Tag Archives: APS

veterans

Department of Defense honors APS

Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), a Department of Defense office, announced today that Arizona Public Service (APS) of Phoenix, Arizona, is one of 15 recipients of the 2014 Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award. The Freedom Award is the Department’s highest recognition given to employers for exceptional support of Guard and Reserve employees. This year’s recipients were selected from 2,864 nominations received from Guardsmen and Reservists for going far beyond what the federal law requires to support their military employees.

“I’m honored to announce the recipients of the 2014 Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award,” said Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. “Guardsmen and Reservists across the nation rely on strong bonds with their civilian employers. By recognizing these 15 exceptional employers, the Department of Defense celebrates the contributions made by American employers to our Citizen Warriors. I commend these extraordinary employers for their unwavering commitment to service members and their families.”

APS was nominated by Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Michael Rich from the 13th Battalion, Army Reserve Careers Division/Adjutant General. He highlighted the company’s “Troops to Energy Jobs” initiative, which accelerates the hiring of Guardsmen and Reservists and provides support to those employees and their families. APS has created an employee-led group, VETRN (Veteran Engagement Transition Retention Network), that promotes corporate support and recognition for members of the Guard and Reserve. In addition to sponsoring military and veteran organizations, the company also maintains contact with deployed service members, sending care packages overseas and offering assistance to families at home.

The 2014 Freedom Award recipients below will be honored at a ceremony in the Pentagon Sept. 26:

Arizona Public Service
Phoenix, Arizona

AT&T
Dallas, Texas

Capital One
McLean, Virginia

CH2M-WG Idaho
Idaho Falls, Idaho

General Mills, Inc.
Golden Valley, Minnesota

J.G. Management Systems, Inc.
Grand Junction, Colorado

Los Angeles Fire Department
Los Angeles, California

N.H. Department of Environmental Services
Concord, New Hampshire

PNC Bank
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Shofner Vision Center
Nashville, Tennessee

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Memphis, Tennessee

Triumph Pharmaceuticals Inc.
St. Louis, Missouri

UNC Health Care
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Washoe County School District
Reno, Nevada

Zions Bank
Salt Lake City, Utah

firefighter

APS Fund provides grants to first responders

First responder agencies in Arizona now have the opportunity to apply for grants through a new APS Fund within the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. The fund, seeded with $50,000 from APS, is available to agencies within APS’s service territory throughout the state and provides the opportunity to procure much needed life-saving equipment.

“We have always been supportive of our first responders and we value the lifesaving work they do every day,” said Tina Marie Tentori, Executive Director of APS Corporate Giving. “We are excited to partner with Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation to help ensure our first responders have the latest technology and equipment to save even more lives.”

Interested agencies can apply for funding from the APS Fund starting on July 1, 2014 through September 5, 2014. Grant applications can be completed via FirehouseSubs.com/Foundation. Applicants will be notified of their status after Sept 17, 2014.

“Since 2005, we have awarded more than $237,000 in grants to Arizona based first responders and we are thrilled that APS made this investment in their community to expand our reach even further,” said Robin Peters, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation Executive Director.

solar

APS names McCarthy Supplier of the Year

McCarthy Building Companies was recently recognized by APS as an outstanding business partner at the 2014 APS Supplier of the Year Awards. In total, six companies were selected representing various supply chain-managed categories. McCarthy was recognized in the “Major Projects” category.

McCarthy was selected out of more than 4,000 different APS suppliers through a nomination process led by APS employees. The nominees were evaluated on their support of APS’s values such as commitment to sustainability, active involvement in the community and a focus on health, safety and environmental concerns. Companies were also assessed on customer service and overall performance.

“Our business partners are a vital resource in helping us provide safe and affordable energy for our customers,” said Barbara Gomez, APS Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer. “APS selected McCarthy and five other companies out of thousands of suppliers not only for their outstanding customer service and ongoing commitment to our company’s core values, but also for setting an example that we hope other suppliers will emulate.”

Earlier this year, McCarthy completed the installation of a large-scale 14-megawatt (MW) solar project in Yuma County called Hyder II for APS, which owns and operates the plant. In addition to Hyder II, McCarthy also completed the 18-MW APS Cotton Center Solar Station in Gila Bend, Ariz., and the 20-MW APS Chino Valley Solar Plant in Chino Valley, Ariz.

“We’ve been fortunate to work on three large-scale solar projects with APS, which is rapidly expanding its solar portfolio and solar leadership in the state,” said Scott Canada, Director of the Renewable Energy team at McCarthy Building Companies. “Our system engineering and construction expertise has helped APS harness the power of the sun and turn it into clean, renewable energy. We are honored to be recognized for our efforts by APS.”

To date, McCarthy Building Companies’ Renewable Energy team, based in Phoenix, has completed several large-scale solar installations across the desert Southwest representing a combined capacity of more than 70 MW of solar energy production. The division was named to Solar Power World’s Top 250 solar contractors list (rank #23) in September 2013.

solar

APS Seeks Renewable Energy Projects from Solar

Arizona Public Service Co. announces a Request for Proposal (RFP) from solar developers and installers to construct two 10-megawatt solar photovoltaic facilities – financed by APS through the company’s AZ Sun Program.

The RFP began on June 16, and interested parties are encouraged to participate in a bidder’s webinar on June 23. Additional information about the webinar and the RFP is available online at aps.com/rfp.

Projects must utilize commercially proven technology. When completed in 2015, the new solar facilities – one located on Luke Air Force Base and the other to be built in partnership with the City of Phoenix – will be owned and operated by APS. These facilities will join seven other AZ Sun Projects that are already online or under construction, totaling 170 MW of solar energy for Arizona – enough to power more than 42,000 APS customers.

With the AZ Sun Program, APS is investing in the development of solar photovoltaic power plants across Arizona. The program allows APS to partner with third-party developers and equipment providers to design and construct the facilities, which increase the opportunity for more developers to participate since project financing is provided by APS.

APS, Arizona’s largest and longest-serving electricity utility, serves nearly 1.2 million customers in 11 of the state’s 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the principal subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corp. (NYSE: PNW).

Solar Power

Luke AFB Leases Land to APS for Solar Plant

Luke Air Force Base and the state’s largest electric utility provider, Arizona Public Service, have partnered on a new solar power plant to be built on 100 acres of land located on the Base. Construction of the 10-megawatt facility – part of the APS AZ Sun Program – is expected to begin in the fourth quarter of this year.

APS is leasing the land from Luke AFB as part of an energy Enhanced Use Lease. Energy EULs are a partnership between the Air Force and public entities to encourage the development of renewable energy – helping the Air Force to save money while meeting congressionally established Air Force goals. APS will lease the land for 30 years from Luke AFB for $6 million.

Through the APS AZ Sun Program, the utility is investing in photovoltaic power plants across Arizona. The project at Luke AFB will join eight other AZ Sun projects that are already online or in some stage of development, totaling 170 MW of solar energy for Arizona – enough to power more than 42,000 APS customers.

“Our partnership with Luke Air Force Base for this project is great for Arizona,” said Tammy McLeod, APS Vice President of Resource Management. “The solar plant will be highly visible and will set a great example of Arizona’s solar leadership for people from all over the world who live, work and train on Base. Plus, APS is proud to support the Air Force and bring more solar energy to our customers.”

The solar plant will generate enough energy to power 2,500 Arizona homes, and will prevent the emission of 12,000-15,000 tons of greenhouse gases a year, according to Robert Worley, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron installation management flight chief.

“It continues a great partnership that we have with APS,” Worley said.

More than 200 local jobs will be created during the construction of the plant, which is expected to begin in the fourth quarter of this year. The facility will be operational, serving APS customers by summer 2015.

bcgs

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale announces new board

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale is pleased to announce the newest members to the non-profit’s Board of Governors:

  • Lee Nickloy – APS
  • Prescott Pohl – Snell & Wilmer
  • Kathleen Preston – Cox Communications
  • Ryan Rayburn – Lincoln Financial Advisors
  • Tom Traylor – Wells Fargo

“We are very thankful to have this great group of individuals serve on our board,” said Steve Davidson, President/CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale. “These dedicated community leaders generously give their time and professional expertise in effort to make sure that the needs of our local youth are being met.”

About Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale, celebrating its 60th Anniversary throughout 2014, empowers 17,800 youth of all ages and backgrounds to develop the qualities needed to reach their full potential as productive, responsible citizens. The Club provides a safe place, caring adult mentors, fun, friendship and athletics, and high-impact youth development programs during critical non-school hours. Clubs are located in cities and on Native American lands in the greater Scottsdale area and promote academic success, positive character and citizenship, and healthy lifestyles. For more information, visit www.bgcs.org.

Marina Heights is a development partnership between Ryan Companies and Sunbelt Holdings. Fellow Valley Partnership member Cushman & Wakefield was awarded the leasing assignment.

A valley of partners

Partner-to-partner transactions building up the valley
one project at a time

When Valley Partnership was founded 27 years ago, it was on the principles of responsible development. It has since grown to thousands of members throughout the commercial real estate community — from subcontractors to some of the largest developers in Arizona.

Eastmark includes a partnership between DMB Associates and Marham COntracting Co.

Eastmark includes a partnership between DMB Associates and Markham Contracting Co.

“In 2014 and beyond, Valley Partnership developer companies are the leaders of almost every major commercial real estate project announced, including Marina Heights, the numerous announcements of deals at Eastmark, and Liberty Center at Rio Salado,” says Valley Partnership President and CEO Richard Hubbard.

The members have rallied behind the idea of partnership, Hubbard says.

“These developers use Valley Partnership partners for all construction disciplines related to the project including planning, design, architecture, general contracting, engineering and even law and accounting,” Hubbard says. “Many of those ‘partner-to-partner’ transactions have come from long-standing relationships created through Valley Partnership. I would say that every level of partner in Valley Partnership, from board member to sole proprietor, is participating in the current commercial real estate building activity in the Valley.”

Some companies, such as Evergreen Devco, take the partner-to-partner very seriously.

Valley Partnership Chair of the Board Doug Leventhal is the principal and COO of Evergreen Devco. Though Evergreen has focused much of its recent work in Denver, the company finds exclusive value in partnership with fellow VP members for Arizona projects.

“I can say that for all our Arizona work, we tend to work exclusively with the companies that see the value in Valley Partnership and either are active members or active sponsors,” Leventhal says. “Our general contractors, for example, need to be members or sponsors almost as a prerequisite to getting our business. Our architects, engineers, attorneys and title companies need to be members of Valley Partnership — or have a good reason why they are not! It’s important to Evergreen that we collectively support Valley Partnership since we all benefit from its mission to promote responsible development in the Valley. We are all connected in this unique way.”

Liberty Center at Rio Salado is a partnership between Liberty Property Trust and Markham Contracting Co.

Liberty Center at Rio Salado is a partnership between Liberty Property Trust and Markham Contracting Co.

That unique connection, as DMB Associates President Charley Freericks sees it involves Valley Partnership’s advocacy role for developers as well as a genuine passion for making Arizona a great place to live.

“Valley Partnership understands that real estate isn’t the only driver of the economy,” says Freericks. “We are the beneficiaries of a strong and growing economy and it’s in our interest to make this a great place to live.”

Freericks, who has been a member for 10 years, served on the board of directors, was chairman in 2009, and has sat on multiple committees.

Most of DMB Associates’ partners at the developers’ 6,000-acre masterplanned community of Eastmark – and around the Valley – are Valley Partnership members, Freericks says.

“Over the years, we have worked with so many contractors, consultants and service providers who are members it would be hard to name them all,” he says. “In fact it might be difficult to find any that aren’t members.”

Valley Partnership has multiple avenues for paving those partnerships. There are 10 committees, including one for an annual golf tournament and a community building project. One of the most popular and frequent member events, is the Friday Morning Breakfasts — a monthly morning panel discussion about an industry trend featuring local experts.

Freericks reflected on a breakfast about the impact and trade partnership Arizona has with Canada as a particularly helpful one for his masterplanned communities of Eastmark and Victory at Verrado, which target Canadian homebuyers.

“Valley Partnership attracts important speakers and hosts debates of candidates for state and local offices which helps me make better informed decisions,” he says. “The Valley Partnership advocacy team was a huge help to the Fighter Country Partnership efforts to bring the F-35 mission to Luke. This will impact our economy for generations to come. Valley Partnership’s role as the champion for moderate regulation has impacted all of our properties over the years and will continue to do so.”

Heather Markham, vice president of Markham Contracting Co., says her company has been a member of Valley Partnership since 1992 and is also a Stewardship Sponsor. Markham has attended breakfasts for the last five years and is one of the students in Valley Partnership’s inaugural Young Advocates Program. As a co-chair of the Community Project Committee, Markham says she also appreciate’s Valley Partnership’s commitment to networking and giving back to the community.

“I believe this involvement in the community is critical personally as well as professionally for everyone,” she says.

Markham has been self performing grading, paving and wet utilities civil infrastructure in the Southwest since 1977. Though Valley Partnership has only been around since 1987, Markham says the company has worked with many current Valley Partnership companies for nearly four decades. Partners include DMB Associates (Verrado and Eastmark), Macerich (Sonoran Crossing), Sunbelt Holdings (Vistancia), APS, Grayhawk Development, Lennar, Vintage Partners, MT Builders, HilgartWilson, Pulte, Atwell, Dibble Engineering, Wood Patel & Associates, Hoskin & Ryan, Siteworks, Speedie & Associates, Trench Shore Rentals, Alliance Bank of Arizona and Cemex.

“Valley Partnership plays a very strong role in responsible development of the commercial real estate community and provides an excellent venue for all the stakeholders in the process to come together and discuss issues and concerns as well as success stories,” she says. “This promotes strong partnerships between cities, counties, towns, state, land owners, developers, contractors, architects, engineers and every trade partner involved in making Arizona a great place to live and work.”

APS Hyder II solar power plant located in Hyder, Arizona.

Green development stays sunny side up

Debates over energy consumption, reduction and alternatives occur frequently in the increasingly “green” world. Arizona stands as a leader in the alternative energy market with the use of solar, geothermal energy and natural gas as alternatives to more traditional energy providers. Even through the decline of green building projects, as reported by Forbes, major companies and builders such as APS, SRP and Adolfson & Peterson (A&P) have completed large alternative energy projects in the last year.

Arizona Public Service, through the APS AZ Sun Program, and McCarthy Building Companies completed its third solar project, a large solar installation called the Hyder II in Yuma County last year. It uses more than 71,000 single-axis tracking photovoltaic panels to generate 14 megawatts of solar energy, which is enough to serve 3,500 Arizona homes. The project set a record year for APS with 410 megawatts of solar power and represented the largest annual increase in solar capacity, nearly tripling the total from 2012. APS contains more than 750 megawatts of solar capacity on its system after investing nearly $1B in solar projects, and serves more than 185,000 Arizona homes. Another large solar project built last year is the Fry’s Marketplace PowerParasol, which shades 74,800 SF, including 220 parking spaces, driveways, aisles, grocery cart stations and sidewalks. It diminishes the heat-island effect, enables light passage to allow the growth of plants and generates 1,013,140 kilowatt hours of solar energy.
aps-quote
Geothermal energy is another popular source of renewable energy in Arizona. Both SRP and A&P developed geothermal projects in 2013. Geothermal energy produces electricity from naturally occurring geothermal fluid, and steam forms when production wells access superheated water reservoirs thousands of feet beneath the Earth’s surface. As opposed to wind and solar that are affected by the weather, geothermal is a more reliable source of renewable energy. SRP purchased 50 megawatts of geothermal energy from CalEnergy. The project will annually offset 460 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, the equivalent of 40,000 cars. SRP also has an agreement to purchase geothermal energy from the Hudson Ranch facility in California and Utah’s Cove Fort plant.

A&P’s latest geothermal project is Lookout Mountain Elementary School where it constructed a closed-loop system that allows the ground’s heat to warm the building during the winter and reverse the process in the summer by transferring heat back into the ground. The system does not use any chemicals, untreated water or Freon. A&P expect it to last up to 30 years and the underground wells to last up to 75 years. The classrooms’ energy consumption will be reduced by 40 percent and the low maintenance and operations costs will save the school district up to $1.8M over the next 20 years.

Although there are many green projects occurring, there is a decline in contracts. Bryan Dunn, senior vice president of A&P, states that “the disconnect between the demand and not seeing as many ‘green contracts’ is that there are more and more building owners viewing a formal certification process as expensive and lengthy. Tight budgets don’t allow for the upfront costs associated with a formal green certification. Instead, they are looking to incorporate the energy saving and durability aspects of green building into their projects without a formal certification of the building.”

Dunn also says solar technology may be played out. He is seeing trends with technology, such as waste-to-energy, bio-mass and bio-gas and geothermal energy. “Clients are considering several types of alternative technologies on single projects…Utilizing multiple solutions also keeps overall and total project costs down, benefiting everyone in the long run,” he adds.

Besides the cost of green projects, Scott Canada from McCarthy explains that projects may be slowing because of supply and demand. “There may be a near-term slowing of new projects while Arizona’s energy consumption begins to grow again, with the improving economy. Energy, including renewables, often cycles between a period of expansion and pause,” he says, adding that solar costs are continuing to drop, making it an attractive energy source, especially with the abundance of sunshine in Arizona. In its latest forecast, APS predicts renewable energy, gas in particular, will double in Arizona by 2029.

8100WBuckeye Road, WEB

Nuclear response center in Tolleson sells

Commercial Properties, Inc. announced the sale of a 72,570 SF industrial property located at 8100 W. Buckeye Rd. in Tolleson, Ariz.  Andy Jaffe, SIOR of CPI’s Tempe office represented the buyer, Barnhart Crane and Rigging Company, in this transaction.  The masonry building was built in 1998 and is a single tenant building near the corner of 83rd Avenue and Buckeye Road as part of a regional nuclear response center.

Andy Jaffe

Andy Jaffe

This center was established in response to the Fukushima accident in Japan in 2011 where power was lost to effectively cool the reactor.  The Phoenix center will be capable of getting the necessary equipment on-site using air and ground transportation within 24 hours to any site in America.

Randy Edington, executive vice president and chief nuclear officer at Arizona Public Service Company, which operates the Palo Verde nuclear facility commented, “Equipment from the regional response centers will enable all nuclear plant operators to protect their reactors and used fuel storage pools until normal power and cooling systems are restored.  This is an addition to other measures, including built-in safety systems, the use of on-site portable emergency equipment, and portable equipment and materials on hand at all 62 nuclear energy facilities that can be utilized and shared during an emergency.”

Each facility contains five sets of equipment including portable backup generators, pumps, standardized couplings and hoses to be deployed into the field, and will undergo regular testing for operability.

According to Andy Jaffe, SIOR, “Their final decision to occupy was the large amount of land on-site, and overhead doors that aligned for ease of ingress and egress of their equipment.  Also, it was a clear spanned building, which permits movement of their equipment, and proximity to the airport and freeway accessibility were key factors.”

The sale was valued at $3.9 million.

baby_trees

Nonprofit giving away drought-tolerant trees

The Valley Permaculture Alliance (VPA), a small nonprofit organization, has big plans to help homeowners reduce energy bills and improve air quality: give away 2,000 drought-tolerant shade trees by the end of June and 100,000 trees over the next ten years.

Through partnerships with APS and SRP, Valley homeowners completing a tree-planting education workshop designed by a certified arborist can take home two free 3-to-5-gallon desert adaptive, low-water, fast-growing trees per property. For details about times, locations and to register, visit www.vpaaz.org or call (602) 535-4635, Ext. 101.

The offer is only good one time for each property.

Upcoming giveaways are scheduled in Chandler, Mesa, North Scottsdale, Phoenix, Surprise and Tempe.

Workshops, organized and offered either online or in a classroom, provide information about:
 how to pick the right spot on the property to create shade for the home to reduce energy
 picking the right tree
 how to properly plant the tree in rock, grass or decomposed granite
 how to maintain the tree.

“We are the tree people,” said VPA Executive Director Jennifer Bonnett.

“We give away free trees and have for several years. Our Shade Tree program reduces energy and improves air quality. Shade trees planted on the west, east or south side of residential buildings can cut energy an average of 214 kilowatt hours per year per mature tree. Our mission is to educate and engage the entire community to create a healthier, more efficient environment. If we can add a cost-effectiveness factor to the outcome, even better.”

Bonnett said that 10,000 shade trees planted near homes would reduce CO2 emissions from power plants by about 15,000 metric tons over 30 years.

Shade Tree workshops and giveaways are scheduled throughout the year on Saturday mornings.

APS-territory workshops are scheduled at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on the dates that follow. Registration must be completed online.
 April 26: North Scottsdale Distribution, Grayhawk Elementary School, 7525 E. Grayhawk Drive, Scottsdale.
 May 10: Tempe Distribution, Skysong Center, 1475 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale.
 May 17: Surprise Workshop and Distribution, Communiversity @ Surprise, 15950 N. Civic Center Plaza, Surprise.

SRP-territory workshops are scheduled at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Registration must be completed online.

 May 3: South Phoenix Workshop & Distribution, South Mountain Community College, 7050 S. 24th St., Phoenix.
 June 7: Phoenix Workshop, Desert Botanical Garden, 1201 W. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix.
 July 12: Chandler Workshop, Chandler-Gilbert Community College, Williams Campus, 7360 E. Tahoe Avenue, Mesa.

For more information about the Shade Tree Program and all VPA programs, visit www.vpaaz.org.

energy supply - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

Report Shows Changing Arizona Energy Mix

Arizona Public Service today released its official forecast of how Arizona will meet its growing energy needs over the next 15 years. The report, called an “Integrated Resource Plan,” takes a big-picture look at Arizona’s energy future that helps APS and other stakeholders plan responsibly. The forecast identified three major trends shaping Arizona’s energy future:

* Arizona’s energy mix will be cleaner. The report predicts that energy from renewable sources will double by 2029. The fastest-growing segment within the renewable category is expected to be rooftop solar, which should triple over the same period. Savings from energy efficiency measures, which are intended to reduce customer demand, are also expected to triple by 2029.

* Natural gas will be the new energy source of choice. Because renewable energy can’t supply customers with steady, predictable energy around the clock, Arizona will need more generation from natural gas, which can start and ramp up quickly, and can provide energy reliably day or night. Over the next 15 years, natural gas is projected to surpass coal and nuclear as the largest source of electricity generation for APS customers. APS still will maintain a diverse, balanced resource portfolio to provide customers with affordable electricity, and manage exposure to fuel price volatility.

* Advanced technology will change the electricity grid. In the next 15 years, APS customers will have more choices about their energy use – smart appliances, plug-in electric vehicles, rooftop solar panels and even the possibility of battery storage. To enable these choices while ensuring safe and reliable electricity, APS is modernizing its electricity grid, making it more dynamic and flexible.

“Arizona’s energy future is bright,” said Tammy McLeod, Vice President of Resource Management for APS. “When we look into the future, we see Arizona’s growing energy needs being met with resources that are increasingly clean, diverse and innovative.”

The report paints an optimistic picture of Arizona’s economic growth. It projects that the state’s energy needs will grow 52 percent in the next 15 years. The requirement for peak demand is predicted to hit nearly 13,000 megawatts by 2029, up 60 percent from today’s peak requirement of 8,124 megawatts. Peak demand measures the amount of electricity being used when energy use is at its highest point.

The projected growth of renewable energy, combined with other actions including the recent closure of three coal-fired units at the APS-operated Four Corners Power Plant, is predicted to make the overall APS energy mix cleaner and more efficient. The report anticipates that in 2029, the APS generation portfolio will produce 14 percent less carbon dioxide and use 24 percent less water per megawatt-hour of electricity generated.

The report also envisions the need for flexible generation and a modern electricity grid. In the past, the electricity grid was like a one-way street. Electricity was generated at large, centralized power plants and delivered to customers at the flip of a switch. Today, power generation is becoming more complex and, in the case of renewable energy, unpredictable and variable based on the weather.

To ensure a steady and reliable energy supply, the report anticipates that utilities like APS will need more generating plants that can respond quickly to changes in customer demand and renewable output. For example, when cloud cover suddenly decreases production from solar sources, APS customers will need smaller, quick-starting generation that can respond within minutes to changing conditions. Power plants fueled with natural gas are better at “ramping,” as it is called, than generating sources such as nuclear and coal.

Along with a more flexible energy mix, Arizona will also need a more flexible, modern electricity grid. APS plans to invest $170 million in modern grid technology over the next five years, in addition to routine grid maintenance and upgrades. This includes installing more than 5,000 advanced devices across the electricity grid that will help APS workers keep it safe and reliable.

APS files its Integrated Resource Plan with the Arizona Corporation Commission every two years, forecasting how it will meet customers’ energy needs over a 15-year planning period.

APS, Arizona’s largest and longest-serving electric utility, serves nearly 1.2 million customers in 11 of the state’s 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the largest subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation (NYSE: PNW).

palo.verde

Palo Verde Unit 2 Ranked as Top Generator

For the 22nd consecutive year, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station was the nation’s largest power producer, generating 31.4 million megawatt-hours in 2013. With this milestone, Palo Verde remains the only U.S. generating facility to ever produce more than 30 million megawatt-hours in a year – an operational accomplishment the plant has achieved on nine separate occasions.

Also in 2013, Unit 2 produced more electricity than any other reactor in the United States and was the second most productive in the world, according to industry data. The unit also achieved a 94.78 percent capacity factor, the highest of all plants in the world top 10 rankings. Capacity factor is an important measure of output and efficiency.

Unit 1 ranked third in the U.S. and seventh in the world, despite a scheduled refueling outage in spring 2013. The main purpose of a refueling outage is to replace some of the older fuel with new fuel that will produce more energy.

Unit 3, which underwent a scheduled refueling outage in fall 2013, ranked 16th in the U.S. and 28th in the world. Palo Verde’s three 1,340-megawatt (net) generating units are on an 18-month refueling cycle, with two refuelings scheduled each year – one in the spring and another in the fall.

“Our top priority is to safely and efficiently generate electricity, thereby providing APS customers and the entire southwest with clean, reliable, low-cost power,” said Randy Edington, Executive Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer for Arizona Public Service Co., the operator and largest owner of Palo Verde. “Once again, our employees’ steadfast focus on plant safety and overall performance improvement helped elevate Palo Verde among the nation’s best operating nuclear power facilities.”

Other 2013 accomplishments included:

Record refueling outage. For the first time ever, a planned refueling outage at Palo Verde was completed in less than 30 days. Last year’s Unit 1 refueling outage began on March 30 and was completed on April 28, 2013 – in a total time of 29 days, 18 hours. The previous shortest Palo Verde refueling outage was 31 days in fall 2012.
Outstanding simultaneous operation. Palo Verde’s three units operated simultaneously for 160 days, the second-longest continuous run in plant history. Together, the three units produced low-cost power around the clock from April 28 to Oct. 5, 2013.

Palo Verde is the largest nuclear power plant in the nation, and its three reactors are part of 100 operating units in the U.S. and 436 in the world. Its three units can generate more than 4 million kilowatts of safe, clean, reliable, low-cost electricity every hour – enough to serve about 4 million people across the southwestern U.S. Approximately half of the plant’s output serves Arizona customers with the remaining power spread among California, New Mexico and far west Texas. In addition to the energy produced, Palo Verde has an estimated annual economic impact of more than $1.8 billion in Arizona through taxes, salaries, purchases of materials and services, and more.

Palo Verde is operated by APS and jointly owned by APS, Salt River Project, Southern California Edison Co., El Paso Electric Co., Public Service Co. of New Mexico, Southern California Public Power Authority and the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power.

APS, Arizona’s largest and longest-serving electricity utility, serves nearly 1.2 million customers in 11 of the state’s 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the principal subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corp. (NYSE: PNW).

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Merit for Economic Development

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


WestWorld Tony Nelssen 
Equestrian Center
Developer: City of Scottsdale
Contractor: Howard S. Wright, A Balfour Beatty Company
Architect: Populous Architects
Size: 310,000 SF
Location: 16601 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale
Completed: Dec. 23, 2013

WestWorld_HSWBBC (4)Arizona tends to deal with hot weather at least eight months out of the year, during which many of us prefer to stay inside if we can help it. (That’s roughly 240 days, by the way.) The winner of this year’s RED Award for Economic Development hosts at least 247 days of horse shows, not to mention car shows. To meet a growing demand for climate-controlled exhibition space that could be used even in the hottest months, WestWorld developed this $42.8M project, which also used the largest crane in Arizona to erect multiple 190,000-pound steel trusses.


Honorable Mention:
APS Hyder II Solar Plant
Developer: APS
General Contractor: McCarthy Building Companies
Engineer: Taylor RyMar

APS Hyder II, WEBBuilt on abandoned farm land, this solar power plant provides 15 megawatts of renewable power that could service approximately 3,700 homes. The plant’s 71,000 modules have an automated single-axis tracking system that allows these modules to follow the sun. It has also added value for adjacent landowners and brought jobs to the community.

clear energy systems coming to tempe

Scottsdale Healthcare recognized for energy efficiency

Scottsdale Healthcare’s continuing investment in energy efficiency is paying off, with Arizona Public Service Co. recognizing the local nonprofit hospital system for reduced energy use.

An upgrade to the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems at the Scottsdale Healthcare Greenbaum Surgery Center last fall resulted in a significant reduction in energy needs and earned a $31,314 rebate from APS, said Dan Evans, facilities manager at Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, where the surgery center is located.

The APS Solutions for Business Program offers rebates based on how much energy may be saved through energy efficient equipment as well as efficiency built into system design, according to Evans.

Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital also has earned recognition for reducing energy use during peak periods. Scottsdale Healthcare is a longtime participant in this green initiative, said Trevor Swanson, hospital facilities manager.

Scottsdale Healthcare has several other ongoing sustainability programs including:

·         Early adoption of LED lights, which last longer and use less energy.
·         Printing reduction, saving more than 3 million pieces of paper.
·         Recycling of paper, plastic, cardboard, metal, medical sharps and computer parts.
·         On-site document shredding, with more than 290 tons of paper recycled in FY2012.
·         Using electric and/or alternative fuel vehicles.
·         Incentives for staff choosing transportation alternatives: free bus passes, employee van pools, carpool partner-finder program, inter-campus shuttle service, secure lockers for bicycles, compressed work weeks and guaranteed ride home program.

Valley Metro’s Clean Air Campaign named Roman Kludka, a coordinator in Scottsdale Healthcare’s Information Technology department, the 2013 Outstanding Bus Commuter for greater Phoenix. Kludka has logged more than 70,000 miles commuting by bus over 14 years. He’s also covered 14,000 miles walking, for a grand total of 84,000 miles.

baseball

D-backs Announce Most Valuable Partner Awards

The Arizona Diamondbacks (@Dbacks) announced the winners of last week’s Most Valuable Partner Awards, the unique award show designed to honor the best D-backs’ partners in a variety of categories. The awards ceremony was held at Gila River Casinos’ Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino – Ovations Live! Showroom.

Several D-backs players were on hand to take part in the red carpet Oscar-style awards show, including Paul Goldschmidt, Aaron Hill, J.J. Putz, A.J. Pollock and Josh Collmenter. The quintet competed in Family Feud against several D-backs partners and comedic results can be viewed here: http://atmlb.com/1aJPQGZ

D-backs President & CEO Derrick Hall emceed the annual event and was featured throughout the night in several commercial spoofs, including the following parodies of a popular AT&T commercial: http://atmlb.com/1dNRpJR and http://atmlb.com/1ap2WPd

The winners of the awards were as follows:

Luis Gonzalez Community Champion – Western Refining
Brand Integration – Subway
D-backs Ambassador – Safelite
Marketing Activation – Anheuser-Busch and Pepsi
Rookie of the Year (first-year partnership) – Safelite
Lifetime Achievement – APS
Fans’ Choice Award – Taco Bell
Most Valuable Partner – Sanderson Ford (Silver Slugger) and Gila River Casinos (Gold Glove)

energy.bill

APS Completes Purchase at Four Corners Power Plant

Arizona Public Service completed on Monday its purchase of Southern California Edison’s ownership in Units 4 and 5 of the Four Corners Power Plant near Farmington, N.M. As part of its plan – originally announced in November 2010 – APS has permanently closed the plant’s older, less efficient Units 1, 2 and 3, and will install additional emission controls on the remaining cleaner, more efficient units.

“This is a milestone occasion,” said Don Brandt, APS Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer. “We have completed a transaction that will benefit the environment, allow us to continue to support the economy of the Navajo Nation and surrounding community, and help electric users in the Southwest with an important, low-cost generating resource.”

Reflecting on the significance of the transaction, Brandt added, “It is bittersweet because generations of Four Corners employees have dedicated their careers to running those three units to keep the lights on for our customers.”

With the closing of the APS-owned Units 1, 2 and 3, capacity at Four Corners is reduced from 2,100 megawatts to 1,540 megawatts, enabling the plant to serve half a million homes. Acquiring SCE’s 48 percent interest in the larger Units 4 and 5 will increase APS’s total Four Corners capacity from 791 megawatts to 970 megawatts. APS now owns 63 percent of Units 4 and 5, which constitute the plant moving forward.

Environmental benefits derived from reduced emissions and more efficient fuel use will increase significantly. Emissions of particulates are expected to decline by 43 percent, nitrogen oxides (NOx) by 36 percent, carbon dioxide (CO2) by 30 percent, mercury by 61 percent and sulfur dioxide (SO2)by 24 percent.

On Monday afternoon, Units 1, 2 and 3 – which helped ensure a reliable supply of energy for APS customers since 1963 (Units 1 and 2) and 1964 (Unit 3) – were permanently shut down in a ceremony for plant employees. Closure of the three older units by Jan. 1, 2014, and the installation of selective catalytic reduction equipment on Units 4 and 5 by July 31, 2018, will satisfy Best Available Retrofit Technology (BART) requirements for the plant issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 2012.

Decommissioning work, including complete dismantle and removal of the older units and any associated structures, will begin immediately and is expected to last about three years. Employees with responsibilities operating and maintaining Units 1, 2 and 3 now will focus on decommissioning activities.

The final purchase price for the Southern California Edison share is approximately $182 million, which is substantially less than other generation alternatives.

“Our plan for the plant moving forward saves APS customers nearly a half-billion dollars over other energy sources and maintains a highly reliable, cost-effective source of electricity generation for APS and other users in the Southwest,” said Mark Schiavoni, APS Executive Vice President, Operations. “Along with natural gas, nuclear, renewables and energy efficiency, coal has an important place in our company’s balanced energy portfolio.”

As APS committed when the agreement was announced in 2010, Schiavoni reiterated that no layoffs are planned at the plant, which employs 434 workers (82 percent of whom are Native American). Any required reduction in workforce will come through normal attrition. The Four Corners Power Plant and supporting mining operations create an estimated $225 million annual economic impact on the Navajo and New Mexico economies. During the next 30 years, their operation could generate more than $6.3 billion in economic value for the region, at least 70 percent of which will benefit the Navajo Nation.

Also, APS on Monday filed an application with the Arizona Corporation Commission to recover costs associated with the purchase of SCE’s interest in the plant. The company’s 2012 rate case settlement includes a provision that allows APS to seek rate relief for those expenses prior to its next rate case. The filing amounts to a bill impact of about 2 percent. For a typical APS residential customer, monthly bills would increase from $140.12 to $142.89.

APS, Arizona’s largest and longest-serving electricity utility, serves more than 1.1 million customers in 11 of the state’s 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the principal subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corp. (NYSE: PNW).

Most Challenging Project 2011: Soleri Bridge

Utilities aim to provide infrastructure to meet Arizona’s continued growth and ensure a vibrant economy

When economic developers head into the marketplace to sell Arizona’s benefits to interested relocation prospects, one item on that list is plentiful: reliable and well-priced utilities. While some cities deliver electric power in addition to sewer and water, the power grid is essentially divided between Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project and Tucson Power & Electric.
With multiple agencies busy knocking on doors around the world to bring home the business, Arizona’s utilities plan to deliver that promise.

Alan Bunnell

Alan Bunnell

“APS is typically looking 15 to 20 years into the future to anticipate future power generating resources,” explains Alan Bunnell, external and media relations representative for APS. “We want to be sure we have the infrastructure to meet Arizona’s continued growth and ensure a vibrant economy.”
Over at SRP, Senior Economic Development Project Manager Ed Grant says, “SRP’s resource plan is designed to meet our peak demand requirements plus a 12 percent planning reserve. We use a mix of conventional resources, renewables, energy efficiency programs and market purchases.” SRP works with its various planning groups to maintain a long-term resource plan to meet growing needs.
Arizona’s economy is a roller-coaster ride over the decades. Each climb is higher than the last. As the economy exits the latest recession, Arizona looms as an economic powerhouse with new businesses coming into the market. As each peak rises higher, utilities planning efforts ensure the power is not a stumbling block.
“APS has experienced the full weight of Arizona’s economic recessions many times in the past,” Bunnell says. “We have a reasonable sense of how to meet future demands. We’re already working on the power generation of the future. We are prepared for how and when those supplies will be developed and delivered.”

Ed Grant

Ed Grant

SRP has responsibility for delivering power and water in its service area. Grant explains that the future is bright, “Extensive planning efforts at SRP ensure the region enjoys an abundant supply of water and power. Long-term planning for power means SRP is able to meet long-term area needs.”
Water for America’s sixth largest metro is a challenge SRP is well-prepared to handle. “SRP has a diverse water supply,” says Grant. “We’re obtaining water from the Colorado River, our own system and treated wastewater. Developers are required to demonstrate an assured, renewable water supply.”
Recently, SRP joint-ventured with the Gila River Indian Community for the Gila River Water Storage program. The program creates a system of Central Arizona Project water credits and storage credits covering more than 100 years of usage.

Charlie Duckworth

Charlie Duckworth

APS and SRP are among the co-owners of the Navajo Generation Station in the Four Corners Region. The coal-fired power plant has been operating under an EPA-generated regulatory cloud that may require unaffordable air quality improvements to the facility. The generator powers the CAP project and serves Arizona, the Navajo Nation and the metro area.
“NGS is one piece of a large and diverse generation portfolio,” says Charles Duckworth, SRP’s senior director of energy management reports. “SRP is working on steps necessary to affordably keep the Navajo Nation operating. However, we have a highly flexible resource plan that gives SRP confidence in its ability to meet long-term customer needs.”

Parabolic solar troughs. Courtesy of Abengoa.com

Gila Bend's Solana Facility Begins Commercial Operation

Press release originally published at abengoa.com

Abengoa, an international company that applies innovative technology solutions for sustainability in the energy and environment sectors, has announced that Solana, the world’s largest parabolic trough plant with a total installed capacity of 280 MW (gross) and also the first solar plant in the United States with thermal energy storage, has successfully passed commercial operation tests. This milestone marks a major accomplishment for Abengoa and the Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) industry.

Solana is the first solar plant in the U.S. with a thermal energy storage system that is able to generate electricity for six hours without the concurrent use of the solar field, which is a turning point for renewable energy in this country, being a tangible demonstration that solar energy can be stored and dispatched upon demand.

Solana, located near Gila Bend and about 70 miles southwest of Phoenix, began construction in 2010 and on Monday, October 7, successfully fulfilled production forecasts required to date and testing for commercial operation. These tests included operating at the turbine’s full capacity while charging the thermal storage system, continuing to produce electricity after the sun went down, and starting up the plant and producing 6 hours of electricity using only the thermal storage system. These tests successfully demonstrated the various operation modes of the plant’s operation.

Abengoa’s first utility-scale solar plant in the United States employs parabolic trough technology. This technology consists of parabolic shaped mirrors mounted on structures that track the sun and concentrate the sun’s heat, later transforming water into steam and powering a conventional steam turbine. This mature technology has additional value since the heat can also be stored and used to produce clean electricity after the sun goes down or during a transitory period.

This ability to generate electricity when needed, or dispatchability, is one of the unique characteristics of concentrating solar power versus other types of renewables. Solana’s thermal storage system, without the use of the solar field, can produce clean energy for six hours at maximum power. These six hours will satisfy Arizona’s peak electricity demands during the summer evenings and early night time hours. Dispatchability also eliminates intermittency issues that other renewables, such as wind and photovoltaics, contend with, providing stability to the grid and thus increasing the value of the energy generated by CSP.

Arizona Public Service (APS), the largest utility in Arizona, will purchase all of the electricity produced by the solar plant for 30 years through a power purchase agreement with Abengoa.

Solana will generate the clean energy equivalent to that needed to power 70,000 households and will prevent about half a million tons of CO2 from being emitted into the atmosphere per year. The construction of Solana led to the creation of more than 2,000 jobs and a national supply chain that spans 165 companies in 29 states.

The total investment of the plant is approximately two billion dollars and during financing, Solana received a federal loan guarantee for $1.45 billion from the United States Department of Energy Federal Loan Guarantee Program. This support made the construction of Solana possible, creating or maintaining thousands of jobs both in the building of the plant as well as those direct and indirect jobs in the supply chain, as well as providing the Southwest with clean, sustainable energy using innovative technology.

Abengoa currently has 1,223 MW of concentrating solar power in operation and 430 MW under construction. It is the largest CSP company in the world and one of the few that constructs and operates both solar tower and parabolic trough plants.

118315706

GPEC announces Board of Directors for FY 2014

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) today announced the appointment of its Board of Directors for the 2014 fiscal year, as approved by the Executive Committee.

Alliance Bank of Arizona CEO James Lundy will continue to lead the Board of Directors as chairman.

“As the economy continues to improve, GPEC’s team of results-driven board directors will work to ensure the region not only maintains its trajectory but also pushes toward a more diversified and sustainable economy that is less dependent on growth industries like real estate and construction,” Lundy said. “I’m honored to work with this talented group of professionals and look forward to a productive year.”

Rounding out the Board’s leadership is SCF Arizona President and CEO Don Smith and Empire Southwest Executive Vice President Chris Zaharis as vice chairs, APS Vice President and Chief Customer Officer Tammy McLeod as secretary and Bryan Cave, LLP Partner R. Neil Irwin as treasurer.

New Board Directors include: Steve Banta, CEO of Valley Metro; the Honorable Denny Barney, District 1 Supervisor for the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors; Scott Bradley, Area Vice President for Waste Management; Mark Clatt, Area President for Republic Services; the Honorable Vincent Francia, Mayor of the Town of Cave Creek; Dr. Ann Weaver Hart, President of the University of Arizona; Bill Jabjiniak, Economic Development Director for the City of Mesa; the Honorable Michael LeVault, Mayor of the Town of Youngtown; Rich Marchant, Executive Vice President, Global Operations for Crescent Crown Distributing; Ryan Nouis, Co-Founder and President of Job Brokers; and Eric Orsborn, Councilmember for the Town of Buckeye.

“GPEC’s success is largely driven by its strong Board of Directors, all of whom reflect the region and state’s most accomplished professionals,” GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome said. “Every single one of them truly cares about our market’s success and serves as a community thought leader when it comes to competitiveness.”

Mayors from GPEC’s member communities and the organization’s Nominating Committee are responsible for nominating and appointing Board Directors. The one-year terms are approved during GPEC’s Annual Board meeting.

GPEC FY 2014 Board of Directors:

James Lundy – Chairman
CEO
Alliance Bank of Arizona

Don Smith – Vice Chair
President and CEO
SCF Arizona

Chris Zaharis – Vice Chair
Executive Vice President
Empire Southwest

Tammy McLeod – Secretary
Vice President and Chief Customer Officer
Arizona Public Service Company

R. Neil Irwin – Treasurer
Partner
Bryan Cave, LLP

William Pepicello, Ph.D. – Immediate Past Chair
President
University of Phoenix

Barry Broome
President and CEO
Greater Phoenix Economic Council

Richard C. Adkerson
President and CEO
Freeport McMoRan Copper & Gold

Jason Bagley
Government Affairs Manager
Intel

Ron Butler
Managing Partner
Ernst & Young LLP

Brian Campbell
Attorney
Campbell & Mahoney, Chartered

Michael Crow, Ph.D.
President
Arizona State University

Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D.
President and CEO
Midwestern University

Derrick Hall
President and CEO
Arizona Diamondbacks

Sharon Harper
President and CEO
The Plaza Companies

Ann Weaver Hart, Ph.D.
President
University of Arizona

Don Kile
President, Master Planned Communities
The Ellman Companies

Paul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation

Rich Marchant
Executive Vice President, Global Operations
Crescent Crown Distributing

David Rousseau
President
Salt River Project

Joseph Stewart
Chairman and CEO
JPMorgan Chase Arizona

Hyman Sukiennik
Vice President
Cox Business

Karrin Kunasek Taylor
Executive Vice President and
Chief Entitlements Officer
DMB Associates, Inc.

Gerrit van Huisstede
Regional President Desert Mountain Region
Wells Fargo

Andy Warren
President
Maracay Homes

Richard B. West, III
President
Carefree Partners

John Zidich
Publisher & President
The Arizona Republic

Chuck Allen
Managing Director, Gov’t & Community Relations
US Airways

Steve Banta
CEO
Valley Metro

Denny Barney
County Supervisor-District 1
Maricopa County Board of Supervisors

Jason Barney
Principal and Partner
Landmark Investments

The Honorable Robert Barrett
Mayor
City of Peoria

Timothy Bidwill
Vice President
Vermilion IDG

Scott Bradley
Area Vice President, Four Corners Area
Waste Management

Norman Butler
Market Executive
Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Mark Clatt
Area President
Republic Services

Jeff Crockett
Shareholder
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck

Wyatt Decker, M.D.
CEO
Mayo Clinic Arizona

George Forristall
Director of Project Development
Mortenson Construction

The Honorable Vincent Francia
Mayor
Town of Cave Creek

Rufus Glasper, Ph.D.
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges

Barry Halpern
Partner
Snell and Wilmer

G. Todd Hardy
Vice President of Assets
ASU Foundation

Lynne Herndon
Phoenix City President
BBVA Compass

Linda Hunt
Senior VP of Operations and President/CEO
Dignity Health Arizona

William Jabiiniak
Economic Development Director
City of Mesa

The Honorable Robert Jackson
Mayor
City of Casa Grande

The Honorable Linda Kavanagh
Mayor
Town of Fountain Hills

The Honorable Andy Kunasek
County Supervisor, District 3
Maricopa County Board of Supervisors

The Honorable Michael LeVault
Mayor
Town of Youngtown

The Honorable John Lewis
Mayor
Town of Gilbert

The Honorable Marie Lopez Rogers
Mayor
City of Avondale

The Honorable Georgia Lord
Mayor
City of Goodyear

Jeff Lowe
President
MidFirst Bank

Paul Magallanez
Economic Development Director
City of Tolleson

Kate Maracas
Vice President
Abengoa

The Honorable Mark Mitchell
Mayor
City of Tempe

Ryan Nouis
Co-Founder & President
Job Brokers

Ed Novak
Managing Partner
Polsinelli Shughart

Eric Osborn
Councilmember
Town of Buckeye

Rui Pereira
General Manager
Rancho de Los Caballeros

The Honorable Christian Price
Mayor
City of Maricopa

Craig Robb
Managing Director
Zions Energy Link

The Honorable Jeff Serdy
Councilmember
City of Apache Junction

Steven M. Shope, Ph.D.
President
Sandia Research Corporation

James T. Swanson
President and CEO
Kitchell Corporation

Richard J. Thompson
President and CEO
Power-One

Jay Tibshraeny
Mayor
City of Chandler

John Welch
Managing Partner
Squire Sanders

Dan Withers
President
D.L. Withers Construction

The Honorable Sharon Wolcott
Mayor
City of Surprise

GENERAL COUNSEL
Bryant Barber
Attorney at Law
Lewis and Roca

solar

ACC issues residential solar recommendations

The Arizona Corporation Commission staff issued its highly anticipated recommendations in response to APS’s proposed rule changes directed at residential solar customers. ACC recommended that the Commission not approve either of APS’s proposed Net Metering cost-shift solutions.

Net Metering is the mechanism that allows residential customers the right to offset energy purchases from the utility with self-generation on a one-to-one basis.

The ACC staff proposals, like those from APS, are only recommendations. Any changes to the existing rules must be voted on by the Arizona Corporation Commissioners. The Commissioners are scheduled to take up the issue at its Oct. 16 and 17 hearing.

ACC staff further recommended that should any changes be granted, existing rooftop solar customers should be grandfathered under the old rules, and that those rules should apply to the rooftop equipment and premises where the equipment is installed. In other words, the net metering rules should “run with the land,” versus being a “right” that resides with a specific customer.

Although ACC staff recommended that no changes be made at this time, it did suggest that this issue be evaluated during APS’s next rate case. They said it was their belief that any cost-shift issue created by Net Metering is fundamentally a matter of rate design and that the appropriate time for designing rates that equitably allocate the costs and benefits of Net Metering is during APS’s next general rate case.

ACC staff further recommended that the Commission hold workshops with all stakeholders to help inform future Commission policy on the value that Distributed Generation (rooftop solar) installations bring to the grid. In addition, Staff recommended that within the workshops, the Commission investigate the currently non-monetized benefits of Distributed Generation with the goal of developing a methodology for assigning a values to the non-energy benefits of rooftop solar.

ACC staff believes this recommended course of action is the most effective and appropriate method of dealing with the Net Metering cost-shift issue APS outlined in its July 12 filing. However, since it is not yet clear whether the Commission will decide to deal with this issue immediately, staff offered two alternative recommendations as bridge solutions in an effort to at least begin gradually addressing the Net Metering cost-shift issue until the matter can be more comprehensively resolved in a future general rate case.

The first interim proposal is a Lost Fixed Cost Recovery (LFCR) Flat Charge provision for all new APS solar rooftop customers, unless the customers choose the ETC-2 rate which relies on a demand-based charge to partially collect fixed costs. The LFCR is designed to recover a portion of costs arising from transmission and distribution, and other miscellaneous fixed costs.

The recommendation would have new solar customers pay into the LFCR account at a flat rate, thereby reducing the impact on non-solar customers. The estimated impact of this flat charge would amount to an estimated monthly increase between $2 and $3 for new solar customers compared to the $50 to $100 a month charge under APS’s proposal.

ACC staff’s recommendation also included a second alternative in the event the Commissioners wanted to implement an immediate rule change before the next rate case, proposing a Distributed Generation (DG) Premium could be implemented on a gradual basis so as to minimize the immediate impact on future solar customers. The proposal said this could be done by initially setting the DG Premium at $2.75/kW. The DG Premium would be the cap for the monthly charge under this alternative. The Commission could lower or increase the DG Premium annually based on the effect it has on new solar installations. The Commission could also adopt an approach wherein the DG Premium is initially set at a lower amount than that recommended by Staff, and phased-in over a period of years.

Joel Hiller

Hiller Elected President of Arizona Citizens for the Arts

Joel Hiller, President of the Yavapai Indian Cultural Center, has been elected president of the Arizona Citizens for the Arts Board of Directors.

Hiller will be joined on the executive committee by Vice President: Robert Knight, Tucson Museum of Art; Secretary: Phillip C. Jones, community volunteer and former executive director of the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture; Treasurer: Dawn Brown, Arizona Business Consulting; Directors at Large: Rick Pfannensteil, Pfocus LLC, and Jeff Rich, Rich-Gillis Law Group.  Also elected to the executive committee were Tom Chapman, retired educator, Advocacy Committee chair; and Lynn Tuttle, Arizona Department of Education, Finance Committee chair.

The following new board members were elected to three-year terms:  Laurie Goldstein, Freescale Semiconductor; Charles Goldstein, Emcare; Anne Kleindienst, Polsinelli P.C.; Bernadette Mills, West Valley Arts Council; Maureen O’Brien, Musical Instrument Museum; Vincent VanVleet, Phoenix Theatre; and Michael Vargas, Arizona Public Service.

Four board members were re-elected to serve another three-year term including Chapman; Jennifer Burns, Public Affairs Consulting; Sen. Steve Farley, Arizona State Senate; and Steve Martin, Childsplay.

For more information about Arizona Citizens for the Arts, visit www.azcitizensforthearts.org.

Mercury welcome Brittney Griner

Mercury, APS team up for 'Green Night'

The Phoenix Mercury and Arizona Public Service (APS) will host their annual “Green Night” on Wednesday, August 14 when the team takes on the Indiana Fever at US Airways Center. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m.

US Airways Center will be powered by renewable energy from APS. The Mercury purchased 42,000 kilowatt-hours of green energy, which is enough to power the entire game.

Throughout the game, the Mercury and APS will communicate “green tips” featuring the APS Refrigerator Recycling Program in-arena and the first 1,000 fans in attendance will receive a free EcoSmart® shirt, courtesy of APS. The EcoSmart® shirts are made of five percent polyester created from recycled plastic bottles. An image of the t-shirt is below and attached.

In addition, the team will wear green shooting shirts during their pre-game warm-up in support of “Green Night.”

Limited tickets are still available for the Mercury matchup against the Indiana Fever on Wednesday, August 14 at US Airways Center. Tipoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. Fans can visit phoenixmercury.com to purchase tickets.

Mercury welcome Brittney Griner

Mercury, APS team up for ‘Green Night’

The Phoenix Mercury and Arizona Public Service (APS) will host their annual “Green Night” on Wednesday, August 14 when the team takes on the Indiana Fever at US Airways Center. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m.

US Airways Center will be powered by renewable energy from APS. The Mercury purchased 42,000 kilowatt-hours of green energy, which is enough to power the entire game.

Throughout the game, the Mercury and APS will communicate “green tips” featuring the APS Refrigerator Recycling Program in-arena and the first 1,000 fans in attendance will receive a free EcoSmart® shirt, courtesy of APS. The EcoSmart® shirts are made of five percent polyester created from recycled plastic bottles. An image of the t-shirt is below and attached.

In addition, the team will wear green shooting shirts during their pre-game warm-up in support of “Green Night.”

Limited tickets are still available for the Mercury matchup against the Indiana Fever on Wednesday, August 14 at US Airways Center. Tipoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. Fans can visit phoenixmercury.com to purchase tickets.

StemCellSciCamp08_5619

$20,000 APS grant funds TGen education initiative

A $20,000 grant from the APS Foundation will help the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) expand its TGen2School initiative by providing science kits and instruction in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education.

The kits and accompanying instruction for teachers are part of the TGen2School initiative at TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division – TGen North – in Flagstaff, where some of the world’s top experts in disease-causing microorganisms study everything from valley fever to MRSA and even anthrax and plague.

TGen North’s Bio-SEEK: Bio-Science Education Enrichments Kits Program provides five different types of bioscience education kits for teachers and their students. The goal is improved overall scientific literacy, and a better-prepared bioscience workforce.

The program includes instructional sessions to help educators use the kits to teach such concepts as infectious disease and genomic testing methods, biosafety procedures, bioinformatics, and how DNA is used in forensics, public health and other life sciences.

“These are ideal tools that teachers can use to convey complex concepts in ways students can easily absorb, and it lessens the burden on the pocketbooks of teachers,” said Zsuzsi Kovacs, TGen North’s STEM Education Coordinator. “These kits are built on next-generation science standards and bioscience basics that students need to succeed in the genome-age.”

TGen will provide instruction for teachers during professional development days at TGen North, 3051 W. Shamrell Blvd., southeast of Interstate 17 and the exit to the Flagstaff Pulliam Airport.

“Commercial bioscience kits often contain limited directions, making teaching concepts challenging when teachers already have so much on their plate,” Kovacs said. “With professional development and teacher-friendly directions, educators will be able to adapt them in a way that is best for their students.”

Thanks to the APS Foundation’s grant, the newly developed kits will be provided at no charge through a checkout system available to teachers who have attended the professional training.

TGen2School initiative aligns with the goals of David Engelthaler, TGen North’s Director of Programs and Operations, one of the leaders in STEM education in Flagstaff, which in 2012 became the nation’s first STEM City.

“With initial funding from the Flagstaff Community Foundation (FCF) and others, we have placed a concerted effort into our TGen2School program,” said Engelthaler, a former State Epidemiologist for the State of Arizona. “We are so excited that the APS Foundation has decided to help us. Their grant will allow us to grow and expand our program in a direction that better meets the needs of our teachers.”

The grant to TGen North was one of 15, totaling more than $500,000, made by the Foundation to non-profit organizations throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Of the 30 fastest growing occupations projected through 2016, more than half will require mastery of STEM subjects, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“We at the APS Foundation applaud the efforts of all the organizations who received the grants,” said Julie Coleman, Executive Director of the APS Foundation. “We are pleased to be able to help support and encourage non-profits who engage in promoting STEM education, and other educational efforts, to increase student achievement. Success in education will result in a healthy society, strong economy and robust Arizona.”