genetic Risk Assessment Program at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare Medical Center. “I would say it’s the slowness of some of the symptoms that may sneak under the radar and makes it difficult for women to pay attention to symptoms, when in retrospect, it’s clear to them.”

Many symptoms such as bloating, irregular vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain seem typical, but, in reality, these and a few common symptoms that could be signs of various types of cancers.

Breast cancer

The stats:

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women and is the second-leading cause of cancer death among women, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In the U.S. in 2012, it was estimated by the National Cancer Institute that there were nearly 227,000 new cases of breast cancer and more than 39,000 deaths.

The symptoms:

The most common complaint or symptom is a lump in the breast.

“Depending on what the lump (cancer) invades during its growth, it may cause a variety of different symptoms based on what it grows into,” says Dr. Maki.

“If the lump invades into the nipple or skin, it can begin causing retraction or dimpling,” he adds. “If the lump invades a blood vessel and milk duct, it can cause blood to be discharged from the nipple. If it invades nerve fibers, it can cause pain. If it invades the skin, it can cause thickening or change in texture of the skin itself.”

Other symptoms include:

  • Discharge from the nipple (particularly a bloody discharge)
  • Nipple inversion or retraction
  • Skin dimpling (along one edge of the breast) or retraction

“Sometimes patients even describe simply a ‘thickening’ of an area of the breast rather than a discrete lump,” says Dr. Maki.

Palowy says that breast changes such as a red breast is an early sign of inflammatory breast cancer and can be mistaken for infection.

Symptoms mistaken for:

Many of the symptoms are often attributed to cysts or one’s menstrual cycle, according to Maki. And in a large number of patients with lumps or pain, the assumption may often be correct.

“However, occasionally these symptoms do unfortunately represent early stages of breast cancer, and any new breast symptoms should always be brought to the attention of one’s doctor,” Dr. Maki says.

Prevention:

Mammograms and screenings are the best way to find breast cancer early. Also, be aware of your family history and risk factors. The National Cancer Institute has a Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool helps estimate a woman’s risk of developing invasive breast cancer. Visit cancer.gov/bcrisktool.

Cervical cancer

The stats:

All women are at risk for cervical (uterine cervix) cancer, which forms in the tissue of the cervix (the organ connecting the uterus and vagina) and is almost always caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, it occurs more often in women over the age of 30.

In the U.S. in 2012, the National Cancer Institute estimated more than 12,000 new cases of cervical cancer and more than 4,000 deaths.

The symptoms:

  • Bleeding with intercourse: This is often mistaken for “just too much friction,” according to Dr. Deborah Wilson, M.D., of Scottsdale.
  • Bleeding after intercourse: Mistaken for the start of one’s period.
  • Irregular or heavy vaginal bleeding pre-menopausal: Mistaken for an abnormal period and could also be a symptom of uterine cancer.
  • Bleeding after menopause: Mistaken for an unexpected period and could also be a symptom of uterine cancer.

Prevention:

Two tests can help prevent or find cervical cancer early: a Pap test (or a pap smear) and the HPV test.

Ovarian cancer

The stats:

Ovarian cancer forms in the tissues of the ovary, with most ovarian cancers either ovarian epithelial carcinomas (cancer that begins in the cells on the surface of the ovary) or malignant germ cell tumors (cancer that begins in egg cells).

The National Cancer Institute estimates that there were more than 22,000 new cases of cervical cancer and more than 15,000 deaths in 2012 in the United States.

The symptoms:

  • Bloating: Mistaken for gas pain.
  • Pelvic pain: Mistaken for indigestion.
  • Early satiety
  • Chronic indigestion: Mistaken for food intolerance.

Prevention:

As with breast cancer, know your family history and inherited risk and changes, such as changes in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. However, according to the CDC, most breast and ovarian cancers are primarily due to aging, the environment and lifestyle.

“Ovarian cancer has no screening test, so that’s the one that most people focus on the symptoms,” says Janicek. “By the time you get bloating and some of the other symptoms, it’s often in its advanced stages.”

Know your history

The No. 1 symptom to consider? Family history, according Janicek.

“Family history is an unusual but very important symptom,” says Janicek. “And it’s not just for breast, but for ovarian and lynch syndrome. People don’t think of family history as a symptom, but it is. If you have a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, you may be at genetic risk for cancer.”

Compile your family’s health history, and go as far back as three generations. Janicek says to let other family members know when another family member gets cancer. Not only will you and your family be informed, but it will also help the doctor look for any patterns of disease in the family.

Visit My Family Health Portrait’s website at familyhistory.hhs.gov to help collect and track your family health history.

Collect the following information about both your mother’s and father’s sides of the family:

  • Number of close relatives with breast or ovarian cancer: mother, sister(s), daughter(s), grandmothers, aunt(s), niece(s), and granddaughter(s)
  • Ages when the cancers were diagnosed
  • Whether anyone had cancer of both breasts
  • Breast cancer in male relatives
  • Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jewish ancestry

For more information about cancer treatment and prevention, visit:

Scottsdale Medical Imaging
Scottsdale Medical Center
3501 N. Scottsdale Rd., #130, Scottsdale
(480) 425-5081
esmil.com

Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers
695 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler
(480) 821-2838
ironwoodcrc.com

Scottsdale Healthcare Medical Center
Scottsdale Gynecologic Oncology
10197 N. 92nd St., #101, Scottsdale
(480) 993-2950
arizonaoncology.com

Deborah Wilson, M.D., Gynecology
8997 E. Desert Cove,  #105, Scottsdale
(480) 860-4791
drwilsonobgyn.com

Scottsdale Living Magazine Winter 2013

fat stem cell transfer

Fat Stem Cells Can Be Used Cosmetically, Medically, As An Anti-Aging Alternative

Phenomenal fat: Fat stem cells can be used cosmetically, medically and as an anti-aging alternative.

If someone were to tell you your fat could not only make you look up to 20 years younger, but also save your life, would you believe it?

According to local surgeons, it can — with fat stem cell transfers and fat banking.
The fat stem cell transfer — or fat grafting procedure — consists of harvesting or removing fat from one part of the body, purifying it and re-injecting it into the areas that need volume or rejuvenation.

The two most common uses for fat stem cell transfers are as natural and long-lasting alternatives to fillers and implants.

“Although the procedure has been around for many years, autologous fat grafting or fat injections are becoming a hot topic in plastic surgery,” says Dr. Jennifer Geoghegan, M.D., of Oasis Plastic Surgery in Scottsdale. “Fat can be used to revise scars, fill in depressions, to volumize or rejuvenate the face or hands or to enhance body contours such as the buttocks or breasts.”

Breast augmentation and reconstruction

Both Geoghegan and Dr. James M. Nachbar, M.D., FACS, Scottsdale Plastic Surgery in Scottsdale, agree that the use of fat to correct defects from breast biopsies has gained popularity over the past year.

“Many of my most informed patients seem to be my breast reconstruction patients,” Geoghegan says. “After doing research on their options, they commonly come in looking for fat injections as an option to potentially improve their lumpectomy scars or as an improvement to their current implant-based breast reconstruction.”

Dr. Todd K. Malan, M.D., founder of the Innovative Cosmetic Surgery Center in Scottsdale, also uses fat-derived stem cells frequently at his practice for patients who have had lumpectomies or multiple biopsies or left with defects. But, he says the most common use for fat stem cells is for breast augmentations, a procedure for which he was the very first surgeon in the United States to perform.

The procedure is performed with needles, with no cutting into the breast, and takes about two hours. The fat, along with the stem cells, is injected throughout the breast. Patients are typically uncomfortable or sore from the liposuction for about three to five days, with possible bruising and very little swelling, according to Malan, and should subside within a couple of weeks.

“You can rebuild the breast, instead of implants,” says Dr. Jeffrey J. Ptak, M.D., FACS, Aesthetic Surgery in Scottsdale. “It would probably take two or three sessions to build a reliably fuller breast to the same volume that you would get an implant.”

Although it may take more time, the fat stem cell transfers are considered a much more natural alternative for breast augmentations, and they’re also long-lasting and less expensive in the long-run, compared to implants.

“With implants, you’re looking at replacing them every 10 years, at least,” Malan says. “A recent study done by one of the implant companies shows that 50 percent of patients will have their implant removed prior to 10 years because of complications or issues. So, you’re talking about a procedure with fat that lasts forever.”

Malan adds that if one were to average the potential complications, potential issues and the replacement costs, she would be looking at $1,000 per year for the rest of her life, after the implants are put in.

Stem cell facelifts

“Stem cell facelifts have been the most popular recently,” Malan says. “And I think that the word is getting out now.”

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, facelifts help improve visible signs of aging in the face and neck, but the procedure does not stop the aging process. Fat transfers to the face, however, can reverse skin aging. Ptak says instead of stretching the skin outward, surgeons who incorporate fat transfers, also known as fat grafting, in their procedures are filling up the volume of fat in the face where there used to be volume, giving patients a youthful look. Ptak, more than a decade ago, was one of the first in the country to offer fat grafting in the country.

Facial aging is caused by a loss of volume, so injecting fat creates volume and rejuvenates the face, creating a natural, youthful, recharged appearance. Stem cells make the skin thicker; they regrow collagen, stimulate blood flow and eliminate age spots, and patients can look up to 20 years younger.

“Fat transfers have been used a lot now along with facelifts to improve the result of the facelift, Nachbar says. “As you age, the wrinkles and the sagging of the skin relates to loss of the fat in the face. As you get older, the fat drains out so it becomes more hallow. Injecting fat can help improve the shape of the face.”

Stem cell transfers are a fraction of the cost and can last up to 10 years, if not longer, Ptak says. For instance, facelifts range from $15,000 to $20,000, while fat transfers can cost anywhere from $4,000 to $7,000, he adds. And the number of patients receiving this procedure at his practice have increased.

“I think we’ve seen anywhere from a two- to five-fold increase in this procedure in the last four years at my practice,” Ptak says. “There are very few of us doing it.”

And the stem cell facelift isn’t just for women. According to Ptak, it’s the most appropriate procedure for male facelifts.

“If you think of all of the bad male face lifts you’ve seen, doing the wrong procedure for the male, just pulling their facial skin doesn’t make it look better,” Ptak says. “What gives a face the youthful volume is all the vary subtle layers of the fat compartments of the face.”

Fat stem cell banking

Normally after liposuction, fat is discarded as medical waste. However, doctors suggest saving or banking your fat for future possible anti-aging or medical treatments — because the fat is rich in regenerative stem cells.

Ptak calls this bio-insurance. “You’re essentially setting up another insurance policy for yourself to have these stem cells readily available,” he says.

For those who do not opt for a fat transfer to the face or use it for a breast augmentation, patients can store it at a tissue bank. Just two exist in the U.S. — BioLife Cell Bank located in Dallas; and AdiCyte located in Tucson, the largest stem cell bank in the country. Last year, Dr. Ptak was appointed as a national board advisor for AdiCyte.

If you have a family history of cancer, multiple sclerosis or Alzheimer’s disease, “You really should be considering having your fat removed and stem cells stored while you’re young,” Malan says. “Those stem cells will be able to do amazing repair work.”

The younger the better, Ptak says. And it can be done anytime. “If you’re going in for another procedure, and you’re under anesthesia, you can have it done then,” he adds. “It’s easy.”

The amount of fat removed for stem cell banking is 500cc’s — about the size of a 16 oz. bottle of water. Malan has had patients come in to his practice specifically for the fat removal and fat stem cell banking.

“This really is the most exciting, medical breakthrough in any of our lifetimes,” Malan says. “This really has the potential of completely altering disease where we could not only cure disease, but we could reverse the disease process so that you don’t have to suffer from debilitating chronic conditions anymore. And, we can actually help repair chronic genetic diseases.”

Rebuilding breasts, reversing aging, treating heart disease and diabetes — fat transfer can be used just about anywhere in the body, from head to toe, with stem cell therapy able to treat a range of conditions. And the fat-derived stem cells can be used now or later.

“Your fat can save your life, especially if you happen to develop a disease that they have a proven therapy with stem cells now or in the future,” Ptak says. “The old model of drugs and surgery being the old way to fight disease is really going out the window. We’re really trying gene therapy and stem cell therapy as the way to fight disease. This is definitely looking in the future of medicine.”

For more information about fat stem cell transfers and/or banking, visit:

Innovative Cosmetic Surgery Center  
7425 E. Shea Blvd., #107, Scottsdale
(623) 748-4892
innovativecosmeticsurgery.com

Jeffrey J. Ptak, M.D., FACS
9431 E. Ironwood Square Dr., Scottsdale
(480) 451-9220
doctorptak.com

Oasis Plastic Surgery
9590 E. Ironwood Square Dr., #108, Scottsdale
(480) 264-6428
oasisplastics.com

James M. Nachbar, MD, FACS, Scottsdale Plastic Surgery
8896 E. Becker Ln., #102, Scottsdale
(480) 289-5300
plastic.org

Scottsdale Living Magazine Winter 2013

Jason Hydrotherapy Microsilk bathtub. Photo: Jason International

Bathroom Remodeling 2013: Create A Retreat, Go Green, Add Tech

The Triple Threat: Remodeling your bathroom? Bathroom remodeling 2013 calls for creating a retreat, creating an eco-friendly bathroom and adding technology.

Don’t ask what you can do to your bathroom. Ask, “What can it do for me?”

Does it provide an escape from your day-to-day? How about the ability to turn on a shower head or receive an oxygen facial with just the touch of a button? Or, does it have eco-friendly features that save water or reduce heat, in turn, saving you money on your next utility bill? Now you can say, “yes,” to all three.

Homeowners are not only transforming their bathrooms into a replica of that much-needed relaxing spa they visited on their last vacation. Homeowners are also incorporating technology and “green” features into their master baths — in turn creating a more efficient, hygienic, and ultimately enjoyable experience.

Bring the spa home

Drop-in tubs with a granite tub deck found in Quisana’s master bathrooms. Photo: Cory Bergquist.“If you think about some of those memorable spots that you experienced on vacation, those beautiful hotel and resort spas, it’s a timeless and relaxing atmosphere,” says Jeffrey Lake, vice president and national director of architecture and community design for Standard Pacific Homes, the creator of Quisana, a new master-planned community offering all-new architecture in Troon North.

Spa-like bathrooms are so popular, in fact, Ann Lyons of Sun Valley Interiors in Scottsdale has even seen a 20 to 40 percent increase of homeowners opting for a spa-like bath in the last year to year and a half.

“More people are staying home rather than going on vacations and putting their money in their homes, and this is one way they can enjoy this room,” Lyons says. “It also gives the homeowner a great return on their investment.”

Beginning with the tub and shower, spa-like features in the master baths include large showers with his-and-her entries, rain heads and double-headed showers. Some luxury homes, including Quisana, even include a no-step entry into the walk-in showers. As for the tubs, homeowners can consider drop-in tubs with a granite tub deck, also found at Quisana, versus the standard one-piece tub.

Lyons adds that calm colors, proper lighting and an open space for more of an open feel can also help create that spa-like environment. Lake adds, “Plenty of light is preferred in the bathroom as well because when you think about a beautiful spa, you don’t really think about a dark atmosphere; you think about something light and bright.”

As for the sinks, if one were to take a cleaner, more tailored path to the design, Lake suggests vessel sinks. “The look is cleaner, more progressive, the materials themselves are cleaner, and there’s not as much movement from a pattern standpoint.” Materials include natural materials such as tumbled marble, granite and rich woods.

Let’s get technical

Photo: MoenEnhance your experience — and adding a touch of technology can help achieve just that.
“What we’re seeing are clients coming in and wanting to make their house personal to them,” says Jeremy Smith, sales manager at Central Arizona Supply in Scottsdale, “and the technology is something that is already in their life, so therefore isn’t a giant leap like tech in the bathroom once.”

Smith goes on to say that many of the “techy” products aren’t simply replacing manual technology such as pressing a button to turn on your Photo: Moenshower versus turning a lever or knob, they are incorporating technology that didn’t exist before.

“For example, controlling a stereo, aromatherapy and chromatherapy from a touch pad in the shower or an oxygen facial essentially for your body in a bathtub,” Smith says. “These are things that may be saving you trips to get a massage or getting to the gym.”

Smith adds to “buy technology because it has a function that you will enjoy for the life of your home, regardless if there is a future, techier way of doing it.”

Two popular items over the past year? Toto’s Washlet G500, which has an integrated toilet. Its features include a lid that automatically lifts and closes, hands-free flush, adjustable seat temperatures, a warm-air dryer, personal Neorest 550 electronic toilet. Photo: TOTOmemory settings and more. The other, according to Smith, is the Microsilk bathtub from Jason Hydrotherapy, which releases oxygen-rich microbubbles.

“These oxygen bubbles attach to your skin and remove carbon dioxide from under the surface of the skin and makes your skin softer and more robust,” Smith says. “It’s like getting an oxygen facial for your entire body. This is all operated from a floating remote control that can also turn on the whirlpool feature or the chromatherapy or the TV mirror you place in front of the tub.

“What is most exciting about bathrooms today is that we are looking at them as a place to get away from our stresses and start the day right or end the day peacefully,” Smith adds. “Technology in the bathroom can help you do that — or maybe just a good lock on the door.”

An eco-friendly environment

From your faucets to your windows, going green isn’t just great for the environment, it lightens up your wallet — and your bathroom — as well.

Let’s start with the windows. Instead of your typical, single-pane window with a metal frame, consider dual-paned, Low-E windows with a vinyl frame. These dual-frame, Low-E windows trap argon gas between two panes of glass to provide better insulation, and the Low-E coatings decrease emissivity, reducing the radiant heat that comes through the sun’s rays.

According to APS and its Standard Plan, for a typical 2,000-square-foot Phoenix area home without exterior or interior shading, the annual energy cost for a double-pane, Low-E window is about $700. The single-pain, clear metal frame window is about $1,200 a year.

“These windows are much more durable and efficient,” says Steve Troth, vice president of sales and marketing for Standard Pacific Homes. “If (homeowners) wanted to do something on remodeling end, it’s a great place to start.”

Photo: BrizoNext, look at your faucet. At Central Arizona Supply, Smith says one item that has sold consistently is the touch sensor kitchen faucet in the bathroom, specifically Brizo’s Odin Single Handle Lavatory, designed by fashion designer Jason Wu.

“Essentially it is an easy way to save water because just by tapping the faucet it will turn on or off,” Smith says. “Plus, if your hands are full or dirty, it is easy just to tap with your arm or something to turn the faucet off.”

So, which do you prefer? No need to choose just one; incorporate all three trends for that triple-threat lavatory.

For more information about bathroom remodeling, visit the following:

Central Arizona Supply
4750 N. 16th St., Phoenix
(602) 943-3488
centralazsupply.com

Sun Valley Interiors
2716 N. 68th St., Scottsdale
(602) 381-1289
sunvalleyinteriors.com

Quisana by Standard Pacific Homes
11029 E. Bent Tree Dr., Scottsdale
(480) 513-3693
standardpacifichomes.com

Scottsdale Living Magazine Winter 2013

Posh

Posh Restaurant Boasts Improvisational Cuisine, Interactive Environment

Check, cross, and relax. Dinner is that easy at Posh — but only for the bold and daring.

I had heard of Posh, the contemporary American restaurant located within the Optima Camelview condos near Scottsdale Fashion Square, from a few people; and each have had nearly the same reaction about the improvisational restaurant — “go into with an open mind,” and “get ready to try things you would normally never try.”

So into it with an open mind I did, expecting quite a culinary adventure. Instead of a “choose your own journey,” it was more of a “tell us which paths are off limits, and we’ll surprise you with the rest.” (Control freaks, beware.)

Instead reading a three-page menu front and back a few times, hesitantly choosing an appetizer and entree at the last minute, at Posh all I had was one half-sheet of paper with a few options.

First, you decide how many courses you want, ranging from four to eight; we chose five. Then, you cross off the main ingredients you dislike, which, for me, included frog legs and oysters; I was game to try the alligator and quail. This list of ingredients changes based on “what is fresh and seasonal,” according to Posh’s ever-changing menu. Next, mark the temperature you’d like your meat and fish cooked; and, lastly, specify any other ingredients to which you are allergic and/or ingredients you generally dislike that you want Joshua Hebert, chef and owner of Posh, to avoid completely.

And that was it. Now it was time to wait for the first course, which would be either a salad or soup.

We sat with our wine and chatted in the warm, candlelit environment. The day we visited was the day of a surprise thunderstorm, so it was quite the intimate setting with just myself, my dinner companion and one other table on the far side of the restaurant.

Just before I began to wonder when we’d receive our first course, my salad arrived. Beautifully presented, the glacier lettuce atop beets and topped with thinly sliced apples literally bursted with flavor. The waitress had mentioned the ingredients were locally sourced, and the salad proved it with its clean, fresh flavors.

We received everything from wild boar bacon; shrimp atop cabbage, lettuce, red onions and red wine sauce droplets; and soft shell crab served with white and green asparagus and a drizzle of Chinese BBQ sauce; to a harmonious chocolate symphony of chocolate cake, chocolate mousse, white chocolate shavings, shortbread, blackberries, raspberries and banana syrup to drizzle atop. Of course, there were a few other dishes in-between, including foie gras and a cheese platter wiped clean within the first five minutes of it landing on our table.

Each dish we received throughout the night was an appropriately-sized portion — small dishes that gave you just enough food to savor the flavors and hold you over the 20 minutes or so until the next entree arrived. Not once did I feel like a glutton, and only once, at the end of our two-hour-plus culinary ride, did I ask my companion, “Where did the time go?”

What’s unique about Posh is no two similar dishes would be served, ever. However, one must take note that Posh is more than just the presentation and taste of its courses — though, don’t get me wrong, every dish was nothing short of innovative and appetizing. It’s also about taking advantage of the interactive environment and the way Hebert builds anticipation and that element of surprise; you don’t know what you’re going to eat or when you’re going to eat it.

That night, Chef Hebert proved to me that, sometimes, allowing others to make the decisions for me can be a great thing. We all have to take risks sometimes; make your next bold move at Posh.


Posh Posh Posh
Posh Posh Posh
Posh Posh Posh
Posh

Posh

Where: 7167 E. Rancho Vista Dr., Scottsdale
Contact: (480) 663-7674
Online: Website | Facebook | Twitter

Searsucker Scottsdale

Searsucker Scottsdale's New American Dishes With A Twist Are A Hit

Only at Searsucker Scottsdale is it possible for the food to overshadow the fact that I both shook Brian Malarkey’s San Diego-tanned hand and exclaimed in my starstruck stammer that “Everything is incredible!” at least three times when he made his rounds that typical Tuesday night. As someone who obsessively watches Top Chef (even during my lunch hour if I happen to miss an episode), Searsucker quickly made its way to the top of my “eateries I must try” list.

The restaurant

Nestled on the corner of Camelback and Goldwater, Searsucker Scottsdale has found an appropriate home at Scottsdale Fashion Square. The warehouse-chic interior is comprised of distressed furniture and oversized drum lamp shapes, exposed ceiling beams, lumber-embellished windows, and entwined ropes and light bulbs dangling from fixtures above various tables and seating areas in the restaurant.

Searsucker’s environment alone appeals to a diverse crowd, the restaurant capable of suiting any type of occasion — from a girls’ or guys’ night out to a romantic dinner for two. And I noticed just that during my visit, even mid-week.

But what was most apparent to me was just how comfortable the open environment made me, and the rest of the patrons, feel. The tables were arranged in a way that didn’t make everyone feel as though we were literally rubbing elbows with one another, the lighting Searsucker Scottsdalewas dimmed perfectly, couches were abound, and the music was at a level low enough to hear the person next to you. The only way to complement such a homey atmosphere is by pairing it with comfort food, which is exactly what Searsucker Scottsdale’s menu consists of.

The menu

Searsucker’s menu, divided into categories like Bites, Smalls, Greens, Ocean, Ranch and Farm, Searsucker Scottsdaleconsists of classic New American dishes with a twist.

After scanning the menu at least five times over, simultaneously munching on the cheddar-cheese-stuffed and cayenne-seasoned cheddar puffers ($2) served to us upon arrival, I’m almost positive our waitress was familiar with our overwhelmed and indecisive response to the menu and immediately began pointing out the more popular items. Due to the very impressive speed at which she spoke about every possible detail of the dishes, we trusted she wouldn’t let us down, and we opted for her suggestions.

The most popular cocktail? The Indian Summer. You can’t get more American than this with its fresh-pressed apple Searsucker Scottsdalejuice mixed with Grey Goose La Poire — delicious!

‘Smalls’/starters

As I slowly made a dent in my Indian Summer, savoring every sip, a large spoon was set on our table, soon followed by our “small bites”: the shrimp “spicy” + bacon grits ($12). This popular appetizer boasts a handful of Cajun-seasoned shrimp swimming in the bacon-buttermilk-and-cheese grits. We finished that so quickly, we could have had seconds and thirds, easily.

Main entrees

Once our plates were taken and my Indian Summer finally came to an end, it was time for our main entrees: the loin “filet” with lobster butter + cognac ($35) and the duck X’s 3 breast + confit + orange ($26). Flavorful and juicy in the center, the hearty filet mignon and its cognac paired perfectly with our two sides — the jalapeno-chorizo “corn off the cobb” ($6) and the fried brussels + walnuts ($7). With the cognac on the sweeter side, the spiciness of the “corn off the cob” complemented the filet well. As for the brussels, which is the most popular item on the menu, these were the most lively, bold and mouthwatering sprouts I’ve ever had. Pair the filet with a cabernet, and you’re set.

The judges’ table

Searsucker Scottsdale was a definite hit for me and my dinner companion. Malarkey may have been a Top Chef finalist, but Searsucker is a winner. But who am I kidding? Head there, and you be the judge.

Searsucker Scottsdale

Where: 6900 E. Camelback Rd., Scottsdale
Contact: (480) 664-3777
Online: Website | Facebook | Twitter

Paper Clouds Apparel logo

Paper Clouds Apparel Raises Money For Special Needs Schools, Organizations

Five years ago in Northern California, one visit to his mother and a drawing displayed on her fridge was all it took to spawn the idea for the Phoenix-based T-shirts company Paper Clouds Apparel (PCA).

“(She) had a drawing on her fridge that really caught my eye,” says Robert Thornton, founder of PCA. “She told me a little girl on her route would draw the whole ride to school and would often give them to her. The drawing had me mesmerized. I woke up the next morning with the idea for Paper Clouds Apparel.” And after saving money for two years, Thornton started PCA and officially became a business in December 2009.

However, Paper Clouds Apparel (PCA) isn’t your typical clothing company. It raises money for schools, habilitation centers and learning centers that work with special needs individuals. And, it just launched its new website this week with a brand new line of merchandise created by individuals with special needs. Every two weeks, PCA teams up with a different special needs school/organization. First on the list, from January 7 through January 21, is the Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD). Here’s a list of some of PCA’s upcoming projects:


Q&A with Robert Thornton of PCA:

Robert Thornton

Scottsdale Living (SL): On PCA’s website, it states that the long-term goal is to raise money for at least one school, learning center and habilitation center in every state. For how many states so far has PCA raised money?

Thornton: PCA currently has 16 special needs schools and organizations as members of our family. Teaming up first with an amazing organization like the Center For Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) on our new website really expands our reach to a new level. They have satellite centers in 16 states and one in New Zealand and another in Australia.

We also have a future project in which we are teaming up with Autism Speaks, which is in every state and worldwide!

SL: How much has been raised for schools/organizations since PCA’s inception?

Thornton: We don’t like to give out actual amounts for our past projects, but we do have a new ticker on our website that will show how much has been raised for the current project and will also have a running yearly total.

I will say that Margaret Stephens-Reed, head of fundraising for VALLEYLIFE, made the comment that without the money we have raised for VALLEYLIFE, they wouldn’t even have an art program!

SL: How are the schools/organizations chosen?

Thornton: We reach out to special needs schools and organizations we love on our own, describe what Paper Clouds Apparel is all about and ask if they are interested. Most special needs schools and organizations rely on government funding and private donations to keep operating. The government has slashed the total they give out dramatically the past three years. VALLEYLIFE, for instance, has seen their government funding cut by almost 20 percent over the past three years. So we want to fill this void and give these amazing special needs schools and organizations the funds they need to give all these amazing individuals the tools they need to thrive.

SL: Could you talk about how the products are eco-friendly and sensory-friendly?

paper clouds apparel

Thornton: We use bamboo for our shirts, which is such a better fabric than cotton.

  • The typical cotton shirt requires 700 gallons from planting to finished shirt ― and that’s for ONE shirt! Bamboo shirts require around 34 gallons in comparison.
  • Cotton shirts require 1/4 pound of chemicals and pesticides, while a bamboo shirt requires none of these nasty products.paper clouds apparel
  • Plus, after the cotton is harvested, you have to fill up the air with exhaust and chemicals from tilling the land. Bamboo roots continually sprout new shoots, so you never have to till the land.
  • Bamboo fabric also feels like a cross between silk and cashmere ― super soft to the skin.
  • Bamboo fabric offers comfort, is highly absorbent, hypoallergenic, has wicking abilities, more paper clouds apparelbreathable than cotton and a natural sheen. That makes it perfect for a large number of individuals with autism who have sensory issues.

SL: What are PCA’s goals for 2013?

Thornton: Paper Clouds Apparel just wants to continue growing. We want to reach as many people as we can and inform them of what we are doing.

Individuals with special needs are all too often made to feel like they lack the ability to contribute to society. We want to show the masses the amazing talents they posses. By doing this, we want to bring hope and raise the self-esteem of a portion of the population that can be made to feel less than others.

Paper Clouds Apparel wants to spread awareness and acceptance of all people. PCA is also hiring individuals with special needs to package our shirts. Steady employment is very hard to find for this part of the population. Ninety-three percent of all individuals of working age that have special needs are unemployed. We hope to sell as many shirts as possible and keep increasing our workforce. Providing a way for someone to make a living is such a huge part of what we are about.

SL: Could you describe one moment when you knew you were touching lives with PCA?

Thornton: I have been really moved by emails I have received from parents of children with special needs that belong to a school or organization PCA is teaming up with. The emails have thanked me for this project, parents telling me this project has completely changed the dynamic in their home. Their child in now inspired and excited to know that people appreciate and want to buy something they have created. I was completely unprepared to receive something like this. Every time I get one of these emails, it really hits me emotionally. That has been the most rewarding development and has made the five years struggling to get to this point completely worth it.


For more information about Paper Clouds Apparel, visit papercloudsapparel.com.

Amanda Borden

How Amanda Borden Stays In Olympic Shape In Her 30s

1996 Olympic Gold Medalist and owner of Gold Medal Gymnastics, Amanda Borden, keeps in shape, but it hasn’t always been easy — especially now in her 30s.

“I retired from gymnastics when I was about 21, and my body went through a lot of changes,” Borden says. “Through my 30s, I had two kids, and my life changed a lot, too. Finding time to workout was extremely difficult, and finding something that motivated me to actually workout was even harder.”

She continued to workout but had trouble getting results, especially compared to the immediate results she used to see in her 20s.

So, to get back in Olympic shape, Borden turned to Orangetheory Fitness, a workout completed in four 10-30 minute intervals throughout an hour, including cardio intervals, weight training routines, rowing and suspension straps. The workout helps build strength and increase energy with noticeable results in three months.

“I’ve always been a very motivated person, but actually doing a workout that is going to challenge me enough to get the results I want is really hard to do without having someone else push you,” says Borden, who frequents the Orangetheory Fitness in Chandler. “The Orangetheory workout challenges me every time I’m there, and it pushes me to places I would never push myself.

“The great thing is that each trainer is really different in his or her style and approach to the workout, so it really feels like no two classes are the same. In one hour at Orangetheory, I get in a killer cardio and strength workout, and I’m really pushing my endurance to the max at the same time.”

In addition to attending Orangetheory classes, Borden says she tries to do something active every day.

“Workout at Orangetheory, go for a run, ride bikes with my kids, etc.,” she adds. “I find that if I build fitness activities into my life, it’s much easier to get a routine and stick with it!”

For more information about Amanda Borden and Orangetheory Fitness, including locations, visit goldmedalgym.com and orangetheoryfitness.com, respectively.

Stephanie's luxury boutique in Scottsdale

Stephanie's, Luxury Fashion & Home Boutique, Last-Minute Gift Picks

It began as a small design studio and retail concept in 1999, and since then has evolved into a premier lifestyle boutique, offering a luxury shopping experience that combines both fashion and home design — an experience not usually found outside New York or L.A.

Ladies, meet Stephanie’s.

Here, you’ll find exclusive designer labels, including Rag & Bone, Majestic T’s, Del Toro Shoes, NSF, Raquel Allegra, Equipment, Current Elliot, Chaser, Mother Denim and Designer’s Guild — a collection shoppers would be hard-pressed to find anywhere else in the Valley.

“I found myself doing most of my shopping while I was out of town because there really wasn’t a place here to go for advanced, contemporary women’s clothing,” says Owner Stephanie Inzalaco. “Stephanie’s fills the void in the Scottsdale market by providing the types of fashion lines previously only found in New York and L.A.”

One of the exclusive lines Stephanie’s carries is IRO, a Paris-based designer — and Inzalaco’s personal favorite.

“The brand merges an edgy street vibe with classic French style for a look that is laid-back and feminine,” she says. “Their boyish blazers are always one of the most coveted and favorite pieces in my closet. IRO is almost impossible to find anywhere else in the Valley.”

Inzalaco says the boutique caters to women who want unique pieces, high-quality basics and transitional clothing that can easily go from day to night and can work with every season. “Our clients enjoy cutting-edge fashion but don’t want to be too trendy.”

As for Inzalaco’s style?

“I definitely have more of a street style,” she says. “It’s a little edgy but put together, casual with a wear-anywhere appeal.”

For more information about Stephanie’s, visit its Facebook page.


Stephanie’s Last-Minute Gift Picks:

Gift shopping tip: “Always make it something you like yourself,” Owner Stephanie Inzalaco says.

IF by apothia, $58

IF by apothia, $58

“The roll-on oil perfume comes in a non-breakable bottle, which is great to carry in your purse and have as a little pick-me-up during the day,” Inzalaco says.

Festa by Alora, $54

Festa by Alora, $54

“This great, seasonal scent sells out every year! It’s a delicious mix of cinnamon and bitter orange. This makes a great hostess gift.”

Avery Silk Pajama Set by Equipment, $438

Avery Silk Pajama Set by Equipment, $438

“This pajama set includes an oversized top and wide-legged drawstring pants. As an extra touch of luxury, the set comes packaged in a matching silk envelope. Anyone who knows Equipment will know that this is a three-for-one — the top can be worn day or night paired with denim, and the pants go great with a t-shirt and flats.”

Del Toro Red Sude Wingtips, $325

Del Toro Red Sude Wingtips, $325

“Exclusive to Stephanie’s, Del Toro is a Miami-based luxury brand. All products are handmade in Italy of the finest leather. These red wingtips are the perfect gift for someone seeking a refined, street-style look. I have a pair myself!”


Stephanie’s

7040 E. Indian School Rd., Scottsdale
(602) 508-0848
Facebook

Kendra Scott Color Bar

Kendra Scott Jewelry Boutique Opens At Scottsdale Quarter

Kendra Scott, founder of Kendra ScottNew to the Scottsdale Quarter is jewelry boutique Kendra Scott, known for its handcrafted and custom jewelry in bold color combinations. With a fan base that includes Eva Longoria, Cameron Diaz, Hilary Duff and Sofia Vergara, Kendra Scott is a global brand sold at retailers, including Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom and Bloomingdale’s, and has locations in both Texas and California. This is the first Arizona storefront for Kendra Scott.

“On our website, we were seeing a lot of customers coming out of the Phoenix/Scottsdale area,” says Owner Kendra Scott. “When we came down and visited Scottsdale Quarter, we were just blown away by the very synergistic brands, and when you look at the Scottsdale woman, she is a Kendra Scott girl; she’s fashionable, she’s put together, she’s fun, she’s outgoing, she has a great fashion sense, and she’s not afraid to express herself with her jewelry or her fashion. So we really felt this was the place for us.”

The boutique will introduce the Scottsdale-area shoppers to the Kendra Scott Color Bar™, with boasts multiple 55″ touch-screen display monitors, iPads and a kaleidoscope of 26 gemstones and 23 jewelry silhouettes in both gold and rhodium silver settings. Although online shoppers can find this on Kendra Scott’s website, the in-store feature provides customers a hands-on, interactive experience to customize one-of-a-kind jewelry.

“People have never seen anything like this,” Scott says, “and they can’t believe they can walk out within minutes with a custom piece of jewelry. We want people to be part of the design process, and our customers just love it.”

Scott adds that the Color Bar™ is a great way to create personalized, statement jewelry as gifts for friends and loved ones this holiday season.

“We help by finding out what her favorite colors are, her skin tone, her hair color,” Scott says. “We’re able to help people find the perfect gift for someone, and we want them to be wowed when they open it. And we usually do a pretty good job at that.”

Kendra Scott also offers space available to reserve for special events, including bridal parties.

“We have a lot of customers who will bring in their outfits that they’re trying to match or a dress that they’re wearing to an event to a party,” Scott says. “We do a lot of bridal parties, so the bride will pick her colors, and her bridesmaids pick the style that they want. We make it a fun event with champagne and cupcakes.”

Not only does Kendra Scott accommodate bridal parties, but customers and charities can also take part in Kendra Gives Back parties, where local charities and those who support them are able to come in to the store and have a shopping party, with 20 percent given back to that charity.

“In our company, we have three core values, which are family, fashion and philanthropy,” Scott says. “And giving back to the community where we have stores has been very, very important to us.

“We work with a lot of women’s and children’s charities, so if there’s an organization in this area that would like to do a Kendra Gives Back event, we’re always so thrilled to do that.”

For more information about Kendra Scott, including store hours, visit kendrascott.com.


Gift Picks:
Emerald green jewelry for your fashion-forward friends:

KENDRA SCOTT Emerald Green Jewelry
1. Valerie Necklace in Green Agate, $250; 2. Marcella Statement Necklace in Green, $175; 3. Tatum Earrings in Green, $95 (celeb favorite); 4. Abena Cuff Bracelet in Green, $150


Kendra Scott

Scottsdale Quarter
15147 N. Scottsdale Rd., #H-155
(480) 525-9265
kendrascott.com

Arizona Stronghold Vineyards' wines

Arizona Stronghold Vineyards Hosts 4th Quarter Wine Club Release At Firesky

This Saturday, December 15, Arizona Stronghold Vineyards is hosting a celebration complete with wine and light fair ― the 2012 4th Quarter Wine Club Release. During this special event held at Firesky Resort & Spa, guests will enjoy the tasting of two Arizona Stronghold Vineyard Site Archive wines as well as food from Taggia – Coastal Italian Cuisine & Cocktails, located in Old Town Scottsdale.

At the event, Arizona Stronghold Vineyards will be pouring its 2011 Nachise, 2011 Site Archive Riesling and 2011 Site Archive Bonita Springs Cabernet Pick 3. The two site archives will be available by the bottle at Taggia for a limited time.

Those at Arizona Stronghold Vineyards have planned the event in hopes to bring together Valley residents and Arizona Stronghold Vineyards Wine Club members to socialize and celebrate Arizona-made wine, which has had quite the impact on the state, pumping millions into the economy and drawing visitors from both in and out of state.

According to the Arizona Wine Tourism Industry Survey, produced for the Arizona Office of Tourism and conducted by Northern Arizona University’s Arizona Hospitality Research & Resource Center:

  • Arizona wine visitors had an estimated $22.7 million in direct expenditures, which resulted in an indirect economic impact of $4.3 million, and induced impacts of $10.5 million for a total industry economic impact of $37.6 million. Indirect business taxes based on direct expenditures produced an additional $5.9 million and the total economic impact supported 265 direct jobs and 140 indirect and induced jobs, for a total of 405 jobs.
  • Day visitors had an average of $149 in direct spending, with restaurant and grocery expenditures ($44) accounting for the largest portion.
  • Overnight visitors had average expenditures of $370, with lodging or camping ($140) comprising the single largest item.
  • In terms of county origins, Maricopa County contributes more than half (55%) of all wine visitors followed by Pima County (33%).
  • Almost one‐third (29.0%) of the sample have never visited an Arizona winery before, while 6.8 percent have visited 11 or more Arizona wineries in the past 12 months (average 4 visits/year).
  • More than four‐fifths (82.7%) of all respondents said that their experience at the winery or tasting room was either “a little better than I expected,” or “much better than I expected.” A glowing endorsement of the customer service and value of the experience.

Admission into Arizona Stronghold Vineyards’ event is free for Wine Club members and $10 for non-members. For more information about Arizona Stronghold Vineyards, visit azstronghold.com, call (928) 639-2789 ext. 206, or email wineclub@azstronghold.com.

Arizona Stronghold Vineyards 2012 4th Quarter Wine Club Release

When: Saturday, December 15, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: FireSky Resort & Spa
4925 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale
Tickets: Free (Arizona Stronghold Vineyards Wine Club members), $10 (non-members)
(Purchase tickets here.)

Dr. John Badolato, Studio B Smiles, Photo: Glory Shim

Dr. John Badolato Of Studio B Smiles Transforms Smiles, Lives Of Athletes

Putting on Their Game Face: Dr. John Badolato of Studio B Smiles transforms the smiles, lives of athletes and high-profile clients.


While sports players are revered for their talent, it can be difficult to deny the obvious: their looks, especially when they’re gracing the cover of magazines; appearing in local and national on-camera interviews; and marketing products, from Steve Nash in last year’s Vitamin Water commercials to Michael Phelps’ recent “Core Values” campaign for Louis Vuitton.

And here in Scottsdale, one cosmetic dentist in particular is familiar with the importance of an athlete’s image — Dr. John Badolato (or “Dr. B”), owner of Studio B Smiles.

Dr. B has been enhancing local sports players’ smiles for about eight years. Not only is he the official team dentist of the Phoenix Suns and the team dentist for the Arizona Rattlers, Grand Canyon University and the Phoenix Suns Dancers, but, let’s not forget, he’s also the Official Cosmetic Dentist for ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition.”

With so many high-profile clients, he knows image, particularly one’s smile, is important, both on and off the court.

“There’s two factors that over the last couple of decades have come into play,” Dr. B says. “One has always been there; that’s a player’s off-court and on-court marketability. These guys have side deals where they’re able to market their products, so, of course, they want to have a great smile. That plays into the cosmetic part of our practice.”

The other factor? High-definition television. “Those two things together have really developed a niche practice with us with a bunch of athletes,” Dr. B adds.

From veneers and whitening to smile makeovers, Dr. B has worked on MVPs of different leagues and sports, from hockey to baseball. But it all started with a soon-to-be Major League Baseball player’s wife, who would become the face of the practice as well as start a chain reaction of referrals.

“It’s been a thriving practice,” he says. “It’s great to do a makeover and then see them on the TV or news the next day.”

But don’t get the wrong idea. Dr. B is set out to do more than just transform one’s smile with procedures such as whitening, veneers or smile makeovers. He wants to help change lives, too. And that all began after a friend introduced him to Chris Powell, who is now the trainer and transformation specialist on “Extreme Makeover.”

“Chris and I got paired up through a friend because we both were in the makeover business; he was training the body, and I was doing the smiles,” Dr. B recalls. “So, we cross-referenced and built our own local makeover team.”

Fast forward through success stories that would catch the attention of national media, and the rest is history. “Extreme Makeover” will be airing its third season, increasing the number of participants from 8 to 17.

“It’s great to see these peoples’ lives change,” Dr. B says. “As they lose weight, as they reach milestones, they gain confidence, and you can just see it. It just glows off them as they go through this process.

“I’m a small part of it with the smiles, but when you put it all together, you just see these people, their potential and where their lives can go from there is radically different than they were 365 days prior,” Dr. B says. “When you can do something by changing their smile that has an impact on their overall self-confidence, their self-worth, their self-esteem, that reward is priceless.”

So just how does Badolato balance various sports teams, “Extreme Makeover,” Studio B Smiles, and an almost 1-year-old son?

“You make time,” Dr. B says. “It’s sometimes challenging, but at the end of the day, it’s totally worth it when you have a lovely wife and an incredible son.”

For more information about Dr. John Badolato and Studio B Smiles, visit studiobsmiles.com.


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A Fruity Fix

Need a quick and inexpensive way to whiten your smile?
Pick up some strawberries and baking soda, and give this a try:

studio b smiles
  1. Crush one strawberry to a pulp.
  2. Mix 1/2 tsp. of baking soda until blended.
  3. Spread mixture onto teeth; leave on for 5 min.
  4. Brush thoroughly with toothpaste to remove berry/baking soda mix.
  5. Voila! A white smile.

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Scottsdale Living Magazine Fall 2012

Sassy Golf expands to Scottsdale.

Denver-Based Sassy Golf Expands To Scottsdale, For Women Golfers Of All Levels

This fall, the links are providing more than just a place for men to swing a few rounds for some male bonding time and competitive play. Look closely, and you’ll find the ladies of Denver-based Sassy Golf, which has recently expanded to the Scottsdale area — providing an inviting, supportive environment for women golfers of all levels.

Nancy Collins, founder of Sassy GolfIt began four years ago when Nancy Collins, who was new to the Denver area at the time, was not only looking for affordable lessons, flexible golf schedules and places to golf, but also women who were just as busy and inexperienced at the game as she was.

Four years later, Sassy Golf’s membership grew to more than 470 members — offering an environment where women can learn the game together with its 45-minute, pre-game lessons; improve their skills at their own pace; socialize and have fun.

“Sassy Golf is all about ‘ease of entry’ and making the experience light, fun, non-competitive, while also learning the game,” Collins says.

“We succeeded when we were young with positive feedback and encouragement, so why does it have to stop now that we’re adults and juggling 100 things, and life gets so competitive and hard? So with Sassy Golf, I tell all the members to leave their tough days at the door and have fun — hence why I offer everyone a drink if they choose to have one.”

And women golfers in Scottsdale are already taking part. Sassy Golf, to date, has close to 70 members and growing daily, according to Collins. She says her goal is to have 150 members this season.

“We decided to expand to Scottsdale for two reasons,” Collins says. “One, because it has the opposite season as Denver. Denver is May 1st to mid-October, and Scottsdale is mid-October to May 1st; so we can be open 12 months out of the year. And two, Scottsdale is the mecca of the golf industry in the U.S. I wanted it to expand here to earn the respect of my peers and the industry leaders. Being here is like being at the Super Bowl for golf.”

Yearly memberships are $249 and include a “play and pay” feature where members can play as few or as many rounds of golf as they would like; monthly, 18-hole, co-ed rounds; free golf clinics and equipment demos; discounts on golf gear and clothing; complimentary membership goodies and more. Corporate memberships are also available for groups of 10 or more.
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For those women interested in learning the game of golf, Collins offers these do’s and don’ts:

Do:

  • Pick up your ball in-between shots when you think you may be taking too long.
  • Drive past the green when putting so that if/when there’s a foursome close behind you, you don’t waste time and can be out of their way to hit.
  • Keep score if you choose to, but don’t hold up the game or make anyone else keep score if they don’t want to. It’s up to the individual.
  • Always be nice and respect each other, and always help each other out. We are or were all newbies at one point.
  • Always have fun, laugh, and pay it forward!

Don’t:

  • Talk when others are hitting the ball.
  • Take longer than a couple minutes to find your lost balls.
  • Walk on someone’s line on the putting green.
  • Mark your ball every time on the putting green.
  • Keep score if you don’t want to. We aren’t the pros, so keep it light and fun!

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For more information about Sassy Golf, visit sassygolf.net.

improper golf swings

Rough Play: How Improper Golf Swings Can Leave Risk For Injury

Don’t be fooled by the seemingly tame appearance of a game of golf; the physical activity involved on the golfers’ end can leave risk for injury if the correct precautions aren’t taken.

In 2009, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reported that there were more than 55,000 visits to hospital emergency rooms for golf-related injuries. And according to Dr. Adam Downs, D.C., owner of Mountain Vista Health Center, roughly 60 percent of avid golfers will sustain some sort of injury within the next year with the percentage increasing by about 20 percent the older people get.

So why are golfers so susceptible to injury? Two reasons: 1) an improper golf swing, and 2) lack of warm-up and strength training.

Downs, Eric D. Marcotte, owner and chiropractor at Endurance Chiropractic, LLC, and Doug Hammond, director of instruction at Troon North Golf Club, all agree that a proper golf swing is important to avoid an injury on the course. Downs says most amateur golfers have injuries related to poor technique — roughly 70 percent of all injuries.

“Proper golf posture at setup already creates a tremendous amount of load on the lumbar spine,” Hammond says. “If a person is in poor golf posture and increases that load, there becomes a serious risk for an injury to the back.”

According to Downs and Marcotte, the top four injuries include the aforementioned back pain as well as golfer’s elbow (medial or lateral elbow), shoulder injuries and hip injuries. Downs adds that these are common throughout all ages of golfers, with back pain and strain the most common.

Wrist, hand and shoulder injuries can be caused by an off-set grip or swinging the club too upright in the backswing.

“A person who swings the club too upright in the backswing usually will create a steep angle of attack into the golf ball on the downswing, causing the club to crash into the ground,” Hammond says. “This crash can cause a serious wrist injury — common in ladies — or elbow tendinitis over time.”

To improve one’s swing and address swing faults, golfers should take lessons, practice, train, condition and warm-up properly before a game — a step Downs says most golfers don’t take. Take care of your joints, shoulders, knees, hips, elbows and wrists through drills, practice techniques and maintaining range of motion; keep blood flowing through these areas.

Marcotte adds that golfers should work on different areas when training for different shots and swings. For instance, focus on balance for bunker shots and uneven lies; flexibility for increased torque and power generation through the trunk and hips; hand-eye coordination for ball striking and ball contact; strengthening for improved lumbar and LE stabilization; and focus on cardiovascular exercise for stamina and generalized conditioning.

While some may believe there’s no perfect golf swing, one can sure try through training, consistency and simply taking care of one’s self — on and off the course.

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Injuries Par For The Course

Golf-related injuries are more common than one may think. The repetitive motions over time can place significant stress on muscles, tendons and joints. Here are some prevention tips, provided by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS):

Prevent Golfer’s Elbow

Strengthen your forearm muscles:

  • Squeeze a tennis ball for five minutes at a time.
  • Wrist curls using a lightweight dumbbell: Perform 10 repetitions with each arm by curling the weight from your fingertips to your palm, followed by curling up your wrist to lift the weight an inch or two higher.
  • Reverse wrist curls using a lightweight dumbbell: Place your hands in front of you, palm side down. Using your wrist, lift the weight up and down. Hold the arm that you are exercising above your elbow with your other hand in order to limit the motion to your forearm. Perform 10 repetitions with one arm and then repeat with the other arm.

Prevent Lower Back Pain

Strengthen lower back muscles:

  • Rowing: Perform three sets of 10 repetitions at least three times a week.
  • Pull Downs: Perform three sets of 10 repetitions at least three times a week.
  • Yoga and Pilates: These programs focus on trunk and abdomen strength and flexibility.

Prevent Foot Injuries

  • Insert orthotics in your golf shoes to help stabilize the feet and establish a healthier contact with the ground during the swing.

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For more information about correcting improper golf swings, visit:

Endurance Chiropractic, LLC
9376 E. Bahia, Scottsdale
(480) 556-8406
endurancerehab.com

Troon North Golf Club
10320 E. Dynamite Blvd., Scottsdale
(480) 585-5300
troonnorthgolf.com

Mountain Vista Health Center
1375 N. Scottsdale Rd., #180, Scottsdale
(480) 874-9800
docdowns.com

Scottsdale Living Magazine Fall 2012

Engagement Rings, Hamra Jewelers

Engagement Rings 2013: What Does Your Ring Say About You?

According to statistics released by TheKnot.com and WeddingChannel.com, the most popular month to get engaged is December (16 percent). And, another statistic shows that 65 percent of brides are somewhat involved in the ring selection, with nearly a third (31 percent) “very involved” — i.e., they shopped for and/or purchased the ring with the groom.

“From a jeweler’s perspective, this really means that the men we have the pleasure of working with throughout the engagement ring selection process have a good idea of what their brides-to-be want and are able to select a ring with confidence that their significant other will cherish,” says Paul Hamra of Hamra Jewelers.

Now and through 2013, it’s all about individuality, according to Jeff Hamra of Hamra Jewelers. He adds that brides-to-be favor something unique or something that tells a story, encompassing the couple’s journey together.

“All of these details are great strides taken for originality and distinction in an engagement ring,” Jeff says. “2013 will be all about fancy-shaped center stones ― particularly pear- and cushion-shaped, fancy-colored diamonds, halo-style mountings and diamonds set in rose gold.”

For those brides-to-be lending a hand in the ring-selection process, ask yourselves: What will your engagement ring say about you?

Here are the six types of engagement rings for 2013 and what they say about your style and your relationship:

Classic Prong Ring Set, Hamra Jewelers

Classic prong set ring

“This type of ring is perfect for the bride who desires simple elegance,” Jeff says. “Her style is classic, sophisticated and elegant at the same time. She is a traditionalist at heart and is truly devoted to the commitment she is making. She is sure to have a marriage that will stand the test of time.”

Pave Design, Tacori emerald cut, Hamra Jewelers

Pave design

“This type of ring is perfect for the bride who wants to wear a contemporary heirloom,” Jeff says. “She is the girl who has been dreaming of her perfect ring for years. She wants to feel like a princess on her wedding day, and she is truly a romantic at heart. Her marriage is certain to include many candlelit dinners and romantic strolls along the beach.”

Halo Style, Henri Daussi cushion halo, Hamra Jewelers

Halo style

“This type of ring is perfect for the girl who loves sophistication and sparkle,” Jeff says. “She wants her friends to adore her ring as much as she does. You will often catch her gazing at the beauty of her own ring. She leads a well-balanced life, and as a result, her relationship is sure to have the perfect symmetry of stability and fun.”

Fancy-Colored Center Stone, Hamra Jewelers

Fancy-colored center stones

“From fancy yellow diamonds to Ceylon sapphires, this bride wants a unique statement piece,” Jeff says. “She is an original and wants her ring to reflect the same. She usually falls in love with her stone first and views her mounting as a pedestal upon which to display the beautiful center stone she has selected. Her relationship is the center of her world, and she is truly devoted to making it last for a lifetime.”

Modern Design, Hamra Jewelers

Modern design

“This bride views her ring as a work of art,” Jeff says. “She is free spirited and enjoys life. She has a unique sense of style, and her ring reflects this as well. She is open to new ideas and is sure to have a relationship that will include plenty of adventure and excitement.”

Twist Design, Hamra Jewelers

Twist design

“This girl loves the symbolism behind her ring,” Jeff says. “She wants it to be a true representation of her and her husband’s union together. She is marrying her best friend and wholeheartedly believes she and her husband are two separate individuals who will be intertwined as one, together, forever.”

For more information about Hamra Jewelers and its upcoming events, including a meet and greet with internationally renowned jewelry designer Charles Krypell on Nov. 2-3, visit Hamra Jeweler’s Facebook page or website.

Hamra Jewelers Meet & Greet
When: Friday, Nov. 2 from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 3 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: 15435 N. Scottsdale Rd., #130, Scottsdale
Contact: (480) 946-5110

Yours Truly, Me

Yours Truly, Me Offers Unique Gift Shopping, Concierge Service

With just a couple months until Christmas, it’s been said that it’s never too early to begin holiday gift shopping. But for those who are guilty of either waiting until the last minute or just dislike shopping altogether, navigating through malls and even online shopping can prove stressful. So, why not have someone else do it for you?

Yours Truly, Me owner Cat KozuchMeet Yours Truly, Me — a recently-launched, personal gift shopper and assistant service in Scottsdale. Opened on October 1st, Yours Truly, Me’s owner Cat Kozuch always had a passion for special occasions and giving gifts.

“From baby diaper cakes and gift baskets, to themed gift boxes, my friends would ask me, ‘How do you come up with these awesome gift ideas?’,” Kozuch says. “With a smile, I would tell them, ‘It just comes naturally.’ ”

So, after years of creative gift giving, Kozuch launched Yours Truly, Me, specializing in unique gift giving tailored to her clients’ individual needs.

Do you feel there’s a large need for personal gift shoppers and assistants in the Scottsdale area?

Of course! With the fast-paced professional lifestyles of today, more and more people have limited time to dedicate to finding that special gift for that special someone. Holding down a full-time job, raising children, traveling for business and maintaining a household doesn’t seem to leave enough hours in the day to get everything done. That’s why many people are now opting for our personal gift shoppers and assistants to step in to give them a hand and fulfill gift requests for any occasion, grocery shop, run errands and more. Whether our clients contact us two weeks in advance or two hours in advance, they can always count on us.

How has business been so far?

We officially opened on October 1, 2012 and we haven’t been bored since. We have several clients already sending us Christmas lists! We receive referral after referral … fortunately word of mouth is spreading through the Scottsdale area, and we are thrilled to take on more clients this holiday season.

What makes Yours Truly, Me stand apart from the rest of the personal shoppers in the area?

When we establish a relationship with a client, we send them an exclusive questionnaire that helps us come up with the perfect gift that tailors to our client’s wants and needs. We want all our clients to feel special, so we create gifts that are not only beautiful on the inside, but the presentation on the outside is equally as elegant and creatively put together.

Our services aren’t just about personally choosing gifts for our clients; sometimes our clients already know what they want so they give us a call, email us their gift lists, and our personal gift shoppers pick up all the items on their list, elegantly wrap them and conveniently deliver them to the client’s home or office or ship the gifts if required.

Why should people consider soliciting the help of a personal gift shopper?

If you look at your Christmas list and feel overwhelmed, or maybe it’s your friend’s 40th birthday, and you don’t want to disappoint them with a lackluster gift, a personal gift shopper can take away the stress that comes with purchasing a gift. Our personal gift shoppers specialize in finding gifts for children, adults and pets. They keep up with the latest trends, and at times they can get their hands on exclusive products that a non-personal gift shopper can’t. It’s also nice to have a personal gift shopper on speed dial, especially when you forget it’s your mother’s birthday, and you need an emergency gift delivered to your home or office immediately!

Also, having a personal gift shopper for your business can benefit you significantly. No matter what is happening in the economy, business owners and executives give gifts to show appreciation to their employees, clients and customers. This is a great way for businesses to keep relationships with clients. Letting a personal gift shopper provide those special clients with gifts will help businesses maintain close relationships with others.

Give five tips to help take the stress out of gift shopping:

  1. Don’t overthink it! Many times we overthink gift giving. We think we need to make a huge purchase in order to make the recipient happy. Wrong! Sometimes you just need to take a moment and listen. Listen to what the recipient likes; listen to what they want, and listen to what they need. Go from there. Pick a gift idea from the information you have already gathered. Listening goes along way when it comes to gifts and can normally be used instead of something big, glamorous and expensive.
  2. If you’re afraid the recipient wont like the one big gift you chose for them, then diversify! Instead of wrapping one big gift, buy several little gifts and elegantly wrap them together ― you’re bound to make the recipient happy with at least one of them.
  3. Think outside of the box! What gift has never been purchased for them before? Think of something so unique that there’s no chance of them having ever received such a gift. For example: Register a star in the recipient’s name, take them on a surprise helicopter tour, or put them in a hot air balloon. It’ll more than likely be a first!
  4. Take advantage of online shopping! This will take away a lot of the stress of going through mall crowds and wasting time walking around department stores. Online shopping helps you quickly compare prices and might also give you the option of having the gift wrapped before delivery to the recipient. Shopping online can even help you cut costs. There are many coupon code websites that can help you attain free shipping, discounts, rebates and other online incentives making it easier to stick with your gifting budget.
  5. Stick to a budget! It doesn’t make sense to rack up a ton of credit-card debt when giving a gift. Window shop before you make a purchase. Be sure to compare prices to other stores. Take advantage of coupons, sales and special discounts ― these options can save you money in the long run, and you can use the money you saved to make another purchase.

What mistakes do people often make when shopping for gifts?

One of the major mistakes people make is waiting until the last minute to find a gift. The worst gifts and worst prices are usually a result of running to the mall minutes before handing over a gift to the recipient. There is nothing worse than frantically running around hoping you will find something the recipient will like. The feeling of stress will burden you as you try to find a decent present for your family or friends, and you will pick something that isn’t personal. Avoid this gift-shopping mistake by putting a reminder in your phone a week prior to when you actually need the gift.

Another major mistake many shoppers make is going overboard on a gift. Always remember, it’s the thought that counts ― NOT the price tag. Most people would prefer a well-thought-out gift that perfectly matches their unique personality and interests to something you bought simply for how big the price tag was.

What do you love about helping people find gifts for the holiday season?

My favorite part about helping people find gifts is the look in their eyes when I find exactly what they hoped for, but they never imagined. When the gift exceeds their expectations, and I hear the excitement in their voice and see joy in their eyes, it melts my heart and makes me very proud. The feeling of appreciation is priceless!

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Yours Truly, Me provides services not all gift shoppers provide. We uniquely wrap gifts and adorn them with bows, jewels, buttons, flowers ― whatever theme you are going for, we will have something special to embellish your gift box with. We also have a concierge service that conveniently picks up and delivers gifts straight to your home or office. Check out our additional unique services on our website yourstrulyme.com.

Yours Truly, Me Yours Truly, Me Yours Truly, Me Yours Truly, Me

For more information about Yours Truly, Me, visit yourstrulyme.com.

Tim Harris, co-owner of Relics Architectural Home & Garden

Relics Celebrates 10 Years Of Business, Travel And Antiques

From accountant to curator, from the cubicle to international flights — when Tim Harris of Relics Architectural Home & Garden in Phoenix gets restless and craves change, he does more than enlist a new hobby. He switches careers.

“We wanted to have more independence, a creative outlet and a chance to travel,” Harris says. Thus, Relics was born from a love of antiques, culture and travel by Todd Zillweger and Harris.

And, 10 years later, Relics continues to thrive as a 12,000-square-foot showroom of European architectural salvage and garden antiques.

Front view of a pair of antique iron gryphons at Relics.Five to six times a year, Harris and Zillweger travel to Europe, collecting antiquities from auctions, country fairs, private individuals dealing from their homes, and shops in the cities — snapping photos of every item along the way.

“We started out traveling to Europe about four times a year, then five times, then a couple years at six times a year — every two Marble sink basins with antique iron legs at Relics.months,” Harris says. “We were at a point where we had to expand to keep up.

“In the beginning, we would fill a 40-foot container from maybe two or three vendors,” he adds. “Now, we might fill a container with probably 30 different stops. We’re on the road for maybe 10 to 12 hours a day.”

Harris adds that their need for expansion was due to their ability to carefully hand-select the best pieces for their clients.

“The reason why we succeeded and continued to succeed, even through the recession, is we’ve always been prudent about our Hand-carved French limestone fountains installed in a client's home.choices,” Harris says. “We always think about things carefully. That’s really been a key and a factor of our success.

“We try to be sensitive to selecting things that we think will appeal to a broad audience, but then again, what we do is very specialized,” he adds. “Not everybody wants an antique chandelier or antique armoire. It’s a smaller market, so we just try to educate our clients to understand why things cost more and what can you compare it to.”

But Zillweger and Harris don’t just have an eye for discovering and selecting timeless and salvageable antiques, including limestone wall fountains, fountain spouts and faucets, sinks, chandeliers, religious Cast bronze faucet with escutcheon — popular for powder rooms.artifacts and decorative ironwork, the showroom itself is a clean and organized work of art — one that customers have compared to a museum, according to Harris.

Relics’ customers are comprised of Paradise Valley and Scottsdale residents and designers, with about half of its customers from out-of-state. This out-of-state customer base has lead Zillweger and Harris to put more work into Relics’ website, keeping its inventory up-to-date. Relics even has its own in-house photography studio where every item is photographed for the website.

“We realize how much business the website is generating, and we launched a new website this spring,” Harris says. “But it’s important when somebody is not here, and you’re trying to help them make their buying decisions by a photo and data that you provide. I find that most often people will see our advertising somewhere out of state, then they’ll visit Arizona so they can stop here and identify with who we are and what we do. Then there’s a trust that’s developed. After that, they’ll feel comfortable buying directly from the website.”

Items that have become popular among out-of-state customers? Relics’ custom sinks.

“We’ll buy antique marble basin, and I’ll work with my blacksmith, and we’ll fabricate custom sinks,” Harris says. “They’re big sellers; we sell a lot of them to Californians and Texans.”

To kick off its 10 years in business, consisting of traveling, building relationships abroad, repurposing and restoring items and sharing the stories of the antiques with their customers, both in and out of state, Relics not only welcomed its 50th container, which arrived last week, but it will also host events beginning January. The events will include a monthly salon series where speakers such as landscape architects and builders will cover a variety of topics through the spring.

For more information about Relics Architects Home & Garden and its events, visit relicsaz.com.

Relics Architects Home & Garden
Where: 839 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Contact: (602) 265-7354
Online: relicsaz.com
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Fall fashion trends

Cocktail Couture: Fall Fashion Trends

Cocktail Couture: This year’s fall fashion trends take the tried-and-true and turn it up a notch.


Designers this fall set out to correct a few misconceptions for this fall season’s fashion trends:

Misconception: Fall fashion calls for dark colors.

As we saw with the spring and summer months, the brighter the ensemble, the better. And it isn’t any different for the fall season — albeit, we aren’t talking DayGlo bright. Tone it down, and go for honey gold, tangerine, chartreuse, rose and especially blue. Donna Karan, Marc Jacobs and Herve Leger, to name a few, all rocked the blue hue on the runway.

Fall fashion trends
fall fashion trends fall fashion trends fall fashion trends Fall fashion trends

Misconception: Tweed doesn’t flatter.

When you have Michael Kors working with the woolen, flecked fabric, you’re left with garments that are more than just a replication or recreation of your grandmother’s tweed dress collection. Kors knows how to take this classic fall statement borrowed through the years and transform it into an elegant and timeless look. Pair it with some Manolo Blahnik pumps, and you have a match made in couture heaven.

fall fashion trends
fall fashion trends fall fashion trends fall fashion trends fall fashion trends

Misconception: Leather is not Arizona-friendly.

OK, this one is true — especially in the summer months — but this fall, break some rules during the cooler, early-winter months. Leather is found in nearly every designer’s collection — whether it’s a leather dress, leather accessories … you name it. For something a bit understated but sexy, give Jean Paul Gaultier’s tough, sleek leather bodice pencil dress a chance. With such a simple design and shape, dress it up with standout shoes and accessories.

fall fashion trends
fall fashion trends fall fashion trends fall fashion trends fall fashion trends

Misconception: Men couldn’t care less about what they wear.

Come on; if this were true, we wouldn’t have custom clothiers out there, like Astor & Black, providing tailored, personalized looks for men of all ages. Ladies, now that you’re ready for your next cocktail party, charity event, holiday party or even your next date night, ensure the man in your life looks just as great. And anything that looks like it came straight from Mad Men will always do.

fall fashion trends
fall fashion trends fall fashion trends fall fashion trends fall fashion trends

Meet the Team:

Makeup artist: Joanna Avillar for Mane Attraction Salon, maneattractionsalon.com
Hair stylist: Randee Miller for Mane Attraction Salon, maneattractionsalon.com
Male Stylist: Katie McEndoo of Astor & Black, (310) 259-4406
Female Stylist: Kira Brown, fashionphoenix.com
Location: Orange Sky at Talking Stick Resort, 9800 E. Indian Bend Rd., (480) 850-8606, talkingstickresort.com
Women’s dresses, shoes and accessories: Nordstrom, Scottsdale Fashion Square, 7014 E. Camelback, (480) 941-2140, nordstrom.com
Suits: Astor & Black, astorandblack.com; Shoes: Allen Edmonds ‘Clifton’ Oxford, Nordstrom

Scottsdale Living Magazine Fall 2012

skin cancer

The Burning Issue of Sun Damage, Skin Cancer

By Kristine Cannon & Remi Omodara

Summer: the season for temporary solutions — such as that crash diet to slim down for your leave-little-to-the-imagination bikini; and, let’s not forget about those days spent tanning either on the beach or in the tanning booth, just for a bit more color.

While some bad habits can be forgiven and forgotten, others can lead to long-term damage, such as skin cancers.

“They’re going to get a temporary tan,” says Dr. Lorna Frederickson, M.D., FAAD of Arizona Skincare Physicians, PLC, “but sustain permanent injury to their skin. You can’t really repair all of the cell damage.”

According to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS), there were more than 2.6 million skin cancer treatments in 2011 performed by ASDS members in the United States, with 2.49 million of them for non-melanomas.

Closer to home, Frederickson says the number of skin cancers they’ve diagnosed and treated at the practice has increased. She goes on to say that women as early in their 20s are developing multiple skin cancers, likely due to tanning bed use.

“Natural or indoor tanning is probably the leading contributing cause to aging of the skin,” Frederickson says. “It’s something people should stop doing, not just for the photo damage, freckling, loss of elasticity and wrinkling, but also because of skin cancer risks.”

And once those in their late 30s or 40s has endured an excess of sun or tanning bed exposure, racking up a fair amount of skin damage, Frederickson says one of the best ways to treat it is with laser treatment.

One of the most common laser treatments at Arizona Skincare Physicians is Fraxel Dual 1550/1927, which stimulates the growth of new, healthy skin cells from the inside out. It targets aging and sun-damaged skin with microscopic laser columns that penetrate deep into one’s skin to expedite the body’s remodeling of collagen. And according to Scottsdale plastic surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Ptak M.D., F.A.C.S., collagen is an important element to younger, healthier skin.

“The skin is like a sponge,” Ptak says. “Loss of collagen combined with sun damage can age the skin quickly.”

Frederickson adds that both young and older patients, who have discoloration from the sun, pre-cancers, blotchiness and freckling, can benefit from the Fraxel Dual laser treatment due to how safe it is and its minimal downtime.

“It’s great for younger patients because they don’t need aggressive lasers,” Frederickson says. “I will also use it on patients in their 80s because they don’t want a lot of downtime, or they have a lot of medial issues — or for a whole host of issues.”

To avoid skin cancer risks and sun-damaged skin, Frederickson says to not only stay away from indoor tanning, but to also not smoke.

“The only other thing besides ultraviolet light is smoking,” Frederickson says, “and the two together have a negative synergy and magnify one another’s ill effects.”

Other tips from Ptak to keep your skin hydrated and healthy include decreasing caffeine intake, drinking more water and using sunscreen.

Lastly, Frederickson advises to consult a skincare professional with any questions or concerns you may have, as well as for smaller, noninvasive treatments, such as botulinum injections or Botox.

“I see a fair number of women who have gone outside of a core speciality,” Frederickson adds. “I’m negative about the many spas because I end up fixing a lot of problems out of there.”

For more information about sun damage and/or skin cancer, visit azskincareplc.com or doctorptak.com.

Arizona Skincare Physicians, PLC
10565 N. Tatum Blvd., Paradise Valley
(480) 991-3203

Jeffrey J. Ptak M.D., F.A.C.S., Plasic Surgery
9431 E. Ironwood Square Dr., Scottsdale
(480) 451-9220

Scottsdale Living Magazine Fall 2012

Red Mountain trailhead, Photo: Kristine Cannon

The Fall And Ensuing Therapy Session On Red Mountain

The walls of Red Mountain feel entirely too far apart at this point. I could feel myself breaking into a cold sweat. The orange-hued walls tower above me; the sunlight receding until it leaves me in the mountain’s chilly shadow.

That’s all this place was anyway – a large cave, it felt. Really, it’s a volcano with a natural amphitheater cut into it. And I felt trapped. I was left battling for my bones, even my life, to be spared.

Red Mountain, Photo: Kristine Cannon

Red Mountain, about 25 miles north of Flagstaff, is where Frank and I decided to spend our Saturday afternoon. This popular hiking site is definitely a kid-friendly, easy stroll, but this trail had never scared me quite this much before — because I decided to take a risk.

My footing slips a little bit, setting loose tiny rocks and kicking up a small cloud of dirt and heightened fear. My breathing and heartbeat quicken its pace. The rocks descending down the slick, steep slope aren’t nearly as audible now. They’ve been falling for a while, it seems …

Frank reminds me to hold on, that he’s going to pull me back up. I had to muster up the courage to move from my face down, arms-and-legs-outstretched position, clinging for dear life.

And then I lose my footing.

A shrilling shriek echoes through the amphitheater.

“Hold on!”

Adrenaline is pumping through my veins; I can’t feel anything but my feet sliding against the wall while trying desperately to stop this epic fall. I can’t hear anything but the rocks from above, below and alongside us falling rapidly down the slope. I can’t see anything but Frank clouded in the kicked-up dirt, tightly gripping my arm.

My eyes close, and suddenly we’re stopped, about 25 feet above level ground. It felt like it lasted minutes, but I’m sure it lasted a mere 15 seconds … maybe even less.

Our heavy breathing slows to a steady pace. “Well, we’re not dead,” I thought to myself, “But, whoa, what a rush!”

Red Mountain, Photo: Kristine Cannon

I’m not an adrenaline junkie by any means, but that was the first time in my life I had experienced something so frightening yet thrilling and exciting. I swore I would walk away with at least a broken finger. Instead, I walked away with an incredibly painful gash in my forearm, cuts and scratches all over my legs, and a newfound respect for safe hiking.

I can safely say this was the most amazing, exciting, scary, wonderful, fun experience I’ve ever had in Arizona. Yes, I walked away bruised and battered, but aren’t those technically the most memorable experiences one could have?

And I mean really memorable … you remember the pain, the fear, the rush, the innocent hike preceding the horrendous fall, the nervous laughter afterward and overcoming the fear of taking a chance and stepping foot onto that mountain ever again. [I eventually did.]

Red Mountain, Photo: Kristine Cannon

But that’s life.

You never know what will happen the next minute. You never know you’ve made a mistake until you’re experiencing the repercussions of it. But the real test is how you handle it all — the fall and the aftermath.

On Red Mountain, I didn’t expect a cathartic experience. I expected to have a few hours of “getting away from it all” but ended up with a different take on life.

So, Frank helped me stand up on my shaky, unstable legs; I brushed myself of the dirt and debris, took a sigh of relief and thought to myself, “I’ll get back on this mountain soon … and this won’t happen again. And if it does, then I can call myself an idiot.”