Tag Archives: APS

baby_trees

Nonprofit giving away drought-tolerant trees

The Valley Permaculture Alliance (VPA), a small nonprofit organization, has big plans to help homeowners reduce energy bills and improve air quality: give away 2,000 drought-tolerant shade trees by the end of June and 100,000 trees over the next ten years.

Through partnerships with APS and SRP, Valley homeowners completing a tree-planting education workshop designed by a certified arborist can take home two free 3-to-5-gallon desert adaptive, low-water, fast-growing trees per property. For details about times, locations and to register, visit www.vpaaz.org or call (602) 535-4635, Ext. 101.

The offer is only good one time for each property.

Upcoming giveaways are scheduled in Chandler, Mesa, North Scottsdale, Phoenix, Surprise and Tempe.

Workshops, organized and offered either online or in a classroom, provide information about:
 how to pick the right spot on the property to create shade for the home to reduce energy
 picking the right tree
 how to properly plant the tree in rock, grass or decomposed granite
 how to maintain the tree.

“We are the tree people,” said VPA Executive Director Jennifer Bonnett.

“We give away free trees and have for several years. Our Shade Tree program reduces energy and improves air quality. Shade trees planted on the west, east or south side of residential buildings can cut energy an average of 214 kilowatt hours per year per mature tree. Our mission is to educate and engage the entire community to create a healthier, more efficient environment. If we can add a cost-effectiveness factor to the outcome, even better.”

Bonnett said that 10,000 shade trees planted near homes would reduce CO2 emissions from power plants by about 15,000 metric tons over 30 years.

Shade Tree workshops and giveaways are scheduled throughout the year on Saturday mornings.

APS-territory workshops are scheduled at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on the dates that follow. Registration must be completed online.
 April 26: North Scottsdale Distribution, Grayhawk Elementary School, 7525 E. Grayhawk Drive, Scottsdale.
 May 10: Tempe Distribution, Skysong Center, 1475 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale.
 May 17: Surprise Workshop and Distribution, Communiversity @ Surprise, 15950 N. Civic Center Plaza, Surprise.

SRP-territory workshops are scheduled at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Registration must be completed online.

 May 3: South Phoenix Workshop & Distribution, South Mountain Community College, 7050 S. 24th St., Phoenix.
 June 7: Phoenix Workshop, Desert Botanical Garden, 1201 W. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix.
 July 12: Chandler Workshop, Chandler-Gilbert Community College, Williams Campus, 7360 E. Tahoe Avenue, Mesa.

For more information about the Shade Tree Program and all VPA programs, visit www.vpaaz.org.

energy supply - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

Report Shows Changing Arizona Energy Mix

Arizona Public Service today released its official forecast of how Arizona will meet its growing energy needs over the next 15 years. The report, called an “Integrated Resource Plan,” takes a big-picture look at Arizona’s energy future that helps APS and other stakeholders plan responsibly. The forecast identified three major trends shaping Arizona’s energy future:

* Arizona’s energy mix will be cleaner. The report predicts that energy from renewable sources will double by 2029. The fastest-growing segment within the renewable category is expected to be rooftop solar, which should triple over the same period. Savings from energy efficiency measures, which are intended to reduce customer demand, are also expected to triple by 2029.

* Natural gas will be the new energy source of choice. Because renewable energy can’t supply customers with steady, predictable energy around the clock, Arizona will need more generation from natural gas, which can start and ramp up quickly, and can provide energy reliably day or night. Over the next 15 years, natural gas is projected to surpass coal and nuclear as the largest source of electricity generation for APS customers. APS still will maintain a diverse, balanced resource portfolio to provide customers with affordable electricity, and manage exposure to fuel price volatility.

* Advanced technology will change the electricity grid. In the next 15 years, APS customers will have more choices about their energy use – smart appliances, plug-in electric vehicles, rooftop solar panels and even the possibility of battery storage. To enable these choices while ensuring safe and reliable electricity, APS is modernizing its electricity grid, making it more dynamic and flexible.

“Arizona’s energy future is bright,” said Tammy McLeod, Vice President of Resource Management for APS. “When we look into the future, we see Arizona’s growing energy needs being met with resources that are increasingly clean, diverse and innovative.”

The report paints an optimistic picture of Arizona’s economic growth. It projects that the state’s energy needs will grow 52 percent in the next 15 years. The requirement for peak demand is predicted to hit nearly 13,000 megawatts by 2029, up 60 percent from today’s peak requirement of 8,124 megawatts. Peak demand measures the amount of electricity being used when energy use is at its highest point.

The projected growth of renewable energy, combined with other actions including the recent closure of three coal-fired units at the APS-operated Four Corners Power Plant, is predicted to make the overall APS energy mix cleaner and more efficient. The report anticipates that in 2029, the APS generation portfolio will produce 14 percent less carbon dioxide and use 24 percent less water per megawatt-hour of electricity generated.

The report also envisions the need for flexible generation and a modern electricity grid. In the past, the electricity grid was like a one-way street. Electricity was generated at large, centralized power plants and delivered to customers at the flip of a switch. Today, power generation is becoming more complex and, in the case of renewable energy, unpredictable and variable based on the weather.

To ensure a steady and reliable energy supply, the report anticipates that utilities like APS will need more generating plants that can respond quickly to changes in customer demand and renewable output. For example, when cloud cover suddenly decreases production from solar sources, APS customers will need smaller, quick-starting generation that can respond within minutes to changing conditions. Power plants fueled with natural gas are better at “ramping,” as it is called, than generating sources such as nuclear and coal.

Along with a more flexible energy mix, Arizona will also need a more flexible, modern electricity grid. APS plans to invest $170 million in modern grid technology over the next five years, in addition to routine grid maintenance and upgrades. This includes installing more than 5,000 advanced devices across the electricity grid that will help APS workers keep it safe and reliable.

APS files its Integrated Resource Plan with the Arizona Corporation Commission every two years, forecasting how it will meet customers’ energy needs over a 15-year planning period.

APS, Arizona’s largest and longest-serving electric utility, serves nearly 1.2 million customers in 11 of the state’s 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the largest subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation (NYSE: PNW).

palo.verde

Palo Verde Unit 2 Ranked as Top Generator

For the 22nd consecutive year, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station was the nation’s largest power producer, generating 31.4 million megawatt-hours in 2013. With this milestone, Palo Verde remains the only U.S. generating facility to ever produce more than 30 million megawatt-hours in a year – an operational accomplishment the plant has achieved on nine separate occasions.

Also in 2013, Unit 2 produced more electricity than any other reactor in the United States and was the second most productive in the world, according to industry data. The unit also achieved a 94.78 percent capacity factor, the highest of all plants in the world top 10 rankings. Capacity factor is an important measure of output and efficiency.

Unit 1 ranked third in the U.S. and seventh in the world, despite a scheduled refueling outage in spring 2013. The main purpose of a refueling outage is to replace some of the older fuel with new fuel that will produce more energy.

Unit 3, which underwent a scheduled refueling outage in fall 2013, ranked 16th in the U.S. and 28th in the world. Palo Verde’s three 1,340-megawatt (net) generating units are on an 18-month refueling cycle, with two refuelings scheduled each year – one in the spring and another in the fall.

“Our top priority is to safely and efficiently generate electricity, thereby providing APS customers and the entire southwest with clean, reliable, low-cost power,” said Randy Edington, Executive Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer for Arizona Public Service Co., the operator and largest owner of Palo Verde. “Once again, our employees’ steadfast focus on plant safety and overall performance improvement helped elevate Palo Verde among the nation’s best operating nuclear power facilities.”

Other 2013 accomplishments included:

Record refueling outage. For the first time ever, a planned refueling outage at Palo Verde was completed in less than 30 days. Last year’s Unit 1 refueling outage began on March 30 and was completed on April 28, 2013 – in a total time of 29 days, 18 hours. The previous shortest Palo Verde refueling outage was 31 days in fall 2012.
Outstanding simultaneous operation. Palo Verde’s three units operated simultaneously for 160 days, the second-longest continuous run in plant history. Together, the three units produced low-cost power around the clock from April 28 to Oct. 5, 2013.

Palo Verde is the largest nuclear power plant in the nation, and its three reactors are part of 100 operating units in the U.S. and 436 in the world. Its three units can generate more than 4 million kilowatts of safe, clean, reliable, low-cost electricity every hour – enough to serve about 4 million people across the southwestern U.S. Approximately half of the plant’s output serves Arizona customers with the remaining power spread among California, New Mexico and far west Texas. In addition to the energy produced, Palo Verde has an estimated annual economic impact of more than $1.8 billion in Arizona through taxes, salaries, purchases of materials and services, and more.

Palo Verde is operated by APS and jointly owned by APS, Salt River Project, Southern California Edison Co., El Paso Electric Co., Public Service Co. of New Mexico, Southern California Public Power Authority and the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power.

APS, Arizona’s largest and longest-serving electricity utility, serves nearly 1.2 million customers in 11 of the state’s 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the principal subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corp. (NYSE: PNW).

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Merit for Economic Development

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


WestWorld Tony Nelssen 
Equestrian Center
Developer: City of Scottsdale
Contractor: Howard S. Wright, A Balfour Beatty Company
Architect: Populous Architects
Size: 310,000 SF
Location: 16601 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale
Completed: Dec. 23, 2013

WestWorld_HSWBBC (4)Arizona tends to deal with hot weather at least eight months out of the year, during which many of us prefer to stay inside if we can help it. (That’s roughly 240 days, by the way.) The winner of this year’s RED Award for Economic Development hosts at least 247 days of horse shows, not to mention car shows. To meet a growing demand for climate-controlled exhibition space that could be used even in the hottest months, WestWorld developed this $42.8M project, which also used the largest crane in Arizona to erect multiple 190,000-pound steel trusses.


Honorable Mention:
APS Hyder II Solar Plant
Developer: APS
General Contractor: McCarthy Building Companies
Engineer: Taylor RyMar

APS Hyder II, WEBBuilt on abandoned farm land, this solar power plant provides 15 megawatts of renewable power that could service approximately 3,700 homes. The plant’s 71,000 modules have an automated single-axis tracking system that allows these modules to follow the sun. It has also added value for adjacent landowners and brought jobs to the community.

clear energy systems coming to tempe

Scottsdale Healthcare recognized for energy efficiency

Scottsdale Healthcare’s continuing investment in energy efficiency is paying off, with Arizona Public Service Co. recognizing the local nonprofit hospital system for reduced energy use.

An upgrade to the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems at the Scottsdale Healthcare Greenbaum Surgery Center last fall resulted in a significant reduction in energy needs and earned a $31,314 rebate from APS, said Dan Evans, facilities manager at Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, where the surgery center is located.

The APS Solutions for Business Program offers rebates based on how much energy may be saved through energy efficient equipment as well as efficiency built into system design, according to Evans.

Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital also has earned recognition for reducing energy use during peak periods. Scottsdale Healthcare is a longtime participant in this green initiative, said Trevor Swanson, hospital facilities manager.

Scottsdale Healthcare has several other ongoing sustainability programs including:

·         Early adoption of LED lights, which last longer and use less energy.
·         Printing reduction, saving more than 3 million pieces of paper.
·         Recycling of paper, plastic, cardboard, metal, medical sharps and computer parts.
·         On-site document shredding, with more than 290 tons of paper recycled in FY2012.
·         Using electric and/or alternative fuel vehicles.
·         Incentives for staff choosing transportation alternatives: free bus passes, employee van pools, carpool partner-finder program, inter-campus shuttle service, secure lockers for bicycles, compressed work weeks and guaranteed ride home program.

Valley Metro’s Clean Air Campaign named Roman Kludka, a coordinator in Scottsdale Healthcare’s Information Technology department, the 2013 Outstanding Bus Commuter for greater Phoenix. Kludka has logged more than 70,000 miles commuting by bus over 14 years. He’s also covered 14,000 miles walking, for a grand total of 84,000 miles.

baseball

D-backs Announce Most Valuable Partner Awards

The Arizona Diamondbacks (@Dbacks) announced the winners of last week’s Most Valuable Partner Awards, the unique award show designed to honor the best D-backs’ partners in a variety of categories. The awards ceremony was held at Gila River Casinos’ Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino – Ovations Live! Showroom.

Several D-backs players were on hand to take part in the red carpet Oscar-style awards show, including Paul Goldschmidt, Aaron Hill, J.J. Putz, A.J. Pollock and Josh Collmenter. The quintet competed in Family Feud against several D-backs partners and comedic results can be viewed here: http://atmlb.com/1aJPQGZ

D-backs President & CEO Derrick Hall emceed the annual event and was featured throughout the night in several commercial spoofs, including the following parodies of a popular AT&T commercial: http://atmlb.com/1dNRpJR and http://atmlb.com/1ap2WPd

The winners of the awards were as follows:

Luis Gonzalez Community Champion – Western Refining
Brand Integration – Subway
D-backs Ambassador – Safelite
Marketing Activation – Anheuser-Busch and Pepsi
Rookie of the Year (first-year partnership) – Safelite
Lifetime Achievement – APS
Fans’ Choice Award – Taco Bell
Most Valuable Partner – Sanderson Ford (Silver Slugger) and Gila River Casinos (Gold Glove)

energy.bill

APS Completes Purchase at Four Corners Power Plant

Arizona Public Service completed on Monday its purchase of Southern California Edison’s ownership in Units 4 and 5 of the Four Corners Power Plant near Farmington, N.M. As part of its plan – originally announced in November 2010 – APS has permanently closed the plant’s older, less efficient Units 1, 2 and 3, and will install additional emission controls on the remaining cleaner, more efficient units.

“This is a milestone occasion,” said Don Brandt, APS Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer. “We have completed a transaction that will benefit the environment, allow us to continue to support the economy of the Navajo Nation and surrounding community, and help electric users in the Southwest with an important, low-cost generating resource.”

Reflecting on the significance of the transaction, Brandt added, “It is bittersweet because generations of Four Corners employees have dedicated their careers to running those three units to keep the lights on for our customers.”

With the closing of the APS-owned Units 1, 2 and 3, capacity at Four Corners is reduced from 2,100 megawatts to 1,540 megawatts, enabling the plant to serve half a million homes. Acquiring SCE’s 48 percent interest in the larger Units 4 and 5 will increase APS’s total Four Corners capacity from 791 megawatts to 970 megawatts. APS now owns 63 percent of Units 4 and 5, which constitute the plant moving forward.

Environmental benefits derived from reduced emissions and more efficient fuel use will increase significantly. Emissions of particulates are expected to decline by 43 percent, nitrogen oxides (NOx) by 36 percent, carbon dioxide (CO2) by 30 percent, mercury by 61 percent and sulfur dioxide (SO2)by 24 percent.

On Monday afternoon, Units 1, 2 and 3 – which helped ensure a reliable supply of energy for APS customers since 1963 (Units 1 and 2) and 1964 (Unit 3) – were permanently shut down in a ceremony for plant employees. Closure of the three older units by Jan. 1, 2014, and the installation of selective catalytic reduction equipment on Units 4 and 5 by July 31, 2018, will satisfy Best Available Retrofit Technology (BART) requirements for the plant issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 2012.

Decommissioning work, including complete dismantle and removal of the older units and any associated structures, will begin immediately and is expected to last about three years. Employees with responsibilities operating and maintaining Units 1, 2 and 3 now will focus on decommissioning activities.

The final purchase price for the Southern California Edison share is approximately $182 million, which is substantially less than other generation alternatives.

“Our plan for the plant moving forward saves APS customers nearly a half-billion dollars over other energy sources and maintains a highly reliable, cost-effective source of electricity generation for APS and other users in the Southwest,” said Mark Schiavoni, APS Executive Vice President, Operations. “Along with natural gas, nuclear, renewables and energy efficiency, coal has an important place in our company’s balanced energy portfolio.”

As APS committed when the agreement was announced in 2010, Schiavoni reiterated that no layoffs are planned at the plant, which employs 434 workers (82 percent of whom are Native American). Any required reduction in workforce will come through normal attrition. The Four Corners Power Plant and supporting mining operations create an estimated $225 million annual economic impact on the Navajo and New Mexico economies. During the next 30 years, their operation could generate more than $6.3 billion in economic value for the region, at least 70 percent of which will benefit the Navajo Nation.

Also, APS on Monday filed an application with the Arizona Corporation Commission to recover costs associated with the purchase of SCE’s interest in the plant. The company’s 2012 rate case settlement includes a provision that allows APS to seek rate relief for those expenses prior to its next rate case. The filing amounts to a bill impact of about 2 percent. For a typical APS residential customer, monthly bills would increase from $140.12 to $142.89.

APS, Arizona’s largest and longest-serving electricity utility, serves more than 1.1 million customers in 11 of the state’s 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the principal subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corp. (NYSE: PNW).

Most Challenging Project 2011: Soleri Bridge

Utilities aim to provide infrastructure to meet Arizona’s continued growth and ensure a vibrant economy

When economic developers head into the marketplace to sell Arizona’s benefits to interested relocation prospects, one item on that list is plentiful: reliable and well-priced utilities. While some cities deliver electric power in addition to sewer and water, the power grid is essentially divided between Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project and Tucson Power & Electric.
With multiple agencies busy knocking on doors around the world to bring home the business, Arizona’s utilities plan to deliver that promise.

Alan Bunnell

Alan Bunnell

“APS is typically looking 15 to 20 years into the future to anticipate future power generating resources,” explains Alan Bunnell, external and media relations representative for APS. “We want to be sure we have the infrastructure to meet Arizona’s continued growth and ensure a vibrant economy.”
Over at SRP, Senior Economic Development Project Manager Ed Grant says, “SRP’s resource plan is designed to meet our peak demand requirements plus a 12 percent planning reserve. We use a mix of conventional resources, renewables, energy efficiency programs and market purchases.” SRP works with its various planning groups to maintain a long-term resource plan to meet growing needs.
Arizona’s economy is a roller-coaster ride over the decades. Each climb is higher than the last. As the economy exits the latest recession, Arizona looms as an economic powerhouse with new businesses coming into the market. As each peak rises higher, utilities planning efforts ensure the power is not a stumbling block.
“APS has experienced the full weight of Arizona’s economic recessions many times in the past,” Bunnell says. “We have a reasonable sense of how to meet future demands. We’re already working on the power generation of the future. We are prepared for how and when those supplies will be developed and delivered.”

Ed Grant

Ed Grant

SRP has responsibility for delivering power and water in its service area. Grant explains that the future is bright, “Extensive planning efforts at SRP ensure the region enjoys an abundant supply of water and power. Long-term planning for power means SRP is able to meet long-term area needs.”
Water for America’s sixth largest metro is a challenge SRP is well-prepared to handle. “SRP has a diverse water supply,” says Grant. “We’re obtaining water from the Colorado River, our own system and treated wastewater. Developers are required to demonstrate an assured, renewable water supply.”
Recently, SRP joint-ventured with the Gila River Indian Community for the Gila River Water Storage program. The program creates a system of Central Arizona Project water credits and storage credits covering more than 100 years of usage.

Charlie Duckworth

Charlie Duckworth

APS and SRP are among the co-owners of the Navajo Generation Station in the Four Corners Region. The coal-fired power plant has been operating under an EPA-generated regulatory cloud that may require unaffordable air quality improvements to the facility. The generator powers the CAP project and serves Arizona, the Navajo Nation and the metro area.
“NGS is one piece of a large and diverse generation portfolio,” says Charles Duckworth, SRP’s senior director of energy management reports. “SRP is working on steps necessary to affordably keep the Navajo Nation operating. However, we have a highly flexible resource plan that gives SRP confidence in its ability to meet long-term customer needs.”

Parabolic solar troughs. Courtesy of Abengoa.com

Gila Bend's Solana Facility Begins Commercial Operation

Press release originally published at abengoa.com

Abengoa, an international company that applies innovative technology solutions for sustainability in the energy and environment sectors, has announced that Solana, the world’s largest parabolic trough plant with a total installed capacity of 280 MW (gross) and also the first solar plant in the United States with thermal energy storage, has successfully passed commercial operation tests. This milestone marks a major accomplishment for Abengoa and the Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) industry.

Solana is the first solar plant in the U.S. with a thermal energy storage system that is able to generate electricity for six hours without the concurrent use of the solar field, which is a turning point for renewable energy in this country, being a tangible demonstration that solar energy can be stored and dispatched upon demand.

Solana, located near Gila Bend and about 70 miles southwest of Phoenix, began construction in 2010 and on Monday, October 7, successfully fulfilled production forecasts required to date and testing for commercial operation. These tests included operating at the turbine’s full capacity while charging the thermal storage system, continuing to produce electricity after the sun went down, and starting up the plant and producing 6 hours of electricity using only the thermal storage system. These tests successfully demonstrated the various operation modes of the plant’s operation.

Abengoa’s first utility-scale solar plant in the United States employs parabolic trough technology. This technology consists of parabolic shaped mirrors mounted on structures that track the sun and concentrate the sun’s heat, later transforming water into steam and powering a conventional steam turbine. This mature technology has additional value since the heat can also be stored and used to produce clean electricity after the sun goes down or during a transitory period.

This ability to generate electricity when needed, or dispatchability, is one of the unique characteristics of concentrating solar power versus other types of renewables. Solana’s thermal storage system, without the use of the solar field, can produce clean energy for six hours at maximum power. These six hours will satisfy Arizona’s peak electricity demands during the summer evenings and early night time hours. Dispatchability also eliminates intermittency issues that other renewables, such as wind and photovoltaics, contend with, providing stability to the grid and thus increasing the value of the energy generated by CSP.

Arizona Public Service (APS), the largest utility in Arizona, will purchase all of the electricity produced by the solar plant for 30 years through a power purchase agreement with Abengoa.

Solana will generate the clean energy equivalent to that needed to power 70,000 households and will prevent about half a million tons of CO2 from being emitted into the atmosphere per year. The construction of Solana led to the creation of more than 2,000 jobs and a national supply chain that spans 165 companies in 29 states.

The total investment of the plant is approximately two billion dollars and during financing, Solana received a federal loan guarantee for $1.45 billion from the United States Department of Energy Federal Loan Guarantee Program. This support made the construction of Solana possible, creating or maintaining thousands of jobs both in the building of the plant as well as those direct and indirect jobs in the supply chain, as well as providing the Southwest with clean, sustainable energy using innovative technology.

Abengoa currently has 1,223 MW of concentrating solar power in operation and 430 MW under construction. It is the largest CSP company in the world and one of the few that constructs and operates both solar tower and parabolic trough plants.

118315706

GPEC announces Board of Directors for FY 2014

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) today announced the appointment of its Board of Directors for the 2014 fiscal year, as approved by the Executive Committee.

Alliance Bank of Arizona CEO James Lundy will continue to lead the Board of Directors as chairman.

“As the economy continues to improve, GPEC’s team of results-driven board directors will work to ensure the region not only maintains its trajectory but also pushes toward a more diversified and sustainable economy that is less dependent on growth industries like real estate and construction,” Lundy said. “I’m honored to work with this talented group of professionals and look forward to a productive year.”

Rounding out the Board’s leadership is SCF Arizona President and CEO Don Smith and Empire Southwest Executive Vice President Chris Zaharis as vice chairs, APS Vice President and Chief Customer Officer Tammy McLeod as secretary and Bryan Cave, LLP Partner R. Neil Irwin as treasurer.

New Board Directors include: Steve Banta, CEO of Valley Metro; the Honorable Denny Barney, District 1 Supervisor for the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors; Scott Bradley, Area Vice President for Waste Management; Mark Clatt, Area President for Republic Services; the Honorable Vincent Francia, Mayor of the Town of Cave Creek; Dr. Ann Weaver Hart, President of the University of Arizona; Bill Jabjiniak, Economic Development Director for the City of Mesa; the Honorable Michael LeVault, Mayor of the Town of Youngtown; Rich Marchant, Executive Vice President, Global Operations for Crescent Crown Distributing; Ryan Nouis, Co-Founder and President of Job Brokers; and Eric Orsborn, Councilmember for the Town of Buckeye.

“GPEC’s success is largely driven by its strong Board of Directors, all of whom reflect the region and state’s most accomplished professionals,” GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome said. “Every single one of them truly cares about our market’s success and serves as a community thought leader when it comes to competitiveness.”

Mayors from GPEC’s member communities and the organization’s Nominating Committee are responsible for nominating and appointing Board Directors. The one-year terms are approved during GPEC’s Annual Board meeting.

GPEC FY 2014 Board of Directors:

James Lundy – Chairman
CEO
Alliance Bank of Arizona

Don Smith – Vice Chair
President and CEO
SCF Arizona

Chris Zaharis – Vice Chair
Executive Vice President
Empire Southwest

Tammy McLeod – Secretary
Vice President and Chief Customer Officer
Arizona Public Service Company

R. Neil Irwin – Treasurer
Partner
Bryan Cave, LLP

William Pepicello, Ph.D. – Immediate Past Chair
President
University of Phoenix

Barry Broome
President and CEO
Greater Phoenix Economic Council

Richard C. Adkerson
President and CEO
Freeport McMoRan Copper & Gold

Jason Bagley
Government Affairs Manager
Intel

Ron Butler
Managing Partner
Ernst & Young LLP

Brian Campbell
Attorney
Campbell & Mahoney, Chartered

Michael Crow, Ph.D.
President
Arizona State University

Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D.
President and CEO
Midwestern University

Derrick Hall
President and CEO
Arizona Diamondbacks

Sharon Harper
President and CEO
The Plaza Companies

Ann Weaver Hart, Ph.D.
President
University of Arizona

Don Kile
President, Master Planned Communities
The Ellman Companies

Paul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation

Rich Marchant
Executive Vice President, Global Operations
Crescent Crown Distributing

David Rousseau
President
Salt River Project

Joseph Stewart
Chairman and CEO
JPMorgan Chase Arizona

Hyman Sukiennik
Vice President
Cox Business

Karrin Kunasek Taylor
Executive Vice President and
Chief Entitlements Officer
DMB Associates, Inc.

Gerrit van Huisstede
Regional President Desert Mountain Region
Wells Fargo

Andy Warren
President
Maracay Homes

Richard B. West, III
President
Carefree Partners

John Zidich
Publisher & President
The Arizona Republic

Chuck Allen
Managing Director, Gov’t & Community Relations
US Airways

Steve Banta
CEO
Valley Metro

Denny Barney
County Supervisor-District 1
Maricopa County Board of Supervisors

Jason Barney
Principal and Partner
Landmark Investments

The Honorable Robert Barrett
Mayor
City of Peoria

Timothy Bidwill
Vice President
Vermilion IDG

Scott Bradley
Area Vice President, Four Corners Area
Waste Management

Norman Butler
Market Executive
Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Mark Clatt
Area President
Republic Services

Jeff Crockett
Shareholder
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck

Wyatt Decker, M.D.
CEO
Mayo Clinic Arizona

George Forristall
Director of Project Development
Mortenson Construction

The Honorable Vincent Francia
Mayor
Town of Cave Creek

Rufus Glasper, Ph.D.
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges

Barry Halpern
Partner
Snell and Wilmer

G. Todd Hardy
Vice President of Assets
ASU Foundation

Lynne Herndon
Phoenix City President
BBVA Compass

Linda Hunt
Senior VP of Operations and President/CEO
Dignity Health Arizona

William Jabiiniak
Economic Development Director
City of Mesa

The Honorable Robert Jackson
Mayor
City of Casa Grande

The Honorable Linda Kavanagh
Mayor
Town of Fountain Hills

The Honorable Andy Kunasek
County Supervisor, District 3
Maricopa County Board of Supervisors

The Honorable Michael LeVault
Mayor
Town of Youngtown

The Honorable John Lewis
Mayor
Town of Gilbert

The Honorable Marie Lopez Rogers
Mayor
City of Avondale

The Honorable Georgia Lord
Mayor
City of Goodyear

Jeff Lowe
President
MidFirst Bank

Paul Magallanez
Economic Development Director
City of Tolleson

Kate Maracas
Vice President
Abengoa

The Honorable Mark Mitchell
Mayor
City of Tempe

Ryan Nouis
Co-Founder & President
Job Brokers

Ed Novak
Managing Partner
Polsinelli Shughart

Eric Osborn
Councilmember
Town of Buckeye

Rui Pereira
General Manager
Rancho de Los Caballeros

The Honorable Christian Price
Mayor
City of Maricopa

Craig Robb
Managing Director
Zions Energy Link

The Honorable Jeff Serdy
Councilmember
City of Apache Junction

Steven M. Shope, Ph.D.
President
Sandia Research Corporation

James T. Swanson
President and CEO
Kitchell Corporation

Richard J. Thompson
President and CEO
Power-One

Jay Tibshraeny
Mayor
City of Chandler

John Welch
Managing Partner
Squire Sanders

Dan Withers
President
D.L. Withers Construction

The Honorable Sharon Wolcott
Mayor
City of Surprise

GENERAL COUNSEL
Bryant Barber
Attorney at Law
Lewis and Roca

solar

ACC issues residential solar recommendations

The Arizona Corporation Commission staff issued its highly anticipated recommendations in response to APS’s proposed rule changes directed at residential solar customers. ACC recommended that the Commission not approve either of APS’s proposed Net Metering cost-shift solutions.

Net Metering is the mechanism that allows residential customers the right to offset energy purchases from the utility with self-generation on a one-to-one basis.

The ACC staff proposals, like those from APS, are only recommendations. Any changes to the existing rules must be voted on by the Arizona Corporation Commissioners. The Commissioners are scheduled to take up the issue at its Oct. 16 and 17 hearing.

ACC staff further recommended that should any changes be granted, existing rooftop solar customers should be grandfathered under the old rules, and that those rules should apply to the rooftop equipment and premises where the equipment is installed. In other words, the net metering rules should “run with the land,” versus being a “right” that resides with a specific customer.

Although ACC staff recommended that no changes be made at this time, it did suggest that this issue be evaluated during APS’s next rate case. They said it was their belief that any cost-shift issue created by Net Metering is fundamentally a matter of rate design and that the appropriate time for designing rates that equitably allocate the costs and benefits of Net Metering is during APS’s next general rate case.

ACC staff further recommended that the Commission hold workshops with all stakeholders to help inform future Commission policy on the value that Distributed Generation (rooftop solar) installations bring to the grid. In addition, Staff recommended that within the workshops, the Commission investigate the currently non-monetized benefits of Distributed Generation with the goal of developing a methodology for assigning a values to the non-energy benefits of rooftop solar.

ACC staff believes this recommended course of action is the most effective and appropriate method of dealing with the Net Metering cost-shift issue APS outlined in its July 12 filing. However, since it is not yet clear whether the Commission will decide to deal with this issue immediately, staff offered two alternative recommendations as bridge solutions in an effort to at least begin gradually addressing the Net Metering cost-shift issue until the matter can be more comprehensively resolved in a future general rate case.

The first interim proposal is a Lost Fixed Cost Recovery (LFCR) Flat Charge provision for all new APS solar rooftop customers, unless the customers choose the ETC-2 rate which relies on a demand-based charge to partially collect fixed costs. The LFCR is designed to recover a portion of costs arising from transmission and distribution, and other miscellaneous fixed costs.

The recommendation would have new solar customers pay into the LFCR account at a flat rate, thereby reducing the impact on non-solar customers. The estimated impact of this flat charge would amount to an estimated monthly increase between $2 and $3 for new solar customers compared to the $50 to $100 a month charge under APS’s proposal.

ACC staff’s recommendation also included a second alternative in the event the Commissioners wanted to implement an immediate rule change before the next rate case, proposing a Distributed Generation (DG) Premium could be implemented on a gradual basis so as to minimize the immediate impact on future solar customers. The proposal said this could be done by initially setting the DG Premium at $2.75/kW. The DG Premium would be the cap for the monthly charge under this alternative. The Commission could lower or increase the DG Premium annually based on the effect it has on new solar installations. The Commission could also adopt an approach wherein the DG Premium is initially set at a lower amount than that recommended by Staff, and phased-in over a period of years.

Joel Hiller

Hiller Elected President of Arizona Citizens for the Arts

Joel Hiller, President of the Yavapai Indian Cultural Center, has been elected president of the Arizona Citizens for the Arts Board of Directors.

Hiller will be joined on the executive committee by Vice President: Robert Knight, Tucson Museum of Art; Secretary: Phillip C. Jones, community volunteer and former executive director of the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture; Treasurer: Dawn Brown, Arizona Business Consulting; Directors at Large: Rick Pfannensteil, Pfocus LLC, and Jeff Rich, Rich-Gillis Law Group.  Also elected to the executive committee were Tom Chapman, retired educator, Advocacy Committee chair; and Lynn Tuttle, Arizona Department of Education, Finance Committee chair.

The following new board members were elected to three-year terms:  Laurie Goldstein, Freescale Semiconductor; Charles Goldstein, Emcare; Anne Kleindienst, Polsinelli P.C.; Bernadette Mills, West Valley Arts Council; Maureen O’Brien, Musical Instrument Museum; Vincent VanVleet, Phoenix Theatre; and Michael Vargas, Arizona Public Service.

Four board members were re-elected to serve another three-year term including Chapman; Jennifer Burns, Public Affairs Consulting; Sen. Steve Farley, Arizona State Senate; and Steve Martin, Childsplay.

For more information about Arizona Citizens for the Arts, visit www.azcitizensforthearts.org.

Mercury welcome Brittney Griner

Mercury, APS team up for 'Green Night'

The Phoenix Mercury and Arizona Public Service (APS) will host their annual “Green Night” on Wednesday, August 14 when the team takes on the Indiana Fever at US Airways Center. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m.

US Airways Center will be powered by renewable energy from APS. The Mercury purchased 42,000 kilowatt-hours of green energy, which is enough to power the entire game.

Throughout the game, the Mercury and APS will communicate “green tips” featuring the APS Refrigerator Recycling Program in-arena and the first 1,000 fans in attendance will receive a free EcoSmart® shirt, courtesy of APS. The EcoSmart® shirts are made of five percent polyester created from recycled plastic bottles. An image of the t-shirt is below and attached.

In addition, the team will wear green shooting shirts during their pre-game warm-up in support of “Green Night.”

Limited tickets are still available for the Mercury matchup against the Indiana Fever on Wednesday, August 14 at US Airways Center. Tipoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. Fans can visit phoenixmercury.com to purchase tickets.

Mercury welcome Brittney Griner

Mercury, APS team up for ‘Green Night’

The Phoenix Mercury and Arizona Public Service (APS) will host their annual “Green Night” on Wednesday, August 14 when the team takes on the Indiana Fever at US Airways Center. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m.

US Airways Center will be powered by renewable energy from APS. The Mercury purchased 42,000 kilowatt-hours of green energy, which is enough to power the entire game.

Throughout the game, the Mercury and APS will communicate “green tips” featuring the APS Refrigerator Recycling Program in-arena and the first 1,000 fans in attendance will receive a free EcoSmart® shirt, courtesy of APS. The EcoSmart® shirts are made of five percent polyester created from recycled plastic bottles. An image of the t-shirt is below and attached.

In addition, the team will wear green shooting shirts during their pre-game warm-up in support of “Green Night.”

Limited tickets are still available for the Mercury matchup against the Indiana Fever on Wednesday, August 14 at US Airways Center. Tipoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. Fans can visit phoenixmercury.com to purchase tickets.

StemCellSciCamp08_5619

$20,000 APS grant funds TGen education initiative

A $20,000 grant from the APS Foundation will help the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) expand its TGen2School initiative by providing science kits and instruction in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education.

The kits and accompanying instruction for teachers are part of the TGen2School initiative at TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division – TGen North – in Flagstaff, where some of the world’s top experts in disease-causing microorganisms study everything from valley fever to MRSA and even anthrax and plague.

TGen North’s Bio-SEEK: Bio-Science Education Enrichments Kits Program provides five different types of bioscience education kits for teachers and their students. The goal is improved overall scientific literacy, and a better-prepared bioscience workforce.

The program includes instructional sessions to help educators use the kits to teach such concepts as infectious disease and genomic testing methods, biosafety procedures, bioinformatics, and how DNA is used in forensics, public health and other life sciences.

“These are ideal tools that teachers can use to convey complex concepts in ways students can easily absorb, and it lessens the burden on the pocketbooks of teachers,” said Zsuzsi Kovacs, TGen North’s STEM Education Coordinator. “These kits are built on next-generation science standards and bioscience basics that students need to succeed in the genome-age.”

TGen will provide instruction for teachers during professional development days at TGen North, 3051 W. Shamrell Blvd., southeast of Interstate 17 and the exit to the Flagstaff Pulliam Airport.

“Commercial bioscience kits often contain limited directions, making teaching concepts challenging when teachers already have so much on their plate,” Kovacs said. “With professional development and teacher-friendly directions, educators will be able to adapt them in a way that is best for their students.”

Thanks to the APS Foundation’s grant, the newly developed kits will be provided at no charge through a checkout system available to teachers who have attended the professional training.

TGen2School initiative aligns with the goals of David Engelthaler, TGen North’s Director of Programs and Operations, one of the leaders in STEM education in Flagstaff, which in 2012 became the nation’s first STEM City.

“With initial funding from the Flagstaff Community Foundation (FCF) and others, we have placed a concerted effort into our TGen2School program,” said Engelthaler, a former State Epidemiologist for the State of Arizona. “We are so excited that the APS Foundation has decided to help us. Their grant will allow us to grow and expand our program in a direction that better meets the needs of our teachers.”

The grant to TGen North was one of 15, totaling more than $500,000, made by the Foundation to non-profit organizations throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Of the 30 fastest growing occupations projected through 2016, more than half will require mastery of STEM subjects, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“We at the APS Foundation applaud the efforts of all the organizations who received the grants,” said Julie Coleman, Executive Director of the APS Foundation. “We are pleased to be able to help support and encourage non-profits who engage in promoting STEM education, and other educational efforts, to increase student achievement. Success in education will result in a healthy society, strong economy and robust Arizona.”

solar

APS proposes changing solar rates

A proposed rate change for Arizona Public Service Co. customers who install rooftop solar panels could affect the future of the state’s solar industry.

The utility is proposing to give customers with new solar panel systems less credit for the electricity their systems supply to the power grid under a proposal pending before the Arizona Corporation Commission.

The proposal would drop the rate of return by as much as 40 percent, but the utility says new customers would also be offered some incentives.

The utility says the change is needed because solar customers are not paying enough for the services they get when their panels are not producing electricity.

Greg Field of Arizona Solar Concepts says if the commission approves the proposed changes to the utility’s net metering program, it will destroy the state’s solar industry.

 

146074426

McDowell Sonoran Preserve to close early July

Fire danger prompts restrictions and increased patrols -

Scottsdale’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve will close at 3 p.m. on Thursday, July 4, to reduce the threat of wild fires during the Independence Day holiday. Summer temperatures dry out vegetation and create an extreme fire threat that can endanger lives, property and the Valley’s fragile desert. The availability and popularity of fireworks during the Fourth of July holiday increases that threat.

All trailheads into the 27,800-acre-acre preserve will have “closed” signs posted. Scottsdale police, staff and volunteer stewards will patrol the area to advise visitors about the closure and fire threat. Violating the closure is a Class 2 Misdemeanor punishable by up to four months in jail and a $750 fine.

The use of fireworks is prohibited in Scottsdale, but sales are permitted. Fireworks should not be used in Scottsdale – or anywhere near a natural desert environment.

“While the legislature mandated that firework sales are permitted throughout the state, our local ordinance prohibits the use of any type of consumer fireworks within city limits,” said Deputy Fire Chief Jim Ford. “Fireworks should not be used in Scottsdale – or anywhere near a natural desert environment.”

Scottsdale’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve encompasses the McDowell Mountains and large areas of the Sonoran Desert north of Dynamite Boulevard.

Visit www.scottsdaleaz.gov/fire.

hispanic

The 25 Most Influential Hispanic Business Leaders

Benito Almanza
Arizona president
Bank of America
Born into a family of migrant workers, Almanza is now responsible for all lines of business efforts, community and civic activities in the state. The graduate of Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara has been with Bank of America for 30 years, working in California before moving to Arizona in 1992.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Hiring top talent and developing them to replace me someday.”
Surprising fact: “Growing up working with my family in the fields helped me better understand agribusiness banking.”

Marty Alvarez
CEO, principal in charge
Sun Eagle Corporation
Alvarez is founder of family-owned and operated Sun Eagle, one of the top minority-owned general contracting and construction management firms in the country. He has been a chair and officer for the Associated Minority Contractors of America since 1993.
His hope for his professional legacy: “That our well-constructed buildings improved the landscape, and our assistance to individuals and families improved lives.”
Surprising fact: “I have been involved with Shotokan Karate continuously for the past 39 years.”

Victor M. Aranda
Area president, Northern Arizona
Wells Fargo Arizona
Aranda manages six Wells Fargo Community Banking markets; Northeast Arizona, Central Arizona, White Mountains, North Phoenix, North Scottsdale and Scottsdale. He is responsible for 816 team members, 69 banking stores, and $4.1 billion in deposits. A 25-year financial services veteran, Aranda presently serves as a board member for Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Valley Leadership Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “My passion in life is to add value to those I come in contact with.  What I would like to be remembered for is how I spent my life serving, helping and developing the leaders of tomorrow.”
Surprising fact: “I was involved and directed a church Spanish choir and I have also sang in Las Vegas at the Bellagio Hotel.”

Tony Astorga
Retired CFO
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona
Astorga recently retired from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona where he served as the Senior Vice President, CFO & CBDO since 1988. He currently serves as chairman of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation and is a member of the board of directors for the Arizona Community Foundation, AZHCC, ASU Foundation, CSA General Insurance Agency, Phoenix Art Museum, and US Bank Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered in my profession as a CPA and CFO for being a good mentor and for helping develop my staff in their work ethic and level of growth.”
Surprising fact: “I have a sweet tooth for twinkies or that my favorite movie is ‘Planes, Trains and Automobiles’, I still laugh when I think about the movie”.

Miguel Bravo
Senior community development consultant
Arizona Public Service Company
Bravo is responsible for directing community development initiatives statewide to help serve diverse markets for APS. He also collaborates with economic development organizations to attract industry to Arizona. Bravo also serves the boards of Friendly House, Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Latino Center at Morrison Institute, Boys Hope Girls Hope and Jobs for Arizona’s Graduates.
His hope for his professional legacy: “For conducting business with integrity, purpose, passion; and for having a conviction for public service.”
Surprising fact: “I became a US Citizen in 2007. Having grown up in Arizona, this was one of my proudest moments.”

José Cárdenas
Senior vice president and general counsel
Arizona State University
Before joining ASU in 2009, Cárdenas was chairman at Lewis & Roca, where he became the first Hispanic to serve as managing partner of a major law firm in Arizona. A Stanford Law School graduate, Cárdenas has served on many boards and commissions and has received various awards.
His hope for his professional legacy: “As a good lawyer who served his clients and community well with the utmost integrity.”
Surprising fact: Cárdenas was involved with death penalty cases for more than 30 years.

America Corrales-Bortin
Co-founder
America’s Taco Shop
Corrales-Bortin grew up Culiacán in Sinaloa, Mexico, watching her mother prepare the dishes that would become the recipes for success at America’s Taco Shop. Founded in 2008, America’s authentic carne asada and al pastor quickly built a following that has led to rapid expansion and a partnership Kahala, a franchise development company. So far in 2013, America’s has already moved into California, Texas and Maryland.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “As someone who has a passion for the food we serve at America’s Taco Shop.”
Surprising fact: “People would be surprised that I am named after a famous soccer team in Mexico.”

Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.
President and CEO
Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
In addition to leading the Hispanic Chamber, de la Melena Jr. operates the Phoenix Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), the state’s leading advocate representing more than 100,000 minority business enterprises. De la Melena is also the Founder of edmVentures, LLC a small business investment company with holdings in Phoenix airport concessions at Sky Harbor International.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Helping small businesses succeed.”
Surprising fact: “I had the opportunity to do business in more than 30 countries before the age of 30.”

Robert Espiritu
Acquisition marketing
American Express
Espiritu’s diversified professional experience includes working for small business enterprises as well as corporate 100 businesses in the areas of sales, marketing and financial management. He has also been actively involved with various nonprofit organizations; most recently as the former chairman of the board for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Innovative and focused leader who delivers with energy and is known for building successful relationships and high performing teams.”
Surprising fact: “As a first generation American, I am passionate about helping aspiring and under-privileged youth achieve their dreams and advocating for Hispanic career advancement, education and scholarships.”

Dr. Maria Harper-Marinick
Executive vice chancellor and provost
Maricopa Community Colleges
Harper-Marinick oversees all areas of academic and student affairs, workforce development, and strategic planning. She serves on several national and local boards including ABEC and AMEPAC, which she chairs.  Originally from the Dominican Republic, Harper-Marinick came to ASU as a Fulbright Scholar.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Passion for, and unwavering commitment to, public education as the foundation of a democratic society.”
Surprising fact: “The joy I get from driving fast cars.”

Julio Herrera
National Spanish Sales and Retention Director
Cox Communications
Herrera and his team work across markets and cross-functional departments to drive Spanish language sales and grow Cox’s Hispanic markets nationally. He also helped establish LIDER, a leadership program tailored for Hispanic team members looking for advancement opportunities in Phoenix and Southern Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Growing and improving the Hispanic customer experience and making a difference our communities.”
Surprising fact: “Spanish was my first language and I started my career in sales leadership at 18 ears old.”

Lori Higuera
Director
Fennemore Craig
Higuera defends, provides counsel and trains employers of all sizes. She’s a Southwest Super Lawyer, an employment law expert for the Arizona Republic/Arizona Business Gazette and is a recent recipient of the High-Level Business Spanish Diploma from the Madrid Chamber of Commerce.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “A skilled lawyer who elevated the practice by integrating the diverse perspectives of our community.”
Surprising fact: “I was fired from my first job as a Santa’s helper for being too social!”

Ana María López, MD, MPH, FACP
Associate dean, outreach and multicultural affairs
Professor of medicine (Tenured) and pathology, College of Medicine
Medical director, Arizona Telemedicine Program
University of Arizona
López has a passion for addressing health inequities and human suffering. From clinical research with molecular targets to health services research, her work focuses on optimizing the health of individuals and communities.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Life is an opportunity to contribute. I hope to contribute, to make a difference.”
Surprising fact: “I love simple pleasures. Witnessing the daily miracle of the sun rising sustains me.”

Paul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation
Luna leads Helios Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. He is the former president of Valley of the Sun United Way and has held positions with Pepsi, IBM and the Office of Governor Bruce Babbitt.
His hope for his professional legacy: “That I cared about our community and helped make it better.”
Surprising fact: “I’m seriously considering getting matching tattoos with my kids in the near future.”

Steve Macias
President and CEO
Pivot Manufacturing
Macias is a co-owner of Pivot Manufacturing, a Phoenix machine shop, chairs the Arizona Manufacturers Council, and is on the boards of the Arizona Commerce Authority and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber. He is an active proponent of manufacturing in Arizona and a proud father of three boys.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Contributed in some small way to the sustainment of manufacturing in Arizona.”
Surprising fact: “In high school, I was the school mascot – a Bronco.”

Mario Martinez II
CEO
360 Vantage
Martinez is responsible for the overall vision, strategy and execution of 360 Vantage, a leader in cloud-based sales and marketing technology solutions designed to solve the unique challenges of the mobile workforce in life sciences, healthcare and other industries.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I would most like to be remembered for truly changing the lives of our clients, employees and our community in great and meaningful ways.”
Surprising fact: “I hosted a radio show during my college years.”

Clarence McCallister
CEO
Fortis Networks, Inc.
McAllister was born in Panama and earned his master’s in electrical engineering from ASU. In 2000, he and his wife started Fortis Networks, Inc., a certified 8a and HUBzone government contractor specializing in engineering, construction and technology services.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Building a world-class organization that always exceeds our customers’ expectations.”
Surprising fact: “I did an emergency landing on a City of Mesa street.”

Rodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
In addition to managing a law firm with 120 attorneys, Parga has been to Best Lawyers in America for the last four years. He also serves as Chairman of the Board of Chicanos Por la Causa, a leading non-profit helping advance and create economic and educational opportunities.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I want to be remembered as always trying to do the right thing and having led with integrity.”
Surprising fact: “I was bullied until age 11, which drove me not only to strengthen my body, but my resolve.”

Hector Peñuñuri
Senior planning analyst
SRP
Peñuñuri is an Arizona native and has spent most of the past 15 years in the Customer Services Division at SRP.  He has served on several boards including the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and LISC.  He was raised in the West Valley, and currently resides in Gilbert.
His hope for his professional legacy: “A trusted and valuable team member/leader; a communicator who understands the importance of sharing knowledge to help others.”
Surprising fact: “I’m a jack of all trades – woodworker, photographer, musician, outdoorsman and a decent cook when I put my mind to it.”

Dan Puente
Owner
D.P. Electric
Puente founded D.P. Electric in 1990 out of his garage with one truck. D.P. Electric now has more than 200 employees and generated more than $30 million in revenue in 2012, making it the biggest Hispanic-owned company in Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “A guy that is fair, honest, hard-working and gives back both personally and professionally.”
Surprising fact: “Professionally, that I do not have a college degree and personally, that I am a Bikram Yoga junkie.”

Marie Torres
Founder
MRM Construction Services
Torres is an Arizona native and built her business in the community that she grew up in. With more than 30 years experience in the construction field, she started MRM in 2002 and currently has more than 50 employees. The focus of her company has been in government contracting and has self performed airfield work at Luke AFB, MCAS Yuma and Davis Monthan.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “As being technically competent.”
Surprising fact: “I don’t like to drive and I am happy as a passenger – even in my own car.”

Lisa Urias
President and CEO
Urias Communications
After 15 years in international marketing and communications, Urias founded Urias Communications to address the need for advertising and PR with a uniquely multicultural focus. Now an award-winning advertising, and PR agency, Urias Communications specializes in the multicultural markets of the U.S. Southwest, with concentration on the burgeoning Hispanic market.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Bridging the divide between corporations and the growing Hispanic community for mutual benefit and respect.”
Surprising fact: “I am a fourth-generation Arizonan whose grandfather was the first Hispanic city councilman.”

Dawn C. Valdivia
Partner, chair of the Labor & Employment Practice Group
Quarles & Brady
Valdivia is the chair of Quarles & Brady’s Labor and Employment Group in Phoenix. She regularly advises clients in all matters of labor and employment law and is skilled in complex litigation matters, including wage and hour class action litigation in Arizona and California.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “A creative problem solver, committed to her clients and to giving back to the community.”
Surprising fact: “I love adventure — sky diving, gliding, scuba diving, helicopters, etc.”

Lorena Valencia
CEO
Reliance Wire
Valencia is the founder and CEO of Reliance Wire Systems, a wire and tubing manufacturing company she founded in 2000. She is also the founder and president of Magin Corporation — an eco-friendly wood pallet alternative company — and the FRDM Foundation.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Empowering children by building schools and libraries in impoverished countries through my FRDM Foundation.”
Surprising fact: “I put hot peppers on almost everything I eat. The hotter. the better.”

Roberto Yañez
Vice president and GM
Univision Arizona
Yañez is a 27-year broadcast television veteran, who has served 17 of those years with the Univision Television Group (UTG). Yañez has created various opportunities that helped build the station’s relationship with the community: Cadena de Gente Buena, El 34 Esta Aqui and Ya Es Hora.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Someone who used his craft to build bridges between the problem and the solution.”
Surprising fact: “Though Monday through Friday you will never see me without a suit and tie, I am most comfortable in boots, jeans and driving a pick-up truck.”

Ian Kennedy

D-backs announce 2013 promotional schedule

The Arizona Diamondbacks have announced the 2013 promotional schedule, which includes three bobbleheads, a Wade Miley Garden Gnome and more than a dozen additional promotional items throughout the season. Individual tickets for each of these games, including Opening Day on April 1 vs. the St. Louis Cardinals, will go on sale on Mar. 4. Tickets can be purchased in person at the Chase Field Ticket Office, online at dbacks.com or by calling 602.514.8400. Fans can also access exclusive presale opportunities by becoming a D-backs Insider at dbacks.com.

The first of the three bobbleheads is the Aaron Hill #BiCycle Bobblehead that will honor Hill for his two cycles last season (June 8). The other two bobbleheads will feature fan favorites Paul Goldschmidt (Aug. 10) and Miguel Montero (Sept. 14). The Montero bobblehead will be given away on Hispanic Heritage Day.

New this year, the D-backs will host a street festival prior to three games throughout the season (Apr. 1, Apr. 13, May 11, Sept. 14) that will feature food trucks, D-backs inflatables and several activities before fans enter the stadium.

Also on the promotional schedule are several $5 College Nights, School Family Nights, Choir Nights and Senior Days as well as Stitch & Pitch (April 13), four educational field trip days (April 29-May 2) and events for the Girl Scouts (May 11), a Camp Day (June 19), Cheer Night (August 31) and a Band Night (September 28). Three Mystery Ball events are also planned for April 27, June 8 and August 10. The club will host post-game fireworks shows, presented by Gila River Casinos, following 10 Friday night home games.

The D-backs 2013 promotional dates are available at dbacks.com/giveaways, with highlights below:

· 2013 Magnet Schedule, courtesy of Pepsi (First 50,000 fans on April 1 vs. Cardinals)
· APS Green Series (April 12-14 vs. Dodgers)
· Beat LA T-shirt, courtesy of Gila River Casinos (First 20,000 fans on April 13 vs. Dodgers)
· Jackie Robinson Day (April 25 vs. Rockies)
· D-backs Outdoor Recreation Night (April 27 vs. Rockies)
· Wade Miley Garden Gnome, courtesy of Sanderson Ford (First 20,000 fans on April 27 vs. Rockies)
· Faith & Family Night Concert, presented by Grand Canyon University (May 10 vs. Phillies)
· Mother’s Day Tote Bag, courtesy of Pepsi (First 5,000 moms on May 12 vs. Phillies)
· Boy Scout Night Sleepover (May 24 vs. Padres)
· D. Baxter Fan, courtesy of CenturyLink (First 10,000 fans on May 25 vs. Padres)
· D-backs Memorial Day Doubleheader (May 27 vs. Rangers)
D-backs Snapback Cap, courtesy of Budweiser (First 5,000 fans 21 and older at the 12:40 p.m. game on May 27 vs. Rangers)
· Aaron Hill #BiCycle Bobblehead, courtesy of Arizona Sports 620 (First 20,000 fans on June 8 vs. Giants)
· Bark in the Park, presented by Pet Club (June 9 vs. Giants)
· MLB Network Drawstring Bag (First 20,000 fans June 22 vs. Reds)
· D-backs Stars and Stripes T-shirt, courtesy of Ram Trucks (First 15,000 fans on July 5 vs. Rockies)
· D-backs Playing Cards, courtesy of Gila River Casinos (First 5,000 fans 21 and older on July 12 vs. Brewers)
· Native American Recognition Day (July 13 vs. Brewers)
· D-backs Beach Towel, courtesy of Gila River Casinos (First 20,000 fans on July 13 vs. Brewers)
· Back-To-School Backpack, courtesy of Cox Communications (First 5,000 kids on July 14 vs. Brewers)
· D-backs Luchador Mask (First 20,000 fans on July 27 vs. Padres)
· Paul Goldschmidt Bobblehead (First 20,000 fans on August 10 vs. Mets)
· Miguel Montero Growth Chart, courtesy of Arizona Milk Producers (First 5,000 kids on August 11 vs. Mets)
· D-backs Alumni Night (August 31 vs. Giants)
· Labor Day Game (September 2 vs. Blue Jays)
· Faith & Family Night Concert, presented by Grand Canyon University (September 13 vs. Rockies)
· D-backs Hispanic Heritage Day, presented by Budweiser (September 14 vs. Rockies)
· Miguel Montero Bobblehead, courtesy of Subway (First 20,000 fans on September 14 vs. Rockies)
· D-backs Luchador Cape, courtesy of Circle K (First 5,000 kids on September 15 vs. Rockies)
· Bark in the Park, presented by Pet Club (September 15 vs. Rockies)
· Roberto Clemente Day (September 18 vs. Dodgers)
· D-backs Car Show Street Festival (September 29 vs. Nationals)
· 2014 Magnet Schedule (First 20,000 fans on September 30 vs. Nationals)

The D-backs 4-Pack will be available starting March 4 and will allow fans to choose any four games with affordable seating options in all levels at Chase Field. Also on March 4, the D-backs Value Pack will be available for single-game purchase.  For $21, fans will receive a game ticket in the bleachers, a regular size hot dog, a 24 ounce drink, and a special offer from Subway®. For more information on ticket packages, visit www.dbacks.com/tickets.

7 Marketing Tips & Strategies, Entourage Marketing

R&R Partners adds new clients, staff

R&R Partners is leaping into 2013 adding new clients and staff as the agency gets comfortable in its new central Phoenix office space. Just recently, R&R took on Arizona Public Service (APS), IO, the datacenter company, and the Health & Wealth Raffle benefiting Barrow Neurological Institute and St. Joseph’s Hospital.

R&R now occupies the entire 29th floor at 101 N. First Avenue giving agency staff added room for growth. With an expanded client roster and new space have also come multiple new hires with plans to add more creative and account services staff.

New staff members include the following:

Ken Pham, Copywriter
A native of Arizona and a Sun Devil graduate, Ken Pham has worked across a vast range of clients with different desires and budgets. Pham’s ability to bring big ideas have earned him significant industry Emmy and Addy awards. He has developed and built brands for local, regional and national accounts such as NextCare Urgent Care, Phiten U.S.A., McDonald’s, Massage Envy, Peter Piper Pizza, Paradise Bakery & Cafe, Bashas’ and The Phoenix Zoo.
At R&R Partners, he exercises his talents on accounts such as APS, IO Data Centers, Health & Wealth Raffle benefiting Barrow Neurological Institute and St. Joseph’s Hospital, Valley Metro, The Residences at the Ritz Carlton Dove Mountain and Cox Business Services.

Ashley George, Senior Art Director
Ashley George brings a wealth of agency experience to R&R – having worked with top agencies before including High Wide & Handsome in Los Angeles and Young & Rubicam in San Francisco. Her talent has helped shape top brands such as Arbor Mist, Dell, Sunkist, Chevron, and Texaco. At R&R Partners, she works on APS, IO, St. Joseph’s Health & Wealth Raffle and Cox Communications.

Sarah Leidy, Assistant Media Buyer
Sarah Leidy hails from the East Coast where she helped launch an interactive Olympic summer campaign during her time at Neo@Ogilvy in New York City.  At R&R, she assists with negotiations and purchasing of advertising space across all media for R&R clients including St. Joseph’s Health & Wealth Raffle, Valley Metro, the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, and The Residences at the Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain.

Beau Cowan, Web Developer
Beau Cowan joined R&R from Yandy.com and was hired to support R&R’s work on the agency’s Boeing International account. His work includes designing and developing new Boeing sites as well as maintaining them for consistency over time.

Matt Porembski, Designer
Matt Porembski developed his talent on interdisciplinary teams at Intel and Motorola.  He also worked as an in-house designer for a Phoenix based law firm. As a part of R&R Partners’ digital team, he creates design options for many of R&R’s web clients.

Stuart Luther, Government and Public Affairs Associate
Stuart Luther began fine-tuning his public affairs expertise while he was a student assistant for the U.S Global Change Research Program in Washington, D.C. and strengthened his research abilities as an intern for the appropriations committee for the Arizona House of Representatives. Blending the two skills together made him perfect for the R&R Partner’s Government and Public Affairs Associate position, where he dives into research to help position R&R’s clients in the public affairs sphere.

Ivanna Garcia, Agency Coordinator
Ivanna Garcia brings a diverse journalism, public relations and community relations background to R&R with experience ranging from work at a boutique advertising agency, work with the U.S. Attorney’s Office and work with another national public relations/advertising firm.  At R&R, Garcia works on public relations for the Health & Wealth Raffle, Valley Metro, and Cox Communications accounts.

7 Marketing Tips & Strategies, Entourage Marketing

R&R Partners adds new clients, staff

R&R Partners is leaping into 2013 adding new clients and staff as the agency gets comfortable in its new central Phoenix office space. Just recently, R&R took on Arizona Public Service (APS), IO, the datacenter company, and the Health & Wealth Raffle benefiting Barrow Neurological Institute and St. Joseph’s Hospital.

R&R now occupies the entire 29th floor at 101 N. First Avenue giving agency staff added room for growth. With an expanded client roster and new space have also come multiple new hires with plans to add more creative and account services staff.

New staff members include the following:

Ken Pham, Copywriter
A native of Arizona and a Sun Devil graduate, Ken Pham has worked across a vast range of clients with different desires and budgets. Pham’s ability to bring big ideas have earned him significant industry Emmy and Addy awards. He has developed and built brands for local, regional and national accounts such as NextCare Urgent Care, Phiten U.S.A., McDonald’s, Massage Envy, Peter Piper Pizza, Paradise Bakery & Cafe, Bashas’ and The Phoenix Zoo.
At R&R Partners, he exercises his talents on accounts such as APS, IO Data Centers, Health & Wealth Raffle benefiting Barrow Neurological Institute and St. Joseph’s Hospital, Valley Metro, The Residences at the Ritz Carlton Dove Mountain and Cox Business Services.

Ashley George, Senior Art Director
Ashley George brings a wealth of agency experience to R&R – having worked with top agencies before including High Wide & Handsome in Los Angeles and Young & Rubicam in San Francisco. Her talent has helped shape top brands such as Arbor Mist, Dell, Sunkist, Chevron, and Texaco. At R&R Partners, she works on APS, IO, St. Joseph’s Health & Wealth Raffle and Cox Communications.

Sarah Leidy, Assistant Media Buyer
Sarah Leidy hails from the East Coast where she helped launch an interactive Olympic summer campaign during her time at Neo@Ogilvy in New York City.  At R&R, she assists with negotiations and purchasing of advertising space across all media for R&R clients including St. Joseph’s Health & Wealth Raffle, Valley Metro, the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, and The Residences at the Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain.

Beau Cowan, Web Developer
Beau Cowan joined R&R from Yandy.com and was hired to support R&R’s work on the agency’s Boeing International account. His work includes designing and developing new Boeing sites as well as maintaining them for consistency over time.

Matt Porembski, Designer
Matt Porembski developed his talent on interdisciplinary teams at Intel and Motorola.  He also worked as an in-house designer for a Phoenix based law firm. As a part of R&R Partners’ digital team, he creates design options for many of R&R’s web clients.

Stuart Luther, Government and Public Affairs Associate
Stuart Luther began fine-tuning his public affairs expertise while he was a student assistant for the U.S Global Change Research Program in Washington, D.C. and strengthened his research abilities as an intern for the appropriations committee for the Arizona House of Representatives. Blending the two skills together made him perfect for the R&R Partner’s Government and Public Affairs Associate position, where he dives into research to help position R&R’s clients in the public affairs sphere.

Ivanna Garcia, Agency Coordinator
Ivanna Garcia brings a diverse journalism, public relations and community relations background to R&R with experience ranging from work at a boutique advertising agency, work with the U.S. Attorney’s Office and work with another national public relations/advertising firm.  At R&R, Garcia works on public relations for the Health & Wealth Raffle, Valley Metro, and Cox Communications accounts.

Brossart Diane final 9314 5-29-12

Valley Forward Exands its horizon

Timing is everything, even when it comes to Mother Nature.

“In 2010, we got an $85,000 grant to look at some federal issues on sustainability,” says Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, which brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. “We were asked to target Arizona’s Congressional delegation and get them up to speed in regards to understanding a sustainability agenda for Arizona and what that meant.”

What grew from that seed was an initiative that had actually been germinating for more than a decade, Brossart says: taking the successful Marocopa County-centric Valley Forward and giving is a statewide focus. In August, Valley Forward’s board voted unanimously to to move forward with a business plan that will transition Valley Forward into Arizona Forward in January.

Brossart says the state is facing some serious issues related to the environment and the livability and vitality of Arizona’s cities and towns will be impacted by upcoming decisions related to:
* Land use planning and open space,
* A balanced multi-modal transportation system,
* Improving and maintaining healthy air quality,
* Solar and renewable energy technology,
*  Managing our water resources, and
* Protecting wilderness, parks, national monuments and other natural areas for Arizona’s tourism economy.

“As Arizona and the country recover from the Great Recession, a statewide dialogue is more important than ever,” says William F. Allison, a shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy. “The issues impacting us – water, energy, transportation, land use – involve the entire state rather than only the Valley. Arizona Forward will provide a forum to think outside the box and beyond the Valley.”

To get Arizona Forward to have its greatest statewide impact, Brossart and her staff connected with nine companies that had influence on communities along the Sun Corridor — the stretch of freeway that connects Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott and Flagstaff — to become charter members of Arizona Forward.

“The leaders of those companies have become our tour guides as we go into Pima County and Northern Arizona,” Brossart says. She points to Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner of Sundt Construction in Tucson, for opening doors for Arizona Forward to spread its wings into Southern Arizona.

“Southern Arizona already has a very strong environmental focus, but struggles with areas that are dependent on statewide engagement from both a funding and advocacy perspective,” Wadlington says. “(Valley Forward’s) shift (to a statewide focus) will provide Southern Arizona with added resources to coordinate its future growth in the larger context of the Sun Corridor.”

Experts agree that now is the perfect time for Valley Forward to shift to a statewide focus statewide because Arizona is at a turning point, economically and environmentally.

“There are major issues that affect the state like transportation; managing resources; and protecting the wilderness, parks, and national monuments,” says Alfie Gallegos, area sales manager for Republic Services. “These are not just environmental issues, but are issues that have an effect on Arizona’s economy statewide. I think Arizona is ready to start having more positive statewide conversations about finding ways to grow our economy in a manner that can be sustained and is environmentally friendly.”

Brossart says that while Arizona has had countless groups that have focused on making their communities better, Arizona Forward will be looking to help educate legislators become the glue that brings those regional organizations together in a spirit of cooperation and unity.

“So much of our goal is to drive a political agenda to the middle and bring folks on both sides of the aisle together,” Brossart says. “The issues that we focus on are sustainability and environmental. Everybody needs clean air, clean water, open space and parks. Those are the things that make a community viable, healthy and liveable. We all want that. Those aren’t political issues. But they do fall into a political arena that sometimes clouds the issues. But if we can be a reasoning voice of balance like we have been successfully in Maricopa County, if we can bring that statewide, it will be really good for Arizona — economically and environmentally.”

Valley Forward members expect the transition to Arizona Forward to foster additional collaboration and conversation on statewide issues, bring additional viewpoints on key issues and allow for a more global conversation.

“My hope is that we can, over time, have a collective vision that regardless of our own regional filters, we’re all in this together and need to find ways to move forward as one sustainable, economically successful state,” says Iain Hamp, community affairs representative, Wells Fargo Team Member Philanthropy Group.

Brossart says one of the biggest messages Arizona Forward will be trying to communicate is that making sound decisions about issues surrounding sustainability and the environment are good for business.

“If we make a case that shows the economic impact of parks and open space on the tourism industry, the business community will take notice and they are uniquely poised to deliver of that message and be heard,” Brossart says. “Parks groupies are great and they are important. But when the business community gets involved, people listen.”

Where Arizona Forward could have its biggest economic impact is on growth industries that rely on the state’s amazing natural resources.

“It’s an exciting time to be a part of solar energy, as the clean, renewable energy source is experiencing massive growth and helping the state and country achieve greater energy independence,” says Patricia Browne, director of marketing and communications for SOLON Corporation in Tucson. “And Arizona has been at the center of this growth. This has been made possible not only by the companies developing the solutions, but by the state and local officials, Arizona-based businesses and individual residents who recognize the importance that solar plays in a number of ways such as a cleaner environment, economic development, and energy price stability. However, there are still challenges in making the adoption viable on a large scale, and Arizona Forward helps bring together the right players to help make this happen on a state level.”

Richard Mayol, communications and government relations director for Grand Canyon Trust in Flagstaff, says Arizona Forward will give members in northern Arizona the opportunity to not only have a voice in discussions that affect the state today, but in decisions that impact what Arizona will be like 20 years from now.

“We hope it will help create an economy that provides the opportunity for prosperity without sacrificing the environment,” he says, “and makes northern Arizona an even better place to live, work, and raise a family.”

And that is what Arizona Forward’s mission is all about: bringing business and civic leaders together in order to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.

“All areas of the state will benefit, from urban to rural and suburban areas in between due to a coordinated and planned strategy for such essential elements as affordable energy, water, transportation, affordable housing, and a wide band of employment opportunities,” says Janice Cervelli, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona. “All geographic, economic, and environmental sectors of the state will increasingly become part of a larger, interdependent, connected system.”

GOALS OF ARIZONA FORWARD

* Establish cooperative relationships with like-minded Arizona conservation organizations and facilitate collaboration on sustainability initiatives.
* Bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.
* Increase awareness of and interest in environmental issues initially in the Sun Corridor and then beyond, statewide, building on an agenda of land use and open space planning, transportation, air quality, water, and energy.
* Support efforts to promote the Sun Corridor as an economic development area incorporating sustainability and smart growth principles.
* Serve as a technical resource on environmental issues through Arizona Forward’s and Valley Forward’s diverse membership of large corporations, small businesses, municipal governments, state agencies, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

ARIZONA FORWARD CHARTER MEMBERS
Arizona Community Foundation
First Solar
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
National Bank of Arizona
SOLON Corporation
Sundt Construction
The Nature Conservancy
Total Transit
Wells Fargo

FOUNDING MEMBERS: Access Geographic, LLC; Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; APS; Arizona Conservation Partnership; Arizona Department of Transportation; Arizona Heritage Alliance; Arizona Investment Council; Arizona State Parks Foundation; Arizona State University, Global Institute of Sustainability; Aubudon Arizona; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona; Breckenridge Group Architects/Planners; Caliber Group; City of Tucson; Environmental Fund of Arizona; Fennemore Craig; Gabor Lorant Architects; Gammage & Burnham; Godec Randall & Associates; Grand Canyon Trust; Guided Therapy Systems; Haley & Aldrich; Intellectual Energy, LLC; John Douglas Architects; Jones Studio; Kinney Construction Services, Inc.; Lewis and Roca LLP; Logan Halperin Landscape Architecture; Pima County; RSP Architects; Southwest Gas Corporation; SRP; University of Phoenix; TEP / UNS Energy Corp.; The Greenleaf Group