Author Archives: Nancy Keane

Nancy Keane

About Nancy Keane

Nancy Keane is an award-winning television and radio anchor, reporter, and producer, who now serves as the Arizona Director of Marketing and Communications for the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. With over two decades of reporting experience, Nancy has delivered thousands of live television news reports, from breaking news to high-profile court cases to national human interest features. Her talents have taken her across the country to a variety of television markets in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Texas, and most recently Phoenix where she is most at home. Upon returning to the Valley, Nancy worked as a reporter for KNXV-TV (ABC-15) and a news anchor/reporter at KTAR-620. In addition, she has also worked as an associate faculty member in journalism at Arizona State University. Throughout her career she has been recognized for her work as a journalist in the following areas: U.S. Western Region - (AP) Associated Press Award - Outstanding News Coverage/Journalism - Overall Excellence, Outstanding Journalism, Breaking News; U.S. Southeastern Region - (AP) Associated Press 'Mark Twain' Award - breaking > 200 stories; Distinguished Honor Award - American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) - Outstanding Media Coverage - Elderly Issues - Biloxi, MS.; Outstanding Media Coverage Award – United States Air Force - Recruiting/Military Issues - Southeast U.S. Region - Little Rock Air Force Base and was selected to fly with the United States Air Force Thunderbirds F-16 fighter - Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. and serves as an on-air host – KAET-TV - PBS 8 - Phoenix fundraising drives - 1998 – 2010.

Knowledge Of Heart Attack And Stroke Symptoms Can Help Save Lives

Some heart attacks are sudden and intense — the “movie heart attack” where no one doubts what’s happening. But most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often, people affected aren’t sure what’s wrong and wait too long before getting help. Here are signs that can mean a heart attack is happening:

Chest discomfort — Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.

Discomfort in other areas of the upper body — Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.

Shortness of breath — this can occur with or without chest discomfort.
Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

As with men, women’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain.

Learn the signs, but remember this: Even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack, have it checked out (tell a doctor about your symptoms). Minutes matter. Fast action can save lives — maybe your own. Don’t wait more than five minutes to call 911.

Calling 911 is almost always the fastest way to get life-saving treatment. Emergency medical services (EMS) staff can begin treatment when they arrive — up to an hour sooner than if someone gets to the hospital by car. EMS staff also are trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. Patients with chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too. It is best to call EMS for rapid transport to the emergency room.

If you can’t access emergency medical services, have someone drive you to the hospital right away. If you’re the one having symptoms, don’t drive yourself, unless you have absolutely no other option.

Stroke warning signs
If you or someone with you has one or more of these signs, don’t delay calling for help:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
  • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause.

Immediately call 911 or the EMS number so an ambulance — ideally with advanced life support — can be sent for you. Also, check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared. It’s very important to take immediate action.

If given within three hours of the start of symptoms, a clot-busting drug called tissue plasminogenactivator (tPA) can reduce long-term disability for the most common type of stroke. The drug is the only FDA-approved medication for the treatment of stroke within three hours of stroke symptom onset.

 

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010

18th Annual Start! Phoenix Heart Walk Set To Break Attendance Record

Have a heart and take a walk on Saturday, Feb. 27, at Tempe Beach Park, at the Start! Phoenix Heart Walk, sponsored by Health Net of Arizona.

This fun, 5K and 1 mile, family fitness event energizes the Valley to step up in the fight against heart disease and stroke. The walk is sponsored in part by FOX 10 and My 45. Join Ron Hoon, anchor of FOX 10’s Arizona Morning, along with KEZ’s Marty Manning, and more than 15 thousand walkers to help eliminate cardiovascular disease. Top walkers and corporate sponsors will have exclusive access to this year’s VIP tent. The beautiful VIP area is created by local interior design guru Anita Lang, Allied Member ASID of Interior Motives Inc.

The American Heart Association’s signature event will feature entertainment, exercise and lots of fun. The event wouldn’t be possible without outstanding community partners that include Health Net of Arizona, Marketside by Walmart, Weight Watchers, Catholic Healthcare West, Maricopa Integrated Health Systems, Abrazo, Mayo Clinic, 99.9 KEZ, Clear Channel Outdoors and Movin 97.5.

Participants earn incentive prizes by collecting donations. Money raised helps to fund life-saving research and community education programs supported by the American Heart Association. After the walk, the Wellness Village is in full swing, packed with heart-healthy activities, presentations, screenings, games, a live band and celebrity appearances.

Survivors: The heart behind the walk
Heart disease and stroke survivors are a very important part of the Start! Heart and Stroke Walk. All heart disease survivors are recognized with a red cap, and all stroke survivors with a white cap. “In tribute to” stickers also are available for participants walking in celebration of a survivor or in memory of a loved one lost to heart disease or stroke. So mark your calendars. We hope to see you.

Start! Phoenix
February 27, 2010
Tempe Beach Park
Rio Salado Parkway and Mill Avenue

8 a.m. — Registration and Opening Ceremonies
9 a.m. — 5K Walk and 1-Mile Stroke Walk
10 a.m. — Wellness Village and Entertainment

Registration Information:
www.phoenixheartwalk.org
(602) 414-5320

 

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010

Grand Canyon University Commits To Go Red For Women Campaign

Many in the Valley still don’t realize that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women. But with long-standing health care educator Grand Canyon University (GCU) putting its muscle behind the annual Go Red For Women campaign, you can bet the issue will become top of mind.

“With our penetration in the local health care market and our ability to advocate through our 30,000 students, faculty and staff, we can take the community education component of the Go Red For Women effort to a very grassroots, but also broad-based level,” says Fran Roberts, RN, PhD., vice president of strategic business alliances of the College of Nursing & Health Sciences at Grand Canyon University.

Roberts is chair of the annual Go Red For Women campaign and luncheon, and GCU has agreed to a three-year sponsorship of the program. The power of GCU’s reach through its campus students and faculty, as well as its online student population, will take the outreach well beyond the Valley’s borders.

“The multiplier effects of our partnership should really help drive home the message throughout our community that heart disease continues to be the No. 1 health threat to women,” says Roberts, who will lead a community speakers bureau of advocates within GCU to promote the heart-healthy message.

GCU already has plans underway to mark the importance of the cause, making an effort to integrate components of the program into every aspect of the university, from food choices in the student union to “going red” at sporting events, and bringing in Go Red messages to its community events that reach tens of thousands of residents each year.

“Red represents much more than a color on this campus,” Roberts says.

The university will wear red with pride as the Grand Canyon team participates in the Start! Phoenix Heart Walk on Feb. 27, and will celebrate National Heart Month with a variety of activities.

The entire campus plans to be immersed in red  — including faculty, staff, students and wrapped buildings — on a designated date in February when the university hosts a Wear Red fashion show on the campus promenade and an important basketball game takes place.

In addition, GCU will host a Hearts in the Arts competition in the spring, encouraging high school students to celebrate heart-healthy living in a competition to benefit the Heart Association.

The sixth annual Go Red For Women luncheon takes place on May 14, at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel.

www.gcu.edu

 

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010

Our Culture Of Physical Inactivity Is Killing Us

Cardiovascular disease is our nation’s No.1 killer. Physical inactivity significantly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. Seventy percent of Americans don’t get enough exercise, blaming lack of time and lack of motivation.

People need help

  • People are less active due to technology, transportation, etc.
  • Sedentary jobs have increased 83 percent since 1950.
  • Almost 65 percent of American adults are overweight or obese.
  • Americans work an average of 47 hours a week — 164 more hours a year than 20 years ago.
  • Agricultural and manual laborers represent only 25 percent of the work force, 50 percent less than in 1950.

Companies need help too

  • Obesity costs American companies $225.8 billion per year in health-related productivity losses.
  • The average health care cost exceeds $3,000 per person annually.
  • An obese employee annually costs an employer an additional $460 to $2,500 in medical expenditures and absenteeism.
  • Preventable illnesses make up 70 percent of illness costs in the U.S.
  • The economic drain will only worsen with time as the percentage of the population over 65 is predicted to rise from 12 percent today to 30 percent in 2030.

Helping people

  • Individuals can gain two hours of life expectancy for each hour of regular, vigorous exercise (the “2-4-1” benefit).
  • Brisk walking for 30 minutes a day can reduce risk of stroke, bad cholesterol (LDL) levels and high blood pressure.
  • Physically active people save $500 a year in health care costs.
  • Walking has the lowest drop-out rate of any physical activity.

Helping companies

  • Employers can save $16 for every $1 spent on health.
  • Fitness programs have reduced employer health care costs by 20 percent to 55 percent.
  • Reducing just one health risk increases productivity and reduces absenteeism.
  • Every dollar invested in worksite health promotion programs averages between a $1 and $3.50 savings in health care and absenteeism costs.

What is Start!

Start! is the American Heart Association’s groundbreaking national campaign that calls on all American companies and their employers to create a culture of physical activity and health in order to live longer, heart-healthy lives through walking. Promoting physical activity through workplace walking programs can help employees reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke and lead to longer, stronger, healthier lives.

Through Start!, the American Heart Association is challenging corporate America to create a culture of physical activity that can help companies address rising health care costs.

It’s also a call to action that evokes active, year-round participation in walking and reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke by supporting the American Heart Association. By participating in the Start! Walking Program you are setting an example for your employees. If leaders show they have made health a priority, employees will do the same, resulting in an increase in productivity and a decline in health care costs.

In addition, Start! is a long-term commitment to fight the major causes of heart disease and stroke in American adults through a comprehensive walking and nutrition program. Companies that sign up for the Start! Walking Program receive a guide that includes a step-by-step plan to kick off a business’ Walking Program, as well as tips on how to maximize employee participation. By following the steps presented, you can encourage and motivate your employees to get involved, stay involved and improve their health. To learn more visit www.americanheart.org or call (602) 414-5353.

Why your company should get involved

Investing in the health of employees is one of the best decisions a company can make. At least 25 percent of the health care costs incurred by working adults are attributed to modifiable health risks such as poor diet and lack of exercise.

With more pressure today than ever before, Corporate America is struggling to be profitable while health care costs continue to rise and attack their most important resource — employees. Most executives know that creating a wellness environment is the only way to have healthier employees and ultimately, lower health care costs.

 

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010

AHA Profile: Nabil Dib

Nabil Dib, M.D., M.Sc., F.A.C.C.
Director of Cardiovascular Research
Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert Medical Centers

As with most of life’s troubles, the problem starts small. A tiny bit of fatty material settles in on the walls of a major artery. Over several years, more and more of this plaque collects, until there is little to no room left for blood to flow freely. Without the blood and the life-giving oxygen it brings, the heart seizes — and the muscle begins to die.

This scenario is the leading cause of death for both women and men. Approximately 1.2 million heart attacks occur in the U.S. every year, and more than 12 million people in the nation are suffering from some form of heart disease.

Efforts to reduce the occurrence of heart attacks through prevention are vital and remain our first priority. Clinical trials are currently underway at two Catholic Healthcare West (CHW) hospitals to determine whether adult stem cells can effectively improve cardiac health.

Using highly accurate 3D images of the heart, Dr. Nabil Dib and his team of interventional cardiologists at Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert Medical Centers are delivering adult stem cells directly into damaged heart tissue via a catheter. The goal of their series of clinical trial, is to determine if the adult stem cells will develop into new blood vessels that will prevent further damage to the heart.

Other treatments being conducted at the hospitals’ Cardiovascular Research Center are testing whether adult stem cells can re-convert scar tissue into live muscle, and whether specific genetic indicators can detect the early stages of heart disease.

“We’re researching whether these new treatments might help those who have exhausted all other options,” Dib says. “The aim of studies such as this is to see if adult stem cells will assist with cardiac regeneration and help repair damaged heart tissue. Cardiac regeneration is about trying to see if you can repair damaged heart tissue and hopefully provide people with a better quality of life.”

By integrating compassionate care with state-of-the-art technology and leading-edge clinical research, CHW is providing innovative treatments to those in need, and advancing the science of care worldwide.

www.chwhealth.org

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010

AHA Profile: Pat Nevin

Pat Nevin
Vice President, General Manager
Fox 10 & My 45

Health and wellness has always played a significant role in Pat Nevin’s life. But today it takes on whole new meaning.

“In 2009, I competed in six triathlons in Phoenix, Payson, and Coeur d’Alene, Idaho,” he says. “I hope to compete in at least 10 events in 2010, starting (with) this year’s triathlon season with the Navy Seals 1/2 Ironman race in April in San Diego (1.2-mile ocean swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run).”

In addition to being an avid runner, Nevin serves as vice president and general manager for FOX 10 and My 45 in Phoenix. Since 2004, Nevin has been responsible for all departments within the television stations’ operations in the nation’s 12th largest television market. With more than two decades of television experience, Nevin has helped increase the top-rated station’s viewing audience by serving the interests of the community, and staying actively engaged with station clients and station viewers throughout the Valley.

“Heart disease and its complications impact many of our television station’s viewers, our employees and their families — plus heart disease runs in my family. Several years ago my grandfather passed away from heart complications,” Nevin says.

As a married father of two, Nevin’s family is a top priority and passion in his life. It’s for this reason, and many others, that he remains committed to a heart-healthy lifestyle and he is leading by example.  “Keeping my heart healthy is something I take seriously,” he says, “and it’s great because I’m actually managing to have a lot fun in the process!”

www.myfoxphoenix.com

 

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010

AHA Profile: Peter Harper

Peter Harper
Vice President and Treasurer
Scottsdale Insurance Co.

As the American Heart Association’s board of directors chairman, Peter Harper brings nearly 25 years of finance leadership experience to the role of vice president and treasurer of Scottsdale Insurance Co.

Scottsdale Insurance is one of the largest excess and surplus, and specialty lines carriers in the nation, with more than 1,400 employees and annual premiums in excess of $2 billion.

Prior to his current role, Harper served as treasurer and chief financial officer of Suntron Corporation. Additionally, he has held senior leadership positions with Iomega Corporation and General Electric.

Harper uses his leadership skills to rally employees at Scottsdale Insurance when it comes to workplace wellness, and understands the benefits associated with a healthy work force.

“Heart disease costs U.S. businesses $24 billion a year in lost productivity. Through wellness programs, companies are able to attract exceptional employees, while enhancing productivity and morale at the same time,” Harper says.

In addition, recent studies have shown that for every dollar spent on health and wellness, companies can save between $3 and $15. Harper says those savings are almost immediately seen within 12 to 18 months of implementing a program.

Harper also spearheads efforts to get employees involved with the American Heart Association’s Start! Heart Walk each year. Scottsdale Insurance has sponsored the Lifestyle Change Award for the past three years.

“I am passionate about physical fitness and living a healthy lifestyle, which aligns with our Lifestyle Change Award sponsorship,” he says. “If we take the initiative to proactively reduce our risk of heart disease — including establishing a physical fitness regimen and adopting a healthier diet — not only will we improve the odds of not incurring life-threatening heart attacks or strokes, but we will be able to enjoy a happier, longer life with our family and friends who care most about us.”

www.scottsdaleins.com

 

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010