Tag Archives: Amy Hillman

global

W. P. Carey School Announces Hall of Fame Members

Two technology mavens and a prominent professor focused on improving our health care will be honored for their accomplishments this month. The three alums will be inducted into the W. P. Carey School of Business Homecoming Hall of Fame at Arizona State University on Oct. 30. Previous inductees come from such diverse organizations as the American Red Cross, the Arizona Diamondbacks, Motorola, Wells Fargo Bank and XM Satellite Radio.

“The new honorees have all blazed a trail in their respective fields, making a difference in their professions, their community and society as a whole,” says Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “They also set a great example for our current students that there are no limits on how far they can go in their own career paths.”

The 37th annual W. P. Carey School inductees are:

• Leonard Berry – Dr. Berry, a distinguished professor and well-known author, has devoted his career to studying the marketing and quality of services, with a recent focus on how to improve health care service. He has written 10 books and done extensive work with the Mayo Clinic. He is currently examining how to improve the service experience of cancer patients and their families. Berry has received countless major academic awards and is both a fellow of the Academy of Marketing Science and a past national president of the American Marketing Association. He is a member of several boards of directors, including for Lowe’s, Genesco and Nemours Children’s Health System. He is a Regents Professor, teaching at Texas A&M University, and he received his Ph.D. from ASU’s business school in 1968.

• Brian Gentile – Gentile’s impressive tech career spans almost 30 years and major global companies, including Apple, Sun Microsystems (now part of Oracle), and NCR Corporation. He is a leader in “big data” and cloud computing, who recently built and served as CEO of Jaspersoft Corporation. After TIBCO Software recently acquired the company, Gentile became senior vice president and general manager of its TIBCO Analytics products business unit. He has also been a public governor on the board of the Pacific Stock Exchange, a public member of a New York Stock Exchange committee on ethics and business conduct, and a founding board member for several Silicon Valley startups. He earned his MBA from ASU in 1992.

• Chuck Robel – Tech legend Robel served as chairman of the board of McAfee, one of the world’s best-known computer-security software companies, prior to its multibillion-dollar sale to Intel. He now serves on the boards of directors of GoDaddy, Jive Software, and several other public and private companies. He previously helped to manage about $1 billion in portfolio investments as chief operating officer at venture capital fund Hummer Winblad Venture Partners. He has been involved in more than 80 initial public offerings (IPOs) as an adviser, investor and board member. He received his bachelor’s in accounting from ASU’s business school in 1971.

Alumni, business leaders and students will attend the Homecoming Hall of Fame event Thursday, Oct. 30 at McCord Hall Plaza on ASU’s Tempe campus. The reception starts at 5:30 p.m. Advance registration is requested at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/events/2965 or by calling (480) 965-3978.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks Top 30 Again

U.S. News & World Report announced its highly anticipated annual rankings for undergraduate business schools. Once again, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is honored among the nation’s Top 30. This is the ninth time in 10 years the school has made the prestigious Top 30.

“We’re proud to strive for and achieve excellence year after year, thanks to our dedicated faculty, staff, students and alumni,” says Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “This ranking is determined by deans and senior faculty members at peer schools, who understand what it takes to create and maintain a fantastic business program.”

In addition to the No. 29 ranking overall, the undergraduate business program is also among the top 10 in the West. The school’s acclaimed supply chain management program ranks No. 3 nationwide in the specialty category for its field. In addition, the school has several other programs in the Top 30 in their specialties – accounting at No. 30, entrepreneurship at No. 19, management at No. 20, management information systems at No. 15 and marketing at No. 23.

The W. P. Carey School and its programs have achieved many other recent Top 30 rankings, as well, including:

• U.S. News & World Report ranks the school’s full-time MBA program No. 27 in the nation.
• U.S. News ranks the school’s online MBA No. 2 nationwide and the school’s evening MBA No. 18 among part-time MBA programs.
• Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s online MBA program Top 10 worldwide.
• The Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 28 worldwide.
• The University of Texas at Dallas ranks the W. P. Carey School Top 30 worldwide for business-school research productivity.
• The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the W. P. Carey School No. 22 in the world for economics/business.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School of Business, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

Small Business Leadership Academy: Lauri Leadley

ASU and SRP Help Small Businesses

Small businesses play a key role in our economy, creating jobs and helping our community. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is offering a program to help small business owners and executives learn how to improve efficiency, streamline operations and raise profits. The seventh annual Small Business Leadership Academy is available to the leaders of small and diverse local businesses.

“Small businesses play a crucial role in our economy, and the W. P. Carey School of Business is very interested in helping local business owners to succeed through added education in subjects like strategy, branding and teamwork,” said Dean Amy Hillman of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. “We designed the Small Business Leadership Academy to fit into the busy schedules of executives from growing businesses.”

Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding co-sponsor, is offering a number of scholarships to its current suppliers and small business customers.

“The partnership we have with ASU, coupled with the sponsorship and scholarships we offer to the academy, is a natural fit for SRP in supporting economic development within our own community,” said Carrie Young, senior director of SRP Corporate Operations Services.

The eight-week academy and its graduation will run on Wednesday nights from Sept. 3 to Oct. 29. The curriculum will cover business strategy, branding, competing through services, negotiations, management and teamwork, among other areas. Program applications are due July 18.

Participants must:

> Have been in business for at least three years,
> Have annual revenues between $1 million and $10 million,
> Have fewer than 100 employees,
> Be the owner or principal of the business.

Applicants must be able to attend all scheduled classes and related activities. Those who complete the program will receive Continuing Education Units (CEUs) from Arizona State University. These units are widely used as a measure of participation in non-credit, professional development courses.

For more information about sponsoring a scholarship or applying to the program offered through the nationally ranked W. P. Carey School of Business, call (480) 965-7579, e-mail or visit http://wpcarey.asu.edu/executive-education/small-business-academy. Current SRP suppliers can also contact SRP’s Supplier Diversity Department for information about this year’s nominating process at SupplierDiversity@srpnet.com.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School earns No. 1 Ranking

This week, U.S. News & World Report issued some new rankings for online-degree programs, growing in popularity because of their convenience and flexibility. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University received the No. 1 ranking among the nation’s online graduate business programs for veterans.

“We’re honored to be ranked No. 1 in providing a stellar online graduate business education for our veterans,” says Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “The W. P. Carey School was one of the first highly respected schools to offer online courses more than a decade ago. We utilize the same MBA degree and the same faculty members online as we do in our highly ranked face-to-face MBA programs, making it convenient for active-duty military members and veterans to participate in a top program from any Internet-accessible location.”

U.S. News & World Report already ranks the W. P. Carey School’s undergraduate business, full-time MBA and evening MBA programs among the Top 30 in the nation in their categories. Earlier this year, U.S. News also ranked the school’s online graduate business programs (online MBA and online master’s in information management) No. 2 in the nation. The new ranking covers the same two online programs for high quality, but it also adds a focus on meeting the unique needs of veterans.

The new rankings consider only distance-education programs housed in accredited institutions and performing well in areas including program reputation, faculty credentials, high student graduation rates and low graduate debt loads. The new rankings also consider criteria related to whether course credits are portable and relatively inexpensive for veterans, such as whether the institution is certified for the GI Bill, is a member of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium, and participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program.

Arizona State University overall has been recognized for its strong commitment to veterans on G.I. Jobs magazine’s “Military Friendly Schools” list five years in a row. Military Times Edge magazine also named ASU on its “Best for Vets” list. ASU has the Pat Tillman Veterans Center to help bolster engagement and guidance for the veteran population in areas like housing, career services, tutoring, and health and counseling services. The university has awarded more than 1,500 degrees using GI Bill benefits.

“Veterans and those serving in the military have repeatedly chosen the W. P. Carey School’s online programs because we feature a team-oriented, flexible approach,” says Stacey Whitecotton, senior associate dean for W. P. Carey School graduate programs. “In the online MBA program, for example, students work in small, personalized teams with peers from other industries, typically focusing on one course at a time. We also offer one of the few online MBA programs that allow students to customize their degrees with an area of emphasis, such as finance, international business, marketing or supply chain management.”

Among those who have completed the online MBA program is Lt. Col. Scott Coulson – a recipient of the Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and a Combat Action Badge for his service in Iraq. He completed his MBA degree while serving in the U.S. Army in Afghanistan.

The school’s online Master of Science in Information Management (MSIM) program is also popular, designed to prepare graduates for a career in the fast-growing information technology (IT) field. American Express, Intel Corporation, Mayo Clinic and US Airways are among the companies that send students to the school’s MSIM programs.

To learn more about the W. P. Carey School’s online programs — all offering small class sizes, a dedicated financial-aid specialist and a career center for help with job searches — visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

Also today, GraduatePrograms.com issued a new ranking, placing the W. P. Carey School of Business’ full-time MBA program among the Top 25 worldwide. The new No. 21 ranking is based on student experience. The site conducted a survey of both current and recent graduate students.

140054736

W. P. Carey Honors Executive of the Year

Jim Davidson has played a key role in some of the biggest deals in the technology industry, including investments in Dell, Skype, Go Daddy, Alibaba, Avago, Seagate and Sabre Holdings, which operates Travelocity. For his impressive work in the investment arena, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University will honor Davidson – co-founder, managing partner and managing director of Silver Lake – with the school’s annual Executive of the Year Award next week.

“Jim Davidson has helped many businesses to strategically invest and grow into market leaders,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman. “He has been an active advisor in the technology industry for more than a quarter of a century and is considered a pioneer in the world of technology investments.”

Davidson co-founded Silver Lake in 1999 and has helped the technology-focused private-equity firm grow to manage more than $23 billion in assets and employ more than 200 professionals around the world. The firm’s portfolio currently includes or has previously included such companies as Alibaba, Ameritrade, Avago, Go Daddy, the NASDAQ OMX Group, Sabre Holdings, Seagate and Skype. The firm was also instrumental in the recent $25 billion deal in which Silver Lake partnered with Michael Dell to take Dell Inc. off stock exchanges to become private again.

Prior to his work at Silver Lake, Davidson was a managing director at Hambrecht & Quist, a technology-focused investment bank and venture capital firm that helped underwrite the initial public offerings (IPOs) of Apple, Netscape and Amazon.com. He was also a corporate securities attorney.

Davidson serves on the board of SMART Modular Technologies, a designer, manufacturer and supplier of flash memory cards and other digital storage products. He has also served on the boards of directors of many other Silver Lake investments, including Avago, Seagate and Skype. He is an active angel investor and advisor to several private tech companies and also serves on the boards of nonprofits, including the University of California, Berkeley’s Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology and the U.S. Olympic Foundation Board of Trustees.

Davidson becomes the 31st annual Executive of the Year chosen by the Dean’s Council, a national group of prominent executives who advise the W. P. Carey School of Business. Previous honorees include Howard Schultz, chairman and chief executive officer of Starbucks Coffee Company; Alan Mulally, president and chief executive officer of Ford Motor Company, and Mike Ahearn, chairman of the board of First Solar, Inc.

Davidson will be honored at a luncheon at the JW Marriott Camelback Inn in Scottsdale on April 17. The event, which starts at 11:45 a.m., is part of the Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series. For more information about the club or to reserve seats, call (480) 727-0596 or visit www.econclubphx.org. Tickets are $75 per person for non-club members.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks Top 30 Again

U.S. News & World Report announces its prestigious annual list of the “Best Graduate Schools” in the country today. For the seventh year in a row, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University ranks Top 30 nationwide among full-time MBA programs. The school’s evening MBA program also ranks Top 20 among part-time MBA programs.

“We’re happy the new rankings confirm we’re achieving consistent excellence here at the W. P. Carey School of Business,” says the school’s dean, Amy Hillman. “We have a phenomenal group of faculty, staff and students who repeatedly boost us to the top, year after year.”

On the new rankings list, the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program comes in at No. 27, the best ranking for any Arizona school. The numbers are largely based on the positive reputation of schools among corporate recruiters — who offer students jobs — and among top administrators from peer business schools in the know.

“We are proud to offer one of the three least expensive programs in the Top 30,” explains Stacey Whitecotton, the W. P. Carey School’s senior associate dean of graduate programs. “We also have one of the two smallest programs in the Top 30, allowing us to keep the class sizes small and personal.”

The W. P. Carey School’s evening MBA program ranks No. 18 for part-time MBA programs nationwide. The evening program is offered in both Tempe and north Scottsdale, and it’s the highest ranked part-time MBA program in Arizona. The school also offers other part-time programs not eligible for inclusion in this particular set of new rankings: an acclaimed online MBA program that U.S. News & World Report ranked No. 2 nationwide earlier this year and a weekend MBA program that mixes online learning and campus classes every other Friday and Saturday.

The new U.S. News & World Report rankings also include other graduate-level “specialties” lists. The W. P. Carey School’s renowned supply chain management program ranks No. 3 for supply chain/logistics. The information systems program ranks No. 12 in its category. In addition, ASU’s Ph.D. program in economics ranks No. 36.

Other recent high rankings for the W. P. Carey School of Business:

> U.S. News & World Report ranks the school’s undergraduate business program No. 27 in the nation.
> Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s online MBA program Top 10 worldwide.
The Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 28 worldwide.
> The University of Texas at Dallas ranks the W. P. Carey School Top 25 in the United States and Top 30 worldwide for business-school research productivity.
The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the W. P. Carey School No. 21 in the world for economics/business.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks No. 2 in the Nation

Online degree programs are skyrocketing in popularity, and if you’re looking for an online MBA or other graduate degree, then the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is an excellent choice. For the second year in a row, U.S. News & World Report ranks the school No. 2 nationwide on its list of “Best Online Graduate Business Programs.”

“Increasingly, people want the convenience of an online degree, but they don’t want to sacrifice the high quality of a recognized, top university,” explains Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “With the W. P. Carey School, you get the best of both worlds: the flexibility of an online format and the same stellar faculty members who teach in our other highly ranked graduate programs. The W. P. Carey School was one of the first highly respected business schools to launch online degrees more than a decade ago, and we use in-house course designers specializing solely in business classes.”

U.S. News & World Report already ranks the W. P. Carey School’s undergraduate business, full-time MBA and evening MBA programs among the Top 30 in the nation in their categories. This new ranking covers both the W. P. Carey School’s popular online MBA program and its online Master of Science in Information Management (MSIM) program. The list is based on student engagement, admissions selectivity, peer reputation, faculty credentials and training, and student services and technology.

“Students serving in the military, starting their own businesses, and traveling extensively for their jobs are among those who have chosen our online graduate business programs,” says Stacey Whitecotton, senior associate dean for W. P. Carey School graduate programs. “Participants have a dedicated financial aid specialist and a career center for those who want help with job searches.”

Again, the W. P. Carey School’s online MBA program garnered a No. 2 ranking last year, too. Among those who have completed the program: NFL Pro Bowl kicker Billy Cundiff and Lt. Col. Scott Coulson — a recipient of the Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and a Combat Action Badge for his service in Iraq — who completed his degree while serving in the U.S. Army in Afghanistan.

The 21-month MBA program allows students to meet at a face-to-face orientation just once at the ASU campus, then complete the rest of the courses online. Students work in small, personalized teams with peers from other industries, focusing on one course at a time. This is also one of the few online MBA programs in which students can earn their degrees with an area of emphasis, such as finance, international business, marketing or supply chain management.

The 16-month online MSIM program just launched in 2012 and is already drawing praise from those in the fast-growing information technology (IT) field. The degree is designed to provide professionals in any career area with a well-rounded education in IT and explain how they can apply that knowledge to their companies overall. American Express, Intel Corporation, Mayo Clinic and US Airways are among the companies that send students to the school’s MSIM programs. The W. P. Carey School’s MSIM programs have an exceptionally high retention rate, thanks to efforts by the world-class faculty and collaborative-learning training for students during orientation.

The W. P. Carey School also offers a weekend/online hybrid MBA and will launch an online version of its master’s program in business analytics (“big data”) this fall. All of the school’s online programs include small class sizes and comprehensive online-learning technologies that are easy to use. For more information, visit wpcarey.asu.edu.

carey school - graduate

W. P. Carey School Announces New Degrees

One of the largest and highest-ranked business schools in the nation is announcing several new degree offerings for next year. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is adding new choices in the areas of “big data,” supply chain management and finance, plus a certificate in sales.

“We’re seeing tremendous growth in demand for professionals who can analyze the mountains of ‘big data’ coming into companies through social media, networking with customers, and other methods,” explains Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “That’s why we’re adding a new bachelor’s degree in data analytics and an online version of our existing master’s degree program in business analytics. We’re also introducing new degrees in global logistics from our Top 10-ranked Supply Chain Management Department and a new master’s degree in finance.”

Experts estimate 4.4 million data analysts will be needed worldwide by 2015, so this is a big area of career growth. The new bachelor’s program in business data analytics will be available at ASU’s Tempe campus, and the master’s will be a flexible online program lasting 16 months, allowing working professionals to take part. In addition, the school will launch an undergraduate certificate in applied business data analytics.

The undergraduate analytics offerings are from the school’s Information Systems Department, and the master’s degree is a joint effort from that department and the school’s Supply Chain Management Department. U.S. News & World Report ranks both departments Top 20 in the nation in their fields.

“We’re also starting up two new degrees in global logistics to help companies with efficiency, cost savings and risk reduction in their logistics operations,” says Professor John Fowler, chair of the Supply Chain Management Department at the W. P. Carey School. “The supply-chain field plays a growing role in the business world as companies work more on an international scale to meet the needs of their customers. The school has spectacular rankings and a stellar career-placement record in this area.”

Logistics knowledge is also vital after disasters like Hurricane Sandy or the big earthquake in Haiti, when countless crews and resources have to be moved. The new bachelor’s and nine-month master’s programs in global logistics will be offered at ASU’s West campus in northwest Phoenix. This is especially helpful for the business community because several global companies have facilities near this campus, including Amazon, Target, Walmart and numerous transportation companies. Also, Phoenix is relatively close to ports in Mexico and California that are heavily involved in shipping.

Next year, the W. P. Carey School will also launch a new master’s in finance program. This type of program is very popular in Europe and growing in demand in the United States, as more new college graduates want short, specialized business master’s programs to complement their undergraduate knowledge from other fields. The nine-month finance program will be available at ASU’s Tempe campus, as will a new undergraduate certificate in professional sales from the school’s Marketing Department. All of the new offerings will start in fall 2014, pending final approval.

The W. P. Carey School of Business is currently ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report for both undergraduate and MBA programs. For more information on the school’s offerings, go to www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Dedicates New McCord Hall

One of the nation’s largest and highest-ranked business schools dedicated a brand new, state-of-the-art facility today. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University held a ceremony to mark the official opening of its 129,000-square-foot McCord Hall.

“We believe we’ve built the most advanced learning environment available for graduate business students,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman. “Every detail was designed to teach students in a way that makes them better contributors to today’s work environment. The building has an emphasis on collaboration, discussion-based learning and flexibility.”

The new building is being added to the school’s two existing structures, which were renovated during this project. Together, they will ease overcrowding for the 10,000-plus students who attend the W. P. Carey School. McCord Hall will be home to the school’s graduate and executive-education programs, including the Top 30 nationally ranked MBA programs.

The impressive facility features modern architecture, technologically advanced tiered and flat classrooms, a multipurpose event space, a new graduate-level career center, team rooms, study areas, outdoor assembly areas, a lounge for honors undergrads, and a health-conscious café. McCord Hall is also environmentally friendly, with less water and energy use than similar buildings and a solar array that returns power to the campus grid. The project totaled $57 million, and the return on investment is expected to be great.

“We estimate the project has already had an economic impact on the gross state product of $64 million and the creation of 880 jobs,” says Professor Dennis Hoffman, director of the L. William Seidman Research Institute at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Of course, the value of the construction does not include the added value that will accrue from the human capital produced in McCord Hall’s learning environment, allowing students to acquire knowledge and skills to compete in today’s economy.”

ASU President Michael Crow and Hillman presided over the dedication ceremony at the university’s Tempe campus. Philanthropist Sharon Dupont McCord and other building donors also took part. McCord and her late husband, Bob, are the major donors behind the facility’s name. More than $17 million in gifts and pledges from area companies and families, as well as other various sources, are helping to fund the building. Student support has been robust.

To learn more about the W. P. Carey School of Business, visit wpcarey.asu.edu. For more information about McCord Hall, go to http://building.wpcarey.asu.edu/. Donations to the building campaign can still be made at asufoundation.org/wpcbuilding. The W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA, evening MBA, online MBA and undergraduate business programs are all currently ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

Amy-Hillman

W.P. Carey dean wants the world to know about school

Amy Hillman, a renowned management professor and noted researcher, replaced Robert Mittelstaedt as dean of Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business in March and became the school’s first female dean.

Az Business sat down with the leader of the W. P. Carey School, ranked in the top 30 among the best graduate business schools in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, to talk about her goals as dean and how her background as a researcher impacts her leadership.

Az Business: What is your biggest challenge as dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business?
Amy Hillman: Keeping the school nimble as an organization. Technology is playing a transformative role in higher education. The skills and expertise needed to succeed in an organization change as a result. We have to stay close to our corporate partners to make sure we stay on the leading edge of business education.

AB: How has the transition from second in command to dean been so far?
AH: Great. In the second-in-command position, I focused internally. We have amazing students, faculty and staff, and we work with some great partners within ASU, outside of the business school. Now, I also get to spend time with alumni, corporate partners and donors. In addition, I interact a lot more with other business-school deans. It’s a full circle.

AB: What are the W. P. Carey School’s strengths?
AH: We have hard-working students, dedicated staff, a supportive community, and a really desirable and unusual faculty combination. It’s not that hard to find good teachers or good researchers, but our faculty members are both, and that’s much more difficult to achieve. They are world-class researchers on the cutting edge of new knowledge in their fields, as well as excellent teachers. Therefore, what they discover one day, they teach in class the next. Add to this, they care about the students’ success in school and future careers. We have a dynamite combination. That’s why we’re currently ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report for all of our marquee programs — undergraduate business, full-time MBA, part-time MBA and online MBA.

AB: What makes you an effective dean for the W. P. Carey School?
AH: I love my work. I value relationships, but also performance. It also doesn’t hurt to be a management professor with real-world managerial experience. We have a lot of stakeholders to manage.

AB: How has your background prepared you to educate the entrepreneurs and business leaders of the future?
AH: In addition to my decades of work as a management professor and then executive dean, I also originally got my MBA because I needed skills to be a better manager in retail, before I ever went into academia. What I learned one night in my classes, I would apply the next day on the job. I also come from a family of entrepreneurs, so innovation and practicality loom large. I think this helps me stay focused on what we need to do to advance the practice of business.

AB: What are your goals as dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business?
AH: I’d like to build stronger — deeper and broader — corporate relations, increase lifelong value to our alumni, make our student experience a personal one, and make working at the W. P. Carey School of Business rewarding and fun. I’d also like to make sure the W. P. Carey School is no longer a “best-kept secret.” More people need to know all we do and how well we do it.

AB: What’s been the biggest change in education since you entered academia?
AH: I’d say one of the biggest changes to education as a whole — not specifically to business education — is the questioning of the value of education. This is unimaginable in developing nations like China. I was recently there with our executive MBA students in Shanghai. One of our speakers at an event was Nobel Laureate Ed Prescott, a W. P. Carey School of Business faculty member. Young kids wanted to have their pictures taken with him for his intellectual achievement. Sadly, I see too many people here in the United States who believe education isn’t the main driver of economic achievement.

AB: How has your background as a researcher impacted the way you educate the business leaders of the future?
AH: As a researcher, I’m strongly influenced by data, not anecdotes. So let’s analyze what’s happening before we jump to conclusions based on our personal observations. That said, most business research questions are big, complex ones without “one right answer,” so we need to train our students to look for patterns among data, but at the same time to embrace uncertainty. Make the best decisions with incomplete information. That’s the real world.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Honors Top Business Leaders

Three top business leaders will be honored for their innovation and achievements, when they are inducted into the W. P. Carey School of Business Homecoming Hall of Fame this month. They include the head of a famed jewelry company, a high-profile business founder from China, and a corporate leader at one of Arizona’s biggest companies.

On Oct. 17, they will join previous Arizona State University alumni inductees from such diverse organizations as the American Red Cross, Motorola, the U.S. Air Force, Wells Fargo Bank, XM Satellite Radio and the Arizona Diamondbacks.

“These stellar inductees represent strength, leadership and accomplishment in the business world,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman. “They demonstrate how far our students can go and have gone in making their mark on the global economy.”

The 36th annual W. P. Carey School honorees are:

> Eddie LeVian, chief executive officer of the Le Vian Corporation, who has made Chocolate Diamonds® a red-carpet staple in Hollywood. LeVian earned a business degree from the W. P. Carey School in 1979 and took his innovative marketing ideas back to his family’s fine jewelry business in New York. The company’s sales have more than quadrupled over the past decade, and the LeVian family is active with many charities, raising $75 million in the past decade alone.

> Canglong Liu, a high-profile business leader in China, who founded one fertilizer factory in 1979, which grew into a conglomerate of major companies, including the Sichuan Hongda Group, now with 30,000 employees and 60 subsidiaries around the world. Liu is chairman of businesses that focus on finance, minerals and real estate. He is also a member of the national committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference and the standing committee of the All-China Federation of Industry and Commerce. The Hongda Group has given $8 million to AIDS prevention and research in China. Liu received his MBA from the W. P. Carey School’s prestigious executive MBA program in Shanghai in 2007.

> MaryAnn Miller, chief human resources officer and executive leader of corporate communications for Avnet, a Phoenix-based Fortune 500 company with more than 18,000 employees and customers in 80 countries. Avnet is one of the largest distributors of electronic components, computer products and embedded technology in the world. Miller has more than 30 years of experience in human resources and operations management, and is responsible for leading the company’s human resources, organizational development and corporate communications worldwide. She is also a member of the Avnet Executive Board. She received her MBA from the W. P. Carey School’s executive MBA program in 2001.

About 200 alumni, business leaders and students are expected to attend the Homecoming Hall of Fame event on Thursday, Oct. 17 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa in Phoenix. A reception starts at 5:30 p.m., followed by the awards ceremony.

Space is limited. For more information on tickets or sponsorship, go to www.wpcarey.asu.edu/homecoming or call (480) 965-2597.

WPCarey-School-Sign

Mayo Clinic and W. P. Carey School Team Up

Mayo Clinic is known as a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education. Now, a select number of students from the Mayo Medical School are going through a cutting-edge program that allows them to get both their M.D. degree from Mayo Medical School and an MBA from the highly ranked W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

“This program is helping to educate some of the brightest medical minds of our future in such a way that they will be more aware of the business side of medicine, the patient experience and the costs for us, the taxpayers,” explains W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman.

Dr. Michele Halyard, vice dean of the Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus, adds, “The collaboration between Mayo Medical School and the W. P. Carey School of Business brings valuable synergies to the education of both future physicians and business leaders. The dual-degree program provides Mayo Clinic physicians in training with complementary competencies in business management, payer systems and accounting practices. This, along with a superb clinical education at Mayo Medical School, will prepare them to be leaders in the complex world of medicine in the 21st century.”

ASU began a strong collaborative relationship with Mayo Clinic in 2002. This particular joint degree program was launched in 2009 and has turned into a highly desirable choice for just a handful of select students from the Mayo Medical School.

Yingying Kumar was one of the first to graduate from the joint M.D./MBA program. She was looking for a way to supplement her strong medical education with a business background to help her stand out in the job market.

“I realized that the business and leadership skills I would learn in the MBA program could help me advance to a higher position in a clinic or even run my own practice in the future,” says Kumar. “I got a better understanding of roles and how hospitals run. I also got the perspective of non-medical students from my business classmates. I think the MBA will help me keep the patients’ voice in consideration at all times.”

Students who take the dual-degree program spend two years at the Mayo Medical School. Then they spend one or two years in the W. P. Carey School’s MBA program, currently ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. They return to medical school afterward to finish up their studies. The whole experience is facilitated by both schools to be virtually seamless for the Mayo students who qualify.

“I first began considering this program after volunteering in Honduras on a medical service trip and learning that the villagers we helped had little or no access to health care,” says Mayo M.D./W. P. Carey MBA student Jack Jeng. “We visited an empty rural medical clinic abandoned by its staff because it did not have a sustainable business model. That helped me realize that a successful health care organization needs more than a great medical facility, dedicated professionals and good intentions. Proper planning and smart business principles are also required to ensure patients continue to benefit from high-quality care, something I personally experienced at the Mayo Clinic.”

Jeng, who has already completed the MBA portion of the joint program, adds, “I was blown away by the opportunities and support at the W. P. Carey School of Business. They offered me valuable knowledge and experience I hope to use throughout my career. As a future physician with business understanding, I aspire not only to help people directly, but also to make meaningful contributions to improve the lives of countless patients who aren’t actually sitting in front of me.”

Amy Hillman - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Amy Hillman – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Amy Hillman – Dean, W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University

Hillman, a world-renowned management expert, popular teacher and noted researcher, took over as dean of the W. P. Carey School on March 1. Hillman is the first-ever female dean of the school, which has undergraduate, full-time MBA, part-time MBA and online MBA programs all ranked Top 30 in the country by U.S. News & World Report.

Surprising fact: “One of my earliest executive education experiences was helping give tools to Czech professors to train managers in their country after the Berlin Wall came down.”

Biggest challenge: “Managing dual careers, since my husband is also an academic. We commuted long distance and traded off ideal positions. We both couldn’t be happier at ASU.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

veterans

USAA CEO Named Executive of the Year

Hiring and helping our veterans is as important today as it’s been at any other time in history. USAA’s chief executive officer will discuss how to assist veterans as they transition to civilian life when he’s honored for his achievements on April 25.

Ret. Maj. Gen. Josue “Joe” Robles served for 28 years in the U.S. Army. He now serves as president and chief executive officer of USAA, a Fortune 500 financial-services provider for members of the military and their families. This month, Robles becomes the 30th annual Executive of the Year chosen by the Dean’s Council of 100, a national group of prominent executives who advise the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

“Robles has set a superb example in serving both his country and his customers,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman. “USAA is known for exceptional customer service and for aiding our active-duty military members, veterans and their families. We’re proud to honor these efforts.”

USAA provides insurance, banking, investment and retirement products and services to 9.6 million members of the U.S. military and their families. The organization is consistently recognized for outstanding service, employee well-being and financial strength. It was founded in 1922 and now employs more than 25,000 people at offices around the world, including one in the Phoenix area.

Robles was a USAA board member from 1990 to 1994, while he was still on active duty in the Army. His stellar armed-forces resume includes command and staff positions in Korea, Vietnam, Germany, and Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in the Middle East. He has received many honors, including the Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster. He also served as commanding general of the 1st Infantry Division (the oldest division in the U.S. Army, also known as “The Big Red One”) and director of the Army budget prior to joining USAA in 1994 as chief financial officer. He became president and CEO in 2007. This new recognition adds to his full shelf of awards.

“I couldn’t be more honored, especially in a community that’s so important to USAA and our mission,” Robles said. “As a veteran myself, I am looking forward to discussing how we can help members of the military transition into civilian careers.”

Robles was named the “No. 1 Veteran in Business” by The Christian Science Monitor in 2009. Among other honors, he also received the Horatio Alger Award for being a dedicated community leader, committed to excellence. He serves on several boards, including the American Red Cross Board of Governors and the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas’ San Antonio branch.

The event to honor Robles will be held Thursday, April 25 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess resort in Scottsdale. The W. P. Carey School of Business Dean’s Council of 100 chose Robles to follow previous high-profile winners, including Michael Dell, chairman and chief executive officer of Dell Inc.; Howard Schultz, chairman and chief executive officer of Starbucks Coffee Company; and Alan Mulally, president and chief executive officer of Ford Motor Company.

This event is part of the Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series. For more information about the club or to reserve seats, call (480) 727-0596 or visit www.econclubphx.org.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks Top 30 in the Nation

U.S. News & World Report announces its prestigious annual rankings for “Best Graduate Schools” today. For the sixth year in a row, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University ranks Top 30 among the best graduate business schools in the nation.

“We’re really proud to demonstrate consistent excellence at the W. P. Carey School of Business,” says the school’s dean, Amy Hillman. “This particular ranking is largely determined by our peer business schools and corporate recruiters who offer our students jobs, so they are very aware of the great work happening here. Thank you to the dedicated faculty members, staff and students who do their best every day to keep us on the cutting edge of education.”

The new list for 2014 ranks the W. P. Carey School No. 30 for its full-time MBA program. It’s the best ranking for any Arizona school. The full-time program also ranks among the Top 20 nationwide for career placement at graduation, demonstrating the school’s keen interest in preparing students to succeed in the real world.

“In addition, our full-time MBA is among the two least expensive programs in the Top 30, a clear value,” says Stacey Whitecotton, senior associate dean of graduate programs at the W. P. Carey School. “It’s also among the two smallest programs in the Top 30, allowing us to keep class sizes at a personal level.”

In January, U.S. News & World Report also pre-announced that the W. P. Carey School’s online MBA program ranks No. 2 among online graduate business programs in the country. The online MBA program is known for its flexibility, convenience and offering of the same stellar faculty members who teach in the school’s highly ranked face-to-face programs.

Several other W. P. Carey School programs also appear on new graduate-level “specialties” lists from U.S. News & World Report this week. The evening MBA program ranks No. 22 among part-time MBA programs nationwide, the highest ranking for any Arizona school on that list. The renowned supply chain management program ranks No. 6 for supply chain/logistics, and the information systems program ranks No. 16 in its category. Also, the Ph.D. program in economics ranks No. 36 in its field.

Other recent high rankings for marquee programs at the W. P. Carey School:

* U.S. News & World Report ranks the undergraduate business program No. 24 in the nation.
* The Wall Street Journal ranks the executive MBA program in the Phoenix area No. 13 in the world.
* Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 21 in the world.
* The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the school No. 18 in the world for “economics/business.”

Amy-Hillman

New Carey School Dean Takes Over

One of the top business schools in the nation will have a new dean at the helm, starting tomorrow. Current Executive Dean Amy Hillman — a world-renowned management expert, popular teacher and noted researcher — will take over as dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, effective March 1.

Hillman is the first-ever female dean of the school, which has undergraduate, full-time MBA, part-time MBA and online MBA programs all ranked Top 30 in the country by U.S. News & World Report. She is outlining a clear vision for the future.

“We’re going to keep advancing what we do to help our students achieve career and life successes,” says Hillman, who has played a key role in the growth of the school in her four years as second-in-command/executive dean. “Our world-class faculty is full of researchers who teach cutting-edge skills. We want to use this knowledge and our excellent position in a major metropolitan area (the Phoenix area) to help support the business world. We plan to broaden and deepen our business partnerships to become a ‘go-to’ place for firms to come to advance their work force and get help with real-life projects. We’re also going to focus on providing even more value and connections throughout the world for our vast 80,000-plus alumni network.”

Hillman never had dreams of academia when she was younger. She actually got her MBA on evenings and weekends, while striving to improve as general manager of a small retail and manufacturing business. However, several of her professors had such a profound influence on her that she realized she’d rather teach others about business than stay in her current job.

“As both an undergraduate and graduate student, I had individual faculty members who had a huge influence on my life,” says Hillman, who has been recognized with outstanding teaching awards every place she has worked. “I felt a sense that if I could make a difference for one student, like these faculty members did for me, then I would personally feel more accomplished than I did in the corporate world.”

Hillman has already made a clear mark on the W. P. Carey School in her decade-plus on the faculty as a management professor. She has championed entrepreneurship projects through the Spirit of Enterprise Center and helped to expand the school’s degree offerings to allow access to more students. (The school’s current total is more than 10,000 students). Recently, she was instrumental in the school introducing several new specialized master’s degrees to help undergraduates from other fields combine their passions with a solid business foundation. These include nine-month master’s programs in management and business analytics.

“I love ASU, and this opportunity to be a leader here, at a place that I love, is a real privilege,” says Hillman. “This is especially significant, since this year is the 10th anniversary of the gift from businessman/philanthropist Wm. Polk Carey that gave the school its name. We’ve come so far, thanks to this transformative gift, and we plan to go even further over the next 10 years.”

Hillman will preside over the opening of the new 129,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art McCord Hall this summer. The building will complement the two existing business-school structures, providing more classrooms for graduate and undergraduate honors students, technologically advanced team study rooms, a new career center, world-class conference facilities and outdoor assembly areas.

“This is a chance for us to really advance the science and culture of learning business,” says Hillman. “The way the building is set up, it will actually help our students to develop teamwork, communication and critical thinking skills.”

Hillman is also a strong supporter of the school’s research efforts. She is a renowned researcher in management, focusing on boards of directors, corporate political strategies, and how links between firms and their external contingencies improve financial performance. Her work has been featured in USA Today, The Washington Post and U.S. News & World Report, among other venues. The journal Technovation recently ranked the W. P. Carey School No. 1 among all business schools worldwide for authoring research in the Top 45 academic business journals with the most global impact.

“What makes this school special, though, is the people,” says Hillman. “The faculty, staff and students are so amazing, supportive and encouraging of each other. At some older, established schools, there is a sense of complacency. The W. P. Carey School is like a nimble entrepreneur, seeking to constantly improve. That feeling permeates our culture, helping us to transform and advance lives, the school and the business world.”

Hillman takes over for current dean, Robert Mittelstaedt, who is semi-retiring after 40 years in academia, including various leadership positions at the prestigious Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an experienced business co-founder, a board member of three public companies and author of two business books. He will continue to serve at ASU as an adviser to the president and provost, as well as work on a project focused on the business and technical issues facing electric utilities in the future.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School of Business and its programs, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

Amy-Hillman

Hillman Named Dean of W. P. Carey School of Business

Amy Hillman has been named dean of Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business, effective March 1, 2013. The school’s current executive dean, Hillman has served as second-in-command at the school since 2009, playing a key role in its growth and success.

U.S. News & World Report currently ranks the school Top 30 in the nation for undergraduate business, full-time MBA and part-time MBA programs.

Hillman succeeds retiring dean, Robert Mittelstaedt, who helped vault the W. P. Carey School of Business into one of the largest and highest-ranked business schools in the world, with more than 10,000 students. He will remain at ASU as dean emeritus and professor of management.

“Amy Hillman is a devoted teacher, a noted researcher and a gifted administrator,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “She has been an integral part of the W. P. Carey School management team that has had so much success during the past decade. We are fortunate that Amy has agreed to move into the school’s deanship to further enhance the school’s excellence.

“I wish to thank Bob Mittelstaedt for his leadership of the W. P. Carey School, and I am delighted that Bob will continue to serve ASU by doing special projects and advising me and the provost.”

Said Executive Vice President and Provost Elizabeth D. Phillips, “Amy Hillman is a top scholar in her field, and she is a creative and flexible administrator well-suited to lead the W. P. Carey School in a time of very rapid change in higher education.”

Hillman is a world-renowned management professor and holds the Rusty Lyon Chair in Strategy at the W. P. Carey School. She has won numerous national awards as an outstanding reviewer and researcher. She was editor of Academy of Management Review, the world’s top management journal in terms of citation impact, and her research has been featured in USA Today, The Washington Post and U.S. News & World Report.

“I’m excited to have the opportunity to lead a terrific group of faculty, staff, students, alumni and our friends in the business community forward,” said Hillman. “The W. P. Carey School of Business is on a steep trajectory toward becoming one of the world’s finest institutions committed to making meaningful contributions to the lives of our stakeholders and also to the future of business practice.”

Students and colleagues consider Hillman to be an exceptional teacher, having honored her with two Outstanding Professor Awards and two Outstanding Teacher Awards. She was also voted one of the most popular professors in Businessweek’s rankings of MBA faculty in 1998.

Before her impressive tenure in academia, Hillman worked as general manager of a small retail and manufacturing business, and she now plays a key role in promoting entrepreneurship at the W. P. Carey School. For example, she helps to advance the school’s Spirit of Enterprise Center, which helps hundreds of businesses each year.

Hillman previously taught at the University of Western Ontario, Michigan State University, Johannes Kepler University in Austria, Texas A&M University and Trinity University. She has a Ph.D. from Texas A&M, where she was also named Outstanding Doctoral Alumni.

Mittelstaedt joined the school in 2004 and will semi-retire after spending about 40 years in academia, including various leadership positions at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.