Tag Archives: arizona commercial real estate

Dark Star Orchestra

Concerts Take The Center Stage At Musical Instrument Museum In April

Musical Instrument Museum marks the start of a series of events focusing on concerts, bringing performances by local and national artists to the Valley.

VladimirPleshakov&ElenaWinther_April26_MIM

Mini Music Makers Series
Mondays and Wednesdays in April (1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24)
9:30-10 a.m. for children ages 0-18 months
10:15-10:50 a.m. for children ages 18 months-3 years
11-11:45 a.m. for children ages 3-5 years
Tickets: $12 per class or $40 for all four
Introduce your child to the wonderful world of music! MIM’s Mini Music Makers Series, an early childhood music-education program, aims to enrich children’s lives by providing a safe, interactive and engaging environment for children to explore a variety of music from around the world. Each class is structured around developmentally appropriate activities for children to interact with and create their own music. This session’s classes will focus on the sights and sounds of African music. Reservations required. To reserve a space, please contact Annabel Rimmer at 480-245-6919 or grouptours@MIM.org.

 

 

Dark Star Orchestra: Continuing the Grateful Dead Concert Experience
Monday, April 1, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $36.50-$39.50
Performing Grateful Dead classics in the same way that an orchestra interprets music of classical composers, Dark Star Orchestra selects from among the nearly 2,500 shows that the Grateful Dead performed during their 30-year tenure as fathers of improvisational rock. The composer spirit is derived and channeled as the musicians capture the excitement and innovation of the original performances and compositions. On most performances, Dark Star Orchestra presents the complete original set list, song by song and in consecutive order, while adapting their phrasing, voice arrangements, and specific musical equipment for the various eras of the Grateful Dead shows that they perform.

Colin Hay
Tuesday, April 2, 7 p.m. (SOLD OUT)
Wednesday, April 3, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $34.50-$39.50
Colin Hay wrote some of the quirkiest pop hits of the early 1980s as the principal songwriter of the Australian-based Men at Work (“Down Under,” “Overkill,” “Who Can It Be Now?”), which became an international pop sensation, seemed to dominate early MTV, and garnered a Grammy Award for Best New Band. As the band’s guitarist and lead singer, Hay’s voice and appearance are still familiar to millions. The past 20 years have found him quietly yet tenaciously reintroducing himself to new generations of fans. In the process, he’s become a respected songwriter whose stage humor and storytelling are nearly as renowned as his music. He’s now enjoying life as a masterful writer and vocalist who is at the peak of his craft.

Alpin Hong
Friday, April 5, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $37.50-$42.50
Whirlwind American tours and performances across the globe have earned pianist Alpin Hong the reputation as a modern-day Pied Piper. His combination of stunning technique, emotional range, and rare humor continues to bring audiences young and old to their feet. The New York Times lauded his “crystalline energy . . . clear and persuasive ideas . . . and remarkable breadth of coloration,” and called him “a pianistic firebrand” in a review of his standing-room-only New York recital debut at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall.

Arizona Opera Up Close Series: Double Entendre
Thursday, April 11, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $37.50-$42.50
Enjoy this rare opportunity to hear the two lead couples from both casts of “The Marriage of Figaro” as they share the spotlight on stage for one night only at the MIM Music Theater. With an impressive collection of debuts and accolades spanning the globe, the quartet will perform from their signature operatic roles and other selections from a variety of genres. Featuring Sari Gruber, Jo駘le Harvey, Jason Hardy, and Daniel Okulitch with Arizona Opera Head of Music Allen Perriello on piano.

MIM Homeschool Day: Compass Guided Tour and Signature Workshop (West African Percussion and Dance)
Monday, April 15
Tickets: $10 per student, $10 per chaperone above the 1:5 ratio
Led by docents, this exciting “trip around the world” introduced students to the diversity of the world’s musical traditions, ranging from an Indonesian gong workshop to a re-created workshop featuring Martin acoustic guitars. Students learn ways that instruments have changed over time, as humans move around the globe and interact with each other. Content and curriculum align with Arizona State Standards in science, social studies, and music education. Students will also participate in a Signature Workshop on West African Percussion and Dance where they will be introduced to different drumming styles and traditions from several cultural groups in Ghana, Mali and Guinea. Students will play along using the djembe, agogo double bell and shekere. There will also be a family-friendly menu available at the MIM Caf・ Best for grades 3‒12. To register, please contact Annabel Rimmer at 480-245-6919 or grouptours@MIM.org.

I Am AZ Music: The Best of the Valley: Open Mic Showcase
Tuesday, April 16, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10
Featuring Andrew Duncan Brown, Ruca (Haley Grigaitis), Tim Allyn, Amanda Morgan and Jason Messer for an evening of local and diverse music.

Bang a Gong: Balinese Gamelan Workshop Series
Saturday, April 20, 10:30 a.m.
Tickets: $12 per class ($10 per class when purchased with museum admission)
Learn to play a gong – and all the other instruments that make up the sounds of a Balinese gamelan at MIM’s workshop! Led by assistant curator Colin Pearson, these bimonthly workshops include an introduction to Indonesian culture and music and easy lessons to play authentic Balinese instruments. No experience is required, and musicians and non-musicians alike will enjoy this unique musical form, so come join us! Please note that each workshop is an introductory class but participants are welcome to register for more than one session and hone their musical skills. Best for ages 8 and older. To register, please contact Annabel Rimmer at 480-245-6919 or grouptours@MIM.org.

The Klezmatics
Sunday, April 21, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $39.50-$47.50
The Klezmatics take one of the wildest approaches to klezmer, the traditional dance music of Eastern European Jews. Although their music is heavily influenced by the recordings of Abraham Ellstein and Dave Tarras in the 1940s and 1950s, their lyrics comment on a wide variety of political and social issues and have led the group to be labeled “the planet’s radical Jewish roots band.”

I Am AZ Music: Local Singer-Songwriters in the Round
Tuesday, April 23, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $15
Five Arizona singers sitting on stage trading stories and songs. It’s like being invited into the living room with some of Arizona’s best musical talent. Featuring Hans Olson, Walt Richardson, Jesse Valenzuela and the Zubia Brothers.

MIM Musical Interludes Series Featuring ASU: French Chamber Music
Wednesday, April 24, 10:30 a.m.
Tickets: Free with museum admission or $7 performance only
Elizabeth Buck, playing flute, with Lynne Aspnes, playing harp, will perform both delightful and triumphant French chamber music in honor of “La Marseillaise,” national anthem of France, which was composed on April 24, 1792.

Molly Ringwald
Wednesday, April 24, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $37.50-$42.50
American actress, singer, dancer, and author Molly Ringwald is frequently named the greatest teen star of all time. The daughter of jazzman Bob Ringwald and the leader of the Great Pacific Jazz Band, Ringwald, will soon be releasing her new CD featuring the talents of Clayton Cameron (Tony Bennett, Nancy Wilson, B.B. King) Winston Byrd (Natalie Cole, Roy Hargrove, Charles Tolliver), Trevor Ware (Hubert Laws, Jimmy Heath) and Allen Mezquida (Brad Mehldau, Bill Charlap).

Music In Motion: Dry River Yacht Club
Thursday, April 25, 6-8:30 p.m.
Tickets: Free with museum admission or $7 performance only
Groove to the sounds of Arizona under the stars and take a musical journey around the world in MIM’s galleries! The last thing one would think of when it comes to Arizona would be yacht clubs. Yet, in the heart of the Valley of the Sun, the dry riverbed of the Salt River winds its way through the metropolis. If you follow it east, straight to the waters of Tempe Town Lake, a yacht club most certainly exists: the Dry River Yacht Club (DRYC). The band, using no amplification, plays an eclectic mix of instruments, including a bassoon, violin, tuba, accordion, acoustic guitar, and bass clarinet, to create a unique combination of gypsy, Western, folk and rock music.

Hayes Carll
Thursday, April 25, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $19.50-$24.50
Texas singer and songwriter Hayes Carll received his first guitar at age 15 and almost immediately began writing songs, influenced by the likes of Bob Dylan, John Prine, Kris Kristofferson, Dead Poets Society and the Beat novels and writings of Jack Kerouac, all of which continued to reverberate in his mature songwriting style. In 2002, he signed with Compadre Records and released his debut album “Flowers and Liquor,” which garnered him favorable comparisons to Townes Van Zandt. His song “Another Like You” was named #1 on AmericanSongwriter.com’s Top 50 Songs of 2011, and is now firmly established in the Van Zandt/Guy Clark/Ray Wylie Hubbard style of maverick country-folk.

Vladimir Pleshakov & Elena Winther: Rachmaninoff Anniversary Concert
Friday, April 26, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $27.50‒$37.50
Vladimir Pleshakov and Elena Winther, husband-and-wife pianists, have been hailed by the Russian press as “European heirs to the great Russian pianistic tradition.” Playing two nine-foot Steinway pianos, they will masterfully convey the history, drama and passion of the last great romantic composer.

Get the Beat! World Drumming Series: Rhythms of the Middle East
Saturday, April 27, 2:30‒3:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 per class (museum admission may be purchased separately)
Join the circle and get the beat! Each month, Frank Thompson, founder of AZ Rhythm Connection, offers a chance to experience community drumming for all levels, from absolute beginners to enthusiastic professionals. Each fun, relaxing and family-friendly session will highlight a new culture or genre, plus provide plenty of time for making music and jam sessions. Guest artists and MIM curators will stop in to demonstrate or share information about instruments, cultures or rhythms. Bring your own drum or use one provided. To register, please contact Annabel Rimmer at 480-245-6919 or grouptours@MIM.org.

 

AZRE, AZ Commercial Real Estate

AZRE | Arizona Commercial Real Estate

A bi-monthly publication that debuted in January 2005, AZRE | Arizona Commercial Real Estate is Arizona’s only publication dedicated to covering up-to-date happenings within commercial development, brokerage, finance, construction, architecture, real estate law and property management.

Additionally, Arizona Commercial Real Estate is an active voice within the commercial industry with local media partnerships to organizations such as NAIOP, ABA, ICSC AZ, AIA AZ and Valley Partnership.

Pulling together the multiple facets of the commercial real estate industry in Arizona, Arizona Commercial Real Estate reaches out to the largest local and national commercial real estate audience within the Grand Canyon State, West Coast and beyond.

Arizona Commercial Real Estate has gained not only local, regional and national attention from its pool of readers, but international attention as well.

With a 25,000 circulation, AZRE began publishing its own annual publication, People to Know, in 2008. PTK is an annual resource guide and a useful informative tool that further supports the local industry’s mission to build great communities throughout the state of Arizona. AZRE created this publication to open new lines of communication, better inform those who enter our state, as well as connect natives who have seen the state prosper and grow over the years.


Read articles from AZRE’s September/October 2011 issue, or pick up a copy today:

AZRE Magazine Nov/Dec 2011 Cover

In this issue of AZRE, find out how Arizona’s Native American tribes are diversifying their economic portfolios in our Development section of the magazine. In our Centennial section, we feature the biggest and best commercial buildings in Arizona history; and DPR, Cannon Design and Banner Health are teaming up — find out why.


AZREMagazine.com

AZRE’s website features everything you’d find in the magazine, including new to market projects, including education, hospitality, industrial, IT and more; newsmakers, including awards, new hires and promotions; economic development, events, articles about green and sustainability, breaking commercial real estate news and more.

If you’d like to contact the editor of AZRE and send him press releases, story ideas and more, please email Peter Madrid at Peter.Madrid@azbigmedia.com.


AZRE | Arizona Commercial Real Estate’s Archive


Top 5 Reasons To Buy Commercial Real Estate Now - AZNOW.BIZ

Top 5 Reasons to Buy Commercial Real Estate Now

1.      Commercial lending is the best it’s been in decades

Don’t believe what you hear when it comes to commercial loans not being available; they are plentiful and at the lowest interest rates I’ve ever seen on commercial property. Small Business Administration (SBA) loans were once known as long and painful and about as much fun as a root canal! Well, the times have changed and so have SBA Loans. Be sure to get with your real estate broker to locate a dependable and professional SBA lender. You will be pleasantly surprised with the results and products you find.

2.      The Bargains are far and few between

The word on the street is that commercial inventory is high. In some cases this is true, but I can tell you from first-hand experience that certain areas in the Phoenix area, such as north Phoenix and north Scottsdale, have very low inventory. A lot of the inventory you will find may not be suitable for you and may typically be in a bad location, have problems, etc. In other words – the good buys and good properties are nearly gone! Don’t take my word for it; get your real estate broker to pull comps and listings for you. Don’t wait any longer; get out there and find that piece of property you need!

3.      Different commercial verticals are on the rise

Whether it’s healthcare, general office or anchor retail, residential areas that realized significant growth four or five years ago are finally getting the local commercial amenities needed to help these communities thrive. The simple act of going to a grocery store has been very cumbersome for some outlying residential subdivisions. The good news is these empty commercial buildings are finally filling up, and the sellers are offering great incentives to buyers such as tenant improvements, deep discounts and even seller carry-backs in some cases.

4.      Commercial growth and construction will begin to increase again

While the inventory flies off the shelves and vacant properties fill up, commercial construction will once again begin to increase leaving the commercial buyer in a supply and demand dilemma. Let’s face it; we all want a good deal, and if you look hard and long enough you and your commercial real estate broker will find one; but be ready, the odds are you’ll have to act fast to get your offer accepted.

5.      Commercial Real Estate Brokers are in The Know

When you make the decision to start your real estate adventure, make sure you work with a local commercial real estate broker who knows where the deals are, what’s happening with current growth patterns, and what large employers are in the area. He or she should also have in-depth knowledge of the city’s zoning laws where you are looking. These key pieces of knowledge and good negotiation skills are going to be your secret weapon when it comes to getting a good deal on your next commercial real estate purchase.

So, you’ve heard me rant on and on about how you need to buy commercial real estate now. I can’t stress to you enough that the good properties are not getting cheaper, interest rates will likely get higher and commercial construction will, again, begin to pick up leaving the commercial buyer with a sense of, “I missed the boat.”

Stop waiting; don’t miss the boat, and get out there and buy the property you need; and remember to hire a licensed commercial real estate broker for all of your commercial needs.

Happy Buying!

[stextbox id="grey"]These tips are provided by Pete Baldwin, designated broker and owner of Platinum Realty Network with offices in Scottsdale and Flagstaff, Ariz. With over 25 years of experience in business and real estate, Pete specializes in country club communities and second home investments, including large commercial portfolios. He also owns an Arizona branch of a family-owned, Montana-based company Baldwin Log Homes – Arizona Territory and has become the area leader in full- custom, handcrafted log homes in Northern Arizona. For more information, please visit www.PeteBaldwin.com.[/stextbox]

Four Things to Know Arizona Commercial Real Estate

Top Four Things To Know About Arizona Commercial Real Estate

1. Different geographical areas bring very different results

When you are looking to invest in Arizona commercial real estate, different geographical areas of the market can have dramatically different results in terms of investment return, including things such as occupancy rate and tenancy terms. As an example, north Scottsdale and Tempe have completely different demographics but may attract similar tenant types due to similar industries, medical parks and office facilities.

Make sure your commercial broker provides demographic information and property comparables in the areas you are looking. It’s very important to have your expectations in the right place when you are looking to buy commercial investment properties.

2. Don’t always believe what you hear

You may be surprised to find that your local market is doing much better than you think it is. With bad news being the seemingly hot news trend, I can tell you as a commercial real estate expert that most of what you hear isn’t true.

North Scottsdale’s commercial real estate market hit bottom months ago and has been on the steady rise ever since. Most offers I make for my clients are greeted with a multiple-offer counteroffer requesting highest and best in return. It’s crazy out there right now with multiple offers, multiple buyers and a lot of investors; in fact, the market here in Arizona is the most competitive I’ve seen — and that’s a good thing.

3. Is there still prime investment opportunities in Arizona?

You bet there is, but your commercial broker will have to work hard to find those bank-owned and “bottom dollar” deals.

Investors love Arizona for many reasons — great weather, beautiful scenery and there are really no natural disasters to speak of. In fact, big companies such as Wells Fargo, American Express and Chase have chosen Arizona as the place to house their large data warehouses because there are no natural disasters like earthquakes and tornadoes.

Why do I go on about all of this? Because investors from all over the world have come to the Phoenix area to buy up all of the surplus and bank-owned real estate. If you’re waiting for the market to hit bottom, it already has; get out there and start your research as soon as possible. You don’t want to look back a year from now and say, “I wish I would have taken advantage of low prices when I had the chance.”

4. Rents are up!

Tenants are paying more per month now than they have in years. Because local spending is up in metropolitan Phoenix and its surrounding suburbs, small- and medium-sized businesses are finding the need to expand and grow into commercial space. The demand for standard office space and industrial office space is at an all-time high right now and is demanding premium pricing from an investor’s standpoint.

Have your broker look for buildings in areas near successful residential subdivisions and big box retailers. With gas prices high and the preference to live “greener,” prospective tenants don’t like to commute and prefer to work closer to home.

In summary, Arizona has taken a beating in the past with respect to residential and commercial real estate, but Arizona has always proven its resiliency by bouncing back stronger than ever. Residential sales are breaking records, certain sectors of commercial real estate are red hot, and there is no better time than now to get out and buy real estate. Find a commercial broker that will work hard for you and provide information in a timely fashion so that you will have the opportunity to succeed in making your first or your next real estate purchase.

Happy Investing!

[stextbox id="grey"]These tips are provided by Pete Baldwin, designated broker and owner of Platinum Realty Network with offices in Scottsdale and Flagstaff, Ariz. With over 25 years of experience in business and real estate, Pete specializes in country club communities and second home investments, including large commercial portfolios. He also owns an Arizona branch of a family-owned, Montana-based company Baldwin Log Homes – Arizona Territory and has become the area leader in full- custom, handcrafted log homes in Northern Arizona. For more information, please visit www.PeteBaldwin.com.[/stextbox]

Valley Partnership Advocates and Allies, AZRE May/June 2011

Valley Partnership: Advocates And Allies

As Arizona emerges from a grueling global recession, business and civic leaders are focusing on creating jobs and jump-starting our economy. Valley Partnership, as the state’s only grass-roots organization devoted to promoting responsible development, is poised to play an important role in that process.

“Our goal is to help stimulate the local economy by our actions,” says this year’s board chair Mindy Korth, an executive vice president and capital markets broker at CB Richard Ellis.

With its extensive ties throughout the development community, as well as into municipal and state offices, Korth says Valley Partnership is in a unique position to help get the economy moving again.

To say the past two years have been challenging for the commercial real estate industry would be an understatement.

Speculative construction in the office, industrial and retail sectors just about ground to a halt, with most construction occurring on build-to-suit projects or others already in the pipeline.

And as the Valley begins to see an uptick in business activity and employment, it is more crucial than ever that the principles of responsible development and job creation come to the forefront — something Valley Partnership has been promoting for 24 years.

As in the past, the linchpin of Valley Partnership’s efforts will be its advocacy, Korth says. Historically, the organization has been remarkably successful in rallying its partners — either against measures that would impose onerous restrictions on development, or on behalf of measures that would promote good growth.

“That’s an ongoing effort,” says Richard Hubbard, president and CEO of Valley Partnership. “We’ve always advocated against over-burdensome regulations at the local and state level.”

This year, Hubbard says Valley Partnership also will emphasize partner-to-partner relationships, as well as those between private and public entities.

Standing Apart

Valley Partnership’s more than 500 partners include representatives from all tiers of commercial real estate — from developers to attorneys to general contractors and engineers. Two important characteristics set it apart from other organizations: its relationships with public sector and government representatives and its emphasis on local stakeholders advocating on behalf of local issues.

“We are specific to the Valley,” says Rick Hearn, director of leasing for Vestar, one of Valley Partnership’s original corporate partners. Hearn has served on the board of directors for six years, and in that time has witnessed the organization’s partners tackle thorny local issues.

“We advocate on behalf of this industry better than anyone else,” he says, adding, “Not one of the national organizations comes close to touching the value proposition of what we do. We work at so many levels and have so many relationships.”

Not only does Valley Partnership share information and expertise with municipal and state leaders, it also has ties to federal officials and even someone at Luke Air Force Base.

City, state and federal partners can dip into Valley Partnership’s brain trust and glean important information on many pressing issues, Korth says.

For example, a municipality that is re-examining its city plan can garner feedback from Valley Partnership. The organization’s task forces dig deeper into issues, then forwards recommendations to a committee before the organization arrives at a public stance.

Some of the measures its committees are examining include:

  • The Maricopa Association of Government’s efforts to design a dark-sky ordinance to reduce excessive light, while also addressing safety issues for tenants and customers.
  • Maricopa County drainage permits and other building permit issues.
  • Incorporating Green Building Codes within Valley cities’ building codes.
  • Proposed city general plans.

Valley Partnership Value Proposition

Another important initiative this year is to make partners more aware of the value that Valley Partnership adds to their efforts. Korth says the communications committee is working hard to articulate back to all partners on what is being accomplished.

“We need to let them know that there is no one else like us here and if we did go away there’d be a gaping hole,” she says.

While membership did drop some during the recession, it is starting to tick back up, Hubbard says. As it does, Valley Partnership also is setting goals for its other key functions: education, networking and public service.

Hubbard said the organization surveyed its members to see what issues they would like to see addressed at educational events and Friday breakfast meetings, a staple for many partners.

Respondents said they would like to hear from industry leaders in the community and those involved in important development issues.

Signs are evident, Hubbard says, that their message is resonating with people in the commercial real estate community. More than 50 people attended the first January meeting of the committee that oversees city and county issues, a big jump from the usual six to eight attendees.

Partners recognize that advocacy on behalf of responsible development reaps dividends for everyone. Korth says: “If you go alone, you may go faster, but if you go together, you go farther.”

AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

Mindy Korth, Valley Partnership - AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

Valley Partnership: Mindy Korth

Mindy Korth has served in a variety of capacities during her 26-year commercial real estate career and has been on the front lines of an up-and-down industry. Korth, an executive vice president at CB Richard Ellis and this year’s Valley Partnership chair, says the advocacy role Valley Partnership plays is crucial to its members in the current recession.

A graduate of Arizona State University with a bachelor’s degree in business administration, Korth is Valley Partnership’s first chair who is an active real estate broker as a capital markets sales professional for the past 14 years. She has been on the Valley Partnership board of directors since 2007, serving as vice chair in 2010. Korth serves on boards for several other organizations, including Social Venture Partners, Channel Eight/KAET Public Television and the Discovery Triangle Development Corporation. She is also a member of Soroptimists and Arizona Commercial Real Estate Women (AZCREW), where she is a past board member.

Q: What does it mean to be an advocate for the commercial real estate industry?

Valley Partnership works to stay in touch with its real estate industry partners’ needs and to understand how local, regional, state and federal policy will affect their ability to thrive in this metropolitan area. We support those public-sector initiatives that promote the health of our industry.

Q: How important is that advocacy during these tough economic times?

Advocacy is important in all economic times. Valley Partnership was established to pool the resources of many in the real estate industry, and to address and bring awareness to the myriad of real estate-related issues that impact our community.

Q: Valley Partnership’s 2011 goals?

The board has set goals that include partner retention, new partner recruitment, outstanding programs that inform and inspire our partners, fun events, community service and most importantly, working closely with our municipal partners to support their initiatives.

Q: How will you achieve these goals?

Our board has engaged in strategic planning sessions through which we created definitive action items and a scorecard to track our progress. Our board is comprised of very talented real estate professionals who have great vision on what is needed and how Valley Partnership can serve our community. Our City/County Committee has a goal to form task forces as needed and already has created three to address and provide input on proposed policy changes. Legislative proposals are reviewed by members of our State Legislative Committee, which then forms recommendations for further action.

Q: What are the biggest challenges in 2011?

There are many controversial issues being discussed within city, county, state and federal chambers. Our role is to be the steady sounding board, bridging and partnering to promote responsible growth. We have found ourselves often asking the question “Should we take a position?” If we say “Yes,” then we ask, “How can we do this in a balanced manner?”

Q: Any advice for partners?

Get involved. Attend our events. Have fun. Create relationships and promote business-to-business among your fellow partners. If you are not familiar with advocacy and want to learn, participate in one of our advocacy committees. You may not be adept the first year, might start feeling comfortable the second and by the third year you will be surprised at what you can do.

For more information about Mindy Korth and Valley Partnership, visit www.valleypartnership.org.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

AZ Big Media's CEO and President Mike Atkinson, Editor in Chief Janet Perez and Vice President Cheryl Green.

2010 Top People To Know In Commercial Real Estate Recognition Reception

Arizona Commercial Real Estate Magazine, AZRE, hosted its first Top People to Know recognition reception. The reception was held at Donovan’s Steak & Chop House on Nov. 9, 2010. The event honored Top People to Know in the commercial real estate industry. To see the rest of the pictures from the recognition reception, visit AZNow.Biz’s Flickr account.

AZRE Top People to Know Recognition Reception 13

Honoree Mike Haenel at AZRE's Top People to Know Recognition Reception

Honoree Mike Haenel and Janet Perez.

Bryan Dunn at AZRE's Top People to Know Recognition Reception

Honoree Bryan Dunn and Cheryl Green.

Mark Winkleman at AZRE's Top People to Know Recognition Reception

Honoree Mike Winkelman and Cheryl Green.

AZRE Top People to Know Recognition Reception 18

AZRE Top People to Know Recognition Reception 14

PTK Top Industry Leaders 2010

People To Know’s Top Industry Leaders Of The Year Announced

AZRE: Arizona Commercial Real Estate Magazine’s latest edition of Top People to Know (PTK) in Commercial Real Estate has just been published, and last night the winners of the PTK Top Industry Leaders were announced at a special event.

PTK showcases the most influential people working in commercial real estate in Arizona in the categories of developers and investors, brokers, architects and engineers, general contractors, sub-contractors, financiers and accountants, attorneys, city planners, property managers, and economic developers.

A committee of CRE professionals and the editorial staff of AZRE picked the people profiled in the 2010-2011 edition of PTK. Of those selected to be in the publication, the committee chose one person in each category as a Top Industry Leader.

A full profile on each of the Top Industry Leaders will be published in the January/February edition of AZRE.

Developers &Investors  Mike Ebert Managing Partner, Development RED DevelopmentDevelopers &Investors

Mike Ebert
Managing Partner, Development
RED Development



Brokers  Mike Haenel Executive Vice President Cassidy Turley | BRE CommercialBrokers

Mike Haenel
Executive Vice President
Cassidy Turley | BRE Commercial



Architects & Engineers  John F. Kane, AIA Partner ArchitektonArchitects & Engineers

John F. Kane, AIA
Partner
Architekton


General Contractors  Bryan Dunn, LEED AP Senior Vice President Adolfson & Peterson ConstructionGeneral Contractors

Bryan Dunn, LEED AP
Senior Vice President
Adolfson & Peterson Construction


Sub-Contractors  Tim Drexler President & CEO Ace Asphalt of ArizonaSub-Contractors

Tim Drexler
President & CEO
Ace Asphalt of Arizona


Financiers & Accountants  Mark Winkleman Chief Operating Officer ML ManagerFinanciers & Accountants

Mark Winkleman
Chief Operating Officer
ML Manager


Attorneys  Jordan Rich Rose Founder & President Rose Law Group pcAttorneys

Jordan Rich Rose
Founder & President
Rose Law Group pc


City Planners  Chris Anaradian Community Development Director City of TempeCity Planners

Chris Anaradian
Community Development Director
City of Tempe


Property Managers  Afton Trail Managing Director CB Richard EllisProperty Managers

Afton Trail
Managing Director
CB Richard Ellis


Economic Developers  Barry Broome President & CEO Greater Phoenix Economic CouncilEconomic Developers

Barry Broome
President & CEO
Greater Phoenix Economic Council

Arizona Commerce Authority - AZRE Magazine November/December 2010

Arizona Commerce Authority: Team Effort in Arizona CRE

If there’s one person who can help give Arizona the home-field advantage when it comes to attracting new businesses, new jobs and making the state more competitive in the global market, it’s Jerry Colangelo, the vice chairman of the Arizona Commerce Authority.

Perhaps that’s why Gov. Jan Brewer picked the Valley businessman as vice chairman of the newly formed Arizona Commerce Authority, a private sector board that will replace the Arizona Department of Commerce. The 35-member board includes a diverse group of business and educational leaders from across the state.

No matter what you’re in, it takes teams and people to win,” Colangelo said. “It’s true in every walk of life. Look at the disconnect that has existed in our state for such a long time, with the Legislature, with the business community, the lack of a game plan. Everyone has to be on the same page. And so the good news is this: There’s only one way to go. There is plenty of space here for us to be very, very successful.”

There definitely is room to grow when it comes to business attraction in Arizona.
According to Department of Commerce statistics, 47 companies located or expanded in Arizona in 2007, bringing a capital investment of $1.6B, almost 10,000 new jobs and an annual payroll of $483M. Then the recession hit and in just two years those figures took a nose dive: 24 companies located or expanded in Arizona with a capital investment of $255M, 2,649 jobs and a $124.6M payroll.

“When I became governor, I promised to get Arizona back on track by creating quality jobs, attracting high-growth industries, and advancing our competitive position in the global economy,” Brewer said. “With this board, I have now delivered a model to advance Arizona.”

Arizona Commerce Authority: Addressing the Industry’s Needs

How that model will advance Arizona is a question those in commercial real estate are asking. To its credit, the Arizona Commerce Authority includes several board members with direct business ties to the industry.

They are: Drew Brown, chairman of the board, DMB Associates; Peter Herder, chairman of the board and CEO, Herder Commercial Development; Mike Ingram, CEO and president, El Dorado Holdings; Doug Pruitt, chairman and CEO, Sundt Construction; and Mo Stein, principal and senior vice president, HKS Architects.

How do those in the industry envision an entity such as the Arizona Commerce Authority boosting a sagging commercial real estate market in Arizona?

“I look for the Arizona Commerce Authority to create a business model for all aspects of development in the state,” Stein said. “The authority will allow leverage of both public and private strengths that go beyond individual projects to opportunities that impact large segments of our communities and industries throughout the state.”

Mike Haenel, executive vice president, Industrial Division at Cassidy Turley BRE Commercial, noted: “I would like the Arizona Commerce Authority to communicate to the State Legislature exactly what it would take to relocate a company to Arizona. Thanks to a sophisticated local commercial real estate development industry, we have well-located and functional real estate available. Given the current economic conditions, pricing is extremely attractive, which translates into a perfect time to rent and or buy real estate in Arizona. The Arizona Commerce Authority needs to figure out what our state government should do to be competitive in attracting and retaining companies.”

Jim Gibson, senior associate in real estate at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey adds: “There has always been a long-standing partnership between economic development and the commercial real estate industry. Because of its role attracting new businesses to the state, I suspect that the Arizona Commerce Authority will be a tremendous resource for lead generation to brokers, developers and others in the industry. In addition, because of the Arizona Commerce Authority’s make-up of leaders in the private sector, it seems well-positioned by having both the business savvy to understand the wants and needs of companies looking to expand or relocate to Arizona, as well as having established relationships in the real estate industry to help each company assemble the right team depending on its particular real estate needs.”

Brewer made sure the new Arizona Commerce Authority is a statewide endeavor. While most board members are from the Metro Phoenix area, there also are four board members from Tucson, two from Flagstaff, and one each from Prescott and Yuma.

By creating a more competitive landscape and making economic development a higher priority, commercial real estate opportunities and transactions will result,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO of Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (TREO). “The ability for the authority to assist groups like TREO in attracting and expanding primary jobs will result in significantly more commercial opportunities downstream.”

Listening to the Industry’s Concerns

While those involved are excited over the prospects of what the Arizona Commerce Authority may be able to achieve, there also is guarded optimism. Mark Singerman, regional director of Rockefeller Group Development Corp., said that just to stay even with what most other states offer, Arizona needs to become more competitive in attracting businesses to relocate here. He cites SB 1403, a bill giving special tax breaks and incentives to the solar energy industry.

Within several months of that incentive for renewable energy companies becoming law, there were at least a dozen solar companies looking to locate here,” Singerman said. “This type of incentive program needs to be expanded to all desirable industries.”

Up until 2006, Singerman said, Arizona became complacent about attracting residents and businesses. By virtue of being in close proximity to high-cost California, the state enjoyed steady growth with little effort.

“We now have to up our game to stay even with other states,” Singerman said. “If we have competitive economic incentive programs similar to what other states offer, our total package will be hard to beat when companies do their comparisons. But we are not there yet.”

Added Tim Lawless, president of NAIOP-AZ, adds: “While strategically targeting specific industry sectors like aerospace in the hopes of further diversifying our state’s economy is laudable, it is very unclear what the Arizona Commerce Authority can or will do to assist the vast number of firms that are already in the state, especially with their very limited budget. We need to keep in mind that we have more than 350,000 firms in our state and we need policies that will create an environment for them to survive and add jobs.

This can only happen should the Commerce Authority advocate for broad-based tax reform, rather than exclusively relying on esoteric tax breaks that create winners and losers,” Lawless continued. “Cake and ice cream tax breaks for industries like solar are fine, but only after a more substantial and well-balanced economic development diet is put on the table for all firms.”

For the Arizona Commerce Authority to make the state more competitive in business attraction, Lawless said Arizona needs to lower overall commercial property tax burdens, which are among the highest in the U.S.; create a significant deal-closing fund (non-tax benefit related) to land large employers that leverage the highest paying jobs; and lower corporate income tax rates that would put the state in a better position to compete with other Western states.

Arizona’s political climate could be another stumbling block in attracting new businesses, said Marty Alvarez Sr., CEO of Sun Eagle Corp.

“Part of the problem is the perception throughout the country that Arizona is a racist state with no upside for their companies to move here,” Alvarez said. “The Hispanic business community needs to be part of the marketing effort to dissuade the thought that our state is in political turmoil. This is the time to bring national and international firms to Arizona.
The collaboration led by the ACA needs political, social and business direction from the Hispanic business community in order to create a positive atmosphere for incoming companies,” he added. “The idea and implementation of the ACA is not only good but is a necessary solution for the future economic well being of our state. The leaders chosen to enact this organization and jumpstart the dialogue must be a public-private partnership.”

AZRE Magazine November/December 2010

RED Awards banner 2010

Brokerage Team Of The Year For Sales 2010

Bo Mills, Cushman & Wakefield
Mark Detmer, Cushman & Wakefield, Brokerage Team of the Year for Sales 2010
Bo Mills
Mark Detmer

Cushman & Wakefield

THE TEAM:
• Bo Mills, Exec. Director
• Mark Detmer, Exec. Director

SALES DETAILS:
• 7 Sale Transactions
• Totaling 2.03 MSF
• $46.3M in Value

Bo Mills and Mark Detmer sold the 2 largest industrial buildings in Phoenix in 2009. Both were sold to corporations that will employ more than 600 new employees in the Phoenix market. Their largest single transaction that closed in 2009 was the largest industrial sale in Phoenix — the 101 Distribution Center, a 619,000 SF center in Glendale that sold for $17.4M. The team represented both sides of the deal between Conair Corp. and Heritage.

Mills and Detmer specialize in representing developers, institutional landlords and corporate tenants desiring to acquire, develop, lease and dispose of industrial real estate. AZRE March 2010 Front CoverThe two started their careers more than 14 years ago, and have completed more than 600 lease and sale transactions totaling more than 13 MSF of buildings and 2,500 acres of land valued in excess of $1.5B.

Both are members of the Society of Industrial and Office Realtors (SIOR) and are Certified Commercial Investment Members (CCIM). They are active in the local chapter of the National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP), and each served as Chairman of Night at the Fights — Mills in 2002 and Detmer in 2008.

www.cushwake.com

AZRE Red Awards March 2010 | Previous: Brokerage Team – Leasing

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AZ Big Media 25 years

Arizona Business Magazine Celebrates Its 25th Anniversary

An important lesson in the launch of any business or new product is to learn everything you can about your target consumer, and that’s exactly what Mike Atkinson did when he bought the Office Guide to Phoenix 25 years ago. He approached leaders in the community in such industries as health care and law, and asked them what they wanted and needed from a local business magazine.

“I took reams of notes and what came out of it was Arizona Business Magazine,” Atkinson says. “The research led me down a path of this is how it should look and read.”

Atkinson was inspired to enter the publishing arena because it presented the chance to exercise his artistic abilities. He wanted to create “a product that was fundamentally art-related and a product that could help inspire, excite and help educate,” he explains. “I’m an artist at heart, so the magazine’s pages were like my mini-canvases.”

Initially, Atkinson was the sole employee of the publication — he wrote the stories, shot the photos and sold the ads. Today, however, the company has increased to nearly 30 employees and publishes an additional six titles, including AZRE: Arizona Commercial Real Estate, Ranking Arizona, Experience AZ, People to Know, Creative Designer and Scottsdale Home & Design. The flagship publication has also undergone many changes over the years, including its frequency, which has gone from quarterly to bimonthly, and in February 2008, to monthly. The company has evolved as well, and last year was re-named AZ Big Media.

Atkinson didn’t limit his creativity to the magazines, however. In 1991, the company launched its first Arizona Home & Building Expo, which is now in its 18th year. AZ Big Media also hosts a series of awards and events that honor various segments of the business community, from health care to finance. In March 2009, the company held its inaugural Southwest Build-it-Green Expo & Conference. AZ Big Media’s newest venture, the Home & Design Idea Center, opens this summer. The company is also building a strong presence online with its new Web site, www.azbigmedia.com, where readers can find many of the stories featured in each magazine.

“If you go to our Web site, you’ll see ‘online’ is where we’re heading in the future,” Atkinson says. He adds that the future will include more home shows when the market is ready for them. He also hints of possibly even adding a radio station.

If he could go back in time and change one thing, Atkinson says, it would involve the company’s interaction with its audience online.

“At the time, we were just learning about the Internet, and I remember one of my editors came in my office and said ‘Guess where I was today? I was on the computer and I was talking to people all the way in Italy!’ and he began to describe how it took him to different places,” he says. “I thought that was pretty cool, but I didn’t have the foresight to say, ‘This computer Web thing just might turn out to be something really big!’ ”

Looking back on the past 25 years, Atkinson says his success is due to two key things: “Hard work and surrounding myself with the right people.”

Here’s to one day cashing in this 25-year silver achievement for gold.