Tag Archives: A.T. Still University

classroom-update

Experts say quality education equals quality jobs for Arizona

The formula is simple: W = $. A well-qualified, educated workforce equals high-paying, deeply entrenched Arizona jobs and statewide economic growth.

“There are too many buzzwords and not enough solutions,” muses Rick Heumann, Chandler’s vice-mayor and a passionate education advocate. “If we don’t do something now, we’re going to lose an entire generation. The legislature cannot continue to starve schools and colleges and expect the economy to grow. Incentives will not overcome lack of qualified workforce.”

Heumann, and other business leaders also say that the solutions are more than just funding. It’s a challenge through the whole system to create opportunities and relevance for today’s students to become tomorrow’s well-qualified workforce.

“Arizona education has to produce the talent needed to find a job and fill the gaps in the workplace,” says Steve Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “We need to create more robust opportunities to inform students about career opportunities and the need for education.”

The Arizona business community is finding opportunities and step-by-step trying to bring change to the state’s education system. This is a marked contrast from political attacks on Common Core that one business leader confided are demonstrations that the legislature just doesn’t understand education or economic development.”

“There’s too much rote and not enough reason,” sighs Joan Koerber-Walker, president and CEO of the Arizona Bioindustry Association, Inc. “America is a world power because we know how to think. We’re losing our edge. Not only does STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) need to be at the core of what’s being taught, students must see relevancy to real life and learn to be creative and critical thinkers. It amounts to a needed change in the way we teach.”

Student retention through high school

“Ensuring that all our students are graduating from high school is simply the biggest priority,” sums Cathleen Barton, Arizona education manager for Intel. “We need students to graduate and be career- or college-ready,” she adds.

Study-after-study shows that students need education to get ahead. Barry Broome, CEO of Greater Phoenix Economic Council says that education is part of good economic development. “Improving education is a long-term investment for Arizona. Right now, only a small percentage of high schools generate half our college enrollment. That needs to change,” he says.

“We’re losing students at an unacceptable rate,” worries Bob Enderle, director of community relations at Medtronic. “About a quarter of our students don’t graduate high school, and that rate is higher in ethnically diverse populations.”

“Making education connect; making it more relevant will help keep students in school,” echoes Dave Cano, the company’s senior manager for continuous improvement and a member of Grand Canyon University’s STEM External Advisory Board. “When students don’t graduate, they earn less, the spend less and the add more costs to the system.”

Heumann adds that workers in minimum wage jobs do not earn enough to cover the costs of their services. “We need to help our students qualify for better jobs and then we need to make sure we have the jobs in the market,” he says. “With a high-paying job, a worker adds more value to the Arizona economy.”

Better education means a better economy

Eve Ross, W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., director of public policy and strategic initiatives Ross about the vicious cycle, “Students are not getting a connection between what’s being learned and how it applies to careers. There are many well-paying careers that require some college, but not necessarily a four-year or graduate degree,” she says. “We need a whole class of student understanding and interested in manufacturing. We’re not talking about a worker tightening bolts on a parade of black Fords. We’re talking about workers who can see how things are made, and come up with ideas to make it better.”

“It’s a simple formula for economic growth. If we can’t attract well-paying careers, Arizona is not going to collect tax revenue for basic services,” she says. “We need a workforce who can read and understand a workplace; students who can do the math and innovate.”

Arizona does education well, but in pockets, says Koerber-Walker, “Schools are short on resources and there are many gaps creating ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots.’ We’re at the bottom of the barrel in too many ways with education. Business will not come if kids are prepared for the jobs.”

The investment in education for tomorrow’s economy comes at a crucial time. Arizona has invested millions of dollars to ready the education system for Common Core standards. “Common Core came out of the business sector,” explains Broome. “Industry needs a uniform standard by which is can compare education achievement to the same standards in every state. This is going to create some concern in Arizona when the results start coming in.”

Building passion for learning

“The world is rapidly changing. Tomorrow’s workforce needs to be able to adapt to a rapidly changing world.” Hal Halladay is the chief people officer for Infusionsoft, “The system needs to focus on training and teaching students to love learning. Education does not end at graduation. Students must be able to continue to learn in order to be able to handle global change.”

Medtronic has jumped into the partnering role with education. It’s been incredibly rewarding and equally frustrating. “We tried to bring students to demonstrate relevancy between what they’re learning and career opportunities, but the process was filled with road blocks,” says Ederle. “We ended up bringing in teachers as interns. One of the science instructors going through the program said it would change the way he taught physics. That’s a success, as we see it.”

Connecting science and technology to something students understand is the key of generating a passion for education. Zylstra talks about the Arizona SciTech Festival, “We had a physics professor talk about the science of baseball. All of the sudden, the kids were seeing how math and physics are in the world relevant to their interests. It’s this type of change we need in education to connect students to learning.”

“We have a mismatch between skills and opportunity,” Barton emphasizes. “Jobs are changing too fast, and education is not changing rapidly enough to keep up. We need to take schools to the next level of teaching.”

Koerber-Walker is concerned that there has been so much focus on what needed to be learned to pass the standardized tests, students weren’t given an opportunity to understand how to use the learning. “There needs to be improvement in outcomes,” she explains. “Students are lacking in soft skills. They need to learn critical thinking, problem solving and an ability to write and communicate.”

“We’re getting good workers coming out of college,” comments Halladay. “The problem is that while the students have the technical skills, they are not getting training on how to function in a face-to-face environment. They need an ability to adapt to changes and creatively solve challenges.”

Partnership part of a solid solution

“This is not going to be resolved by just giving schools more money,” Zylstra says. “It start with motivating parents to be participants in their child’s education. It requires business to partner with schools.” Enderle and Cano at Medtronic, agree. Barton and Heumann cited examples in their conversation.

Heumann doesn’t mince words. “We’re not competing with Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi for jobs. We’re competing with Texas, California, Washington and New York. Our education investment needs to be at their levels, not the bottom of the heap.”

“We need to re-fund education. The way education is funded does not reflect the needs of business in Arizona,” suggests Koerber-Walker. “Teachers are spending major portions of their own incomes supplying classrooms. That has to stop. We need to invest some dollars to provide schools with the tools to teach the workers we want to offer new business.”

“We have a lot of thoughtful people involved in the process of bettering our schools and workforce. In business, we know that if you don’t invest in training, you start losing ground to competition.” Barton is listing off the solutions she’d like to see for schools. “We want teachers to have the resources to make the curriculum relevant to keep students engaged.”

“Charter schools need to have the same public accountability as public schools,” insists Heumann. “If we have a well-balanced education with pay encouraging bright and effective teachers into the profession, we’re going to do a lot better with students coming out.”

Halladay sums up what a good education system means, “When I try to recruit top-level knowledge workers for my company, the quality of schools is a big reason they will accept or walk away from the job offer. The inconsistency of education quality across the Valley is a major recruiting challenge.”

Heumann sighs, “We can spend millions on cutting taxes and offering incentives. If we don’t have good workers, we’re not going to get good companies locating here. It’s simple economics.”
A well-educated workforce equals strong economic development.

Not making the grade
Personal finance social network WalletHub conducted an in-depth analysis of 2014’s states with the best and worst school systems. WalletHub used 12 key metrics, including dropout rates, test scores and bullying incident rates to assess the quality of education in each state. According to the analysis, Arizona has the 9th worst school system. Here is where Arizona schools rank in individual categories (1=best):
35th – Dropout rate
8th – Champlain University High School Financial Literacy Grade
36th – Math test score
46th – Reading test score
49th – Student-to-teacher ratio

Executive Education
Here are the colleges and universities in Arizona that offer post-graduate programs:

Argosy University
602-216-3118
Website
Number of campuses: 1
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Doctorate
Leadership: Norma Patterson, associate vice president of academic compliance

Arizona State University
480-965-7788
Website
Number of campuses: 4
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Doctorate
Leadership: Michael Crow, president

A.T. Still University
480-219-6000
Website
Number of campuses: 1
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Doctorate
Leadership: Craig M. Phelps, president

Communiversity @ Surprise
480-384-9000
Website
Number of campuses: 1
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Master’s
Leadership: Todd Aakhus, Ph.D., director

DeVry University
602-870-9222
Website
Number of campuses: 4
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Master’s
Leadership: Craig Jacobs, metro president

Grand Canyon University
800-800-9776
Website
Number of campuses: 1
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Doctorate
Leadership: Brian Mueller, CEO

Midwestern University
623-572-3200
Website
Number of campuses: 1
Online classes: No
Highest degree offered: Doctorate
Leadership: Kathleen Goeppinger, president and CEO

Northern Arizona University
928-523-9011
Website
Number of campuses: 34
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Doctorate
Leadership: Rita Cheng, president

Ottawa University
800-235-9586
Website
Number of campuses: 3
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Master’s
Leadership: Dr. Kirk Wessel, dean of Angell Snyder School of Business

Thunderbird School of Global Management
602-978-7000
Website
Number of campuses: 1
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: MBA
Leadership: Larry Edward Penley, Ph.D., president

University of Arizona
520-621-1162
Website
Number of campuses: 2
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Doctorate
Leadership: Ann Weaver Hart, president

University of Phoenix
480-557-2000
Website
Number of campuses: 5
Online classes: Yes
Highest degree offered: Doctorate
Leadership: Timothy P. Slottow, president

brain

‘Get Your Jersey On’ funds TGen concussion study

Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School students and teachers will wear their favorite sports team jersey or t-shirt to class today, the first organization to participate in “Get Your Jersey On,” a fun way to help promote and fund concussion research at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The Chandler school is the first of what is expected to be many organizations this fall that will help fund TGen’s collaboration with the Arizona State University Sun Devil football team to help find new ways to protect athletes from serious injuries caused by head trauma.

“Our school is just a few miles south of ASU, and what better — and fun — way to show our support for the teams and athletes than to help fund a program that will ultimately help protect their health. Concussions affect not just athletes, but people of all ages. We are proud to partner with TGen to help raise the awareness of this important research,” said Dino Katsiris, Assistant Principal at Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School.

Teachers and parents of students participating in “Get Your Jersey On” are encouraged to make small donations of $5 or $10 to TGen. If you would like your organization to participate, contact Dean Ballard, Assistant Director of Development for the non-profit TGen Foundation, at dballard@tgen.org, or 602-343-8543.

Student-athletes at ASU wear football helmets made by Riddell, a leader is sports helmet technology, with sensors that record the number, direction and intensity of impacts during games and practices.

TGen researchers, working with Barrow Neurological Institute and A.T. Still University, are attempting to connect data about the helmet impacts with biological changes that could be detected in the players’ blood, urine or saliva samples.

The goal is to discover a biomarker — some change in the student-athlete’s genetic makeup — that would objectively indicate when they are too injured to continue playing, and when they are fit enough to return to the game.

Representatives from the Sun Devil medical team and TGen will collect the molecular samples from the participating athletes, all of whom volunteered to partake in the study.

“It is so exciting to have the children of Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School join us in this important work,” said Michael Bassoff, President of the TGen Foundation. “We welcome the participation of Brisas Elementary School and other businesses and organizations who want to turn their love of sports into a way to help protect the athletes they admire.”

For more information about the TGen-led concussion study, please visit tgen.org.

Conquering Concussions

ASU, TGen Team Up for Concussion Research

Riddell, the leader in football helmet technology and innovation, and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), a leader in cutting-edge genomic research, today announced that the Pac-12’s Arizona State University and its Sun Devil football program will again participate in a genetic research study designed to advance athlete concussion detection and treatment.

Now in its second year, the joint research project will combine molecular information and head impact data from Sun Devil football student-athletes to identify whether the effects of sub-concussive hits are identifiable. The researchers will monitor the players’ changing molecular information throughout a season of typical head impact exposure associated with football practice and games. Representatives from the Sun Devil medical team and TGen will collect the molecular samples from the participating athletes, all of whom volunteered to partake in the study.

“This partnership represents another dynamic and innovative step toward ensuring that the health and well-being of our student-athletes remains our most important goal,” Vice President for Arizona State University Athletics Ray Anderson said. “Sun Devil Athletics continues to serve as a pioneering force in this important issue and is proud to participate in this world-class research study for the second consecutive year with two outstanding industry trendsetters in Riddell and TGen.”

Arizona State’s preferred helmet and protective equipment provider, Riddell, has again deployed its Sideline Response System (SRS) to obtain real-time head impact data from Arizona State football student-athletes. Riddell SRS provides researchers with a wide range of valuable information on the frequency and severity of head impacts a player receives during games and practices. Data gathered from the system will be combined with genetic information from players that experience concussion, with the objective of helping physicians diagnose concussion and better identify when a player might be expected to recover and return to the field.

“Player protection has become an essential part of football, and this cutting-edge partnership sets ASU apart from not only the rest of the conference, but every collegiate football program in the nation,” ASU Head Coach Todd Graham said. “We are not only looking out for our student-athletes while they are enrolled at ASU, but for the rest of their lives. You become a part of the brotherhood once you put on the maroon and gold, and that doesn’t end at graduation.”

Riddell will also utilize the player head impact data collected from the ASU and TGen research partnership to inform the development of new football helmets and further refine updates to smart helmet technologies like Riddell SRS and its recently launched Riddell InSite Impact Response System.

“We’re impressed by the enthusiasm exhibited by our partners, Arizona State University and TGen, as we enter the second season of our important research collaboration,” President of Riddell Dan Arment said. “They have matched our level of passion for football, and we are all committed to better protecting those that play the sport we love. We are left encouraged following the first year of our project and look forward to continuing on the path towards advancing concussion detection and treatment of athletes.”

The researchers at TGen are exploring whether the effects of sub-concussive hits are identifiable through blood-based molecular information. Their findings could prove pivotal to the game of football and other sports. Similar to last season, during this phase of the study the TGen faculty and staff are on the sidelines collecting samples and data. A baseline sample was collected from all participating players prior to their pre-season workouts. Since then, the researchers have followed the team through their daily workouts and will continue throughout the season.

Through the collection of samples over various points in time and the data generated by Riddell SRS, the goal is to identify the genomic changes in athletes exposed to routine head impacts during practice and games, athletes with diagnosed concussions that recover on both a routine time scale, and athletes with persistent symptoms following concussion that require additional treatment.

“As the mother of a young son who has played football, I’m keenly aware of the need to improve the current standards in place today for dealing with this issue,” said TGen Associate Professor Dr. Kendall Van Keuren-Jensen, whose technique for studying the collected samples drives this unique partnership. “As a researcher whose daily work looks for ways to determine the early warning signs of head injury, I get to see first hand how committed Arizona State University and Riddell are to student-athlete safety, and their determination to improve the game at all levels.”

Following the season long campaign, the researchers will gather post-season data and begin the analysis process with their colleagues at Barrow Neurological Institute and A.T. Still University. During this process, TGen will work closely with Barrow, whose B.R.A.I.N.S. (Barrow Resource for Acquired Injury to the Nervous System) program treats patients who have sustained a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury. The Barrow data will provide the researchers with additional concussion data and allow for comparison between data sets.

hcla-featured

2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Winners & Photos

David Lincoln and the Lincoln family earned Arizona Business Magazine’s first Lifetime Achievement Award to highlight the 5th annual, 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Thursday, March 8 at the Arizona Biltmore.

“Even though this is a lifetime award, I hope that I have a lot more life to live,” David Lincoln joked.

Thirteen other awards were presents to honorees, who heard keynote addresses from Dr. Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health and interim co-director at ASU’s Biodesign Institute; and Elizabeth Reich, President and CEO, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Arizona.

Congratulations to the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards finalists and winners!


View photos of the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards on our Facebook!


2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Winners:

Community Outreach: Ruth Rimmer, Director of Psycho/Social Research, Arizona Burn Center, Maricopa Integrated Health Systems

Institution or Educational Program: Arizona Institute for Breast Health

Insurance Provider or Executive: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Volunteer of the Year: Jean Reynolds, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Dentist of the Year: Tony S. Hashemian, DDS, A.T. Still University Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health

Nurse or Nursing Advocate: Dr. Anne McNamara, Grand Canyon University

Manager of the Year: Brain Shelley, Banner Del E. Webb

Hospital Executive of the Year: Rhonda Anderson, Cardon Children’s Medical Center

Hospital Administrator of the Year: Dr. Edgar Staren, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Researcher of the Year: Julie Robbins, Battelle

Healthcare Leadership Physician of the Year: Dr. Stephen Pophal, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Surgeon of the Year: Dr. David Jacofsky, The CORE Institute

Medical Center or Hospital: Thunderbird Medical Center

Lifetime Achievement Award: David Lincoln and the Lincoln Family


Photos of the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards reception and ceremony:

Photos: Cory Bergquist

[slickr-flickr tag=”2012-hcla-reception” items=”38″ type=”slideshow” id=”77774765@N07″]


Presenting Sponsors:

CTCA LogoQuarles & Brady Logo
National Bank of AzHealth Care Trust of America, Inc.

Event Sponsor:

Arizona Biltmore Resort

Dessert Sponsor:

Scan Health Plan Arizona

HCL Awards 2012 - Tony S. Hashemian, DDS

HCL Awards 2012: Dentist, Tony S. Hashemian, DDS


Dentist

Tony S. Hashemian, DDS

A.T. Still University, Arizona School of Dentistry &  Oral Health

HCL Awards 2012 - Tony HashemianTony S. Hashemian is currently the assistant dean for Global Oral Health and was the chair of admission committee at A.T. Still University, Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health for three years. In addition to being a practicing dentist, Hashemian has always been involved in improving the quality of dental care and helping make dental care affordable for everyone. In his efforts to help make dental care available to everyone, Hashemian founded Appleton Dental Plan, an Arizona discount dental plan, in 2003. In 2004, he also established the first scholarship given to the Arizona School of Dentistry &  Oral Health students. The Dr. Tony Hashemian Award of Excellence is given to the ASDOH students who obtain the highest score on part one and also on part two of the national examination.
“It is my hope and intention in establishing and providing the awards to build enthusiasm and encourage ASDOH students to excel on the dental board examinations,” Hashemian has said.

Hashemian received a philanthropy award from A.T. Still University in 2007 in recognition of his tireless efforts on behalf of the university and the community.

atsu.edu


Finalist

Dr. Michael Thompson

Kierland Dental

HCL Awards 2012 - Michael ThompsonThompson has practiced dentistry for 30 years – 25 of those years at his own cosmetic and family dentistry practice in the North Phoenix and Scottsdale area – and has become one of the most respected dentists in Arizona. He is the only dentist in Arizona history to have been honored with two Dental Hall of Fame Lifetime Achievement Awards, which he earned in 2008 and 2010. Community service has always been a big part of his career. He is a volunteer with Lincoln Children’s Dental Clinic, CASS dental clinic for the Homeless, Christina’s Smile and Give Kids-A-Smile programs.

kierlanddentalcenter.com


Finalist

Dr. Stephen Harkins

Stephen J. Harkins DDS & Associates

HCL Awards 2012 - Stephen HarkinsHarkins has been a pioneer in the field of chronic pain management related to jaw dysfunction (TMJ), chronic facial pain, headache/migraine management, bruxism management (tooth grinding, jaw clenching), and nerve pain in the jaw/head/neck unrelated to infection or dental pain. Harkins had the first limited orofacial pain practice in Arizona , which he started in 1980 in Tucson. Harkins has been very active in the treatment of insomnia, snoring, obstructive sleep apnea, and pain modulated sleep disturbance. Harkins is also involved with treating indigent patients and and improving the lives of those who cannot afford conventional pain management.


HCL Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012