Tag Archives: Abrazo Health

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Abrazo helps Arizonans with healthcare enrollment

Abrazo Health on Nov. 20 is launching its Path to Health education series aimed at helping Arizonans get affordable insurance coverage.

The new enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act’s Health Insurance Marketplace, a one-stop shop to more affordable and accessible health care, is Nov. 15-Feb. 15.

Abrazo Health will hold free Path to Health seminars this month through February to present information about the potential benefits to individuals and families regarding the Affordable Care Act, Health Insurance Marketplace and Medicaid Expansion.  Sessions are scheduled for Arrowhead, Arizona Heart, Maryvale, Paradise Valley, Phoenix Baptist and West Valley hospitals.

“We want to help individuals and their families understand the Affordable Care Act. We want to make sure our community members are well informed in order to make the best decisions for themselves and their families.’’ said Dr. William Ellert, Abrazo Health’s Chief Medical Officer.

In Arizona, about 8 out of 10 people qualified for financial assistance and cost reductions for 2014 coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace.  The Marketplace’s health insurance plans offer lower costs on out-of-pocket expenses and premiums based on income while private plans do not. Federal tax credits, which can be used to lower premiums, are available to those who qualify.

Abrazo Health’s Path to Health sessions include:
·       Arizona Heart Hospital, 1930 E. Thomas Road: 6-7 p.m. Dec. 2 and Jan. 27.
·       Arrowhead Hospital, 18701 N. 67th Ave., 6-7 p.m. Nov. 20 and Jan. 8.
·       Maryvale Hospital, 5102 W. Campbell Ave., 6-7 p.m. Dec. 4, Jan. 10, Jan. 22 and Feb. 7 in Spanish; 7-8 p.m. Dec. 4, Jan. 22 and Feb. 7 in English.
·       Paradise Valley Hospital, 6-7 p.m. Jan. 13 and Feb. 5.
·       Phoenix Baptist Hospital, 2000 W. Bethany Home Road, 6-7 p.m. Dec. 6 and Feb. 3.
·       West Valley Hospital, 6-7 p.m. Nov. 22 and Jan. 24.

Individual appointments also can be made with Certified Application Counselors at Abrazo Health’s six hospitals to receive help in signing up for health insurance on the Health Insurance Marketplace.  Coverage can begin Jan. 1 if enrollment is completed by Dec. 15.

Under the Affordable Care Act, people who do not enroll in health insurance by Feb. 15, 2015 will have to pay a penalty fee of $325 per adult and $162.50 per child or 2 percent of their annual income, whichever is higher, and it will be collected when they file income taxes.

Some of the important health benefits covered under Marketplace plans include emergency services, maternity and newborn care, lab tests, preventive services and pediatric services. Free preventative services include screenings for blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, cholesterol and colon cancer.

For a schedule and more information, visit AbrazoHealth.com/PathToHealth. To register for a Path to Health seminar, call 866-893-8446.

Michele Finney, Market CEO for Abrazo Health.

Abrazo recognized for patient safety

Abrazo Health’s Arrowhead, Maryvale, Paradise Valley and West Valley hospitals received top grades in The Leapfrog Group’s Fall 2014 Safety Score, representing the hospitals’ continued commitment to delivering safe, high-quality healthcare services.

The Leapfrog Group Hospital Safety Score is a rating system designed to give consumers information they can use to make healthcare decisions for themselves or a loved one.

“Every day, our teams of hospital colleagues are focused on improving outcomes and enhancing the safety of the care we deliver,” said Michele Finney, Market CEO for Abrazo Health. “We are proud to receive ‘A’ grades in safety from The Leapfrog Group, as we believe it reflects the hard work of our teams to position our hospitals as leading, trusted providers of care for the patients we are privileged to serve.”

As the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, Abrazo Health is committed to providing medical care to the residents of Maricopa County. The Abrazo system includes six acute care hospitals: Arizona Heart Hospital, Arrowhead Hospital, Maryvale Hospital, Paradise Valley Hospital, Phoenix Baptist Hospital and West Valley Hospital; with a combined 1,059 licensed beds, North Peoria Emergency Center and West Valley Emergency Center.

Paradise Valley Hospital current - Copy

Paradise Valley Hospital celebrates 30th anniversary

Abrazo Health’s Paradise Valley Hospital will celebrate its 30th anniversary with a free Autumn Festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 25 at the hospital, 3929 E. Bell Road.

Free food, blood pressure checks, bicycle safety, posture checks, shoe assessment for wound care are among the highlights.  A walk-in inflatable heart exhibit will educate visitors on common heart diseases.  Emergency vehicles including Phoenix fire trucks and a Native Air helicopter will be on display. Paradise Valley High School, which is located across the street, will provide a  DJ.  Historical photos and video interviews with hospital staff also will be featured.

Paradise Valley Hospital Food Service Manager Juan Carranza will conduct healthy meals demonstrations at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Paradise Valley Hospital’s cafeteria created Meals to Go, a program offering pre-packaged, healthy take-out meals that are nutritionally aligned with diabetic and/or cardiac dietary needs. Meals can be ordered 24 hours ahead and picked up at Paradise Valley and the five other Abrazo hospitals in the Phoenix area.

During three decades as a registered nurse at Paradise Valley Hospital, Andi Chronister has observed many changes in and around Paradise Valley Hospital.

The hospital has had different names and owners over the years. Medical advances such as robotic surgery and electronic medical records have transformed how patient care is delivered.  Neighborhoods and businesses filled the vacant land that once surrounded the hospital. The nearby 51 Freeway brought more traffic to the area.

But the constant at Paradise Valley Hospital has been the close-knit feeling among staff and patients.

“Patients come into the room and they look familiar to me. After we get talking, I find out that the patient’s parents were cared for here and they remember me. I’ve taken care of physicians’ families here. When I go shopping, people stop me in the store and say I remember you,’’  said
Chronister, a case manager who watched the hospital being built from her backyard and still lives close by.

Jaime Wasden, clinicial services manager for the Emergency Department, said services have improved over the years. In particular, the InQuicker program has enabled patients to wait for their emergency room visit at home and come in for a scheduled time.

One of Wasden’s favorite programs at Paradise Valley Hospital is the partnership with Paradise Valley High School. Students come observe what it’s like to be in the health-care field and nurses go to the high school health classes to show pig hearts. A new junior volunteer program for teens is underway.

“If anyone wants to work here, I want you to know that we are fantastic. We say welcome to the family,’’ she added.

Sandra Sears, who has been a registered nurse at Paradise Valley Hospital, remembers fondly when she set up the surgical instrument trays in the operating rooms on the day the hospital opened on Aug. 28, 1983.

“We have a great medical staff and nursing staff devoted to great patient care. I am very proud to be a part of the team at Paradise Valley  Hospital,’’ she added.

Paradise Valley is a 136-bed acute care, community-based hospital and is an affiliate of Abrazo Health, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Tenet Healthcare Corporation.

Some of its special programs include an accredited chest pain center, wound care and hyperbaric (high pressure) medicine, outpatient rehabilitation services, high-tech navigation system for orthopedic procedures, da Vinci robotic surgery and surgical weight loss.

“Our top goal is to ensure that our patients have the best experience possible. We hold customer satisfaction in the highest regard,’’ said David Tupponce, Paradise Valley Hospital CEO.

Paradise Valley Hospital’s Chief of Staff Shawn Blick, a urologist, said he enjoys the camaraderie of a small hospital.

“When a patient gets admitted to the floor, I know their care will be excellent,’’ he said.

123RF.com, Copyright: threeart

What to do when life gives you lemon water

Grape, strawberry kiwi, cherry pomegranate, pineapple coconut and mixed berry. What do all these flavors have in common? They are just a few of the many flavor enhancers that can be added to water.

Based on the sheer number of flavored waters for sale, plain water is no longer good enough for some people. When it comes to health, the trend is to find water alternatives that appear to come with various miracle benefits.

Lemon water is one of the trends that has gained popularity over the years. Different from most artificial flavor enhancers, lemon water is simply a lemon squeezed into water.

Bloggers rave about it and health sites list the benefits of drinking it. Many stories on lemon water claim it aids in digestion, helps you loose weight, gives you an energy boost and so on.

Yet the evidence to support all the benefits of drinking lemon water is mostly absent. Does drinking lemon water actually do all of those things? Which is better, lemon water or regular water?

Luckily, Abrazo Health’s Maryvale Hospital dietician Cara Osgood answers some of the big questions about lemon water and it’s supposed benefits in an email interview.

“First, let’s be clear, changing from fresh water to lemon water is not the same as changing to lemonade or a lemon / sugar-sweetened beverage. Lemon water is water that lemon has been steeped in, rind and all,” Osgood said.

“There are dozens of claims regarding lemon water and its purported benefits to one’s health. Unfortunately, there is insufficient evidence to support any of these claims in current medical literature,” Osgood said.

According to Osgood, here are the real truths of what lemon water does for your health:

CLAIM: Lemon water aids in digestion.
Lemon juice is an acid. While acid aids in food break down, too much acid can be harmful to those of us with heartburn or gastric ulcer, worsening our gastrointestinal symptoms.

CLAIM: Lemon water acts as a natural detoxifier.
True, sort of. Lemons and other citrus peels contain enzymes that aids in ridding the body of toxins, but the amount needed would likely require a supplement, since too much lemon water would need to be consumed to get enough of the enzyme, called D-limonene, into the body.

CLAIM: Lemon aids in mineral absorption.
True. Lemon, along with other citrus fruits and fruits and vegetable high in Vitamin C (think spinach, kale, peppers, strawberries), aids in the absorption of iron from foods, as well as other minerals.

If you find yourself wanting to test lemon water out, generally it’s recommended that if you’re under 150 pounds to squeeze half a lemon in filtered water. If you weigh more than 150 pounds, squeeze a full lemon in filtered water.

“Why drink lemon water? If you don’t drink water now because of the taste, but you’ll drink it with lemon in it, I support it 100 percent. But, if you have existing medical conditions, check first with your doctor. Don’t dump sugar in your lemon water, and be sure to add the sliced lemon to the water while it is lukewarm, keeping the skin on!” Osgood said.

In the end, just know that what you read on the Internet or hear from a friend about lemon water isn’t always the full truth. The best source is always you physician.

Dr. Miles Howard, an OB-GYN on staff at West Valley Hospital, who performed the first surgery with the new da Vinci Xi.

New robotic surgery debuts at West Valley Hospital

The first surgery in the Valley using the new da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system was performed September 15 at Abrazo Health’s West Valley Hospital.

West Valley Hospital in Goodyear is the only hospital in the Phoenix metropolitan area that has the da Vinci Xi, which is designed to offer patients minimally invasive procedures and faster recovery from a variety of surgeries.

The new technology provides advanced robotic technology including high-definition, 3-D visualization. It also allows for enhanced dexterity and greater precision and control for the surgeon.

Dr. Miles Howard, an OB-GYN affiliated with West Valley Hospital, performed the first hysterectomy with the da Vinci Xi surgical platform in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

He is among several surgeons on staff at West Valley Hospital who are trained to use the new Xi platform of da Vinci. Dr. Rama Muddaraj, a general surgeon on staff at West Valley Hospital, is scheduled to do the first general surgery procedure with the new da Vinci Xi surgical platform this week. He has been doing robotics surgery since 2012.

Howard, who has done more than 100 robotic procedures, said that the da Vinci Xi provides many advantages over earlier robotic surgery platforms.

For example, he said the endoscope can be used on any of the four arms and the Xi can be docked at different angles providing easier access to the patient and more flexibility for surgeons.

“Robotic surgery may result in less pain, less bleeding, less complications and a shorter hospital stay,’’ Howard said.

Purchasing this technology solidifies West Valley Hospital’s commitment to the healthcare of residents of the West Valley, said Dr. Pankaj Jain, a urologist affiliated with West Valley Hospital, who has done robotic surgeries since 2004.

”West Valley Hospital continues to advance the level of medical care in the region by purchasing some of the latest in robotics technology,’’ Jain said. “With this technology, my colleagues and I will be able to do even more types of complex surgeries with smaller and fewer incisions.”

Stan Holm, chief executive officer for West Valley Hospital, led the effort to bring the daVinci Xi to West Valley Hospital. “The da Vinci Surgical System provides surgeons with an alternative to both traditional open surgery and conventional laparoscopy, putting a surgeon’s hands at the controls of an advanced robotic platform.”

“The use of robotic-assisted surgeries continues to grow at a rapid pace, and West Valley Hospital is at the forefront of that growth. We are pleased to offer the da Vinci Xi Surgical System as part of our continued efforts to offer significant surgical advancements to our patients,” he added.

Surgeons with privileges at West Valley Hospital can perform many different types of robotically assisted procedures including prostatectomy, kidney and bladder surgery and gynecological procedures such as removal of ovarian tumors and other cancers and pelvic prolapse surgery, Holm said.

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

A computerized image of the brain fibers shows the sheath, deployed in conjunction with the BrainPath, inserted into the brain. The sheath allows a neurosurgeon easy access to the surgical site inside the brain.

Phoenix Baptist Hospital uses innovative brain surgery technology

BrainPath - DevicesAbrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, has announced that Phoenix Baptist Hospital is the first in Arizona to provide a breakthrough surgical approach to remove once-inoperable brain abnormalities while minimizing damage to healthy brain tissue.

Dr. Marco Marsella, a neurosurgeon on staff at Phoenix Baptist has successfully performed this new surgery using the new NICO BrainPath device. He is the only physician in Arizona and among 121 doctors nationally trained to use the NICO BrainPath device.

The BrainPath device works with several existing and new advanced technologies integrating high-definition imaging, computerized navigation, access, optics, and tissue removal and collection. The device allows physicians to navigate safely through the natural folds and delicate fibers of the brain to reach the abnormality and minimizing tissue damage.

“With this technology we may approach tumors that were considered hard to remove or whose resection would pose a high intraoperative risk,’’ said Dr. Marsella. “Benefits of this device include safer surgery, that usually provides faster recovery time, minimal internal and external scarring, less trauma to the brain and nerves, and fewer side effects and complications post-surgery.”

The purchase of this new technology underscores Phoenix Baptist Hospital’s commitment to neurological patient care,” said Phoenix Baptist Hospital CEO Dan Jones.

“This is a promising and significant development for both the hospital and patients needing targeted, flawless brain surgery,” Jones added.

Exercise Addiction: Do You Know When To Stop?

Expert offers tips on heat-related emergencies

Dr. Kevin Haselhorst, an emergency medicine physician at Kevin Haselhorst Ask the Expert’s Arrowhead and West Valley hospitals, answered questions about how to prevent heat-related emergencies.

Question: What can be done to prevent heat-related medical emergencies?
Answer: The high temperatures we experience in Arizona make us vulnerable to heat-related illnesses, so it is important to know how we can protect ourselves. The main thing is to stay hydrated, drinking enough water and wearing appropriate clothing, such as light colored, breathable and loose-fitting clothes. The average person sweats one liter of water per hour, while well-trained athletes can often sweat two liters of water per hour. To stay one step ahead of heat exhaustion, you should have plenty of water on hand, not stored in a backpack or cooler. Drinking plenty of water needs to become a natural reflex, not an afterthought.

Question: What are the early symptoms of heat exhaustion?
Answer: Symptoms of heat exhaustion can escalate from being thirsty, achy and nauseated to becoming weak, confused and vomiting. These symptoms are indicative of heat stroke which is a life-threatening condition. It is important to treat heat exhaustion symptoms immediately by getting out of the heat, drinking plenty of water, and even taking a cool shower or bath. Heat stroke treatment would require a trip to the emergency room.

Question: How can people participate safely in outdoor activities in Arizona’s hot summer?
Answer: Yes, but for shorter duration than in cooler temperatures. The key is to drink plenty of water to replenish hydration lost to sweating and be aware of the symptoms of dehydration. Young children and older adults are especially vulnerable to heat-related illnesses, as well as those with a variety of health problems including lung, heart and kidney disease and diabetes. By keeping activities in moderation and being in tune with the symptoms of heat exhaustion, we can enjoy outdoor activities and remain healthy at the same time.

Dr. Christopher Salvino, West Valley Hospital’s Trauma Medical Director, (far right) watches during one of the mock drills leading up to the opening of West Valley Hospital’s Level 1 Trauma Center that opened on July 21. Photo by Abrazo Health.

New Level 1 Trauma Center opens in West Valley

Abrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, announced that West Valley Hospital has earned a state designation as a Level 1 Trauma Center, which is the highest status attainable. As a result, the Level 1 Trauma Center at West Valley Hospital is officially open to the public.

The Level 1 Trauma Center at West Valley hospital offers 24-hour emergency care and advanced treatment options for a variety of traumatic injuries. Located in Goodyear, it is the first Level 1 Trauma Center in the West Valley and will serve Arizona communities up to the California state line. The trauma center expects to serve approximately 1,200 patients annually.

The state designation comes after extensive preparation, including a $26 million expansion project that added two trauma operating suites, two trauma resuscitation bays and 32 new private patient rooms. In addition to experienced trauma staff and board-certified physicians, there are more than 50 surgical specialists added to the staff practicing in areas including orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, facial surgery, hand surgery, cardiovascular surgery, ophthalmology, and general surgery.

“West Valley Hospital is the first Level 1 Trauma Center in Arizona and possibly the first in the United States to implement intense training drills as part of its preparation,” said Dr. Christopher Salvino, West Valley Hospital’s Trauma Medical Director, who spearheaded the mock drills.

Prior to opening, more than 70 mock drills were executed 24 hours a day for 17 continuous days to ensure a streamlined approach to trauma care by all hospital employees and several EMS providers. The drills included high-pressure situations such as car accidents, serious falls, gunshot victims and stabbing victims, Salvino added.

West Valley Hospital’s Level 1 Trauma Center is positioned to improve overall outcomes for critically-injured patients and their families.

“Our multidisciplinary trauma team is trained to provide around-the-clock expert medical care to these patients in complex emergency situations,” Salvino added.

The successes of the trauma drills will anchor West Valley Hospital’s Level 1 Trauma Center for a successful future, said Stan Holm, West Valley Hospital’s Chief Executive Officer.

“The synergies seen by our highly talented team members coming together was very rewarding to observe. Mock patients were moved from trauma bays to imaging to operating suites to intensive care to a post-surgical unit and other areas as the scenarios dictated. All of our team has done an outstanding job preparing us for this pinnacle moment in the history of West Valley Hospital,’’ he added.

“Launching such an endeavor required great planning, passions and persistence. Being the West Valley’s first Level 1 Trauma Center is a rewarding opportunity for all of us as we now have the privilege to care for the seriously injured in all of the western region of Arizona,’’ Holm said.

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Abrazo hospital 1st to get da Vinci Xi surgical system

Da-Vinci-Xi armsAbrazo Health’s West Valley Hospital in Goodyear is the first in Arizona to receive the robotic-assisted da Vinci Xi Surgical System, which offers patients less invasive options and faster recovery from a variety of surgeries.

The new technology, approved by the FDA on April 1, provides advanced robotic technology including high-definition, 3-D visualization. It also allows for enhanced dexterity and greater precision and control for the surgeon.

Being the first to purchase this technology in Arizona solidifies West Valley Hospital’s commitment to the healthcare of residents of the West Valley, said Dr. Pankaj Jain, an urologist affiliated with West Valley Hospital.

”West Valley Hospital continues to advance the level of medical care in the region by purchasing some of the latest in robotics technology,’’ Jain said. “With this technology, my colleagues and I will be able to do even more types of complex surgeries with smaller and fewer incisions.”

Dr. Miles Howard, an OB-GYN affiliated with West Valley Hospital, agrees.

“West Valley Hospital’s newest addition, the da Vinci Xi Robot, will put West Valley Hospital on the cutting edge for all surgical procedures. This will be a significant advancement in patient care for the West Valley.’’

The da Vinci Surgical System provides surgeons with an alternative to both traditional open surgery and conventional laparoscopy, putting a surgeon’s hands at the controls of an advanced robotic platform, said Stan Holm, chief executive officer for West Valley Hospital.

“The use of robotic-assisted surgeries continues to grow at a rapid pace, and West Valley Hospital is at the forefront of that growth,” Holm said. “We are pleased to offer the da Vinci Xi Surgical System as part of our continued efforts to offer significant surgical advancements to our patients.”

Surgeons with privileges at West Valley Hospital can perform many different types of robotically assisted procedures including prostatectomy, kidney and bladder surgery and gynecological procedures such as removal of ovarian tumors and other cancers and pelvic prolapse surgery, Holm said.

foreworks

Fireworks safety tips from Abrazo Health

While fireworks are beautiful to watch, they are dangerous to play with, Abrazo Health medical professionals warn.

If not handled properly, fireworks can cause severe injuries to eyes and skin. Even just watching a friend light fireworks can put you at risk.

Play it safe, allowing for everyone to enjoy the holiday, said Kevin Haselhorst, an Emergency Medicine physician on staff at Abrazo Health’s Arrowhead and West Valley hospitals.

“While the Fourth of July is intended to celebrate independence, injury to the hands or eyes will limit independence,’’ he added. “ Similar to fireworks, the good the bad and the ugly can result from planning, happenstance and carelessness respectively. The same level of attention that is given to public fireworks is especially necessary when firecrackers are held in the hand or close to the face.’’

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, more than 11,400 fireworks-related injuries happened in 2013. Of these, 65 percent occurred in the 30 days surrounding July 4th. Last year, children younger than the age of 5 experienced a higher injury rate than other age groups.
In fact, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) noted that children ages 5 to 14 had a two-and-a-half times’ greater risk of fireworks injury than the general population. While the best way to prevent these types of injuries is to leave the show to the experts, it is incredibly important to make sure that children do not handle fireworks.

Even fireworks sold at a grocery store, such as sparklers or other small novelties, are just as dangerous. Sparklers, which can burn at more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, and bottle rockets accounted for nearly 40 percent of all estimated injuries in 2013. Firecrackers and bottle rockets that explode near a person may cause injury to the hands or face.

Children, who are naturally curious and want to see how things work, may unintentionally put themselves in harm’s way when playing near fireworks. They can get too close to a lit firecracker or try to examine a dud that hasn’t ignited properly. Always make sure that children have close adult supervision near fireworks.

If you or a friend chooses to handle fireworks, the National Council on Firework Safety offers these tips:

· Use fireworks outdoors only.

· Obey local laws. If fireworks are not legal where you live, do not use them.

· Always have water handy. (A hose or bucket).

· Only use fireworks as intended. Don’t try to alter them or combine them.

· Never relight a “dud” firework. Wait 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water.

· Use common sense. Spectators should keep a safe distance from the shooter and the shooter should wear safety glasses.

· Alcohol and fireworks do not mix. Have a “designated shooter.”

· Only persons over the age of 12 should be allowed to handle sparklers of any type.

· Do not ever use homemade fireworks of illegal explosives: They can kill you! Report illegal explosives to the fire or police department in your community.

Abrazo announces new trauma operations director

Daniel Didier, Abrazo Health

Daniel Didier, Abrazo Health

Abrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, has announced the appointment of Daniel Didier as the new Trauma Operations Director for West Valley Hospital.

As Trauma Operations Director, Didier will be responsible for managing the hospital’s daily trauma center operations, including the oversight of all trauma performance improvement activities. Additionally, he will work in collaboration with other hospital administrators to assure the smooth integration of trauma services into West Valley Hospital’s missions and goals.

Didier is an accomplished healthcare leader with 20 years of experience in managing emergency medical services and trauma care, including strategic planning and business development. Prior to joining West Valley Hospital, he served as the State of Arizona’s Trauma Section Chief where he provided regulatory and designation oversight to the state’s trauma system. He also worked with the American College of Surgeons and trauma stakeholders to ensure quality care is delivered to communities across Arizona.

Didier holds a Paramedic Certification from Sinclair Community College and completed the Project Management Professional Training course at Ohio State University. He earned his M.B.A. from the New York Institute

Michele Finney, Market CEO for Abrazo Health.

Abrazo Health Announces New CEO

Michele Finney has been named chief executive officer of Abrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona with six hospitals and a network of primary care and specialty clinics.

“Michele Finney is an accomplished healthcare leader who brings deep experience in running integrated health networks in our California operations to Abrazo Health,” said Jeff Koury, chief executive officer of Tenet Healthcare’s Western Region. “We are very pleased that she will lead the direction, strategy and operations for Abrazo Health and continue our mission to provide the highest quality of care for residents throughout the region.”

Prior to joining Abrazo Health, Finney served for 14 years as the chief executive officer at Los Alamitos Medical Center, a 167-bed acute care hospital with five affiliated outpatient facilities in California. Under her leadership, that medical center expanded its services to include urgent care centers, primary care and specialty physician foundation practices, as well as a residency training program. Abrazo Health and Los Alamitos are part of Tenet Healthcare, a national, diversified health network of hospitals, outpatient centers, health plans and hospital business services. Finney has been with Tenet for 36 years.

“I am very excited to join the outstanding leadership team at Abrazo Health,” said Finney. “I look forward to working with our doctors, nurses, staff and volunteers to further Abrazo’s commitment to providing high quality, patient-focused healthcare to Arizona communities.”

Finney earned an Executive Master of Business Administration from Pepperdine University in Malibu, California and a Bachelor of Science degree in healthcare administration from the University of LaVerne in California.

Paul Martsall - Surgical Services Nurse for PBH

Phoenix Baptist Hospital nurse earns honor

Abrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, has announced that Phoenix Baptist Hospital surgical services nurse Paul Marstall has been inducted into the Tenet Heroes Hall of Fame. The announcement was made at a ceremony in Dallas, Texas earlier this month.

Marstall is recognized for his compassion and professionalism during one family’s difficult decision to remove a loved one from life support and donate her organs. The patient’s cardiac arrest created a time-sensitive situation in which the family had limited time to say goodbye so the transplant team could retrieve her organs. Marstall worked to make the patient’s final moments meaningful for the family, going beyond the medical definition of “care” by providing emotional support and guidance in a delicate situation. Due to his professional care, several patients received organ transplants from the patient’s donation.

“Our Tenet Hero inductees represent the best of who we are at Tenet and what we do as healthcare providers in the communities we serve,” said Trevor Fetter, president and chief executive officer of Tenet Healthcare. “Paul’s extraordinary character and dedication is an inspiration to us all.”

Marstall was one of seven employees inducted into the Tenet Heroes Hall of Fame, Tenet Healthcare Corporation’s highest honor for employees. This year’s recipients were chosen from more than 130 nominations. Tenet Heroes are nominated by their hospital’s leadership team and selected based on their dedication to their patients, colleagues and communities. The Tenet Heroes Hall of Fame recognizes exceptional employees who demonstrate Tenet’s values of quality, integrity, service, innovation and transparency.

brain

Abrazo Announces Cutting-Edge Neuroscience Center

Abrazo Health announced that Phoenix Baptist Hospital is now home to a new state-of-the-art Neuroscience expansion. The new suite will include all the latest equipment, including a Biplane Neuroangiography System. The Biplane Neuroangiography technology will allow surgeons to deliver potentially life – saving care to patients with speed and accuracy by providing enhanced visualizations of the brain and spine, treatment that reduces the risk of additional problems and will also expedite recovery.

This latest move by Phoenix Baptist Hospital adds to an already banner year, further advancing the care patients in need of neurological care. Earlier this year, the hospital was once again honored with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award. The hospital has also earned honors of being placed on the Target Stroke: Honor Roll for a second year in recognition for their commitment to turning patient guidelines into lifelines.

Right now in the U.S., stroke is the fourth leading cause o f death among adults, and someone suffers from a stroke in this country every forty seconds, making need for such a technologically advanced center even greater. Dan Jones, CEO of Phoenix Baptist Hospital says, “This new neurosciences care suite is just further proof of our commitment to the best in quality care for the patients here in the valley and across the southwest. Stroke patients, head injury patients and spine injury patients will have access to the latest in technology and trained physicians here at Phoenix Baptist and our entire staff couldn’t be more excited to be bringing this all to the community.”

Lawsuit Dropped To Prevent AHCCCS Hospital Payment Cuts

3 Abrazo Hospitals Earn Top Performer Recognition

Abrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, has announced today that Arrowhead Hospital, Maryvale Hospital and Paradise Valley Hospital have been named Top Performers on Key Quality Measures® by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health care organizations in America.

The three Abrazo Health hospitals are recognized for exemplary performance in using evidence-based clinical processes that are shown to improve care for certain conditions. The clinical processes focus on care for heart attack, pneumonia, surgery, children’s asthma, stroke and venous thromboembolism, as well as inpatient psychiatric services. New this year is a category for immunization for pneumonia and influenza.

Arrowhead Hospital, Maryvale Hospital and Paradise Valley Hospital are among 1,099 hospitals in the U.S. earning the distinction of Top Performer on Key Quality Measures for attaining and sustaining excellence in accountability measure performance. This is the second year in a row that Maryvale Hospital is being recognized as a Top Performer.

Arrowhead Hospital, Maryvale Hospital and Paradise Valley Hospital and all the Top Performer hospitals have demonstrated an exceptional commitment to quality improvement and they should be proud of their achievement,” says Mark R. Chassin, M.D., FACP, M.P.P., M.P.H., president and chief executive officer, The Joint Commission.”

“We understand that what matters most to patients at Abrazo Health is safe, effective care. That’s why our organization has made a commitment to accreditation and to positive patient outcomes through evidence-based care processes. Arrowhead Hospital, Maryvale Hospital and Paradise Valley Hospital are proud to receive the distinction of being a Top Performer on Key Quality Measures,” says Ken Howell, President of Abrazo Health.

humana

Abrazo helps guide Community Through Healthcare Reform

Abrazo Health has announced a new education series aimed at helping Arizonans navigate through the complex topic of healthcare reform and insurance reform programs. Abrazo Health will hold a series of free community events in November to answer questions about health care reform, Medicaid Expansion, and the new Health Insurance Marketplace and the potential benefits to individuals and their families. The education sessions will be offered in both English and Spanish.

Crystal Hamilton, Chief Executive Officer of Maryvale Hospital, an Abrazo Health hospital, says, “Because this community will be greatly affected by these changes, we are intent on helping individuals and their families understand this complex topic and their options.” Hamilton adds, “The complexity of the Affordable Care Act, insurance reforms and all that comes with it can be a slippery slope so Abrazo wants to make sure our community members are well-informed in order to make the best decisions for themselves and their families.”

The sessions are scheduled for the following dates at Maryvale Community Center at 4420 N. 51st Ave. in Phoenix:

·         Wednesday, November 6 at 11am – 2pm
·         Thursday, November 7 at 6pm – 9pm

Residents can register online at AbrazoHealth.com/ReformEvent or by calling 1-855-292-9355.

trauma

Abrazo Health Announces New Trauma Medical Director

Abrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, has announced Dr. Christopher Salvino as West Valley Hospital’s new Trauma Medical Director. Dr. Salvino is an accomplished trauma surgeon with experience in leading American College of Surgeons (ACS)-verified trauma centers.

As Trauma Medical Director (TMD), Dr. Salvino will be responsible for the development of the trauma program at West Valley Hospital. Specifically, he will develop a trauma service inclusive of a specialist on-call panel, treatment protocols, and oversee the hospital’s peer review and performance improvement process.  Additionally, he will provide leadership in the development of the regional Trauma System by continuing to serve on national, regional and local committees.

“I am thrilled to be part of the Abrazo team in developing a modern, high-quality and professional Trauma service at West Valley Hospital.” said Dr. Salvino, “The opportunity to help develop the only high-acuity trauma program in western region of Metro-Phoenix to the California border and to help integrate the other Abrazo hospitals into our system’s approach to trauma is exciting. West Valley Hospital’s world-class Trauma program will be able to care for the most critically injured trauma patients and I predict we will be very proud of our outcomes as the program launches.”

Dr. Salvino currently serves as the Clinical Assistant Professor for the University of Arizona’s College of Medicine in Tucson. He is also a board member of the Arizona Trauma and Acute Care Consortium (AzTRACC). He is a member of the State Trauma Advisory Board (STAB) serving as co-chair for the workgroup charged with revising the State Trauma Plan. Additionally, Dr. Salvino developed the first formal training course for trauma laparoscopy in the United States as a surgical resident.

big belly of a fat man and measuring tape isolated on white

Paradise Valley Hospital to Treat Obesity

Obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges we face today.  According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health, more than 64 percent of adults in Arizona are overweight, with 24 percent suffering from obesity.  In Maricopa County alone, about 200,000 individuals suffer from Severe Obesity.

Last month, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced its decision to formally recognize obesity as a medical disease. In doing so, the AMA joins numerous other medical organizations and government agencies which have either officially recognized obesity as a disease or asserted such through their leadership representatives.

In mid-August, Abrazo Health will open its comprehensive bariatric surgery center at Paradise Valley Hospital in collaboration with Dr. Kurt W. Sprunger of the Phoenix Bariatric Center.  Dr. Sprunger and his team are dedicated to the proper treatment of those suffering with obesity who have for too long endured criticism and discrimination and felt frustration and shame after the failure of inappropriate and ineffective treatments.

Dr. Sprunger sees the decision by the AMA as a significant milestone in helping to remove societal misconceptions about obesity and improve access to proper medical care for the millions of Americans struggling with this disease, including the 24 million Americans suffering from Severe Obesity and its serious related conditions, for whom bariatric surgery has proved to be the most effective and lasting treatment.

The services offered by Paradise Valley Hospital and Phoenix Bariatric Center will help Arizonans suffering from obesity to reverse the effects of diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, sleep apnea, infertility and a host of other medical conditions associated with obesity and reduce their risk of certain cancers and heart disease.