Tag Archives: Adolfson & Peterson

EMCC-PAC-Exterior Rendering

Adolfson & Peterson Break Ground on EMCC Performing Arts Center

Adolfson and Peterson Construction announced Monday it broke ground on Estrella Mountain Community College’s new performing arts center. The $9.7M center is a 30,000 SF free standing fine arts space at the heart of the campus. Orcutt Winslow designed the building, developed by the Maricopa County Community College District. The new building will serve as a bookend to the student mall at the center of the campus master plan. In addition to the 300-seat performance area with professional style crossover orchestra pit and pit lift platform, the state-of-the-art building features a comprehensive performing arts support space including – black box performance studio complete with pipe grid and theatrical accessories including digital projection; dance studio with premium Marley dance surfacing; costume design and fabrication lab; tech lab for digital audio, video and digital scene production; performer support areas and dressing rooms; backstage support space and scene shop for complete theatrical production, scenery construction, and stagecraft. Construction is expected to wrap up in November 2014.

Adolfson & Peterson Break Ground on EMCC Performing Arts Center

Adolfson and Peterson Construction announced Monday it broke ground on Estrella Mountain Community College’s new performing arts center. The $9.7M center is a 30,000 SF free standing fine arts space at the heart of the campus. Orcutt Winslow designed the building, developed by the Maricopa County Community College District. The new building will serve as a bookend to the student mall at the center of the campus master plan. In addition to the 300-seat performance area with professional style crossover orchestra pit and pit lift platform, the state-of-the-art building features a comprehensive performing arts support space including – black box performance studio complete with pipe grid and theatrical accessories including digital projection; dance studio with premium Marley dance surfacing; costume design and fabrication lab; tech lab for digital audio, video and digital scene production; performer support areas and dressing rooms; backstage support space and scene shop for complete theatrical production, scenery construction, and stagecraft. Construction is expected to wrap up in November 2014.

JaimeVidales

Adolfson & Peterson Promotes Jaime Vidales

Jaime R. Vidales has been promoted to Director of K-14 in Adolfson & Peterson’s Southwest region. Vidales has spent the last eight years at A&P working on the firm’s local education projects.

As Director of K-14, Vidales will serve as the market leader in the primary, secondary, and two-year post-secondary and technical learning environments. His responsibilities will include the management of the firm’s educational construction projects in the region, development of internal teams to serve the K-14 market, industry advocacy, and community outreach with Arizona schools and colleges. Vidales will remain actively involved in the day-to-day management of projects while bringing hisknowledge of building learning environments as an early resource to current and prospective clients.

I’m a product of the education system here in Arizona,” states Vidales. “I’m passionate about the future of education in the state and have a vested interest in the opportunities afforded to students locally. I look forward to contributing to the betterment of Arizona schools in my expanded role at A&P.”

Vidales is an Arizona native and holds an undergraduate degree in Construction Management from the Del E. Webb School of Construction at Arizona State University. During his tenure at A&P, he has been directly involved in the preconstruction and construction management efforts on 23 educational projects. His experience includes renovations and new construction of elementary and middle school campuses, a $50+ million occupied high school modernization, and new construction and repurposing of space on community college campuses locally.

Vidales will be actively involved in a number of local organizations supported by Adolfson & Peterson Construction, including the Arizona Business and Education Coalition (ABEC), Arizona Association of School Business Officials (AASBO), and the Alliance for Construction Excellence (ACE) among others.

We are very excited to have Jaime take on this leadership role”, said Bryan Dunn, Senior Vice President at A&P. “Building learning environments has been a cornerstone for A&P in Arizona for the last 22 years. Projects with such an impact on our local communities are what truly drive us to perform as an organization. Jaime’s expertise, passion and commitment to education in Arizona will serve as a solid foundation as we continually strive to provide added value to our educational clients.”

Adolfson & Peterson - Devine Legacy

Two Adolfson & Peterson Projects Win National Tax Credit Excellence Awards

Two multi-family projects built by the Phoenix office of general contractor Adolfson & Peterson ― including a 2012 RED Award winner ― were among the six winners of the 18th Annual Charles L. Edson Tax Credit Excellence Awards.

Presented to the most outstanding Low Income Housing Tax Credit (Housing Credit) properties in six categories, this national awards program celebrates the best in affordable rental housing development.

Devine Legacy on Central (above photo) won in the category Metropolitan/Urban Housing. Devine Legacy on Central was the 2012 RED Award winner for Best Multi-Family project. Apache ASL Trails in Tempe won in the category Special Needs Housing. Apache ASL trails was also a RED Awards finalist. Both were built by Adolfson & Peterson.

This year, the Affordable Housing Tax Credit Coalition (AHTCC) received numerous remarkable entries ― 55 applications from 24 states.  A panel of five judges selected 6 first place finishers and 10 honorable mentions.  Other winners:

  • Rural Housing: Colville Homes II, Inchelium, Wash.;
  • Senior Housing: Salem Towers Senior Housing, Malden, Mass.;
  • Green Housing: Northwest Gardens, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.;
  • Public Housing: Heritage View Homes Phase II, Cleveland, Ohio.

Each winner will be recognized at a Capitol Hill luncheon ceremony on Thursday, June 21, 2012.

This year’s judging panel included Dan Mendelson, DTM & Associates (chair); Lauren Bazel, Office of the Honorable John F. Kerry (D-Mass.); Ethan Handelman, National Housing Conference; Ted Simpson, Nebraska Investment Finance Authority; and Deborah VanAmerongen, Nixon Peabody LLP.

For more information on the Charles L. Edson Tax Credit Excellence Awards visit their website at taxcreditcoalition.org/awards.

AZ schools

Schools Feel The Pinch When It Comes To Growth In West Valley

Growing Pains

Schools feel the pinch when it comes to growth in the West Valley

By Lori K. Baker

It’s back-to-school time. Will the children in the West Valley’s new residential developments have a neighborhood school to attend? At first, that question might strike you as odd. After all, many consider school the cornerstone of the neighborhood, something you automatically count on to be there. But officials in the West Valley’s fastest growing school districts say it’s not correct to make that assumption. “People assume there’s a place for their kid to go to school, but logistically it isn’t always so,” says Pete Turner, superintendent of Liberty Elementary School District in Buckeye.

growing_painsTwo potent forces have converged in the West Valley to create a school shortage: rapid growth and a school funding formula that fails to keep pace.

Mark Maksimowicz heads Dysart Unified School District, one of the Valley’s fastest growing districts. In the 2005-2006 school year, the student population shot up by 3,500 students, more than a 25 percent leap for a district with approximately 18,000 students. In a perpetual game of catch-up to meet the demand for classroom space, DUSD is expected to open four new schools in the 2006-2007 school year.

The long-term outlook looks even more daunting for the Liberty District. While it ended last school year with 3,000 students and five schools, Liberty is expected to have 35,000 students and 45 to 50 schools by 2020. “But that depends on what happens in the housing market over the next 15 years,” Turner says.

That means 15 years of wrestling with overcrowding for Turner and other West Valley superintendents, unless the state’s schools funding formula is changed.

The old school finance system relied on the secondary property tax, driven by the assessed valuation of a school district and general obligation bonding. In the old system, school districts could ask for voter approval for bonds of up to 15 percent of the school district’s assessed valuation as a way to keep pace with growth.

But all that changed in 1994, when the Arizona Supreme Court decided that the funding formula was unconstitutional in the landmark case, Roosevelt Elementary School District No. 66 v. Bishop.

Four years later, then-Gov. Jane Dee Hull signed legislation that dramatically reformed the way K-12 schools are constructed in Arizona. The legislation is known as Students FIRST (Fair and Immediate Resources for Students Today). Students FIRST moved responsibility for funding school construction and other capital items away from local districts to the state and phased out those local property taxes used to support capital expenditures. The new law created a state School Facilities Board to administer the system.

“I don’t think anyone realized at the time what was about to happen,” says Roxanne Morris, superintendent of the Saddle Mountain Unified School District in Tonopah.

Rapidly growing districts found it nearly impossible to keep pace with growth. The funding formula multiplies the number of students by the square footage and cost per square foot to determine the allocation. “By the time you can even begin construction you’re already overcrowded in some—if not all—of your schools,” Turner says. “Construction of a new school takes between eight to 12 months, so sometimes when a school opens, it’s already full. It makes it very difficult to keep up with growth without having overcrowded schools.”

Meanwhile, developers say the School Facilities Board’s cost per square foot doesn’t reflect the fact that construction costs have catapulted over the last few years. Barry Chasse, vice president of Adolfson & Peterson, developer of numerous Valley schools, says his company has seen a 30 to 40 percent hike in construction material costs—namely steel, copper and petroleum-based products—over the last two and a half years. Labor costs have also jumped 15 to 20 percent over the same period, he says. “The funding levels are inadequate in today’s dollars,” he says.

A solution? “It’s time for the School Facilities Board to be revisited,” says Jack Lunsford, president and CEO of WESTMARC. Fellow WESTMARC member Herman Orcutt, partner of The Orcutt/Winslow Partnership, says schools are a key component in the future of the West Valley’s successful economic development. “The quality of schools is an important fabric of the community,” he says. “Higher quality schools bring up the level of residential, commercial and business development.”

AZ Business MagazineMeanwhile, savvy school district officials like Morris are discovering ways to free themselves from state funding straitjackets. She’s discovered a key is forging successful partnerships with developers, such as Joel H. Farkas, chairman of JF Companies. Forget golf courses and greenbelts. Farkas believes the wisest investment for developers is the neighborhood school. “Of all the things we could possibly do as a developer, that’s the most important,” he says.

www.dysart.org
www.liberty.k12.az.us
www.smusd90.org
www.a-p.com
www.westmarc.org
www.jfcompanies.com

Arizona Business Magazine Aug/Sept 2006

AZ Business Magazine Aug-Sept 2006 | Previous: Home Run | Next: The Metro Report