Tag Archives: 2015 super bowl

Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee CEO Jay Parry. Photo by Shavon Rose, AZ Big Media

Super Bowl’s impact on economy may last long after game

Early in the planning process for the 2015 Super Bowl, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee CEO Jay Parry was giving a presentation to Greater Phoenix Leadership and she referred to some of national perceptions of Arizona as “misperceptions.”

“An individual walked up to me after the presentation and said, ‘You did a great job, but just one point of clarification,’” Parry recounts. “‘Those are not misperceptions, those are reality.’ That was a good point. Some of those things are real, but there are so many positives about Arizona that offset the negatives.”

Parry, who was an executive with both the Phoenix Suns and WNBA champion Mercury before taking her role with Super Bowl committee, says that when the eyes of the world turn to Arizona for the Super Bowl on February 1, it will be the perfect time to showcase the progressive and innovative nature of Arizona. Az Business caught up with Parry near the future home of Super Bowl Central to talk strategy before the big game.

What has been your biggest challenge as CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee?
There is so much positive excitement about Arizona hosting the Super Bowl. People want to be supportive and they want it to be a big success for Arizona, so everyone wants to be involved. Channeling all that interest and excitement and figuring out a way to put it to the best use to make the event amazing has been a challenge.

Why do you think this Super Bowl is generating so much more buzz locally than when Arizona last hosted the game in 2008?
We’ve really worked to build that buzz. We got the bid in 2011 and started working on all the community events and buildup in 2012. We know that to make this a big success for Arizona and have the positive impact that we want, it takes getting the whole community involved and excited. We have a volunteer board of directors of 20 Arizona leaders and they’ve been instrumental in creating meetings and introductions to corporate leaders here. Trying to make all those stakeholders a part of the process has been our goal and it’s gotten everyone excited about the event.

How does being CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee differ from running a professional sports team?
There are a lot of similarities. But what I’ve learned is that there is nothing as big as the Super Bowl. It goes way beyond football. I attended the Super Bowl when Arizona hosted it in 1996 and in 2008, but when I got off the plane for the Super Bowl in 2013 in New Orleans, I said to myself, “This is so much bigger than I remember it being.” What I’ve realized is that there is a different dynamic from year to year. While some of the things stay the same, each host community brings its own stamp of personality to the event. Arizona’s hospitality industry is tailor made to host mega events and Arizona has become such an expert at it that we have a nice platform to work from. It just gets bigger and bigger.

How has adding the Pro Bowl to the mix impacted the planning process for the Super Bowl?
What we’ve been able to do is take the infrastructure and the planning for the Super Bowl and back it up a week. There is so much overlap with parking and transportation and aviation and volunteers, that it really made sense to have it span the whole week. Hosting the Pro Bowl is just another amazing coup for our state and a feather in our cap. When you take the perfect trifecta of the Pro Bowl, Waste Management Phoenix Open and the Super Bowl, all eyes from around the world will be on Arizona.

How has the Valley’s ability to host a Super Bowl changed since we last hosted the game in 2008?
Getting a Super Bowl is such a competitive process. For us to be selected to host again after seven short years is a testament to Arizona. The investment in the infrastructure in downtown Phoenix — from the light rail to the remodeled Convention Center to the extra restaurants that have been added to CityScape to the 3,000 hotel rooms in downtown Phoenix — is really what’s different for 2015. When we hosted the NFL in 2013, we walked through downtown Phoenix and ended up at the Hotel Palomar Phoenix on the pool deck. We looked out over Phoenix and the head of events turned to me and said, “This is a completely different place than it was in 2008.” That was a major win for us because they realized how much was done, and not just in Phoenix, but in Mesa and Tempe and Scottsdale and all the neighboring communities.

How will your efforts to make the 2015 Super Bowl a regional experience impact the visitor?
We want to make sure the entire Valley and the state gets to show its unique personality. Each of our communities is unique. From a visitor’s standpoint, the big difference will be Super Bowl Central, which will be located in downtown Phoenix. What the NFL learned from Indianapolis three years ago was the idea of a fan campus, where it’s the epicenter of activity. It has a lot of merit for visitors and they really enjoyed that, so the NFL built on that and we adopted that idea and created Super Bowl Central, which will be the biggest thing that Arizona has ever seen with its 12-block campus. Fans can migrate there and experience free family-friendly fun for the week leading up to the game, and then also have spokes throughout the Valley where they can enjoy other activities.

How do you think that super week — the Pro Bowl, Phoenix Open and Super Bowl — will impact Arizona’s tourism industry?
The sum total will be bigger than anything we’ve seen in Arizona before. The economic impact for the Super Bowl alone is estimated at more than $500 million. The Thunderbirds have measured the economic impact of the Waste Management Phoenix Open at more than $200 million. You add in the Pro Bowl on top of that and we don’t have a best guess yet, but you’re talking almost three-quarters of a billion dollars in economic impact for just that week. But what I get most excited about is the seeds that we are planting that week with all the exposure, all the media, all the visitors. It’s an enormous commercial for Arizona.

How do you hope business leaders and economic development leaders take advantage of Arizona’s role as host of the 2015 Super Bowl?
There is a lot of intention around capturing and growing that economic impact. We have a couple programs that the host committee leads. One is our CEO Forum, where we invite CEOs from outside of Arizona to come to Arizona for the weekend of the Super Bowl. We’ve created a three-day curriculum for them to meet local CEOs, learn why we are a pro-business environment and give the reason to relocate their business or expand their business in Arizona. We hope that builds more of an emotional connection with Arizona so they have real reasons and proof points why Arizona is different. The focus on economic development has been spearheaded by (Arizona Cardinals President) Michael Bidwill and (Salt River Project President) David Rousseau. Both of them have long standing commitments and have demonstrated ongoing business leadership in various local forums and organizations to build the Arizona business community.  So capitalizing on this with Super Bowl XLIX was a natural extension.”

What accomplishment as CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee gives you the most pride?
We want it to be the best Super Bowl yet. By doing that, it will keep us in that regular rotation for hosting future Super Bowls and mega events, which is a lasting legacy from an economic development standpoint. Introducing the world to Arizona and demonstrating what our brand really is — progressive, youthful, energetic, committed to business — and telling that story on behalf of Arizona and creating a positive brand image would be a fantastic legacy for all of us.

lights-city-landscape

Expert expects mega events to boost meetings industry

When Cristin Barr, CMP, went to college, she was more interested in investor relations than guest relations. “At The University of Texas I studied Investor Relations, which took me to New York City for my first professional job,” said the current president of the Arizona Sunbelt Chapter of Meeting Professionals International (AzMPI).

AzMPI President: Cristin Barr

AzMPI President: Cristin Barr

“For the past 10 years, though, I’ve been traveling the world and enjoying the hospitality industry.” Now director of national accounts at The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain, Barr is working with the No. 1 hotel in Arizona, according to Travel + Leisure.

“I work with meeting planners to secure guest rooms and meeting space at the hotel for programs, including incentive trips, client events, annual meetings and board retreats,” Barr said.
Az Business caught up with Barr to talk about how the next year is shaping up to be a big one for the state’s tourism brand.

WHAT ATTRACTED YOU TO THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY?
The sales role in hospitality is a great mix of creative and analytical. On any given day, we have unique challenges that can be best solved with a combination of critical thinking and service-based creativity.

HOW HAS YOUR MEMBERSHIP IN MPI IMPACTED YOU PROFESSIONALLY?
MPI membership and CMP (certified meeting planner) certification give me a sense of personal achievement as well as recognition in the industry. The increased credibility among customers and prospects is invaluable.

WHAT KIND OF ECONOMIC IMPACT DOES THE MEETING AND EVENTS INDUSTRY HAVE ON ARIZONA?
Tourists bring almost $20 billion to Arizona each year, which can be seen in employment and tax base coming from lodging, food service, transport and recreation — just to name a few. But the benefits reach far beyond the hotels and golf courses. The economic impact is evident in important public services as well as in the businesses that open or relocate to our area.

HOW DO MEGA EVENTS LIKE THE 2015 SUPER BOWL IMPACT ARIZONA’S MEETINGS AND EVENTS (M&E) INDUSTRY?
The economic impact of hosting a Super Bowl makes Arizona itself the clear big winner. A mega event places a spotlight much wider than just expenditures during the week of the game. There is no doubt that the M&E industry will benefit from incredible media exposure, generating future event bookings.

WHAT SHOULD ARIZONA’S M&E INDUSTRY DO TO CAPITALIZE ON THE 2015 SUPER BOWL?
We are lucky to have a very strong network of CVBs, offices of tourism and advocates that work year round to attract and assure successful meetings, conventions and events are held in Arizona. The Super Bowl will be a unique and exciting tool for continued messaging that Arizona is a premiere destination.

WHAT CURRENT TRENDS ARE HAVING THE BIGGEST IMPACT ON THE M&E INDUSTRY?
Social media is interesting in that the content is often driven by stakeholders rather than by the planners or the educators. Social media can help attendees engage before and after a meeting and provides opportunity to connect with a very broad audience or a narrow specific slice of the demographic. It’s easy, it’s inexpensive and it will continue to change the face of the industry.

WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS AS AZMPI PRESIDENT?
2013-2014 was a hugely successful year for AzMPI in terms of promoting excellence in the meeting industry through education, certification, advocacy and business alliances. For the 2014-2015 year, we will focus on our key metrics with an emphasis on member satisfaction and financial management. We will also organize six monthly educational programs, the holiday party, awards gala, as well as a golf tournament that we do in conjunction with the Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International (HSMAI).

photo provided by Pauls Corporation.

Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee signs lease at Renaissance Square

Hines, the international real estate firm, announced today that the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee has signed a 7,535-square-foot lease in Renaissance Square, a two-building, 965,000-square-foot Class A office complex located in the hub of downtown Phoenix.

Super Bowl XLIX is scheduled to be played at University of Phoenix Stadium on February 1, 2015, marking Arizona’s second Super Bowl in seven years.

Hines Managing Director Chris Anderson said, “We are honored that One Renaissance Square is the official headquarters building of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. They are an outstanding addition to an already world-class tenant roster.”

“Renaissance Square is one of the premier office buildings in Phoenix, and we are thrilled to call it our new home for the next year. We look forward to hosting the world’s biggest single-day sporting event in 2015, all the surrounding activities, and the 2015 Pro Bowl,” said Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Chairman David Rousseau.

One and Two Renaissance Square were designed by the architecture firm Emery, Roth & Sons, Inc., and were completed in 1987 and 1989 respectively. One Renaissance Square is 25-stories tall, and Two Renaissance Square contains 27 stories. The buildings are clad in red granite, connected by a pedestrian sky bridge, and boast numerous on-site amenities.

Renaissance Square is leased to large corporate tenants, such as Bryan Cave LLP, Ernst & Young and Quarles & Brady LLP, as well as many GSA tenants and prominent local businesses.

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee was represented in lease negotiations by Brad Anderson of CBRE. Jerry Noble of Cushman & Wakefield represented Hines, the building’s owner and property manager.

province.1

Restaurants serve super-sized economic impact

Think about the celebration that occurred after Arizona was awarded  the 2015 Super Bowl.

Much of that excitement came because of the economic impact the Super Bowl will have on the state. But the restaurant industry in Arizona generates revenue equivalent to hosting two Super Bowls a month.

“Restaurants are critical to Arizona’s visitor industry – and vice versa,” said Debbie Johnson, president and CEO of the Arizona Lodging & Tourism Association. “Arizona attracts more than 37 million visitors annually and dining is the No. 1 activity for those visitors. So the success of the two industries are definitely intertwined.”

Arizona’s restaurant industry, which included 8,885 eating and drinking places of business in 2011, is expected to rake in $10.5 billion in sales this year, according to the National Restaurant Association. Arizona’s restaurants also employ 262,200 people, roughly 10 percent of the state’s workforce. That number is projected to grow 15.9 percent by 2023 to 303,800 – translating into 41,600 new jobs in the industry.

“While the Recession claimed 500 Arizona restaurants, the industry that was born out of the recession was stronger and more resilient,” said Steve Chucri, president and CEO of the Arizona Restaurant Association. “From 2007 on, Arizona’s industry sales have grown from $7.9 billion to $10.1 billion (in 2012) with extremely modest growth in the hungrier years of 2008-2010.”

Chucri said Arizona’s rate of restaurant sales growth, while once the top in the nation at 6.2 percent, is starting to fight its way back, growing at a little more than 3 percent each year, boosting this industry’s sales by an estimated $400 million annually.

“I think the restaurant community has stabilized and I sense an increasing confidence in the community,” said Steven Micheletti, CEO of Z’Tejas Southwestern Grill, which has five locations in Arizona and plans to add two more in the next year. “New restaurants are being built and being opened in interesting parts of the city. There is ongoing collaboration between great entrepreneurs happening, creating some great restaurant experiences. Operators are building restaurants in all types of buildings, creating really fun dining environments.”
A lot of the growth in Arizona’s restaurant industry is coming from entrepreneurs and chefs who are giving consumers different and unique dining experiences.
“Some of the strengths in Arizona’s restaurant industry include population growth, strong tourism, unmatched lifestyle and weather, and access to good produce,” said Russell Owens, president and COO of Fox Restaurant Concepts. “With all of these factors working together, there is more appeal for great chefs to come to Arizona to offer innovative new restaurants and fresh ideas. I think we are seeing more creativity today than over the last 20 years and this will positively shape the industry in Arizona for years to come.”

That influx of great chefs and innovative ideas has become an economic engine for the tourism industry.

“Scottsdale has seen a growth in chef-driven, independent restaurants, which are fueling our culinary scene,” said Rachel Pearson, vice president of community and government affairs for the Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau. “Not only do our resorts boast award-winning chefs and restaurants, but now you can drive to every corner of Scottsdale and find unique culinary experiences from well-known chefs.”

Not only are many of the new restaurants that are popping up utilizing fresh ideas and concepts, they are also beginning to increasingly rely on local produce and products to help serve their customers.

“Arizona visitors are really looking for a unique and distinct dining experience that they can’t get back home,” Johnson said. “So trends that we’re seeing in both hotel/resort restaurants as well as off-site restaurants include utilizing local ingredients and offering menu items and experiences that provide a taste of the local community.”

Micheletti has seen an increasing shift to supporting local farmers and growers, but the “Local First” trend doesn’t stop there.
“There’s also a growing influence of local crafted beers and wines,” he said. “Guests really are reading menus and asking questions about ingredients and sourcing. It’s not just about calories anymore.”

In addition to Arizona-grown ingredients, Chucri said one of the most transcendent trends he sees in the industry is the desire for healthy foods.

“The tendency towards more healthful items for the entire family illustrates that consumers are looking to restaurants for more than an indulgent special occasion meal,” he said. “Restaurants are becoming a part of consumers’ daily lives, an extension of their family. Whether it be a compliment dish for Easter dinner, a post-Little League party, or a got-home-too-late-to-cook family dinner, restaurants have infused themselves into the fabric of families everyday lives … a trend that is certain to stick around.”

University of Phoenix, Glendale, 2015 Super Bowl

Arizona Lands 2015 Super Bowl

The third time is the charm as the NFL today awarded the 2015 Super Bowl to University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.

NFL owners meeting in Houston picked the Valley of the Sun over Tampa, Fla., for the 2015 game, Arizona previously hosted the Super Bowl in 1996 (at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe) and in 2008 (at UOP Stadium).

The Super Bowl is expected to add a much-needed boost to the state’s sagging economy. In 2008, fans spent an estimated $500 million when the New York Giants beat the New England Patriots 17-14.

According to the Associated Press, Phoenix beat the Tampa area in the bidding on the second ballot. Tampa has hosted the game in 1984, 1991, 2001 and 2009. The 2012 Super Bowl is in Indianapolis. The next two after that will be in New Orleans and the New York/New Jersey area.

In a statement released today, the City of Glendale expressed pride in being the host city, calling the game, “ an economic engine that benefits our entire state. This decision is a positive reinforcement on the entire region, highlighting our ability to put Arizona on a stage for the world to see.

“Glendale’s opportunity to host a Super Bowl honors the continued commitment to Arizona voters to use the state-of-the-art University of Phoenix stadium and the amenities and infrastructure that were built around the stadium in Glendale to attract hundreds of thousands of people while also pumping money into the local economy. “

It will be Super Bowl XLIX – the 49th title game.

Video: Super Bowl heads back to the desert

Read more about the 2015 Super Bowl news from the Associated Press.