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Az Business honors Most Admired Companies

BestCompaniesAZ and Az Business magazine honored 40 companies at the 2014 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies award reception on September 11, 2014 at the Westin Kierland Resort.

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Arizona’s Most Admired Companies are selected based on how a company has performed in the following areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, corporate and social responsibility, customer opinion and innovation. Five companies were recognized with a “spotlight” award for each of the five categories.

CONGRATUALTIONS!

The five spotlight awards winners are:

Customer Opinion: Cresa
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Quality Leadership: Kitchell
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Social Responsibility: Vanguard
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Innovation: Laser Spine Institute
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Workplace Culture: GoDaddy
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“This is the most comprehensive and prestigious corporate awards program in Arizona because it recognizes the contributions and impact these ‘most admired companies’ bring to our state,’” says Denise Gredler, co-founder of the Most Admired Companies Program.

“These companies truly exemplify what it means to be a good corporate citizen,” says Cheryl Green, publisher of Arizona Business Magazine. “MAC winners consistently show strong leadership, a commitment to the communities in which they operate and concern for their employees and customers.”

This year’s presenting sponsors included Dignity Health of Arizona, National Bank of Arizona and Thunderbird International School of Global Management. Additional Event Sponsors include Charles Schwab, Progrexion, Ryan and Shutterfly.

The 40 companies named Most Admired Companies for 2014 were:

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Alliance Residential Company
American Express
Arizona Diamondbacks
AXA Advisors
Banner Casa Grande Medical Center
Cancer Treatment Centers of America
CBRE, Inc.
Charles Schwab
Cresa Phoenix
Desert Diamond Casinos and Entertainment
DIRTT Environmental Solutions
Fennemore Craig
GoDaddy
Goodmans Interior Structurs
Grant Thornton
Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino Resort
Homeowners Financial Group
Hyatt Regency Phoenix
Infusionsoft
International Cruise & Excursions, Inc.
Kitchell
LaneTerralever
Laser Spine Institute
Mayo Clinic
Miller Russell Associates
National Bank of Arizona
Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Quarles & Brady
Rider Levett Bucknall
Ryan, LLC
Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network
Shutterfly, Inc.
Sonora Quest Laboratories
Sundt Construction
The CORE Institute
Telesphere
UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
University of Advancing Technology
Vanguard

Erin Harper, Keyser

Erin Harper Joins Keyser

Keyser announced today that Erin Harper has joined the firm. 

I am very pleased to be able to welcome such a talented and experienced project manager to our growing team,” said founder Jonathan Keyser. “Erin’s commitment to service is a perfect fit for our service based culture, and her experience and expertise will help Keyser continue to set the bar for providing best in class service to each and every client.”

Erin Harper brings 20 years of comprehensive project management experience to Keyser, having worked as a project manager for American Express, Motorola, Honeywell, and other corporate space users. Erin’s project experiences ranges from large ground up construction projects to modest tenant improvement remodels.

I am very excited to have found a company whose core values and principles for business and life are in alignment with my own,” stated Erin. “I am looking forward to making a difference, and to being a part of changing how project management is done through Keyser’s model of selfless service.”

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McDowell Sonoran Preserve to close early July

Fire danger prompts restrictions and increased patrols -

Scottsdale’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve will close at 3 p.m. on Thursday, July 4, to reduce the threat of wild fires during the Independence Day holiday. Summer temperatures dry out vegetation and create an extreme fire threat that can endanger lives, property and the Valley’s fragile desert. The availability and popularity of fireworks during the Fourth of July holiday increases that threat.

All trailheads into the 27,800-acre-acre preserve will have “closed” signs posted. Scottsdale police, staff and volunteer stewards will patrol the area to advise visitors about the closure and fire threat. Violating the closure is a Class 2 Misdemeanor punishable by up to four months in jail and a $750 fine.

The use of fireworks is prohibited in Scottsdale, but sales are permitted. Fireworks should not be used in Scottsdale – or anywhere near a natural desert environment.

“While the legislature mandated that firework sales are permitted throughout the state, our local ordinance prohibits the use of any type of consumer fireworks within city limits,” said Deputy Fire Chief Jim Ford. “Fireworks should not be used in Scottsdale – or anywhere near a natural desert environment.”

Scottsdale’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve encompasses the McDowell Mountains and large areas of the Sonoran Desert north of Dynamite Boulevard.

Visit www.scottsdaleaz.gov/fire.

hispanic

The 25 Most Influential Hispanic Business Leaders

Benito Almanza
Arizona president
Bank of America
Born into a family of migrant workers, Almanza is now responsible for all lines of business efforts, community and civic activities in the state. The graduate of Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara has been with Bank of America for 30 years, working in California before moving to Arizona in 1992.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Hiring top talent and developing them to replace me someday.”
Surprising fact: “Growing up working with my family in the fields helped me better understand agribusiness banking.”

Marty Alvarez
CEO, principal in charge
Sun Eagle Corporation
Alvarez is founder of family-owned and operated Sun Eagle, one of the top minority-owned general contracting and construction management firms in the country. He has been a chair and officer for the Associated Minority Contractors of America since 1993.
His hope for his professional legacy: “That our well-constructed buildings improved the landscape, and our assistance to individuals and families improved lives.”
Surprising fact: “I have been involved with Shotokan Karate continuously for the past 39 years.”

Victor M. Aranda
Area president, Northern Arizona
Wells Fargo Arizona
Aranda manages six Wells Fargo Community Banking markets; Northeast Arizona, Central Arizona, White Mountains, North Phoenix, North Scottsdale and Scottsdale. He is responsible for 816 team members, 69 banking stores, and $4.1 billion in deposits. A 25-year financial services veteran, Aranda presently serves as a board member for Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Valley Leadership Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “My passion in life is to add value to those I come in contact with.  What I would like to be remembered for is how I spent my life serving, helping and developing the leaders of tomorrow.”
Surprising fact: “I was involved and directed a church Spanish choir and I have also sang in Las Vegas at the Bellagio Hotel.”

Tony Astorga
Retired CFO
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona
Astorga recently retired from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona where he served as the Senior Vice President, CFO & CBDO since 1988. He currently serves as chairman of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation and is a member of the board of directors for the Arizona Community Foundation, AZHCC, ASU Foundation, CSA General Insurance Agency, Phoenix Art Museum, and US Bank Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered in my profession as a CPA and CFO for being a good mentor and for helping develop my staff in their work ethic and level of growth.”
Surprising fact: “I have a sweet tooth for twinkies or that my favorite movie is ‘Planes, Trains and Automobiles’, I still laugh when I think about the movie”.

Miguel Bravo
Senior community development consultant
Arizona Public Service Company
Bravo is responsible for directing community development initiatives statewide to help serve diverse markets for APS. He also collaborates with economic development organizations to attract industry to Arizona. Bravo also serves the boards of Friendly House, Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Latino Center at Morrison Institute, Boys Hope Girls Hope and Jobs for Arizona’s Graduates.
His hope for his professional legacy: “For conducting business with integrity, purpose, passion; and for having a conviction for public service.”
Surprising fact: “I became a US Citizen in 2007. Having grown up in Arizona, this was one of my proudest moments.”

José Cárdenas
Senior vice president and general counsel
Arizona State University
Before joining ASU in 2009, Cárdenas was chairman at Lewis & Roca, where he became the first Hispanic to serve as managing partner of a major law firm in Arizona. A Stanford Law School graduate, Cárdenas has served on many boards and commissions and has received various awards.
His hope for his professional legacy: “As a good lawyer who served his clients and community well with the utmost integrity.”
Surprising fact: Cárdenas was involved with death penalty cases for more than 30 years.

America Corrales-Bortin
Co-founder
America’s Taco Shop
Corrales-Bortin grew up Culiacán in Sinaloa, Mexico, watching her mother prepare the dishes that would become the recipes for success at America’s Taco Shop. Founded in 2008, America’s authentic carne asada and al pastor quickly built a following that has led to rapid expansion and a partnership Kahala, a franchise development company. So far in 2013, America’s has already moved into California, Texas and Maryland.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “As someone who has a passion for the food we serve at America’s Taco Shop.”
Surprising fact: “People would be surprised that I am named after a famous soccer team in Mexico.”

Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.
President and CEO
Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
In addition to leading the Hispanic Chamber, de la Melena Jr. operates the Phoenix Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), the state’s leading advocate representing more than 100,000 minority business enterprises. De la Melena is also the Founder of edmVentures, LLC a small business investment company with holdings in Phoenix airport concessions at Sky Harbor International.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Helping small businesses succeed.”
Surprising fact: “I had the opportunity to do business in more than 30 countries before the age of 30.”

Robert Espiritu
Acquisition marketing
American Express
Espiritu’s diversified professional experience includes working for small business enterprises as well as corporate 100 businesses in the areas of sales, marketing and financial management. He has also been actively involved with various nonprofit organizations; most recently as the former chairman of the board for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Innovative and focused leader who delivers with energy and is known for building successful relationships and high performing teams.”
Surprising fact: “As a first generation American, I am passionate about helping aspiring and under-privileged youth achieve their dreams and advocating for Hispanic career advancement, education and scholarships.”

Dr. Maria Harper-Marinick
Executive vice chancellor and provost
Maricopa Community Colleges
Harper-Marinick oversees all areas of academic and student affairs, workforce development, and strategic planning. She serves on several national and local boards including ABEC and AMEPAC, which she chairs.  Originally from the Dominican Republic, Harper-Marinick came to ASU as a Fulbright Scholar.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Passion for, and unwavering commitment to, public education as the foundation of a democratic society.”
Surprising fact: “The joy I get from driving fast cars.”

Julio Herrera
National Spanish Sales and Retention Director
Cox Communications
Herrera and his team work across markets and cross-functional departments to drive Spanish language sales and grow Cox’s Hispanic markets nationally. He also helped establish LIDER, a leadership program tailored for Hispanic team members looking for advancement opportunities in Phoenix and Southern Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Growing and improving the Hispanic customer experience and making a difference our communities.”
Surprising fact: “Spanish was my first language and I started my career in sales leadership at 18 ears old.”

Lori Higuera
Director
Fennemore Craig
Higuera defends, provides counsel and trains employers of all sizes. She’s a Southwest Super Lawyer, an employment law expert for the Arizona Republic/Arizona Business Gazette and is a recent recipient of the High-Level Business Spanish Diploma from the Madrid Chamber of Commerce.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “A skilled lawyer who elevated the practice by integrating the diverse perspectives of our community.”
Surprising fact: “I was fired from my first job as a Santa’s helper for being too social!”

Ana María López, MD, MPH, FACP
Associate dean, outreach and multicultural affairs
Professor of medicine (Tenured) and pathology, College of Medicine
Medical director, Arizona Telemedicine Program
University of Arizona
López has a passion for addressing health inequities and human suffering. From clinical research with molecular targets to health services research, her work focuses on optimizing the health of individuals and communities.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Life is an opportunity to contribute. I hope to contribute, to make a difference.”
Surprising fact: “I love simple pleasures. Witnessing the daily miracle of the sun rising sustains me.”

Paul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation
Luna leads Helios Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. He is the former president of Valley of the Sun United Way and has held positions with Pepsi, IBM and the Office of Governor Bruce Babbitt.
His hope for his professional legacy: “That I cared about our community and helped make it better.”
Surprising fact: “I’m seriously considering getting matching tattoos with my kids in the near future.”

Steve Macias
President and CEO
Pivot Manufacturing
Macias is a co-owner of Pivot Manufacturing, a Phoenix machine shop, chairs the Arizona Manufacturers Council, and is on the boards of the Arizona Commerce Authority and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber. He is an active proponent of manufacturing in Arizona and a proud father of three boys.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Contributed in some small way to the sustainment of manufacturing in Arizona.”
Surprising fact: “In high school, I was the school mascot – a Bronco.”

Mario Martinez II
CEO
360 Vantage
Martinez is responsible for the overall vision, strategy and execution of 360 Vantage, a leader in cloud-based sales and marketing technology solutions designed to solve the unique challenges of the mobile workforce in life sciences, healthcare and other industries.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I would most like to be remembered for truly changing the lives of our clients, employees and our community in great and meaningful ways.”
Surprising fact: “I hosted a radio show during my college years.”

Clarence McCallister
CEO
Fortis Networks, Inc.
McAllister was born in Panama and earned his master’s in electrical engineering from ASU. In 2000, he and his wife started Fortis Networks, Inc., a certified 8a and HUBzone government contractor specializing in engineering, construction and technology services.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Building a world-class organization that always exceeds our customers’ expectations.”
Surprising fact: “I did an emergency landing on a City of Mesa street.”

Rodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
In addition to managing a law firm with 120 attorneys, Parga has been to Best Lawyers in America for the last four years. He also serves as Chairman of the Board of Chicanos Por la Causa, a leading non-profit helping advance and create economic and educational opportunities.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I want to be remembered as always trying to do the right thing and having led with integrity.”
Surprising fact: “I was bullied until age 11, which drove me not only to strengthen my body, but my resolve.”

Hector Peñuñuri
Senior planning analyst
SRP
Peñuñuri is an Arizona native and has spent most of the past 15 years in the Customer Services Division at SRP.  He has served on several boards including the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and LISC.  He was raised in the West Valley, and currently resides in Gilbert.
His hope for his professional legacy: “A trusted and valuable team member/leader; a communicator who understands the importance of sharing knowledge to help others.”
Surprising fact: “I’m a jack of all trades – woodworker, photographer, musician, outdoorsman and a decent cook when I put my mind to it.”

Dan Puente
Owner
D.P. Electric
Puente founded D.P. Electric in 1990 out of his garage with one truck. D.P. Electric now has more than 200 employees and generated more than $30 million in revenue in 2012, making it the biggest Hispanic-owned company in Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “A guy that is fair, honest, hard-working and gives back both personally and professionally.”
Surprising fact: “Professionally, that I do not have a college degree and personally, that I am a Bikram Yoga junkie.”

Marie Torres
Founder
MRM Construction Services
Torres is an Arizona native and built her business in the community that she grew up in. With more than 30 years experience in the construction field, she started MRM in 2002 and currently has more than 50 employees. The focus of her company has been in government contracting and has self performed airfield work at Luke AFB, MCAS Yuma and Davis Monthan.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “As being technically competent.”
Surprising fact: “I don’t like to drive and I am happy as a passenger – even in my own car.”

Lisa Urias
President and CEO
Urias Communications
After 15 years in international marketing and communications, Urias founded Urias Communications to address the need for advertising and PR with a uniquely multicultural focus. Now an award-winning advertising, and PR agency, Urias Communications specializes in the multicultural markets of the U.S. Southwest, with concentration on the burgeoning Hispanic market.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Bridging the divide between corporations and the growing Hispanic community for mutual benefit and respect.”
Surprising fact: “I am a fourth-generation Arizonan whose grandfather was the first Hispanic city councilman.”

Dawn C. Valdivia
Partner, chair of the Labor & Employment Practice Group
Quarles & Brady
Valdivia is the chair of Quarles & Brady’s Labor and Employment Group in Phoenix. She regularly advises clients in all matters of labor and employment law and is skilled in complex litigation matters, including wage and hour class action litigation in Arizona and California.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “A creative problem solver, committed to her clients and to giving back to the community.”
Surprising fact: “I love adventure — sky diving, gliding, scuba diving, helicopters, etc.”

Lorena Valencia
CEO
Reliance Wire
Valencia is the founder and CEO of Reliance Wire Systems, a wire and tubing manufacturing company she founded in 2000. She is also the founder and president of Magin Corporation — an eco-friendly wood pallet alternative company — and the FRDM Foundation.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Empowering children by building schools and libraries in impoverished countries through my FRDM Foundation.”
Surprising fact: “I put hot peppers on almost everything I eat. The hotter. the better.”

Roberto Yañez
Vice president and GM
Univision Arizona
Yañez is a 27-year broadcast television veteran, who has served 17 of those years with the Univision Television Group (UTG). Yañez has created various opportunities that helped build the station’s relationship with the community: Cadena de Gente Buena, El 34 Esta Aqui and Ya Es Hora.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Someone who used his craft to build bridges between the problem and the solution.”
Surprising fact: “Though Monday through Friday you will never see me without a suit and tie, I am most comfortable in boots, jeans and driving a pick-up truck.”

Shop Small, Small Business Saturday in Scottsdale

Shop Small And Spend Small Business Saturday In Scottsdale

You’ve heard of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, but how about Small Business Saturday? On November 24, 2012, support local businesses and shop local — or, “Shop Small.”

According to the 2011 Small Business Saturday Consumer Survey by Echo Research, and commissioned by American Express, more than 100 million people nationwide took part in Small Business Saturday.

This year, the City of Scottsdale is encouraging Scottsdale residents to take part in the one-day event. They’ve even created a Facebook page for it, for both shoppers and businesses. Businesses can use the page to post information about their shops, special deals for Small Business Saturday and other products and services.Download materials such as this sign on Shop Small's website.

Shoppers can join Small Business Saturday Scottsdale on Facebook for a chance to win a $25 American Express gift card. Winners will be selected in time to use the gift cards on Nov. 24.

Shop Small’s website has made it easy to determine which small businesses are participating in Small Business Saturday with its “Where to Shop” tool. And for those businesses interested in participating, they can promote themselves with American Express’s free, downloadable marketing tools.

For more information about Small Business Saturday, taking place on November 24, visit shopsmall.com. And, don’t forget to check out the Small Business Saturday Scottsdale Facebook page.

Are you a Scottsdale business participating in
Small Business Saturday?
Let us all know in the comments section!

Youth of the Year: Alyssa Coughenour

Boys & Girls Clubs Of Greater Scottsdale Announces 2012 Youth Of The Year

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale has selected Scottsdale resident and Pinnacle High School senior Alyssa Coughenour as the 2012 Youth of the Year. She was selected from nine finalists, one representing each branch in the nonprofit organization.

Coughenour was honored at the Youth of the Year Celebrate Youth Gala & Auction at Talking Stick Resort, which was attended by more than 600 members of the community and raised more than $235,000 for Scottsdale Clubs.

The following is an excerpt from her award-winning speech, where she reflected on her experiences as a Club member:

Alyssa Coughenour“My facial muscles tense, my forehead wrinkled, I fixated my eyes on the inside of my eyelids. Moments earlier, they had been forced shut by an intruding red blindfold and the hands of someone whom I trusted. She twisted the cloth behind my head to ensure my blindness.

It was two years ago at the PROUD Lock In, a Boys and Girls Club event, and it was the single experience that embodies what I’ve learned about respect.

At a young age, I learned how to respect others. However, it was the PROUD lock-in that taught me why respect was so important.

When I was blinded at the event, it only took me a few minutes to realize how dependent I was on other people. Being blind opened my eyes to circumstances other people have to live with, and I experienced first-hand what it would be like if I was not as fortunate as I am.

To this day, you’ll find the framed PRIDE Award, an award I received at the PROUD Lock-in, on top of the antique rollover desk in my room. It reminds me of the most important lesson I’ve learned in the past 18 years: respect. People who respect others’ unique differences are proud of themselves for appreciating everyone regardless of their color, disabilities or quirks. Thus, pride lies in respect, and respect, thanks to the Thunderbirds Branch, is something I have begun to fully comprehend.”

As the 2012 Youth of the Year from the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Scottsdale, Coughenour received a $5,000 scholarship from General Dynamics C4 Systems and $1,000 gift card courtesy of American Express. She hopes to attend Duke University and pursue a career in public relations.

Finalists from the other branches of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale were: Colleen Campbell, Mary Ellen & Robert McKee Branch; Andy Dao, Rose Lane Branch; Jackson Fogerty, Virginia G. Piper Branch; Doniar Mason, Lehi Branch; Claudia Mendoza, Harley & Ruth Barker Branch; Vivian Nguyen, Vestar Branch; Kristofferson Walker, Hualapai Branch in Peach Springs; and Lane Yazzie, Red Mountain Branch.

Each member received $1,000 scholarship from General Dynamics C4 and a $500 American Express gift card.

For more information about the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale, the Youth of the Year finalists or the Celebrate Youth Gala and Silent Auction, please visit bgcs.org.

50 Largest Employers in Arizona - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

50 Largest Employers In Arizona

These are the 50 largest employers in Arizona, including public and privately held companies and not-for-profit corporations, ranked by the number of employees based on full-time equivalents of 40 hours per week and based on industry research.


50 Largest Employers in Arizona

Walmart Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 30,634
Employment change since 2010: Added about 300 jobs
2010 revenue: $421.8 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Bentonville, Ark.
Phone: (479) 273-4000
Website: www.walmart.com

Banner Health

Arizona employees in 2011: 28,353
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1911
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 747-4000
Website: www.bannerhealth.com

Wells Fargo & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 14,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $93.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1852
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 411-4932
Website: www.wellsfargo.com

Bank of America Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 13,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,000 jobs
2010 revenue: $150.5 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1904
Headquarters: Charlotte, N.C.
Phone: (800) 944-0404
Website: www.bankofamerica.com

McDonald’s Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 12,770
Employment change since 2010: Added about 955 jobs
2010 revenue: $22.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1955
Headquarters: Oakbrook, Ill.
Phone: (800) 244-6227
Website: www.mcdonalds.com

Apollo Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 460 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1973
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (480) 966-5394
Website: www.apollogrp.edu

Kroger Co. *

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 400 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.7 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1883
Headquarters: Cincinnati
Phone: (623) 936-2100
Website: www.frysfood.com
* Includes Fry’s Food Stores and Fry’s Marketplace

Raytheon Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 11,500
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $25.2 billion
Company’s focus: Missile manufacturing
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: Waltham, Mass.
Phone: (520) 794-3000
Website: www.raytheon.com

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 10,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $102.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1799
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (602) 221-2900
Website: www.chase.com

Honeywell International Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,716
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 700 jobs
2010 revenue: $33.4 billion
Company’s focus: Aerospace manufacturing
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Morristown, N.J.
Phone: (602) 231-1000
Website: www.honeywell.com

Intel Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,700
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $43.6 billion
Company’s focus: Semiconductor manufacturing
Year founded: 1968
Headquarters: Santa Clara, Calif.
Phone: (480) 554-8080
Website: www.intel.com

Target Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $65.4 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Phone: (612) 304-6073
Website: www.target.com

US Airways

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,926
Employment change since 2010: Added about 150 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.9 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1981
Headquarters: Tempe
Phone: (480) 693-0800
Website: www.usairways.com

Catholic Healthcare West

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,291
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1986
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (602) 406-3000
Website: www.chw.edu

Home Depot Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 8,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 350 jobs
2010 revenue: $66.2 billion
Company’s focus: Home improvement
Year founded: 1978
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (714) 940-3500
Website: www.homedepot.com

Walgreen Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,750
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $63.3 billion
Company’s focus: Retail drugstores
Year founded: 1901
Headquarters: Deerfield, Ill.
Phone: (847) 940-2500
Website: www.walgreens.com

Safeway Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,500
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $41.1 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1926
Headquarters: Pleasanton, Calif.
Phone: (480) 894-4100
Website: www.safeway.com

American Express Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,465
Employment change since 2010: Added about 200 jobs
2010 revenue: $30.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1850
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (623) 492-7474
Website: www.americanexpress.com

Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 7,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 935 jobs
2010 revenue: $19 billion
Company’s focus: Mining
Year founded: 1834
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 366-7323
Website: www.fcx.com

Pinnacle West Capital Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,900
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 earnings: $330.4 million
Company’s focus: Electric utility
Year founded: 1985
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 250-1000
Website: www.pinnaclewest.com

Bashas’ Supermarkets

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,641
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 1,800 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1932
Headquarters: Chandler
Phone: (480) 895-9350
Website: www.bashas.com

Scottsdale Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,556
Employment change since 2010: Added about 55 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 882-4000
Website: www.shc.org

UA Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: About 6,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,050 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 694-7737
Website: www.u.arizona.edu

Circle K Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 590 jobs
2010 revenue: $16.4 billion
Company’s focus: Convenience stores
Year founded: 1951
Headquarters: Laval, QC, Canada
Phone: (602) 728-8000
Website: www.CircleK.com

General Dynamics

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,026
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,810 jobs
2010 revenue: $32.5 billion
Company’s focus: Defense, communications
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Falls Church, Va.
Phone: (480) 441-3033
Website: www.generaldynamics.com

Boeing Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,800
Employment change since 2010: Added about 100 jobs
2010 revenue: $64.3 billion
Company’s focus: Aircraft manufacturing
Year founded: 1916
Headquarters: Chicago
Phone: (480) 891-3000
Website: www.boeing.com

Carondelet Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 124 jobs
2010 revenue: About $601 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1880
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 872-3000
Website: www.carondelet.org

Mayo Foundation

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 138 jobs
2010 revenue: $7.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1864
Headquarters: Rochester, Minn.
Phone: (480) 301-8000
Website: www.mayo.edu

CVS Caremark Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 50 jobs
2010 revenue: $96.4 billion
Company’s focus: Pharmaceutical services
Year founded: 1993
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (615) 743-6600
Website: www.caremark.com

Salt River Project

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,346
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 392 jobs
2010 revenue: $2.7 billion
Company’s focus: Utility supplier
Year founded: 1903
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 236-5900
Website: www.srpnet.com

Costco Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,151
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.2 billion
Company’s focus: Membership discount stores
Year founded: 1976
Headquarters: Issaquah, Wash.
Phone: (602) 293-5007
Website: www.costco.com

Abrazo Health Care *

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,089
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $1.5 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (602) 674-1400
Website: www.abrazohealth.com
* A division of Vanguard Health Systems

Albertsons Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 450 jobs
2010 revenue: $5.9 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery and drug stores
Year founded: 1939
Headquarters: Boise, ID
Phone: (602) 382-5300
Website: www.albertsons.com

FedEx Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,918
Employment change since 2010: Added about 330 jobs
2010 revenue: $34.7 billion
Company’s focus: Delivery, copy centers
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Memphis, Tenn.
Phone: (866) 477-7529
Website: www.fedex.com

Southwest Airlines Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,857
Employment change since 2010: Added about 259 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.1 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Dallas
Phone: (602) 304-3983
Website: www.southwest.com

Marriott International

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 722 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.7 billion
Company’s focus: Resorts and hotels
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters: Bethesda, Md.
Phone: (301) 380-3000
Website:  www.marriott.com

Qwest Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,200
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 190 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.3 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1896
Headquarters: Denver
Phone: (800) 244-1111
Website: www.Qwest.com

United Parcel Service

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,170
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 48 jobs
2010 revenue: $49.5 billion
Company’s focus: Package delivery
Year founded: 1907
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (888) 967-5877
Website: www.ups.com

John C. Lincoln Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,166
Employment change since 2010: Added about 539 jobs
2010 revenue: $551 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters:  Phoenix
Phone: (602) 870-943-2381
Website: www.jcl.com

USAA

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,045
Employment change since 2010: Added about 74 jobs
2010 revenue: $17.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: San Antonio
Phone: (800) 531-8111
Website: www.usaa.com

Charles Schwab & Co. Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,001
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1974
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 435-4000
Website: www.schwab.com

Freescale Semiconductor

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.5 billion
Company’s focus: Microchip manufacturing
Year founded: 1953
Headquarters: Austin
Phone: (512) 895-2000
Website: www.freescale.com

IBM Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $95.8 billion
Company’s focus: Technology services
Year founded: 1924
Headquarters: Armonk, N.Y.
Phone: (800) 426-4968
Web site: www.us.ibm.com

Cox Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,997
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 67 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.1 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (623) 594-0505
Website: www.cox.com

TMC HealthCare

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,966
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 84 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1943
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 327-5461
Website: www.tmcaz.com

Verizon Wireless

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,901
Employment change since 2010: Added about 201 jobs
2010 revenue: $63.4 billion
Company’s focus: Wireless provider
Year founded: 1984
Headquarters: Basking Ridge, N.J.
phone: (480) 763-6300
Website: www.verizonwireless.com

Cigna HealthCare of AZ

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,865
Employment change since 2010: Added about 401 jobs
2010 revenue: $21.3 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1972
Headquarters: Philadelphia
Phone: (602) 942-4462
Website: www.cigna.com

Grand Canyon University

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,818
Employment change since 2010: Added about 537 jobs
2010 revenue: $385.8 million
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1949
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 639-7500
Website: www.gcu.edu

Starbucks Coffee Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,783
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,003 jobs
2010 revenue: $10.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Seattle
Phone: (602) 340-0455
Website: www.starbucks.com

Go Daddy Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,754
Employment change since 2010: Added about 441 jobs
2010 revenue: $741.2 million
Company’s focus: Internet services/technology
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 505-8800
Website: www.GoDaddy.com

These are the state’s 5 largest government employers, ranked by the number of employees.

State of Arizona: About 49,800 employees
City of Phoenix: About 15,100 employees
Maricopa County: 12,792 employees
Arizona State University: 11,185 employees
Mesa Public Schools: 8,376 employees

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Tammy Weinbaum - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Tammy Weinbaum, Sr. VP, General Manager Of American Express

Tammy Weinbaum, Sr. VP of American Express, discusses her first drop as a water girl at a deli in Florida, as well as her first job as a proofreader with American Express.

Tammy Weinbaum

Title: Senior Vice President and General Manager
Company: American Express

Describe your very first job and what you learned from it.
I was a water girl at a deli in Florida. My job was to make sure that as soon as customers were seated, their water glasses were filled; and when they were finished eating, their tables were cleared as quickly as possible. The major lesson I learned from this job was to listen to the customer. Some  would want to talk and would want you to learn about them. Others would engage me only when they wanted to do so. I learned to take my cues from the customer.

Describe your first job in your industry.
My first job in the industry was at American Express, where I’m still employed today. My first role was as a customer service clerk, which was proofreading. My job was to read the manual paragraph that the customer service representatives had typed. I would circle grammatical errors and send it back to them. I was spellcheck before it existed.

What were your salaries (in your first job and first industry job)?
My salary as a water girl was $2.10 per hour plus tips, so providing excellent customer service was very important to me. My first salary at American Express, my first industry job, was $13,500 annually.

Who is your biggest mentor?
My parents, David and Cookie. They gave me one of the greatest gifts that has carried me through personally and professionally, and that’s the confidence to believe that I could do anything that I wanted. My dad was always a hard worker, working two jobs. My mom stayed home taking care of me and my sisters, later working full-time. They made major sacrifices for us that we didn’t obviously realize until we were adults. I appreciate the self-confidence and work ethic that they helped instill in me at a young age.

What advice would you give to a person entering your industry?
As someone in the service industry, don’t ever lose sight of who your customers are.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
One of the things I love about my job is being able to give back to the community. If I weren’t doing this job, I’d be serving others through a role in community service.

Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

Corporate Giving - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Corporate Giving More Discriminating, But Still Charitable

Like the economy, a dip in corporate giving appears to have bottomed out, but that charitable landscape has changed both for givers and receivers.

Corporations are re-evaluating which not-for-profit organizations they support, and in some cases businesses are providing more volunteers and less cash. At the same time, fund-raising efforts are changing. Some elaborate parties designed to attract big donors are a little less gala. Instead of the usual full-blown dinner, some groups are opting for less expensive cocktail parties.

Nationally, corporate giving rose 10.6 percent (8.8 percent adjusted for inflation) in 2010, according to the Giving USA Foundation. In Arizona, Laine Seaton of the Greater Arizona Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals says corporate giving is improving, with some caveats.

“It’s starting to get a little better – slowly,” she says. “Two years ago was definitely worse than it is now. I’m seeing that more companies are looking at alternate ways to support nonprofits. Definitely, volunteerism is up. Corporations and nonprofits have to be more flexible. Those chicken dinners are hard to fill.”

At the St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance, demand for food has nearly doubled in the past three years to a record 74 million pounds, which equates to 285,000 meals a day going to 700 agency-partners in 10 Arizona counties. St. Mary’s depends on a three-pronged operation to serve the increased number of needy and unemployed: financial donations, volunteers to help run the massive distribution center at 31st Avenue and Thomas Road, and food donations.

Terry Shannon, president and CEO of the food bank, says everyone is tightening their belt during these tough economic times. “But, fortunately, the economy has caused many corporations to refocus some of their support,” he says. “Maybe the total they can give is down, potentially donating to fewer nonprofits and focusing on basic needs. Obviously, we supply a very basic need. Our corporate financial support is strong.”

Volunteering is strong as well, saving the food bank $5 million a year in labor costs. “Corporations in Arizona are encouraging employees to volunteer more and more,” Shannon says. “At our main distribution center, we can handle 150 to 200 volunteers at a time. We get many corporate groups from companies like American Express, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Target. It keeps their employees together – sorting, bagging and boxing food for distribution – and it almost functions as a team-building effort, rather than everyone doing their own thing.”

Food donations from manufacturers and retailers represent the third leg of the food bank’s operations. Some 55 trucks are dispatched to 280 grocery stores daily to pick up what Shannon calls “non-salable but edible” food items, such as a dented can of soup or a package of buns with one that is crushed.

“We’re a food distribution business,” Shannon says, “but we do it with donated and rescued food. Imagine what would happen if we had the food, but no money to put fuel in those 55 trucks (we use to distribute) or if we didn’t have the volunteers.”

In addition to having its employees volunteer at St. Mary’s Food Bank, Wells Fargo announced it is contributing $38,000 to 20 non-profits in recognition of volunteer efforts throughout the community. Twenty Wells Fargo Arizona team members were named Volunteer Service Award winners. Two will have $10,000 given to the charity of their choice and 18 will have $1,000 given to their selected charities.

In 2010, Wells Fargo team members reported nearly 80,000 volunteer hours in Arizona. They served as mentors, board members, project leaders, fund raisers, educators and more. Wells Fargo also donated $5 million in 2010 to nonprofits and schools in Arizona.
Despite the struggles of some corporations and non-profits, Phoenix Suns Charities is cashing in on its community-based reputation. In the past year, the organization distributed a record $1.36 million to 178 charitable organizations. That tops last year’s record of more $1.2 million awarded to 156 recipients, and marks the two best years since Phoenix Suns Charities was formed 23 years ago.

Kathryn Pidgeon, executive director of the NBA team’s charitable arm, has an explanation for the impressive results. “We are connected at the hip to a stellar organization – the Phoenix Suns,” she says. “The community loves the Suns. There is a strong history of giving to the community. Our donors really believe in us, trust us. They know the money is going for the kids.”

The $11.6 million in donations the Phoenix Suns Charities has distributed since 1988 is separate from the free tickets, signed memorabilia and personal appearances by team members, dancers and the mascot, the Gorilla. “My number is all cash,” Pidgeon says.
Grants from Suns Charities start at $1,000. The largest donation of $100,000 went to Improving Chandler Area Neighborhoods to build a basketball court in its new facility in downtown Chandler.

Phoenix Sun Charities is one that still relies on a gala to raise money. “We’ve given people a fabulous party,” Pidgeon says. “It’s wildly successful with great entertainment. All the players are there and they’re accessible.”

Pidgeon says the gala, which is partly underwritten by corporate sponsors, netted $1.1 million last March.

There are numerous other ways Phoenix Suns Charities generates money for its donations. The newest venture is an official state of Arizona Phoenix Suns license plate that produced $39,000 the first year and $51,000 the second year.

A new development in fundraising, says Seaton of the Fundraising Professionals group, is the target audience. The most giving demographic has been women in the 55 to 65 age group. “Nonprofits these days are also looking at twenty-somethings,” she says. “They didn’t have money to give. That’s not the case anymore. Young people want to make a difference. They have energy and new ideas. Social media is part of that effort.”

Arizona Corporate Angels

National Kidney Foundation of Arizona

 National Kidney Foundation, Corporate Giving
4203 E. Indian School Rd., Suite 140
Phoenix, AZ 85018
(602) 840-1644
azkidney.org

Arizona’s Children Association

Arizona Children's Association, Corporate Giving
2833 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ 85004 | (602) 234-3733 | arizonaschildren.org
2700 S. 8th Ave., Tucson, AZ 85713 | (800) 944-7611 | hope3ways.org

United Cerebral Palsy of Central Arizona

United Cerebral Palsy of Central Arizona, Corporate Giving
1802 W. Parkside Ln.
Phoenix, AZ 85027
(602) 943-5472
ucpofcentralaz.org

Arizona School of Choice Trust

Arizona School of Trust, Corporate Giving
P.O. Box 1616
Glendale, AZ 85311
(623) 414-3429
asct.org

Phoenix Rescue Mission

 Phoenix Rescue Mission, Corporate Giving
1801 S. 35th Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85009
(602) 233-3000
phoenixrescuemission.org

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For more information about these Arizona Corporate Angels and their respective corporate giving, view the AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2011 digital issue.

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Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

 

Diversity Leadership Alliance Winners - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Diversity Leadership Alliance Winners

Govt./Nonprofit Category Winner Yuma Regional Medical CenterGovt./Nonprofit Category Winner
Yuma Regional Medical Center

Yuma Regional Medical Center (YRMC) is proud of having a diverse work force that represents the community and the patients it serves. That work force diversity includes ethnicity, cultural background, gender, age, economic means, physical and mental ability, family settings, educational levels, and religious beliefs.

By valuing diversity, YRMC seeks to achieve an environment where the total spectrum of differences is valued and integrated into every aspect of the hospital. YRMC classifies its various dimensions of diversity as human, cultural and systemic. Human diversity refers to the physical characteristics or life experience of an individual. Cultural diversity is characterized by fundamental beliefs, attitudes, assumptions, values and personal characteristics. System diversity is characterized by the integration of organizational structures and management operating systems where differences are involved or implicit.

YRMC strives not only for diversity within its walls, but also outside of them. The YRMC Community Outreach Team allows employees to connect with Yuma’s many diverse cultures. The program focuses on meeting the needs of winter visitors, migrant workers, military personnel, as well as the elderly, uninsured and Spanish-speaking population.

Diversity Champion Lee A. Barnett: Director of Technology, American ExpressDiversity Champion
Lee A. Barnett: Director of Technology, American Express

Lee A. Barnett’s dedication to diversity and Valley youth already is bearing fruit.

Barnett, the director of technology at American Express’ Valley operations, has been a member of the Diversity Leadership Alliance’s (DLA) board since 2007. He has been key in developing the DLA Youth Council, which assists high school sophomores, juniors and seniors to transition to higher education and work force readiness. The council also develops leadership skills among youth that are aimed at building an inclusive community.

Under Barnett’s guidance, the three-year-old DLA Youth Council has grown from 24 students to 120 students participating in monthly workshops. At this year’s DLA Youth Council ceremony, 12 students from several Phoenix-area high schools received recognition. They in turn expressed their gratitude for the confidence, support, and diversity awareness and training that DLA provides.

One student stated: “I went into the DLA being someone who preferred their own ideas and thoughts over others. I am extremely proud to say I am leaving the DLA being a person who now respects, accepts and is grateful for different ideas.”

Barnett’s dedication to the Youth Council is opening new horizons for many diverse high school students throughout the Valley.

Small Co. Category Winner Northern Arizona Regional Behavioral Health Authority Inc.Small Co. Category Winner
Northern Arizona Regional
Behavioral Health Authority Inc.

Serving 10 Native American tribes, the Northern Arizona Regional Behavioral Health Authority (NARBHA) has made a commitment to upholding diversity and cultural sensitivity in order to provide high-quality care to its patients.

NARBHA is the Regional Behavioral Health Authority for Coconino, Navajo, Yavapai, Apache and Mohave counties, serving more than 700,000 people throughout 62,000 square miles of Northern Arizona.

In 2001, NARBHA established a cultural competency plan as required by the Arizona Department of Health. The following year, NARBHA developed the Cultural Awareness and Diversity Committee, which uses community input to annually update the cultural competency plan. In 2003, the co-chair of the committee saw a gap in communications between NARBHA and the 10 tribes NARBHA serves. To improve coordination with the tribes, NARBHA created a new position called the Tribal Liaison.

The development of the cultural diversity committee, the cultural diversity plan, and employees devoted to cultural inclusion has improved NARBHA’s ability to provide services to diverse populations. The initiative has broken down barriers to tribal members’ access to care, created culturally responsive behavioral health programs in treatment clinics, and increased awareness statewide of the unique needs of diverse, rural communities. In addition, NARBHA focuses its hiring efforts on developing a work force that reflects the diversity and language needs of the community.

Large Co. Category Winner Cox CommunicationsLarge Co. Category Winner
Cox Communications

The Spanish word for “leader” is “lider.” It’s no surprise that LIDER is the name of Cox Arizona’s 12-week Leadership Development Program. The program was created to introduce the company’s frontline bilingual (Spanish/English) employees to leadership, and to develop future leaders that will help Cox grow its Hispanic customer base.

LIDER provides education on the leadership roles at Cox and Cox’s core competencies (influencing others, producing results, communication skills). The program is structured to address the uniqueness of Hispanic culture, and the combination of multiple cultures and languages in a business environment.

The four-year-old LIDER program is facilitated by the Cox Internacional leadership team and was developed through a collaborative effort of the company’s Arizona care, field training and human resources. Candidates are provided extensive development plans, participate in presentations by the local executive leadership team, review core leadership competencies, book reviews, and are given a final project that is presented in front of the Cox Arizona executive team. The program is cross-departmental and has seen a 33 percent promotion rate.

Development programs such as LIDER help to grow Cox’s diverse employee base. The company’s leadership team, from executives, VPs, directors and managers, participates and actively promotes self-development and growth.

Large Co. Category Winner Veolia TransportationLarge Co. Category Winner
Veolia Transportation

Veolia Transportation is committed to creating an environment of diversity and inclusion. Through its Diversity and Inclusion Program, Veolia’s overall human resource strategy includes recruiting, hiring, promoting, engaging and retaining the company’s diverse talent.

Veolia’s Diversity and Inclusion Program began with revamping the entire recruiting process to ensure Veolia became an Equal Opportunity Employer. Once on board, Veolia provides an employee orientation program that includes diversity training. In addition, all existing employees completed a diversity training class in 2008. Awareness and education regarding diversity have continued with the production of a monthly diversity newsletter. Also, an internal Mentoring Program was created to provide opportunities for new hires to be partnered with seasoned employees.

The need for a culture change was imminent at Veolia Transportation of Tempe. Due to a poorly run operation, new leadership was sought. A new, diverse team was brought together in 2007 to help transform the performance of the operation and improve the overall morale of employees. The diversity training initiative helped “create an environment of respect for our differences and inclusion.” Soon, Veolia’s slogan of “Together We CARE” became real. CARE stands for commitment, accountability, respect and empowerment. These are four values that are consistent with Veolia’s everyday operations in Tempe.

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Most Admired Companies - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

2010 Most Admired Companies Winners – Customer Opinion

The Customer Opinion category recognizes companies that deliver exceptional customer service.

Winner: American Express
Category:
Customer Opinion
Headquarters: New York
Year Est.:
1850
No. of Employees in AZ:
7,073
Recent Award:
Fortune Magazine’s Most Admired Companies – 2010
www.americanexpress.com | Facebook | Twitter

video by Sonoran Studios

American Express prides itself on understanding and fulfilling the customers’ needs, and then using the knowledge gained by each interaction to improve the company. One way American Express does this is by calling employees at their service centers “Customer Care Professionals.” They aren’t just service representatives; they are professionals who are the face and voice of American Express. The employees understand that when they take a call, they aren’t just providing cards for payments — they are helping customers achieve their goals, live out their passions and get through tough situations. American Express has delivered customer care from medical evacuations to replacing stolen cards anywhere at anytime to creating unique experiences for customers.

American Express welcomes customer feedback to help create a better, more customer-friendly company. At American Express, a call is not a transaction; it’s an opportunity to create a better relationship with the customer. Customer relationships also have been strengthened by American Express’ hiring technique. The company attracts employees from the retail, sales and hospitality industries who know how to create an environment that fosters strong customer service.

In its 160 years, the company’s core values have instilled a sense of pride in its employees. The employees’ pride in what they do transfers to the customer during their conversations. For three consecutive years, from 2007-2009, J.D. Power and Associates has named American Express highest in customer satisfaction among credit card issuers. American Express also was one of Fortune Magazine’s Most Admired Companies.


Grant Thorton

Finalist: Grant Thornton
Category:
Customer Opinion
Headquarters:
Chicago
Year Est.:
2004 (in AZ)
No. of Employees in AZ:
73
Recent Award:
Arizona Women’s Top 25 Workplaces for Women – 2009
www.grantthornton.com
| Facebook | Twitter

The “Grant Thornton Client Experience” demonstrates the company’s commitment to professional excellence. Employees strive to understand and exceed clients’ expectations, deliver high-quality service, provide valuable ideas and recommendations, show a personalized focus, and provide value. All branches of Grant Thornton strive to exceed their clients’ expectations, but the Phoenix office exceeded the company’s expectations in 2009. Grant Thornton uses a third-party vendor to ask its key clients to evaluate the company’s performance and the client’s service experience. In the audit and tax sections, the Phoenix office scored more than the 8.5 out of the 10 mark the company set as its target goal.

In addition to the Phoenix office exceeding the company’s goal, Grant Thornton has won national honors, including being on the Companies that Care Honor Roll from 2005-2009.  In 2009, Grant Thornton was on Working Mother Magazine’s Top Ten Companies list.


Sonora Quest

Finalist: Sonora Quest Laboratories
Category:
Customer Opinion
Headquarters:
Tempe
Year Est.:
1997
No. of Employees in AZ:
1,750
Recent Award:
Arizona Corporate Excellence Award – 2009
www.bannerhealth.com

Sonora Quest Laboratories’ vision is to be “the trusted leader in diagnostic testing and information services.” This vision shows the company’s focus on the customer, whether it be patients, health care professionals or payer groups. The Patient Care Gold Standard, a poster with 17 standards of care, hangs at each service center to reinforce excellent patient care.

Patients are surveyed by a third-party vendor at patient service centers, and this information is shared with employees to improve the patient experience. In the first quarter of 2010, Sonora Quest Laboratories achieved a 97 percent customer satisfaction rating from patients served at the patient service centers. Employees must commit to putting patient care first by signing the Phlebotomy Code of Conduct and the “Our Promise to Our Patients” packet. Sonora Quest Laboratories also shows its commitment to providing superior service and timely, accurate information to its health care clients by using quality tools and principles that improve productivity.


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Arizona's Most Admired Companies November-December 2010

Most Admired Companies - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

2010 Most Admired Companies Award Winners

Arizona Business Magazine and BestCompaniesAZ are honored to unveil the winners of our inaugural Arizona’s Most Admired Companies Awards.

With 43 winners, we think you’ll agree the awards selection committee has done an outstanding job in determining some of the most admired companies in our state.  Our primary goal in developing this program was to find those organizations that excel in four key areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, social responsibility and customer opinion.  This list features the most prestigious companies in our state, providing us the opportunity to learn from the best.

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 69
Recent Award: AIA Kemper Goodwin Award – 2009
WEB: www.a-p.com

AlliedBarton Security Services
Headquarters: Conshohocken, Penn.
Year Est.: 1957
No. of Employees in AZ: 1,047
Recent Award: Brandon Hall Research Award for Best Integration of Learning and Talent Management – 2009
WEB: www.alliedbarton.com
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American Express
Headquarters: New York
Year Est.: 1850
No. of Employees in AZ: 7,219
Recent Award: Fortune Magazine’s Most Admired Companies – 2010
WEB: www.americanexpress.com
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Arizona Charter Academy
Headquarters: Surprise
Year Est.: 2001
No. of Employees in AZ: 61
Recent Award: Elks Lodge Community Partner of the Year – 2010
WEB: www.azcharteracademy.com
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Banner Health
Headquarters: Phoenix
Year Est.: 1999
No. of Employees in AZ: 27,528
Recent Award: Gallup Great Workplace Award – 2009
WEB: www.bannerhealth.com
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BeachFleischman PC
Headquarters: Tucson
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 104
Recent Award: Accounting Today’s Best Accounting Firms to Work For – 2009
WEB: www.beachfleischman.com

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Arizona's Most Admired Companies November-December 2010

hr_team

2009 HR Team Of The Year Finalists

American Express LogoCompany: American Express Service Center – Phoenix
Web: www.americanexpress.com

Company established: 1850 | No. of employees in AZ: 7,400
No. of employees in HR dept.: 17

The 17 professionals in the human resources department at American Express’ service center in Phoenix have had a busy year and met many challenges amidst difficult circumstances.

The team fulfills its responsibilities by following two philosophies. First, it approaches its work as a partner with the center’s 2,900 employees. Team members participate in business meetings, listen to customer calls with employees and keep in touch with everyone who works there. Second, it believes all team members are “in it together.” They share information, focus on the most important priorities and support each other as a cohesive group.

The year began with work force reductions at the center, but the human resources team was expected to ramp up in areas needing additional attention. As part of that effort, the team successfully convinced existing front-line employees to take a chance and move into different jobs, even as the recession ravaged the financial-services sector.

Significant attention also was devoted to leadership development within the center’s management ranks. The team developed a new team-new leader assimilation program that reduced the learning curve for new managers. Four team members who specialize in leadership development conducted focus groups to help managers understand the needs and expectations of the employees they lead.

In addition, American Express selected its Phoenix service center to pilot a global wellness strategy this year. More than 1,300 employees participated in a kick-off event and 90 percent of employees who took on a healthy-living challenge completed it. The HR team also hired a full-time wellness coach and nutritionist.


Arizona Public Service Co.Company: Arizona Public Service Co.
Web: www.aps.com

Company established: 1886 | No. of employees in AZ: 7,147
No. of employees in HR dept.: 85

To say that the human resources department at Arizona Public Service Co. (APS) is busy is a vast understatement. This team of 85 professionals has its hands full.

APS faces a staffing challenge at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station west of Phoenix. As operator of North America’s largest nuclear power plant, APS must deal with the fact that the majority of the employees there will near retirement age at the end of this decade. Human resources has launched an intense 18-month program to train college engineering recruits on the operation of highly technical aspects of the plant. Also, existing Palo Verde engineers are being groomed as mentors for the college graduates.

Human resources overhauled APS’ leadership development programs, as well. Few succession plans were in place for key leaders, and many emerging leaders were not receiving the breadth and depth of assignments they needed to progress to the next level. All existing leaders are given values-based training and new leaders receive basic training in supervisory skills. And, for the first time, APS’ middle managers have a program that enhances their skill sets and gives them feedback from peers. In addition, human resources is developing an emerging-leaders program.

Another duty for human resources was modernizing the company’s compensation model. It also has revamped compensation philosophy, moving APS away from cost-of-living pay increases to a performance-based merit system. Starting in 2010, APS will have an incentive program impacting 95 percent of its work force that will be tied directly to performance of the company and its employees.


St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical CenterCompany: St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center
Web: www.stjosephs-phx.org


Company established: 1895 | No. of employees in AZ: 5,000+
No. of employees in HR dept.: 26

The human resources team at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center played a significant role in helping the Phoenix hospital reach two milestones this year.

St. Joseph’s became the only hospital in Arizona to be recognized by BestCompaniesAZ as a best place to work for seven consecutive years. And for the first time, St. Joseph’s was named by Modern Healthcare as one of the industry’s top 100 best places to work nationally. BestCompaniesAZ administers best-places-to-work recognition programs in Arizona. Modern Healthcare is a national health care business news magazine.

Employee satisfaction may have something to do with St. Joseph’s open-door and two-way communication policies. Staff members have ample opportunities to ask questions and provide input. Each department holds daily employee meetings, with the hospital’s president hosting monthly employee forums. In addition, senior management conducts employee town halls throughout the year. To promote a work-life balance, the hospital offers telecommuting, flex hours, compressed work weeks, summer hours and job sharing.

The 25-member human resources team encourages diversity at St. Joseph’s. It partners with the Center for Transitional Rehab to integrate brain-injured patients into the hospital’s staff. The team partners with local and national job boards to reach out to ethnic groups and has developed programs to support a large Hispanic and Filipino work force. Disabled workers are encouraged to apply for employment or volunteer at the hospital.

Reaching out to the community, the human resources staff hosted five workshops this year to help the unemployed use alternative job-search tools such as Twitter and LinkedIn. gement, and employee relations. Its clients include startup companies and Fortune 50 firms.