Tag Archives: Arizona Sports & Tourism Authority

21601 21st Avenue_Pompay

Cassidy Turley Completes $1.07M Sale of Deer Valley Industrial Property

Cassidy Turley sold 21601 N. 21st Ave., a ±13,068-square-foot warehouse property in Phoenix. Bunker Hill, LLC. (Phoenix), purchased the property for $1,078,000 ($82.49/psf) from High Altitude Holdings, LLC (Anthem, Ariz.). John Pompay of Cassidy Turley’s Industrial Group represented the buyer. Eric Bell and Mike Ciosek, with VOIT Real Estate Services negotiated the transaction for the seller.

Bunker Hill, LLC is a provider of ESD safe and static control equipment. The family owned and operated business has serviced the EOS/ESD Industry since the 1980’s. Bunker Hill, LLC plans to occupy ±7,468square feet of the building.
Built in 2000, 21601 N. 21st Ave. is a one-story warehouse-office building on .76 acres with freeway access to the Loop 101 and I-17 Freeway.

Two new spring training stadiums

Two New Spring Training Stadiums Set To Debut In The West Valley

With football, hockey, baseball and possibly USA Basketball joining the mix, the West Valley is becoming an active sports mecca for the rest of the Valley. Recent additions to this bustling hub of game activity are new Cactus League training facilities in Glendale and Goodyear that will come online for the 2009 spring training season.

This year, the Cactus League set a record when 1.3 million fans (60 percent from out of state) attended spring training games. The Cactus League’s contribution to the state’s economy is more than $200 million a year.
“Spring training is a big draw and a great experience,” says J.P. de la Montaigne, Cactus League president. “We call it our Super Bowl every year.”

Glendale’s new facility will be the spring training complex for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Chicago White Sox. The state-of-the-art baseball stadium will have seating for 13,000, four major league practice fields, eight minor league practice fields, two practice infields and 118,000 square feet of major and minor league clubhouses for the two teams. Down the road, the 151-acre site will also have residential, restaurant and retail development, a four-star hotel and an 18-hole golf course developed by Rightpath Limited Development Group.

The Arizona Sports & Tourism Authority is funding two-thirds of the complex, and the city of Glendale is contributing one-third of the $90 million project, which is under construction on 111th Avenue west of the Loop 101 between Camelback Road and Glendale Avenue. Stadium construction started in November 2007 and will be finished in time for the 2009 spring training season.

Tom Harrison, construction executive for Mortenson Sports, a division of Mortenson Construction which is building the complex, says planning the facility took longer than anticipated, so they added a night shift in August to keep construction on schedule.

“This is an exciting project and we have the right team to get it accomplished on time,” Harrison says. “I’ve been involved in five other spring training facilities in the Valley, but this is truly the most unique. The Glendale facility will be more than just a place to watch the game.”

Harrison says the Glendale stadium will have a 1,400-foot-long lake as part of the facility. The lake will have an aesthetic function as well as serve as the irrigation source for the lush landscaping that will create a park-like setting at the stadium.

“This is not going to be a standard practice area,” Harrison says. “It’s going to be an aesthetically pleasing setting with benches so fans can enjoy their surroundings.”

Based on a 2006 economic impact study conducted by Economic Research Associates for the city of Glendale, the economic impact of moving the Dodgers and White Sox to Glendale could be as much as $19 million per year for the region.

“The new spring training facility fits well in our sports and entertainment district,” says Jennifer Liewer, senior marketing and communications manager for the city of Glendale. “The Dodgers and White Sox want to make this something that will last and be part of the community, so we know that when they get to Glendale it will become their home as well.”

The Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds will play at the Goodyear Ballpark, which will be located on a 3-acre parcel south of Yuma Road and east of Estrella Parkway. The ballpark will open in March 2009 for spring training for the Indians. The Cincinnati Reds will move their spring training operations to Arizona in 2010.

HOK Sport of Kansas City designed the baseball complex, which will have 8,000 lower-bowl fixed seats, 500 premium seats, 1,400 berm seats, six luxury suites, 3,000 parking spaces, and a state-of-the-art scoreboard and public address system. It will also have two group event areas: an outfield pavilion and bar with berm seating for 400 and a third-floor party deck behind home plate that will hold 150 people. Barton Marlow, a national construction services company out of Michigan, is building the ballpark complex.

The Goodyear Recreational Sports Complex, which will house the Cleveland Indians’ clubhouse/player development facility and two practice fields, is under construction on a 52-acre site east of Estrella Parkway about a half-mile south of the Goodyear Ballpark. It will be completed this month, at which time the Indians will begin using it. The Indians will use the clubhouse and two practice fields year-round. Besides the clubhouse, the Goodyear Recreational Sports Complex has six full-baseball practice fields, two half-baseball practice fields, a 36,000 square foot agility field, six covered practice batting cages and tunnels, three open practice minor league batting tunnels, six pitching mounds for the major league and six for minor league, an observation tower for the major league fields and a scoreboard.

Goodyear citizens approved a bond election in 2004 for $10 million to help build the recreational sports fields, so the city will be able to use the four minor league fields 10 months of the year. Regis Reed, Goodyear’s senior project manager, says the city plans to use the fields for city events, youth programsand high school tournaments since the fields are lighted to high school standards.

Ticket prices at the Goodyear Ballpark will be comparable to other Cactus League facilities, which are $8 for a lawn seat and up to $27 for a club or premium seat.

Nathan Torres, stadium manager for the Goodyear Recreational Sports Complex, says that based on a 2007 Cactus League survey, the economic impact of the Cleveland Indians moving to Arizona in 2009 will be more than $23 million. That number will grow to more than $47 million when the Cincinnati Reds are introduced in 2010.

Janet Napolitano

Gov. Janet Napolitano Is The Public Face Of Super Bowl XLII

Head Coach

New governors often inherit their predecessors’ programs and initiatives — the good and the bad — when they take office. So it was when Gov. Janet Napolitano officially took the state’s helm in 2003. But at least one of those programs already had her stamp of approval.

Governor Janet Napolitano

Proposition 302, which provided funding for the University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, other sports-related programs and authorized the creation of the Arizona Sports & Tourism Authority, was passed by voters two years before Napolitano took office. She says it has been money well spent.

“The voters decided to spend the money on the stadium and I think it’s proven to be a good decision,” she says. “We’ve been able to attract a lot of different events to Arizona because of that new venue and the Super Bowl is a great way to showcase Arizona.”

Napolitano, along with Glendale Mayor Elaine Scruggs, then-bid committee chairman Gregg Holmes and retired ABC newscaster Hugh Downs, presented the bid to host Super Bowl XLII to National Football League team owners in 2003.

“They had already put together a good presentation. I just added my two cents worth as governor of the state that we were very supportive of the bid and we would do everything we could to support the Super Bowl,” she says.

The team’s efforts paid off, as did Prop. 302’s goal. And, Napolitano points out, other items funded by Prop. 302 have been successful as well.

“It’s not just the Super Bowl and the stadium, but the Cactus League venues, which are growing by leaps and bounds, the playing fields for young people and their teams, and all the other things that got wrapped into that funding for 302,” she says.

Short term, she says the Super Bowl will produce a lot of fun activities for the state and will generate an estimated $400 million in revenue. Long term, she expects the Super Bowl will generate interest among developers and investors to support Arizona.

“I’m hopeful that we can use this as an opportunity to show this state as a growing, vibrant economy,” Napolitano says. “A state that has a lot of things going on beyond sports and beyond some of the common stereotypes about Arizona.”

That includes construction, new laboratories, high-tech companies and medical schools, all of which she describes as the “foundation for our economy as we move forward.”

In 2008, Napolitano will focus on improving education, dealing with growth and transportation issues and protecting open space.

Arizona Business Magazine December-January 2008“We’re really looking to enrich, grow and diversify the economic performance here,” she says. “We’re going to have a good, fiscally sound budget that keeps investment where it needs to be, so that when we come out of the housing downturn, we haven’t cut off our nose to spite our face with respect to the state budget. Long term, the key thing is going to be education. None of this happens in terms of economic performance, generation of wealth … unless you have a sound education system underlying it, so we need to continue to keep our focus there.

“Being governor is a great honor. It’s the ability to try to set the agenda for the state — to try to enunciate our vision for this new Arizona we’re building and strategies on how to get there that are pragmatic and fit within our pocketbooks that keep us moving forward. I’m proud to say that I think we’ve done that over the past five years and we’re going to continue to.”

 

www.azgovernor.gov

AZ Business Magazine Dec-Jan 2008 | Next: Pampered Pooches…

Scott Norton

Arizona Cardinals Stadium Plays Host To Outside Events

Beyond Football

When the pigskin isn’t flying, Arizona Cardinals Stadium plays host to an impressive lineup of outside events.

By Tiffany M. Obergfoll

Valley sports fans share their anticipation as Cardinals Stadium draws nearer to opening day this summer—an opening day that will offer a glimpse of what’s to come, as the state-of-the-art facility will host the annual Tostitos Bowl and the first of many super bowls in 2008.

beyond_footballLong ago outgrowing their devilish college stadium, the NFL team finally comes into its own on Aug. 12 against the Pittsburgh Steelers. The move even helped the Cards sell out of season tickets for the 2006-2007 season—an impressive feat for a team that holds more low attendance records than Super Bowl appearances.

But the stadium is more than the steel embodiment of a fan’s dream. The uniqueness of its design establishes it as one of the most efficient and versatile structures in the history of sports complexes. Already famous for its appearance on the Discovery Channel’s “Extreme Engineering,” the stadium’s 12-million-pound rolling function permits the natural grass field uninhibited access to the Arizona sun without the high cost associated with completely removing the roof. The design also eliminates humidity problems other facilities face while attempting to sun their fields indoors. Removing the Bermuda hybrid turf when it isn’t being trampled by 22 sets of cleats also allows it to heal better in its natural environment—the grass is, indeed, greener on the other side.

In addition to the agricultural benefits resulting from the hour-long field exodus, the stadium’s interior is entirely transformed by the absence of its playing field. Teeming with 160,000 square feet of open, climate-controlled convention space uninhibited by columns or other impediments, the field-less stadium interior is fully geared with an electrical grid and ready for large-scale events. Global Spectrum, the facility’s management company, has booked everything from motocross events to food shows and women’s expos to maximize non-football revenue.

Working under contract with the Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority, Global Spectrum promotes and markets the multipurpose facility in accordance with Title 5 of the Arizona Revised Statutes, which requires the involvement of a third-party company. The Philadelphia-based firm also committed to finance the development of numerous spaces within the stadium.

Scott Norton, director of sales and marketing for the company, manages the building from an operational standpoint, “It’s cool and clean,” he says. “We have trade and consumer shows, private and public events, corporate and social functions, auctions—even weddings and proms.”

The stadium’s VIP Club rooms offer 39,000-square-foot lounge areas ideal for corporate and social functions, and the South-End Stadium Bridge consists of 12,500 square feet of open space overlooking the stadium floor. “We offer an unmatched setting,” Norton explains. “We don’t have a ballroom to hold a super-swank wedding, but we’re unique, especially for sports-minded people”—particularly those who do not mind an occasional Budweiser advertisement accompanying team insignia throughout the building.

AZ Business MagazineNorton, who has acted as Global Spectrum’s director of sales and marketing since March of 2005, is realistic about the facility’s appeal. “We’re not competing with the Marriott and the Phoenician,” he points out, shifting focus toward the unexpected and off-the-beaten-path appeal of Cardinals Stadium. Public tours are just one of the bonuses groups can opt for, and Global Spectrum’s large parent company, Comcast-Spectator, has many connections “to help book non-traditional, non-sports events.”

Of course, Glendale is quickly establishing itself as the metropolitan sports hub of the Valley, but the city’s newest megastructure demonstrates how innovation and efficient design allows both sports and non-sports events to flourish under one gigantic roof.

 

www.az-sta.com
www.azcardinalsstadium.com

Arizona Business Magazine Aug/Sept 2006

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