Tag Archives: arizona land

Cheryl Lombard, Photo by Mike Mertes for AZ Big Media

The changing face of development: Cheryl Lombard

If Valley Partnership is the voice of responsible development in the Valley, new CEO and President Cheryl Lombard is expected to be the deep breath behind it.  In mid-March, she transitioned from being director of government relations at The Nature Conservancy in Arizona to the leader of Valley Partnership.

“We were looking for a transformative leader that could really build on the organization’s more than 25-year history,” says Chairman of the Board Scott Nelson of Macerich. “Someone who was well connected and respected in the community, especially in the role of advocacy, which is one of our organizational pillars. We truly believe there is an opportunity to take Valley Partnership to the next level as a voice in the community and a value-add proposition to our partner companies. We are extremely confident that Cheryl can deliver on those promises.”

Lombard has led companies and clients through challenging entitlement cases and large master-planned community developments in California.

“Her understanding of the government agency, municipal and community touch points and how they relate to the development process is paramount in the underlying goals of Valley Partnership,” says Nelson.

While at The Nature Conservancy in Arizona, Lombard helped develop, lead and execute the strategic initiatives for the organization.

“Her Nature Conservancy involvement with local, state and federal legislation and policy making will be a tremendous asset to Valley Partnership,” says Nelson. “Her role required her to bring different stakeholders and viewpoints together to work on and advance issues impacting the organization.”

Lombard holds a J.D. from Southwestern University School of Law, a Master’s in public administration from California State University and a Bachelor’s degree from American University.

What attracted you to working with Valley Partnership, given your previous role at The Nature Conservancy?
I gained years of experience in the development industry as a public affairs executive and attorney in California, helping acquire entitlements through some of the most challenging bodies. My 10 years with The Nature Conservancy made Valley Partnership the perfect fit to utilize my experience representing all sides in the development process.

What Valley Partnership Political Action Committee (VPAC) efforts we can expect with you as president and CEO?
VPAC is a great tool that allows us to participate in the political process at a different level, while also furthering Valley Partnership’s reach. We anticipate enhancing VPAC for the 2016 elections to actively support state and local candidates and potentially ballot measures that share our principles and priorities.

What specific issues is Valley Partnership advocating  in 2015?
The biggest is how we prepare for the future and our water so we continue to maintain economic vitality. Arizona has led the way in the West with its leadership in dealing with a continuing drought. We need to ensure funding is sufficient to our state agencies and water providers to ensure our water security.
Next are economic development and the tools we need for infrastructure, a well-funded Arizona State Land Department, and consistent policies on taxes and fees. As we prepare for the 2016 legislative session, we want to work closely with the chambers and other commercial real estate development organizations to assemble a unified agenda.

 How does Valley Partnership partner with — and distinguish itself from — the other commercial real estate and development organizations in Arizona and the Valley?
Valley Partnership is an advocacy organization that is an umbrella group and honest broker for the development industry. We are the only group who can lobby at all levels of government and have members from the commercial, industrial and master planned real estate development industries. Other groups are slightly narrower in focus or membership. However, partnerships, collaboration and coordination with all of these groups is extremely important to all of our success.

What role do you see Arizona’s higher education institutions playing in the Valley’s development and growth? How do you think the recent budget cuts to education may affect such development?
The leadership and forethought of Arizona’s higher education institutions in the development of downtown Phoenix and Tempe have had a tremendous impact in kick-starting surrounding commercial development. It has made the universities a nationwide example of how public and private investment can be done. Recent budget cuts have made it even more important for our higher education institutions to focus on how to make the most of their assets and be true entrepreneurs.

Grand Canyon Railway, Arizona, Photo: Kristine Cannon

Video Contest: Grand Canyon Railway

It’s not just about the destination; the journey there is what makes it an unforgettable adventure.

We’ve all heard this before, right? From point A to point B, departure to arrival, and everything in between should be just as exciting and eventful. And never before has this been more true than during my breathtaking and relaxing trip to the Grand Canyon via the Grand Canyon Railway.

You’ll experience a side of Arizona you’ll otherwise never have the opportunity to experience aboard this two-and-a-half hour train ride. Atop plains and dry desert and winding through Ponderosa pine forests, the train’s route cuts through varying landscapes.

Along the way, musical acts and entertainment will stroll from car to car, and you’ll learn about the culture and history of the northern Arizona area. Of course, there are a few surprises, too.

We even have a video below featuring some highlights and sights one will witness while on board the Grand Canyon Railway. And this video inspired us to take things one step further … a video contest.

The Contest

From now until August 31, 2011, share your vacation, trip and Arizona-based adventure highlights with us in a less-than-2-minute video. And you can use any video recording device, whether it be a cell phone, iPad, Flip, video camera, etc.

It can look like the video below or you can put your own twist on it — whatever you’d like to do. Just be sure to credit yourself in the video and use original or royalty-free images and sound. And, of course, the videos must have been filmed in Arizona.

Record, edit, and upload!

Video Contest Requirements

  • Time: less than 2 minutes
  • Content (images, sound, etc.) must be original or royalty free.
  • Video must be filmed in Arizona and must focus on one attraction/location.
  • Post the video to YouTube.
  • Send an email to kristine.cannon@azbigmedia.com with the link to the video, a paragraph description of the video, as well as your contact information, including your name, email and phone number.
  • We will call and email if you win.

Thrills, Chills & Trills: The Prizes

The winner is determined based on originality and creativity.

The winner will receive:

Bonus: Submissions we receive by July 31, 2011 will be entered to win:

Resources

Film editing tools:

If you have any questions, please contact Kristine Cannon at kristine.cannon@azbigmedia.com or call 602-277-6045.

Town of Superior

The Town of Superior Awaits Copper Mine Ruling

The residents of the Town of Superior are collectively holding their breaths as they wait for SB 409, the Southeast Arizona Land Exchange and Conservation Act, to pass. Supported by Senators John McCain and John Kyl, as well as Gov.  Jan Brewer, SB 409 will essentially trade the Oak Flat Campground for various areas around the state, such as the riparian area of the San Pedro River and the Appleton Ranch. In exchange, the Oak Flat Campground will become part of the Resolution Copper Mine.

The Resolution Copper Mine Company, made up of London-based Rio Tinto Group and the Australian-based Broken Hill Properties, purchased the abandoned Magma Mine and is looking to acquire the Oak Flat Campground. Why? Because beneath it is possibly the largest vein of copper ever discovered.

The economic impact to the state is estimated at $46 billion over the mine’s 60-year life span. This would put Superior back on the map and employ many of its residents. The Resolution Copper Mine Company is proposing a block-style mining technique.

However, in 1955, President Eisenhower mandated that the Oak Flat Campground cannot be developed when he signed Public Land Order 1229.

Oak Flat Campground and the surrounding area is a recreational dream, and a sacred land to several Native American tribes. Devil’s Canyon lies to the immediate east. It is a canyon that is a mecca for rock climbers, canyoneers, hikers and bird watchers. The mining will significantly impact the water source for the creek. Apache Leap lies to the west, overlooking Superior, and is sacred to the Apache and several other tribes. Apache Leap is named after an uncomfirmed story of a skirmish between troops and Indians at what is now called Apache Leap Mountain. The legend states that Apache warriors were trapped on the large rock ledge by cavalry troops from Camp Pinal. Instead of surrendering, about 75 of the warriors opted to leap off the cliff to their deaths.

Superior’s history is one of coal mining. The first mines in the area were developed in the late 1800s. The town itself was founded in 1896, and incorporated in 1904. The town reportedly was named after the superior quality of coal found in the area. West of Superior is the Boyce Thompson Arboretum

Superior Facts:

  • Population in July 2009: 3,525
  • Population change since 2000: +8.3%
  • Males: 1,757  (49.8%)
  • Females: 1,768  (50.2%)
  • Median resident age:  39.2 years
  • Arizona median age:  34.2 years
  • Zip codes: 85273
  • Estimated median household income in 2008: $37,392 (it was $27,069 in 2000)
  • Superior:  $37,392
  • Arizona:  $50,958
  • Estimated per capita income in 2008: $16,810
  • Estimated median house or condo value in 2008: $100,261 (it was $45,400 in 2000)
  • Superior:  $100,261
  • Arizona:  $229,200
  • Mean prices in 2008
  • All housing units: $109,693
  • Detached houses: $102,383
  • Townhouses or other attached units: $103,822
  • Mobile homes: $34,951
  • Occupied boats, RVs, vans, etc.: $85,000
  • Movies: 1962 movie, “How the West Was Won,” and 1997 movie, “U-Turn”
  • Read more about the town of Superior