Author Archives: Monique Zatcoff

About Monique Zatcoff

Monique Zatcoff is an intern for AZ Big Media and a sophomore print journalism student at Arizona State University. She is currently a freelancer for the Catholic Sun Newspaper and has also written as a columnist for ASU's newspaper, The State Press. After college she hopes to pursue a career in magazine writing.

Delete Exterior Shot

Delete Tattoo Removal Salon Erases The Past

Excuses for not getting an unwanted tattoo removed may be a thing of the past with the opening of the Valley’s first free-standing tattoo removal salon.

Delete Tattoo Removal and Laser Salon, which opened Nov. 8, uses three-wavelength technology combined with Alex TriVantage laser treatment that is safe, effective and affordable.

Owner and founder Marci Zimmerman got the idea for her business while at a spring training baseball game two years ago.

“There were a lot of bad tattoos out there and I said to my friends, ‘That’s going to be a huge business,’” she says. “It was just one of those things that stuck in my head and I couldn’t let it go.”

Zimmerman, two doctors, and three trained technicians are helping clients take the next step in removing unwanted body ink.

The process begins with a complimentary consultation where patients sit down with a doctor to discuss treatments, costs, risk factors and pain reduction options.

Next, a photo is taken to track the removal progress.  Patients are given protective eyewear that is worn throughout the laser procedure and are asked to choose from a variety of pain-numbing options.

“We can either do cold air, ice, a topical numbing or an anesthetic numbing injection that goes under the surface of the skin,” says Dr. Julie Keiffer, medical director and supervisor for Delete. “Most clients choose the anesthetic. They feel a little needle stick and slight discomfort and then they don’t feel anything.”

After each session, patients wait four to six weeks before coming back for another round. The number of treatments and cost both depend on the amount of ink, colors and the location of the tattoo.

Zimmerman says that Delete specifically targets 29- to 45-year-olds who are going through a change in life, whether it is marriage, children or a new job. Clients also include those who never liked their tattoo to begin with and want it removed.

“It’s a need out there and no one deserves to live with something permanently if there’s the technology out there to remove it,” she says.

Samya Cochran, 35, a mother of two, says she felt that it was time to remove two of her tattoos after being overlooked several times for modeling jobs because of her body art.

“It just wasn’t my style anymore,” she says. “I wanted my skin back and I’m just over-the-moon thrilled that this is getting done.”

In addition to its tattoo removal services, Delete also removes unwanted pigment spots on the body such as freckles or birthmarks.

As a sponsor of the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, the company launched All Clear, a complimentary removal service for breast cancer survivors that removes the small mark left from the radiation site.

The removal salon is the company’s first location, but Zimmerman says she hopes to expand and eventually franchise Delete nationally.

“The more salons we have the bigger our messaging can be,” she says. “It’s a huge gamble but I really believe if we provide a superior product at a superior price, great results and great costumer service, then we’ve got a winner.”

IPic Theaters Image

IPic Theater In Scottsdale Quarter To Offer New Movie-Going Experience

A traditional night out at the movies will be redefined in Scottsdale this December after the opening of IPic Theaters.

The new, eight-auditorium cinema will seat between 71 and 91 people per theater featuring plush seats, pillows, blankets and state-of-the art technology.

IPic movie goers will have the option of choosing between two types of seating: premium seats will feature 30-inch leather chairs or Gold Class seats with custom recliners and foot rests that also offer food-and-beverage service during the movie as well as complimentary popcorn and valet parking.

Dining selections will include a seasonal menu, a 60-bottle wine list, cocktails, beer, breads, salads and desserts. Food and beverage service is available before or after the movie. Those items may also be brought directly into the theater.

A smart phone application is in the works that will enable guests to order food from their seat.
“We will give them as little or as much service as they want,” says Mark Mulcahy, Vice President of Marketing for IPic Theaters. “We’re trying to make sure the people who come in have the greatest experience possible.”

The theater’s opening couldn’t have come at a better time. Its Dec. 17 date will allow it to benefit from the holiday season’s offering of such first-run films including Little Fockers, Tron and True Grit. In an effort to promote a more stress-free environment for its viewers, iPic will not show pre-movie advertisements on the screen.

Apart from bringing an upscale form of movie-going to the Scottsdale area, the theater is also a boon the economy by creating 150 new jobs.

Open-call interviews will be held daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. until all positions are filled. Positions include sales and marketing, guest services, and bartending. All new employees will go through a three-week training session.  Training will include educating workers on proper food and wine pairing.
In addition to providing jobs, the theater hopes to further boost the economy by bringing in more business to the surrounding Scottsdale area.

“This is a movie town,” Mulcahy says. “It will be a great asset to Scottsdale’s night life and will increase business for the Scottsdale Quarter as well as driving people over here for movies.”

Until its Dec. 17 opening, IPic is offering a free movie ticket for those who sign up online for its membership services. Members will also receive discounts for online advanced ticket purchases, member-only movie screenings along with weekday promotional events.

“They’re just going to have a better night out,” Mulcahy says. “People like to go out and people like to eat and we’re bringing it all to them.”

For more information on IPic Theaters or to sign up for membership services visit www.ipictheaters.com.

CrossFit Push Up

Building A Better Body And Community

Plastered against the windows of the entrance to an intense workout company in Scottsdale is a sign that reads: Motivated People Only.

CrossFit Scottsdale, started by husband-and-wife team Luke and Najla Kayyem in 2008, is striving to provide the best results to their clients while building a positive community atmosphere.

The CrossFit method shies away from typical workouts seen at traditional gyms. Instead, it focuses on sessions that involve strength and conditioning training programs with exercises that are executed at high intensity.

“It may look a little intimidating, but we scale everything,” says Najla Kayyem, co-owner and coach. “We’ve got a very wide spectrum of skill-level, from at-home moms to military personnel; everybody can benefit.”

Classes are led by one of the three coaches and workouts are kept under an hour. Some are even as short as 10 minutes, depending on the intensity level. Routines are constantly varied so that different muscle groups are worked and progress can be made.

CrossFit Scottsdale features a new Workout of the Day, or WOD, which often is named after a CrossFit member. The WOD is performed in class as directed by a coach and can also be found online for those who are unable to make it to class.

All of the coaches at CrossFit are trained to enforce basic nutrition policies to their students. Members are taught that proper nutrition maximizes recovery and refuels their body after workouts.

“Accountability is big here,” said Tiffany Divelbiss, CrossFit nutritionist and coach. “Whether it’s showing me a food journal or talking to me about what they ate, it helps our clients stick to their plans.”

Food and Fuel classes are offered for free along with cooking seminars that suggest quick and easy food to pack for on-the-go meals.

CrossFit Scottsdale even offers members a chance to meet with a coach for one-on-one grocery shopping at Trader Joe’s to help choose the right foods to fuel their bodies.

Not only is nutritional support readily available to members, but CrossFit Scottsdale also works to foster a strong sense of community.

While stretching out before the WOD, new and returning members introduce themselves and tell how long they have been attending CrossFit Scottsdale.

Along with building community, accountability is highly valued.

“We have agreements with them,” Najla Kayyem says. “We’ll call, e-mail, or even call them out on Facebook; anything to help them achieve their goals.”

At the end of each workout, members record their personal fitness goals and time frames on a whiteboard that is openly displayed so that they can be held accountable.

“It was really difficult for me to get started,” says Don Wong, who has been going to CrossFit Scottsdale for more than a year. “But being a part of this community and people who are motivating and encouraging has really helped me reach my goals.”

CrossFit Scottsdale Connections, a once a month networking event held over lunch, creates even more of a sense of community among coaches and members.

During lunch, members and coaches learn about each other’s professional lives in addition to their fitness life and network their businesses with one another.

CrossFit Scottsdale also offers a kids program that focuses on teaching teamwork, fitness and nutrition at a young age.

“We’re changing people’s lives,” Divelbiss says. “They’re not here for a workout. They’re here for a full lifestyle change and because of that we get results really quickly.”

CrossFit Scottsdale memberships run between $99 and $289 a month. For more information visit www.crossfitscottsdale.com or call (480) 922-3253.

CrossFit Workout

CrossFit Workouts

Fifth Annual Arizona Entrepreneurship Conference

Fifth Annual Arizona Entrepreneurship Conference

Arizona Entrepreneurs Hold Fifth Annual Meeting Of The Minds

Join in for an exciting opportunity to connect, share ideas and be inspired at the fifth annual Arizona Entrepreneurship Conference.

This year’s conference, which will take place Wednesday Nov. 17, 2010 at the Desert Willow Conference Center, will feature tips and ideas from expert CEOs while also providing allotted time for networking with fellow entrepreneurs.

Over the course of the day several topics will be discussed including everything from effectively using social media and creating an eco-edge to conquering the chaos of entrepreneurship and engaging in top-notch customer service.

Attendees will not only get the chance to learn from local leaders on what it takes to get funded in Arizona, but will also see a showcase exhibit of Arizona companies and organizations that provide services that support entrepreneurs.

Additionally, this year AZEC will be addressing five of the most important needs to consider when reaching out to Arizona communities: collaboration, civics, education and training, arts and culture, and investment capital.

A variety of keynote speakers will accentuate the conference by providing their knowledge and expertise of the entrepreneurship field.

Debra Johnson, founder and CEO of EcoEdge will share how her passion for reducing environmental impact and being frugal created her award-winning company.

Jeremiah Owyang, a web strategist for Altimeter Group will discuss useful approaches to entering the digital world.

Dr. Paul Bendheim, founder and CEO of BrainSavers, a company that provides assistance in reducing the risk of memory disorders by incorporating healthy lifestyle habits, will speak about his entrepreneurial experience.

For those who are just starting out or who have been lifelong entrepreneurs, this year’s conference will provide abundant opportunities to foster new ideas and learn how the experts first got started.

To register and for more information, visit azentrepreneurship.com.

Phoenix Breast Cancer Awareness Events

Breast Cancer Awareness Month – Events In Phoenix

October has not always been associated with the color pink. It was only after it was deemed National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in 1985 that the pink ribbon became the well-known symbol of breast cancer awareness.

Since then, organizations such as the Susan G. Komen Foundation and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation have been raising money in hopes of finding a cure for breast cancer.

During October, several businesses host fundraising events across the country in support of breast cancer research. This year, Arizonans can find many opportunities to take part in the fight against breast cancer.

The 18th annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure will be held Sunday in the vicinity of the State Capitol near Downtown Phoenix. The event raises funds and awareness while honoring survivors and those who lost their battle with the disease.

This year’s race will consist of the option to choose between a 1 mile Run/Walk, a 5K Run for Breast Cancer Survivors or a 5K Walk or Sleep In for the Cure.

Also on Sunday, Suddenly Slimmer Day Spa and Wellness Center in Phoenix is offering a 25 percent discount on all spa services for their Breast Awareness Spa and Wellness Day.

In addition, those currently undergoing cancer treatments can get complementary “pink” mini-facials and 15-minute chair massages. Cancer patients and survivors can also get their makeup done, receive brow makeovers and participate in a laughing meditation session at no charge.

Pick up a cupcake at Wildflower Bread Company between now and Monday and $1 of the purchase will go to support the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer funds. Since 2005, Wildflower has raised more than $26,000 with its Cupcakes for the Cure program.

Head over to Gallery 225 in Gilbert on Friday Oct. 15 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. where more than 36 donated mixed-media art pieces will be auctioned at the Saving the Tatas Fundraiser.

The night will consist of refreshments, a silent auction and a raffle with a variety of prizes including round-trip airline vouchers. One hundred percent of the proceeds will benefit the Susan G. Komen Passionately Pink for the Cure Foundation.

Later on in the month, join Remedy Pilates and Massage Studio for its Pilates in the Park event to raise money for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Pilates for Pink will be held Sunday Oct. 24 at 10 a.m. at the McCormick-Stillman Railroad Park in Scottsdale.

For every $5 donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, class participants will be entered into the “Remedy Raffle” which will include prizes such as massages, acupuncture sessions, nutrition consultations, and private Pilates sessions. Each participant will also receive $20 worth of coupons good toward a massage at Remedy.

Following the class, lunch will be provided along with instruction from Dr. Mary King, who will explain self-breast exams and how acupuncture increases prevention.

http://www.komenphoenix.org/
http://www.remedypm.com
http://artsaveslives2010.blogspot.com/
http://www.suddenlyslimmer.com/

Tartesso Elementary

Elementary School Leaves A Small Carbon Footprint

Buckeye’s Tartesso Elementary School is receiving high marks, but it has nothing to do with the kids in the classroom.

On Aug. 19, 2010, the United States Green Building Council awarded the 3-year-old school with a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certification for sustainable building design.

Tartesso, a part of the Saddle Mountain Unified School District, is the first fully state-funded LEED Silver School in Arizona with this recognition.

“Having the certification is a big bonus to our district,” said Dr. Deborah Garza-Chavez, principal of Tartesso. “It’s nice to be noticed as a small district by trying to provide the best learning environment for our students and staff.”

The school had just a little more than 200 students upon opening in 2008 and only served kindergarten through 6th grade. Now fully functioning up to 8th grade, more than 600 students walk the halls of a completely sustainable and environmentally conscious building.

Architects and engineers from DLR Group were responsible for the building designs of the school and worked with budgets allocated by the Arizona State School of Facilities Board.

“Before we started designing the facility in early 2006, we brought our team into a brainstorming session where we could evaluate and strategize as to what sustainable products we wanted to use,” said Bill Taylor, a LEED-accredited professional with DLR Group.

The staff and students at Tartesso have a wide variety of energy saving technologies and products that create a healthy learning environment.

In an effort to reduce water shortages, the building design provides a plumbing system that conserves water. All of the boys’ restrooms contain waterless urinals and the kitchen sinks have low flow water fixtures, a reduction that saves half a million gallons of water per year.

The school provides a high performing mechanical system that goes above and beyond state standards.

A completely computer controlled airflow system continuously brings in new air circulation and automatically turns off air conditioning in an unoccupied room.  This reduces the annual energy cost by 20 percent, in comparison to a building that just meets the state code requirements.

In addition to significant energy savings, DLR Group improved the indoor environmental quality of Tartesso.  The building is positioned so that natural daylight offsets the artificial lighting in all occupied academic spaces, reducing energy and improving the educational environment.

Only low organic compound paint was used and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) free carpets were installed to promote a healthy interior for students and staff.

“[Students] have benefited from not having those harsh smells,” said Angel Tellez, Facilities Engineer for Saddle Mountain Unified School District. “Everything is kid friendly and environmentally friendly and that is improving the learning environment.”

Not only has the school been a leader in sustainable innovations, but it has served as an asset to the economy by purchasing materials from local companies. Ingredients in the concrete were all locally harvested and nothing was shipped long distance.

“This is a place that has students, staff and the community in mind,” said Premnath Sundharam, Senior Associate for DLR Group. “It’s an educational tool for what can be done on limited funds while still making an impact on the environment.”