Tag Archives: Arizona House of Representatives

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Medical miracle girl raises funds for TGen

Shelby Valint, the 12-year-old Phoenix girl whose sequenced genome led her from a wheelchair to walking, is raising funds for the non-profit Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The “Shelby Valint Inspiration Fundraiser” will generate needed research dollars for TGen’s Center for Rare Childhood Disorders (C4RCD). It was research through this innovative unit at TGen that helped enable Shelby to go from a wheelchair to walking.

“TGen has done so much for me,” Shelby said. “Now, I want to do something for TGen so they can continue to help other children like me with rare medical disorders.”

The fundraiser is being organized by Shelby’s mother, Renee Valint, and by one of Shelby’s 7th Grade teachers, Tracy Livingston, whose husband – the Honorable Rep. David Livingston – is a freshman member of the Arizona House of Representatives, representing the north Valley’s District 22.

“In October, TGen launched their Center for Rare Childhood Disorders, which is helping parents in Arizona find answers and treatment for their children,” said Rep. Livingston, who has invited Gov. Jan Brewer and members of the Arizona Legislature to the fundraiser at the home of Shelby’s parents, Renee and Scott Valint – 1-5 p.m. April 6 at 1517 E. Red Range Way, about a mile south of Carefree Highway, just east of 14th Street.

“In my recent tour of TGen’s facilities, I saw first-hand the cutting-edge research, tools and technology being used to help children like Shelby,” Rep. Livingston said. “My wife, Tracy … has personally seen Shelby’s amazing transformation.”

By sequencing, or spelling out, the nearly 3 billion letters in Shelby’s DNA, TGen researchers found a gene that prevented Shelby from producing sufficient amounts of a brain chemical called dopamine, which is needed for balance and muscle control.

Using a combination of drugs usually given to older persons for treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Shelby was able within several weeks to abandon her wheelchair. She was able to more easily walk, talk, eat and even breathe, generally restoring her to a normal functioning child.

“Before TGen’s discovery, we had been through an enormous amount of despair with all the doctor visits and tests, and I had watched helplessly as Shelby was poked and prodded with a heart-wrenching number of needles and IVs,” Renee Valint said. “Shelby’s newfound ability to walk and talk, and generally lead a normal life, is a testament to the unwavering dedication to helping patients exhibited by the scientists at TGen.”

To see Shelby’s amazing transformation from a girl who was unable to walk, talk and eat to a girl who dances across the room, watch this recent story from CBS 5 News.

 

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Arizona Opera's New, $5.2M Center Opens on Central Avenue

 

Arizona Opera opened its new $5.2M, 28,000 SF Opera Center on Central Avenue in Phoenix.

The building project, in partnership with the City of Phoenix, included two phases. Phase 1 houses an intimate black box performance venue, rehearsal space, and orchestra loft and patron viewing gallery. General contractor was Brignall Construction; architect was Motley Design Group.

Phase 2 features administrative offices, box office, costume, wig and make-up shops, as well as educational and meeting facilities. Phase 2 made adaptive re-use of the previous Walsh Brothers building.

The Opera Center joins other cultural venues such as Phoenix Art Museum, the Heard Museum and Phoenix Theatre in the “uptown” arts district, which is easily accessible via METRO Light Rail.

The Opera’s Opera Center, was built in partnership with the City of Phoenix, which provided $3.2M in city bond funds.

“We are thrilled to have found such a perfect location for our new home, near our sister arts organizations and directly on the light-rail route,” said Scott Altman, general director of Arizona Opera.

The first full opera production will be held in April 2014 in the black box theater, while rehearsals, master classes and workshops will be held in the theater as early as April.

Arizona Opera will continue to present main stage productions in Tucson Music Hall and Symphony Hall Phoenix.

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Liberty Property Trust to Develop Liberty Center at Rio Salado

 

Liberty Property Trust announced that it will develop a sustainable, mixed-use business park on 100 acres purchased from the City of Tempe last month.

The company is developing a site plan for the new park which will be known as Liberty Center at Rio Salado.

“After several years of continued success at our nearby Liberty Cotton Center , we sought opportunities that would allow us to continue to offer national and regional tenants opportunities to relocate to or expand,” said John DiVall, senior vice president and city manager for Liberty’s Arizona region.

“Liberty Center at Rio Salado is centrally located in the heart of Metro Phoenix and it will offer a terrific mix of office, flex and industrial space, and, we anticipate, hotel and retail locations.”

The Tempe City Council approved the purchase of the first 80 acres of land at Priest Road and Rio Salado Parkway in February. Liberty has the option to purchase 20 more acres at the location once development has begun.

“The City of Tempe offered its land for this project because we recognize that it is our role to encourage high-quality development and foster the growth of our local economy,”  Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell said. “We are proud to welcome Liberty Center at Rio Salado to Tempe and look forward to watching it thrive, provide jobs and add to our community.”

Liberty also plans to announce the development of its first speculative building on the site later this year. All buildings it develops at the park will be designed to meet LEED certification with a focus on energy efficiency.

The park will offer visibility from Arizona Route 143 and the Loop 202, within minutes of Sky Harbor International Airport. Liberty has launched a website featuring information about the park and the surrounding area: libertycenteraz.com.

“This is a prominent piece of real estate that will allow tenants many benefits, from its central location to the airport and major highways to access to a strong, well educated labor pool,” DiVall said. “We expect to grow here for many years to come.”

Liberty Property Trust owns and manages more than 2 MSF of space in Phoenix, Tempe, Goodyear and Tolleson.

Some of its holdings include Liberty Cotton Center, Liberty 303 Business Park, Liberty Tolleson Center, Liberty Sky Harbor Center, and the LEED Gold and Energy Star certified 8501 E. Raintree Dr. office building.

ACA Board of Directors

Arizona Commerce Authority Board Of Directors Comprised of Statewide Leaders

The Arizona Commerce Authority aims to boost Arizona’s economy by creating jobs for Arizonans, attract and bring in new business, as well as show corporations Arizona is a better operating environment and a better place to collaborate and grow.

The following ACA Board of Directors are leaders within their respective fields:

Metro Phoenix

Chair: Gov. Jan Brewer
Co-Chair: Jerry Colangelo, Partner, JDM Partners
President and CEO: Don Cardon
Hon. Kirk Adams, Speaker, Arizona House of Representatives
Richard Adkerson, CEO, Freeport McMoRan Copper & Gold
Benito Almanza, State President, Bank of America Arizona
Dr. Craig Barrett, Chairman of the Board and CEO (Retired), Intel
Michael Bidwill, President, Arizona Cardinals
Donald Brandt, Chairman of the Board and CEO, APS
Drew Brown, Chairman of the Board, DMB Associates
Les Brun, Chairman and CEO, SARR Group
Hon. Robert Burns, President, Arizona Senate
Steve Cowman, CEO, Stirling Energy
Dr. Michael Crow, President, Arizona State University
Jerry Fuentes, President, AT&T Arizona/New Mexico
Dr. William Harris, CEO and President, Science Foundation Arizona
Linda Hunt, President, Catholic Healthcare West Arizona
Mike Ingram, CEO and President, El Dorado Holdings
Sherman Jennings, Chair, Governor’s Workforce Policy Council/
Human Resources Site Leader, The Boeing Company
Anne Mariucci, Regent, Arizona Board of Regents
Dr. Vicki Panhuise, Chair, Arizona’s Aerospace & Defense Commission/
Vice President, Honeywell Military Aircraft
Mary Peters, President, Mary E. Peters Consulting Group
Doug Pruitt, Chairman and CEO, Sundt Construction
Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, Executive Chairman, Abraxis BioScience
Mo Stein, Principal and Senior Vice President, HKS Architects
Pat Sullivan, CEO, Flypaper Studio
Roy Vallee, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Avnet

Tucson

Gary Abrams, CEO and President, Abrams Airborne Manufacturing
Peter Herder, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Herder Companies
Dr. Robert Shelton, President,  University of Arizona
Judith Wood, Chair, Governor’s Council on Small Business/ President, Contact One Call Center

Flagstaff

Dr. John Haeger, President, Northern Arizona University
Michael Manson, Co-Founder and CEO, Motor Excellence

Prescott

Dr. Jeanne Swarthout, President, Northland Pioneer College

Yuma

Victor Smith, President and Owner, JV Farm
Divorce and Business - AZ Business Magazine Oct/Nov 2006

How To Ensure Your Joint Business Outlives A Failing Marriage

‘Til Business Do Us Part

How to ensure your joint business outlives a failing marriage

By Alexander D. Nirenstein

Divorce can be a trying time for individuals faced with income, property and child custody issues, but throw in a joint business venture, and the formula could be detrimental to both couple and business. The phenomena of newlywed couples seeking an instant satisfying and established lifestyle has led many to open up their own business, where profits can be quick and hours are flexible. Couples in their mid-40s and 50s are also embracing joint business ventures, finally opening that family business they have spoken about for years.

 

business_doWhile this combination of business and pleasure can be a success story for both a marriage and a business, it can also be the recipe for disaster. Arizona boasts one of the highest divorce rates in the nation—about 64 percent of all marriages in Arizona and 75 percent of all marriages in Maricopa County end in divorce (according to the Committee on Human Resources for the Arizona House of Representatives and the U.S. Census Bureau). And the Valley’s most successful CEOs and prominent figures are not immune to the effects a failed marriage can have on a thriving business. Having represented some of the Southwest’s most high-profile figures in family law cases, I have seen first hand that even the elite are not immune to blindly entering into the sanctity of a joint business, without proper legal preparation and agreements.

The No. 1 thing I tell my clients, family and friends who are considering entering into joint business rights or assets is to draft a solid shareholder’s agreement with a buyout provision to protect you, your spouse and the business. This can be in a prenuptial agreement or a separate agreement, but it’s a must. Without this, it can be a free-for-all if you divorce or if one of the parties wants out of the business during a separation.

You also have to be familiar with state divorce and community property laws. As I am often faced with clients who have not taken proper legal protection, Arizona’s community property law never fails to be one of the most shocking divorce provisions to couples. Under this law, regardless of which partner in the marriage is primarily running the business on a daily basis, both parties are entitled to equitable shares of the business. This means the stay-at-home mom can be found to have contributed as much to the business as her CEO husband who puts 60 hours a week into the company. Thus, each party will usually get 50 percent of the business.

Cover - AZ Business Magazine Oct/Nov 2006For couples who have been fortunate enough to properly prepare their business for this scenario, dealing with the buyout provision before the divorce is also a smart move as court rulings in divorce cases can impact the share each party has in the business. Additionally, contested divorces can also take years to settle, creating huge setbacks for a business’ growth and success, and creating roadblocks to selling the company should an attractive offer come along.

Bottom line? Putting your head where your heart is could save you and your business. If you are in the middle of a business divorce or on the brink of one, ensure you get all your ducks in a row beforehand. Have your financial planner, CPA and business lawyer collaborate through initial negotiations. This will ensure all parties representing you and your business will be on the same page regarding your personal, financial and business interest.

Alexander D. Nirenstein is a managing partner and co-founder of Nirenstein Ruotolo Group (NRG Family Law), a boutique family law firm with offices in Scottsdale and Tempe.

www.nrglaw.net

 

Arizona Business Magazine Oct/Nov 2006