Author Archives: Stella M. Shanovich

About Stella M. Shanovich

Stella M. Shanovich is the local health care practice leader and an audit partner for Grant Thornton's Phoenix office. She can be reached at 602-474-3434 or at stella.shanovich@gt.com. For more information visit www.grantthornton.com.

A New Study Provides Lessons On Enhancing Hospital Board Effectiveness

A New Study Provides Lessons On Enhancing Hospital Board Effectiveness

It’s no secret that nonprofit hospitals, which account for the majority of hospitals in the U.S., are under growing scrutiny from legislators and regulators. In exchange for being exempt from paying taxes, nonprofit hospitals must provide benefits to their communities, including charity care. As health care reform efforts are beginning to get underway, an increasing emphasis has been placed on tax-exempt hospitals, and legislators are questioning the level of benefits actually provided to the local communities. At the core of this debate is how these hospitals are governed. Consequently, effective health care governance has never been more important.

So, what should health care systems be doing to maximize governance effectiveness? And what can these organizations learn from the governance practices of the most-effective community health systems?

According to a recent study, “Governance in High-Performing Community Health Systems: A report of trustee and CEO views,” which Grant Thornton co-sponsored in collaboration with the University of Iowa, College of Public Health and the American Hospital Association, there are a number of important lessons to consider. The study examines the governance of community health systems based on feedback from 123 hospital CEOs, and follow-up visits and onsite interviews with CEOs and trustees of 10 “high-performing” systems. The “high-performing” systems were selected from a set of performance and governance metrics.

Six principal factors emerged from the study as critical to effective governance at high-performing systems:

Strong values-based CEO leadership and effective management teams
Effective CEO leadership is vital to achieving and maintaining a high level of health system operating performance. Among the specific attributes mentioned by interviewees were a commitment to the system’s mission and values, excellent communication and relationships with the board and medical staff, expertise in financial management and cost controls, a passion for improving the system and its patient care, and strategic vision. They also cited the importance of a strong, effective management team with expertise in the full range of management functions.

Well understood systemwide mission, vision and values
Interviewees emphasized that key internal and external stakeholder groups must understand and support a meaningful systemwide mission statement, a compelling vision for the system’s future and a clearly stated set of core values. These expressions of organizational mission, vision and values can be powerful in unifying the stakeholders and galvanizing energy toward established goals and standards, but only if they are consistently reinforced by organizational leaders throughout the system. Interviewees also recognized that building the understanding and support of key constituencies within the system, and in the communities the system serves, requires continuous attention by the board and management.

A highly committed and engaged board of directors
Trustees commented that a highly committed, well informed and proactive governing board is extremely important to achieving and maintaining organizational success. The board should work collaboratively with the CEO and physician leadership. In addition, many board members stressed the importance of well organized and staffed board committees, the leadership role of the board chairperson and a mutually supportive relationship between the board chair and the CEO. They also noted the need for trust-based relationship between the board of directors and its CEO.

Strong clinical leadership and capabilities
The majority of interviewees underscored the need for committed, competent clinicians as a critical determinant of operational performance. They commented that without strong physician leadership, no hospital or health system can achieve enduring success. A number of interviewees also noted the importance of excellent nursing leadership. Also critical were strong, mutually beneficial partnerships between the system and physicians.

Clearly defined organizational objectives, targets and metrics
Interviewees stressed the importance of working toward well defined organizational targets and evidence-based metrics. These enable the board, management team and clinical leadership to monitor actual performance in relation to established standards in key aspects of system operations. Metrics should include the health systems’ community benefit program, financial performance and quality of patient care.

Healthy organizational culture
Interviewees frequently mentioned the importance of organizational culture. They commented that the prevailing culture within their systems included broad-based commitment to excellence in patient care and operating performance.

In addition to the importance of these six factors, there is ample room for improving board performance, particularly related to boardroom culture, board evaluations and community benefit programs. We recommend the following:

Devote time and energy to serious reflection and dialogue about the board’s fundamental role, responsibilities and the overall caliber of its performance in recent years. Then, develop a concrete strategy for creating a better, more proactive and more effective board.

Reexamine the organization’s current board size and composition. Consider adding greater racial and gender diversity, as well as respected and experienced nursing leaders as voting members. Keep in mind that large boards can be unwieldy; nine to 17 members is considered ideal.

Take a hard look at existing board-development programs. On that basis, adopt a strong commitment and a concrete plan for improving them.

Initiate an overall review of the present board evaluation process. Objectively assess the value it has provided for the organization and determine how to improve its effectiveness. Board evaluation must not be a pro forma exercise with minimal value.

Give careful attention to the boardroom culture and determine steps to make it healthier and more effective. Board members must feel free to express their views and constructively challenge each other and the system’s management team. Directors should actively engage in discourse and decision-making.

Devote attention and resources to meeting emerging benchmarks of good governance for community benefit responsibilities. Establish formal measurable policies and measurable objectives for community benefit plans, with regular reporting on the achievement of those objectives. It’s also important to collaborate with other organizations in ongoing community needs assessment and to provide thorough reports to the communities served regularly at least once per year.

Current and emerging benchmarks of good governance for nonprofit hospitals and health systems should be reviewed, refined and compiled into authoritative, consolidated documents to provide guidance for trustees and CEOs as they strive to meet these benchmarks.

With growing attention from the IRS, Congress and the media, forward-looking health care organizations are taking steps to examine their governance and identify opportunities to strengthen it. Organizations that are committed to continuous improvement not only will enhance their performance, but also improve their systems’ contributions to the communities they serve. The time has never been better to apply these lessons learned.