Tag Archives: alzheimers research

banner alzheimers foundation - brain research

Banner Alzheimers Foundation Launches $40 Million Campaign

Banner Alzheimers Foundation (BAF), the philanthropic resource for Banner Alzheimer’s Institute (BAI), announces a $40 million campaign to advance some of the most challenging yet promising research to stop Alzheimer’s disease. The BAI Breakthrough will support cutting-edge studies aimed at treating and preventing the disease, state-of-the-art brain imaging and an unparalleled model of patient and family care.

The campaign will designate $15 million to help fund the groundbreaking research that BAI recently announced in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health and others. This prevention trial, which will span two countries, will test an amyloid immunization therapy and is the first ever conducted with cognitively healthy individuals who are certain to develop Alzheimer’s because of their genetic history.

The campaign’s remaining $25 million will support additional studies of both the preclinical and symptomatic stages of the disease; critical technology for a new 18,000-square-foot imaging center; and expansion of BAI’s comprehensive model of care to serve as the standard nationwide.

The BAI Breakthrough officially launched this spring with a $6 million gift from the Stead Family Foundation. Mary Joy and Jerre Stead are long-time supporters of BAI and chairs of the campaign’s leadership cabinet. He is also chairman of the BAF board.

“We absolutely believe prevention of Alzheimer’s will become a reality through BAI’s research efforts,” Jerre Stead says. “Yet, not only is BAI working on behalf of future generations, it is taking care of individuals and families dealing right now with the impact of this devastating disease. Mary Joy and I feel privileged to be a part of this effort and encourage others to get involved.”

About 5.4 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s, a debilitating and incurable disease of the brain. By 2030, that number could exceed 7.7 million, and by 2050, as many as 16 million Americans could have Alzheimer’s. The disease takes an enormous physical, emotional and financial toll on individuals, caregivers and families.

Dr. Eric Reiman, BAI executive director and CEO of Banner Research, applauds the role that philanthropy is playing here in advancing research and care.

“We could not be more grateful to Jerre and Mary Joy Stead for their leadership, passion and extraordinary support—and to so many people who provide the resources needed for us to fulfill our ambitious goals,” Reiman says. “Their support makes it possible for BAI to provide hope and help, research and care, and to give us the chance to make a transformational difference in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.”

The campaign is a collaboration between a team of renowned scientists and clinicians and an outstanding group of individuals, corporations and foundations dedicated to funding the breakthrough that could change lives for generations to come.

More information about Banner Alzheimers Foundation and The BAI Breakthrough or the work of BAI can be found at www.banneralz.org.

2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

2010 HCLA – Legislative Impact Award And Lifetime Achievement In Research Award

Legislative Impact Award

Honoree: Roy Ryals, Executive Director, Southwest Ambulance

Roy Ryals
Executive Director
Southwest Ambulance

Virtually every pre-hospital care related rule at the Arizona Department of Health Services, and every piece of related state legislation approved in the past 30 years, has something in common — Roy Ryals helped to write it.

Roy Ryals, Executive Director of Southwest Ambulance, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

Ryals, executive director for the Southwest region of Southwest Ambulance and Rural/Metro, is considered the pre-hospital regulatory expert and reference point. His knowledge and memory of the history behind decisions, and the far-reaching effects of every word that’s written, has earned him the respect of both the industry and state regulators.

In effect, every patient in Arizona who has used an ambulance over the past 30 years has benefited from Ryals’ intellect and participation in the legislative and regulatory process, whether he’s at the state Capitol, in a board room, or in the back of an ambulance. Ryals has been appointed by four Arizona governors to the Emergency Medical Services Council and was named by three directors of Department of Health Services to the State Trauma Advisory Board.

He is president of the Arizona Ambulance Association and a registered lobbyist with the state. At Southwest Ambulance and Rural/Metro, Ryals is responsible for all contracts, regulatory issues and legislative oversight. He indirectly oversees all field employees through his involvement in medical protocols and regulation for field crews of both companies. He also manages Southwest’s administrative leadership team and legislative consultants. Ryals began his career at Southwest Ambulance in 1987 as the executive director over Arizona medical transport.

Two years later, he was promoted to national director of EMS. In 1991, he became the regional chief operating officer overseeing system integration and regulatory compliance.

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Lifetime Achievement Award

Honoree: Joseph Rodgers, PH.D.

Joseph Rodgers, PH.D., Founder and Senior Scientist
Banner Sun Health Research Institute

Joseph Rogers, Ph.D., the motivating force behind Banner Sun Health Research Institute in Sun City, has devoted three decades to finding the cause of and cure for Alzheimer’s disease. But the first work from researchers at the institute did not originate in multimillion-dollar labs or in high-tech facilities; they began their research at a card table with folding chairs.

Joseph Rodgers, Founder and Senior Scientist Banner Sun Health Research Institute, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

The institute, a tribute to Rogers’ tireless efforts in the field of Alzheimer’s research, has created opportunities for intensive research into other age-related illnesses, including Parkinson’s disease and arthritis. The discoveries already made at the institute, and those yet to come, promise to have significant benefits for millions around the world. Rogers, the institute’s founder and senior scientist, was recruited in 1986 to develop the research facility.

His qualifications for this breakthrough role include a doctorate from the University of California, San Diego; a postdoctoral fellowship and service as a staff scientist at the Salk Institute; and immediately prior to his arrival in Arizona, he was at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, serving as a principal investigator within the New England Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Harvard University. Rogers made the revolutionary discovery of the damage that inflammation causes to the Alzheimer’s-affected brain. Initially, other scientists scoffed because conventional wisdom precluded the inflammatory process from entering the brain, but Rogers’ discovery changed Alzheimer’s research.

Under Rogers’ leadership, the institute has attracted internationally recognized faculty and scientists, who have made their own compelling discoveries, including a direct linkage between Alzheimer’s and high cholesterol, and a compound of drugs that has promise for significant benefit to those with rheumatoid arthritis. Another key to the institute’s growth is its full-tissue repository, which Rogers initially developed as a brain bank soon after founding the institute.

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