Tag Archives: Arizona Center for Cancer Care

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-001
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-001
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-081
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-081
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-082
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-082
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-083
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-083
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-084
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-084
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-086
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-086
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-002
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-002
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-003
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-003
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-004
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-004
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-005
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-005
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-006
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-006
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-007
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-007
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-008
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-008
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-009
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-009
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-010
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-010
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-011
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-011
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-012
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-012
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-013
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-013
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-014
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-014
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-015
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-015
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-016
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-016
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-017
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-017
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-018
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-018
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-020
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-020
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-019
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-019
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-021
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-021
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-079
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-079
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-022
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-022
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-023
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-023
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-024
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-024
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-025
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-025
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-026
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-026
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-027
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-027
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-028
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-028
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-029
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-029
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-030
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-030
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-031
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-031
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-032
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-032
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-033
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-033
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-034
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-034
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-035
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-035
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-036
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-036
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-037
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-037
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-038
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-038
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-039
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-039
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-040
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-040
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-041
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-041
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-042
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-042
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-044
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-044
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-045
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-045
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-046
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-046
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-047
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-047
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-048
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-048
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-049
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-049
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-050
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-050
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-052
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-052
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-053
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-053
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-054
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-054
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-056
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-056
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-060
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-060
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-062
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-062
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-063
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-063
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-064
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-064
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-065
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-065
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-066
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-066
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-068
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-068
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-069
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-069
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-071
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-071
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-072
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-072
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-073
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-073
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-074
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-074
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-080
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-080
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-075
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-075
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-076
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-076
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-082
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-082
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-077
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-077
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-079
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-079
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-084
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-084
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-078
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-078
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-083
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-083
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-004
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-004
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-006
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-006
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-007
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-007
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-008
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-008
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-009
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-009
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-011
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-011
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-012
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-012
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-013
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-013
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-015
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-015
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-016
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-016
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-017
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-017
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-037
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-037
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-038
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-038
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-054
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-054
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-056
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-056
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-060
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-060
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-063
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-063
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-078
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-078

They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

luci_chen

Luci Chen – Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Luci ChenPartner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Chen is partner at Arizona Center for Cancer Care and an award-winning medical researcher and radiation oncologist. She is also a volunteer/fundraiser for American Cancer Society, Tesseract, MADD, Salvation Army, Goodwill and Heifer International.

Greatest accomplishment: “Co-founding Arizona Cancer Specialists (now Arizona Center for Cancer Care).”

Surprising fact: “I have never ordered takeout pizza for my family, but cook fresh foods daily .”

Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue, Az Business Magazine celebrates the amazing women who make an impact on Arizona business.

Click here to see all of the 2014 Most Influential Women.

Michael Gordon MD

Gordon named clinical trials medical director

Michael S. Gordon, MD, one of the greater Phoenix area’s leading medical oncologists and cancer researchers, has been named the new Medical Director for the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials program at Scottsdale Healthcare. Dr. Gordon will oversee the center’s internationally recognized Phase I clinical trials program, which is known for its leadership in first-in-human studies of new cancer therapies.

Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare, a partnership with TGen, is a leading clinical research site for Phase I studies of new cancer drugs. It is often among the first in the world to offer a new investigational drug for eligible patients with a broad range of cancers.

Dr. Gordon is a medical oncologist who serves as CEO of Pinnacle Oncology Hematology, a division of Arizona Center for Cancer Care, in Scottsdale, focusing on translational research and the care and management of cancer patients seeking phase I and phase II clinical trials. He is a Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix, and is actively engaged in the education of medical students as co-director of the Oncology Block.

Dr. Gordon’s principal research interests are in development of new cancer therapies with a focus on targeted and immunologic therapies as well as drugs that affect angiogenesis (tumor blood vessel supply). Avastin®, Perjeta® and Neumega® are among the drugs Dr. Gordon has helped validate for FDA approval. His disease focuses include kidney cancer, melanoma, prostate cancer, lung cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and ovarian cancer.

Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare, through its relationships with top physician scientists, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies world wide, offers a variety of early-phase cancer research studies providing local impact to the citizens of Arizona, according to Dr. Gordon.

“The care and management of patients with cancer and associated diagnoses is rapidly evolving. The ability to provide patients with cutting-edge treatments has the potential to transform the way cancer care is delivered. The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare has always been a leader in this regard and its relationships with its community partners defines Scottsdale Healthcare’s commitment to our patients and our community,” said Dr. Gordon.

“I look forward to working with my colleagues and to the evolution of a new dynamic as we work to accelerate the access to new cancer drugs to our patients in need. By focusing on innovation in a collaborative spirit with our community physicians, we reinforce our primary commitment to our patients and their families,” he continued.

Dr. Gordon specifically noted the strength of the talent in Scottsdale and their commitment to excellence. “Our programs have a tremendous core of individuals at all levels of clinical research and primary patient care who ensure that we do the best work possible, drawing greater focus on Scottsdale as the “go to” place for cancer drug development.”

The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare and Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute are known for collaborations with leading genomic scientists, academic centers and community-based physicians such as the Arizona Center for Cancer Care, Palo Verde Hematology Oncology and Arizona Oncology Associates, said Mark Slater, PhD, chief executive, Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute.

“We will continue to collaborate with our community physicians, our partners at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), Translational Drug Development (TD2), nationally recognized universities and others to better serve our community and accelerate breakthrough innovations for cancer treatment,” added Dr. Slater.

Examples of recent successes in accelerating new drug development at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center are skin cancer drug Erivedge® and the use of Abraxane for treating pancreatic cancer. Both worldwide studies were led in Scottsdale by Daniel D. Von Hoff, MD, chief scientific officer of the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare and TGen Physician-in-Chief.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Erivedge® for advanced basal cell carcinoma in January 2012 and approved Abraxane in combination with standard therapy for pancreatic cancer in September 2013.

“We are honing in on the pathways to help tailor the right drug to the right patient at the right time,” said Dr. Von Hoff. “This is an exciting era of precision medicine and the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials program at Scottsdale Healthcare provides unprecedented access to new therapies for people in our community.”

Ramesh Ramanathan, MD, an investigator at Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials specializing in treatment of gastrointestinal cancers, agreed that the program will benefit from the inclusion of Dr. Gordon.

“My passion is cancer research and I look forward to growing our program along with Dr. Gordon, Dr. Von Hoff and everyone involved in this important work at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare. I’m optimistic that we can continue our strong track record of success as we battle this disease,” said Dr. Ramanathan, who is also a senior investigator and Clinical Professor at TGen and the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix.

“Our campus is becoming the epicenter of research activity across the Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network, and we are creating an infrastructure that continues to attract top talent to our organization,” added Gary Baker, senior vice president and CEO, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center.

Baker noted that the depth of science through the diagnostic and genomic capabilities available to local cancer patients is a key benefit of the inclusiveness and collaborative spirit fostered within the Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute.

“It’s a great example of locally based, yet nationally respected leading researchers, community physicians and clinical teams working together to develop new therapies and innovative treatments that benefit patients here in Arizona and across the United States,” concluded Ron Korn, MD, PhD, medical director of the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare.

The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare opened in 2001 as the first major cancer center in greater Phoenix, offering comprehensive cancer care and research through Phase I clinical trials, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and support services in collaboration with leading researchers and community oncologists.

Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare is known worldwide for its expertise in studying new treatments for pancreatic cancer. It is a co-lead site with Dr. Von Hoff as the principal investigator for Stand Up to Cancer’s Pancreatic Cancer Dream Team comprised of scientists working to develop new treatments for pancreatic cancer.

The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, an affiliate of the Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network, is designated by the Association of Community Cancer Centers as a Community Resource Center for Pancreatic Cancer and holds Accreditation with Commendation from the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons.

cancer.ytratment

Old Town Scottsdale gets new Cancer Care Center

Arizona Center for Cancer Care (AZCCC), a multispecialty group of Arizona’s most recognizable names in cancer treatment and technology, has announced that it has officially opened at Scottsdale Healthcare’s Osborn Medical Center location.

“We are pleased to welcome AZCCC to the Osborn Medical Center location and look forward to continuing to work together to provide exceptional oncology care at both of our Scottsdale Healthcare facilities,” said Lindsay Thomas, director of oncology for Scottsdale Healthcare.

Earlier this year AZCCC opened a facility at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare’s Shea Medical Center location, allowing doctors to accommodate an increased volume of patients and bring leading-edge cancer care technology to Scottsdale Healthcare.

The facility is an outpatient single story building at 337 E. 2nd St. on Scottsdale Healthcare’s Osborn Campus.

“The goal was to bring the best physicians together to offer the best comprehensive care to patients,” said Thomas. “Both the Scottsdale Healthcare Shea and Osborn Centers share a commitment to clinical excellence and our partnership with AZCCC has enabled us to broaden our services in this region.”

Aside from additional exam and procedure rooms, the now complete facility renovations include:
* The addition of state-of-the-art radiation therapy services such as RapidArc Sterotactic Radiosurgery, which will allow for short courses of pin-pointed radiation
* The installation of a new iX Linear Accelerator manufactured by Varian, the industry leader in radiation equipment, capable of delivering precision Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and image-guided radiation therapy

“Radiation therapy technologies such as IMRT/ IGRT and Radiosurgery help deliver higher doses of radiation to tumors with fewer complications and less immediate and long-term side effects,” said Dr. Diane C. Racine, a partner at AZCCC and member of the Scottsdale Healthcare medical staff.

Dr. Racine has been providing services at the AZCCC Virginia G. Piper location, but will soon bring her services and expertise to the new facility at the Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center. In addition to her current role, Racine practiced at and served as director of residency programs for the Department of Radiation Oncology at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago and has both taught radiation oncology courses at the University of Chicago and served as assistant professor of radiation oncology at Rush Medical College.

Joining Racine at the Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center will be fellow radiation oncologist Dr. Luci Chen. . Chen also brings experience from her time as clinical director of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Louis A. Weiss Memorial Hospital and as assistant professor of radiation oncology at the University of Chicago. She has also been awarded a Fellowship by the American Cancer Society for her clinical research in cancer care.

“With a coordinated multidisciplinary approach to radiation therapy now available through both Scottsdale Healthcare locations, patients will have the best chance for achieving optimal treatment results with the added convenience of the two local centers,” said Chen.

For more information, please visit www.arizonaccc.com.

cancer.ytratment

Cancer Center Creates Synergy with Like-Minded Life Savers

Cancer is a scary word.

“The word ‘cancer’ is actually the general name given to some 100-plus diseases from breast to lung to skin cancer, and is when cells in a specific part of the body begin to grow out of control,” said Dr. Daniel Reed, co-founder of Arizona Center for Cancer Care (AZCCC) in Peoria.

While the word itself may be general, those fighting its 100-plus diseases are anything but.

“No two cancer patients are alike – and no two patients’ treatment should be either,” said Dr. Reed, who understands this firsthand as his grandmother fought breast cancer while he was in medical school, inspiring him to go into the field.

Depending on a patient’s needs, he/she may require cancer treatment with chemotherapy, radiation therapy or a combination of both. If being treated with a combination, West Valley patients were often required to go to different cancer centers throughout the Northeast and Southeast Valley – sometimes hours away – for regular care. Unsatisfied with West Valley patients’ access to nearby facilities and support services, Dr. Reed partnered with fellow specialists Drs. Christopher Biggs and Terry Lee in 2008 to launch Arizona Center for Cancer Care in Peoria. Their mission, simply put, was to become the future of cancer treatment in Arizona.

“Our multi-specialty treatment center was designed to give us the ability to offer comprehensive cancer care to patients on this side of town – something never done before in this community,” said Dr. Reed.

Upon launching the facility, the group quickly became the first of its kind to offer West Valley patients Brachytherapy, which is an effective, less-invasive treatment for prostate, breast, lung, esophageal, gynecologic and head/neck cancers, among others. They also became the first to invest in and offer Radiosurgery to the area using a state-of-the-art technology called RapidArc® radiation therapy.

“This very precise form of therapeutic radiation uses beams of radiation to treat cancerous tissues without a surgical incision or opening, allows patients to receive treatment in as little as 10 minutes, compared to the several hours it used to take with older technologies like the cyber knife and gamma knife,” said Dr. Reed.

In 2008 the radiation oncologist and team realized they were ready to expand and partnered with prominent medical oncologist Dr. Devinder Singh and his practice, Arizona Center for Hematology and Oncology, increasing the practice to 10 physicians and the West Valley’s first comprehensive cancer practice. By 2011, when the Peoria center became Arizona’s only freestanding radiation oncology facility to earn The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval™ for accreditation, they had also added gynecological cancer treatment to their growing list of patient services, another first for the West Valley.

Over the past year, two major events have happened:
First, it partnered with Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists (ABCS) and Arizona Radiation Oncology Specialists (AROS) to expand into the Scottsdale and Southeast Valley markets.
Then, thanks in part to relationships with ABCS and AROS, the group joined together to enter into a long-term relationship with Scottsdale Healthcare, wherein AZCCC is now overseeing the Piper Center’s ENTIRE radiation oncology wing and beyond.

Today, the practice in total now boasts 52 physicians, more than 200 employees and 20 partner offices Valleywide as a result.

“We are a cancer center without walls whose services stretch into every inch of this community, offering the West Valley with the best doctors, best treatment technologies and best research in the country,” says Dr. Reed. “Cancer is a disease of survivors – and we want to keep it that way.”

140384435

Summertime Cancer Risk – It’s Not What You Think!

You slather on sunscreen with high SPF, don a floppy sunhat and shield your eyes with shades – all great defenses against skin cancer, especially in the sunny summer months. But despite your best efforts to avoid harmful cancer-causing UV rays, chances are you are still overlooking one major cause of many kinds of cancer: your fruity, sugary summertime cocktail.

“Perhaps just as common at pool parties as swimsuits themselves, summer cocktails like daiquiris and margaritas are high in sugar and alcohol, two of cancerous tumors’ favorite cohorts,” said Dr. Coral Quiet of Arizona Center for Cancer Care.

We unknowingly consume a lot of sugar through beverages. According to a recent study, if you include sodas and sports drinks along with mixed cocktails, drinks make up 20 percent of our sugar intake. And sure, we all know sugar can lead to weight gain and diabetes, but not many people know it can actually feed certain types of cancerous tumors.

“An estimate one third of cancerous tumors have insulin receptors – including breast and colon cancers,” says Dr. Quiet. “These receptors pull sugar in from the bloodstream, which not only feeds the tumor, but prevents muscles and other organs from getting the insulin they need.”

According to Dr. Quiet, while often overlooked, sugar – especially the kind in alcohol – is a leading cause of cancer in the United States. A leading reason why – we often don’t realize how much we are indulging in.

For example, one margarita (and you know you have more than one!) made with store-bought mix has more than 24 grams of sugar. A strawberry daiquiri can have upwards of 35 grams. To put that in perspective, according to the American Heart Institute, folks should only have the following added sugars in their diets, meaning above and beyond natural sugars like fruits:

  • Recommended Daily Sugar Intake for Men: 36 grams or 9 teaspoons
  • Recommended Daily Sugar Intake for Women: 20 grams or 5 teaspoons
  • Recommended Daily Sugar Intake for Children: 12 grams or 3 teaspoons

But that’s only half of a cancer cocktail. Alcohol comes with its own risks. Just like with sugar, there are obvious pitfalls to consuming alcohol – weight, memory and long-term risk of disease.168718391

But the fact is, alcohol is a carcinogen, meaning there is sufficient evidence to show its connection to cancer.

“In the United States, alcohol may play a role in more than 20,000 cancer deaths each year and has been linked to breast, esophagus, colorectal, liver, stomach and ovarian cancers,” says Dr. Quiet.

Luckily, cancerous tumors develop and grow over extended lengths of time, so it’s okay to sneak a fruity, frilly cocktail once in a while, just be careful not to over indulge. Also, be sure to have regular check-ups for cancers with your physicians. The earlier tumors are detected, the greater the chance of survival.

For more information please, visit the Arizona Center for Cancer Care.

Health Resolutions to Make Before the New Year

Health Resolutions To Make Before The New Year

Each year, we spend New Year’s Day resolving to improve mind, body and spirit.

However, in most cases, those resolutions are often broken, forgotten and shelved for yet another year before the holiday lights even come down.

So, this year, why not get a head’s start on make better choices before the New Year arrives?

Below are some helpful tips from Valley health leaders on how to get a jump start while the holidays are still in full swing:

Decrease Risk of Silent Nights

“Resolve to make your ears a part of your yearly physical exam,” says Sherri Collins, executive director of Arizona Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. “General practitioners will check your eyes, heart and blood pressure, but they do not normally perform hearing tests. This could prevent furthering any existing hearing loss.”

She adds to also turn down excess noise this holiday season and beyond. According to Collins, 15 percent of individuals aged 20-69 have some degree of hearing loss that may have been caused by exposure to loud noises.

Increase Talk Time

“The holidays are the perfect time to create healthy communication in your family by talking regularly with your kids about finals, school recess plans, social life, goals and peer-pressure,” says Leslie Bloom of DrugFreeAz.org. “Children who regularly talk with their parents are 50 percent less likely to use drugs. A great place to start that conversation is around the dinner table together.”

Also, while stocking the cabinets for guests this holiday season, take some time to unstock what you no longer need.

“Use the excuse of holiday guests to go through your medicine cabinet and clear out any unused or expired medicines,” Bloom says. “Check out DrugFreeAz.org/Rx for the best ways to dispose of those unused or expired medicines.”

Decrease Sweets for Your Sweets

In a recent report, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, an Emmy-award winning chief medical correspondent for the Health, Medical & Wellness unit at CNN, reported that according to estimates, nearly 20 percent of the total calories in American diets comes from added sugar via soda, energy drinks, sports drinks, desserts, fruit drinks, ice cream and other candies.

But that is just the beginning.

“Most people don’t realize that diets rich in sugar not only lead to increased risk of diabetes, but also to heart disease and cancer,” says Dr. Coral Quiet of Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists. “Breast and colon cancers have insulin receptors that encourage tumor growth.”

A best bet to optimize health — fight the sugar bug during the holidays.

Increase Pillow Talk

“There will be more than 12,000 new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed this year in the United States alone, making it the third most common cancer in women,” says Dr. Rhianna Meadows of Planned Parenthood Arizona. “The No. 1 risk factor in developing cervical cancer — the human papilloma virus, or HPV.”

With this disease — and most other STDs — easily confused with common ailments in early stages, the only defense is a good offense. The offense: communication.

According to Dr. Meadows, some questions to get started:

  • Have you ever been tested for any STDs? If so, which ones?
  • Are you involved with anyone else, or when was your last sexual activity?
  • I believe in safe sex and condom use, do you?

Decrease the Summer Glow

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 31,000 Arizona residents are diagnosed with skin cancer each year. And not all of them have the hot summer sun to blame.

“This is Arizona — not the Jersey Shore,” says Dr. Gregory Maggass of Arizona Center for Cancer Care. “Simply put, do not step foot in a tanning bed to keep your summer glow this holiday season.”

Each of these early resolutions will make for a very happy — and healthy — New Year, indeed.

For more information on all these and other health resolutions to make, please visit any of the below:

acdhh.org
drugfreeaz.org
breastmd.com
ppaz.org
canceraz.com