Tag Archives: associated general contractors

federal transportation bill

Upcoming Valley Partnership breakfast covers transportation

Valley Partnership has announced the topic for its upcoming monthly breakfast on Friday, Nov. 14. This month’s program will feature an update on current road, highway and infrastructure projects in Valley’s construction pipeline. Panelists will discuss projects currently underway as well as those projects slated for near and long term development and how they will benefit the business climate in the metropolitan Phoenix.

The Transportation Update panel will feature Michael Kies, director of planning and programming, Arizona Department of Transportation; Eric Anderson, transportation director, Maricopa Association of Governments; and David M. Martin, president, Arizona Chapter-Associated General Contractors. The panel will be moderated by Andrew Smigielski, principal/senior traffic engineer, Southwest Traffic Engineering.

The continued development and improvement of infrastructure across the Valley is vital to economic development of metro Phoenix and Arizona as whole,” said Richard Hubbard, president and CEO of Valley Partnership. “Well-planned, strategically-situated infrastructure is the framework upon which all other commercial real estate and economic development is built. It’s important the commercial real estate and development communities are educated current and future projects and the opportunities and challenges that come along with them.”

In addition to the panel, the Community Project Committee will present a Community Project wrap up. This year’s recipient is Arizona Foundation for the Handicapped (AFH) and build day is Saturday Nov. 8th. The committee will give a short presentation featuring photos and video from the event giving partners an opportunity to see what their time, energy and money accomplished for AFH’s Perry Rehabilitation Center.

The Valley Partnership Monthly Breakfast will take place Friday, Nov. 14, at the Phoenix Country Club located at 2901 N. 7th St. in Phoenix. Registration begins at 7 a.m.; program begins at 7:45 a.m. To register, visit Valley Partnership and click on the “Monthly Breakfast” tab.

Sundt’s Marty Hedlund elected to ABA board of directors

Marty Hedlund

Marty Hedlund

The Arizona Builders’ Alliance (ABA), a statewide construction trade association, formed as an alliance of the Associated Builders & Contractors (ABC) and the Associated General Contractors (AGC) welcomed Martin R. (Marty) Hedlund, P.E., DBIA as a newly elected board member.  Hedlund joined Sundt Construction, Inc. in 1984 and currently serves as the Profit Center Manager for the Southwest District responsible for all Sundt’s vertical construction in Arizona, New Mexico, West Texas and Colorado. Hedlund has served in the roles of field engineer, project engineer, project superintendent, project manager and project director for more than 30 years constructing offices, corporate headquarters, data centers, schools and other commercial projects.

A Registered Professional Civil Engineer in Arizona, Hedlund received his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the Stanford University. Hedlund has widely presented on several topics including Alternative Project Delivery, Lean Construction and Building Information Modeling (BIM).

His industry involvement includes six years on the Design Build Institute of America National Certification Board which is responsible for upholding the standards of the DBIA Certified Professional designation as well as the testing and application processes. In 2011, Hedlund served as Chair of that board. Hedlund has also been active in the Arizona Builder’s Alliance (ABA) for many years serving on the Legislative Committee and being active in building industry education and public affairs. He is a graduate of the ABA’s Leadership Development Forum (LDF) and the Senior Executive Program (SEP).

Hedlund is an avid golfer, husband of 25 years to wife, Ellen, proud father of two teenagers, and happy to be giving back to an industry that has given so much to him.

The ABA exists for the purpose of advancing the productivity and profitability of our members and the construction industry.   Celebrating its 20th year in 2014, the ABA is proud to service the construction industry through advocacy, education, and networking opportunities in the state of Arizona.

Arizona Builders - Cell Phone Collection

Arizona Builders' Alliance Stepping Up To The Plate This Summer

There has been quite a bit of good news coming out the Arizona Builders’ Alliance (ABA) office this summer.

The ABA was recently awarded the AGC in the Community Award by Associated General Contractors of America. The award was given to the ABA for its outstanding community service projects in Tucson and Phoenix in 2011.

The ABA also earned the Excellence in Education Award from the Associated Builders and Contractors for its Leadership Development Forum (LDF) program.

On the community front, the ABA smashed its own record for the number of cell phones collected in the annual Cell Phone Drive for the Troops.

Last year’s record was 800 cell phones. This year ABA members collected 955 phones, which will give 28,650 minutes of free calling time to troops in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Additionally, the ABA is also in the middle of its Backpack Drive to collect school supplies for the upcoming year. The ABA will accept donations through July 20 and will donate the supplies to the schools in the most need.

The Arizona Builders’ Alliance is one of 95 chapters across the country that is aimed at productivity of contractors, suppliers and professional service firms.

For more information on Arizona Builders’ Alliance, visit Arizona Builders’ website at azbuilders.org.

Quality Education and Jobs Initiative

Quality Education and Jobs Initiative To Prevent Cuts To Education

The Quality Education and Jobs Initiative was filed today with the Secretary of State’s Office. The initiative renews the voter-approved one-cent sales tax to provide dedicated statewide funding for education for students of all ages tied to performance and accountability, scholarships for university and community college students, reinvestment in vocational education and new jobs.

“This added investment from preschool through university represents a game-changer in the quest for quality education and offers voters a once-in-a-generation opportunity to take a giant leap forward,” Cunningham says.

This grassroots-led effort will prevent the Legislature from making any further cuts to K-12 education and reinvests in our state’s education system to prepare our students, teachers and schools for more rigorous academic Common Core standards that will go into effect in the 2015-2016 school year.

“We are expecting more from our students, our teachers and our schools statewide,” says Ann-Eve Pedersen, a parent leader who chairs the Quality Education and Jobs Committee. “To help them succeed and to help our economy grow, we must provide targeted resources to ensure we meet our goals to significantly improve education across the spectrum in Arizona.

“Strong schools, vocational education programs, community colleges and universities help create the strong workforce that makes Arizona attractive to the higher-wage employers we need,” adds Pedersen, president of the Arizona Education Parent Network, a statewide nonpartisan, non-profit organization founded in 2009. “This initiative helps us succeed in strengthening education for students of all ages and meeting goals set by policymakers to increase high school graduation rates, ensure more children are reading at grade level by third grade, improve performance on nationally-normed tests and increase the number of students receiving bachelor’s degrees.”

A percentage of incentive funds will be tied to system-wide performance and will only be released to school districts and charter schools statewide if overall performance improves. Funding for career and technical programs in our high schools and community colleges as well as university funding will also be tied to performance and auditing requirements. A poverty factor will ensure that resources go to school districts and charter schools serving students living in poverty to help them achieve and to fund voluntary preschool programs in those school districts and charter schools.

“This is great news for Arizona university and community college students,” says James Allen, University of Arizona student body president. “This initiative brings real solutions and will ensure we can graduate students to fill the jobs of the future.”

While 80 percent of the resources raised will be dedicated to education, additional components in the measure ensure that there are jobs awaiting students when they graduate and that children come to school healthy, safe and ready to learn. The measure restores KidsCare, a program that provides healthcare for children living in poverty. It also creates the Family Stability and Self-Sufficiency Fund, administered by the Governor’s Office, which provides resources to state agencies and non-profits to help reduce family violence, provide childcare, and reduce hunger and homelessness.

To help create new jobs and protect public safety, the initiative prevents the Legislature from diverting funds from the Highway User Revenue Fund (HURF) and the Vehicle License Tax.

The HURF funds can continue to be used for highway patrol officers and will help fund transportation projects. The initiative will also create a state infrastructure fund that will help build road, rail and transit projects in our communities – another boost to our economy by creating new jobs and ensuring that modes of transporting goods and people are safe and high-functioning.

“Educating our children will prepare them for quality jobs in the future, but it is also of the utmost importance that jobs are created now for them to fill later,” says Matt Gully, President of Tempe-based FNF Construction and a member of the Board of Directors of the Arizona Chapter-Associated General Contractors. “The preservation of HURF and creation of the infrastructure fund will result in immediate job creation that will help jumpstart our economy’s recovery.”

With today’s filing, the Quality Education and Jobs Committee will immediately begin collecting the 172,809 signatures needed to qualify for the November ballot.

For more information about the Quality Education and Jobs Initiative, please visit qualityeducationandjobs.com or call 1-888-530-2297.

 

Reviving the Construction Industry

Plan to Revive Construction Industry Unveiled

The Associated General Contractors of America released a new national plan today detailing measures to stimulate demand for construction. Officials said the plan was needed to reverse construction employment declines that have taken place in 317 out of 337 metro areas since January 2007, according to new data the association released today.

“Our goal is to rebuild a devastated construction market that has left millions jobless, littered cities with incomplete projects and sapped much needed revenue, commerce and customers out of our economy,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “Considering the scope and impact of construction job losses, the last thing any of us can afford is a repeat of the past four years.”

The plan, called “Building a Stronger Future, A New Blueprint for Economic Growth,” outlines measures to help boost private sector demand for construction, help tackle a growing infrastructure maintenance backlog and reduce needless red tape and regulations. Sandherr said the association developed the plan to overcome the years-long construction downturn that has left over 2.2 million construction workers unemployed and the industry’s unemployment rate at 21.8 percent, more than twice the national average.

Sandherr released the plan and the new employment figures, during a visit to Phoenix,  which has lost more construction jobs – 91,400 – than any other metro area since the start of the construction downturn in January 2007, a 54 percent decline. Nationwide, 28 cities lost 50 percent or more of their construction jobs, including Boise, Idaho; Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Medford, Ore.; and Merced, Calif., Sandherr noted.

The metro areas that lost the most construction jobs during the past four years, besides Phoenix, included Las Vegas (-61,900 jobs, -61 percent); Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif. (-57,700 jobs, -51 percent); the Atlanta area (-57,700 jobs, -42 percent); and the Los Angeles area (-56,200 jobs, -37 percent).

Lake Havasu City-Kingman (-65 percent, -4,200 jobs) and Bend, Ore. (-65 percent, -5,200 jobs) lost the highest percentage of construction jobs of any metro area. They were followed by St. George, Utah (-62 percent, -5,200 jobs); Las Vegas; and Naples, Fla. (-61 percent, -13,700 jobs).

Only 14 metro areas added construction jobs during the past four years, while employment levels were unchanged in another six. The five metro areas with the largest construction employment gains were all in Texas: Beaumont-Port Arthur (3,400 jobs, 21 percent); Longview (3,100 jobs, 26 percent); Midland (2,100 jobs, 15 percent); El Paso (1,900 jobs, 14 percent); and Odessa (1,800 jobs, 17 percent).

Pascagoula, Miss., experienced the highest percentage increase in construction employment (47 percent, 1,600 jobs) during the past four years. Other metro areas adding a high percentage of construction jobs included Longview; Beaumont-Port Arthur; Lawton, Okla. (20 percent, 300 jobs); and Odessa.

“In too many metro areas, the construction industry is a mere shadow of what it was just four years ago,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist, who prepared the new employment analysis. “This new data should make it pretty clear that the sector’s revival is anything but guaranteed.”

Sandherr said the recovery plan emphasizes boosting private sector demand, which once accounted for 76 percent of all construction activity, but now accounts for only 60 percent. It calls for approving pending trade agreements to boost demand for manufacturing and shipping facilities, repealing the alternative minimum tax and making permanent the tax cuts that were first put in place in 2001 and 2003.

The plan also identifies new tax credits to encourage retail and restaurant upgrades, improve the efficiency of commercial buildings and help contractors invest in new, more efficient construction equipment. And it urges Congress and the Administration to finally end the double taxation of U.S-based businesses that succeed in international markets.

Sandherr noted the plan includes measures to tackle infrastructure problems that cost American businesses an estimated $100 billion a year due to delays and lost productivity. It calls for significant reforms to federal surface, aviation and waterways programs. And it urges federal officials to refocus on efforts that are clearly in the national interest, streamline the years-long federal review process, and find new ways to leverage private sector dollars.

Sandherr added that the plan also includes comprehensive measures to reduce costly, time consuming and needless regulatory burdens. It calls on Congress to pass legislation limiting major new regulations, reform the approval process for new highway and transit projects and oppose well-meaning labor and Buy American mandates that do little to create new jobs and a lot to add costs and delay work.

The plan also highlights the need to repeal a costly new mandate set to begin next year that requires governments at all levels to withhold three percent of the cost of virtually all major construction projects from contractors. “For an industry where most firms are lucky to make three percent in profit on a project, this new mandate will either put a lot of people out of work or needlessly inflate the cost of public construction,” Sandherr cautioned.

Real Estate/Construction in Arizona

Construction Spending Up 0.7%, Driven By Surge In Power, Public Projects

Total construction spending increased by 0.7 percent in October, driven largely by growing demand for power projects and public construction, the Associated General Contractors of America noted today in an analysis of new Census Bureau data.

The new data, however, indicated continued weakness in many construction categories, including private nonresidential and single family construction, association officials observed.

“Without any upward trend in key private-sector construction components like homes and office buildings, it is hard to feel optimistic about the near future,” says Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “With public construction at risk of cutbacks, it is premature to conclude that construction has awakened from its long nightmare.”

Simonson added that power construction increased by 8.8 percent between September and October at a seasonally adjusted rate, although the total remained 3.9 percent below the year-ago level. Public construction, aided by federal spending on stimulus, military base realignment and Gulf Coast hurricane-control projects, edged up 0.4 percent for the month and 2.2 percent year-over-year.

Private nonresidential construction, however, slumped 0.7 percent in October, leaving the total 20.7 percent below the October 2009 figure. All 11 of the Census Bureau’s private nonresidential categories were below year-ago levels, Simonson added, with only private power and transportation showing gains from September.

Private residential investment jumped 2.5 percent for the month. However, Simonson cautioned that the apparent leap is attributable to a 3.2 percent advance in new multi-family construction and a 6.2 percent rise in improvements to existing properties, whereas single-family construction sank 1.2 percent for the month.

Association officials said that a proposal released today by the Deficit Commission to increase investments in highways, bridges and transit system construction provided some room for optimism. They urged Congress to embrace the transportation proposal, noting it would help the economy over the long run while giving a much-needed boost to short term construction demand.

“The best way to reduce the deficit and simultaneously support a strong and expanding economy is to invest in our aging network of highways, bridges and transit systems,” said Stephen E. Sandherr. “Even as the broader report calls for dramatic reductions in federal spending, it is clear that our country can’t afford to neglect its infrastructure.”

Arizona leads nation in Construction Employment

Arizona Leads Way As Construction Employment Expands In 29 States

Construction employment expanded in 29 states between September and October with Arizona leading the way, the Associated General Contractors of America reported in an analysis of state employment data released today by the Labor Department.

The new figures continue a nearly year-long trend of ups and downs in construction employment as the industry performs stimulus-funded work yet grapples with broad market uncertainty.

“Considering that most states adding construction jobs in October had shed workers in September, it is safe to say that construction employment remains volatile,” says Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “Construction is no longer in free fall, but the industry remains fragile as improvements vary greatly by state and project type.”

Arizona (4.4 percent, 5,000 jobs) experienced the largest one-month seasonally adjusted percentage increase and Texas (2.3 percent, 8,800 jobs) the largest one-month total increase in construction employment between September and October.

Other states adding large numbers of construction jobs during October included Illinois (1.5 percent, 3,000 jobs); Washington (2.1 percent, 3,000 jobs); South Carolina (3.2 percent, 2,500 jobs); and Colorado (1.6 percent, 1,800 jobs).

Simonson noted 20 states plus the District of Columbia lost construction jobs during the past month, while construction employment remained unchanged in Rhode Island. Minnesota (-2.7 percent, -2,300 jobs) lost the highest percent of construction jobs for the month while Florida lost the most jobs (-2.4 percent, -8,600 jobs). Among other states losing construction jobs between September and October were Pennsylvania (-1.0 percent, -2,200 jobs); Maryland (-1.3 percent, -1,900 jobs); Georgia (-1.2 percent, -1,800 jobs); and Massachusetts (-1.4 percent, -1,500 jobs).

Eleven states and D.C. added construction jobs for the year, Simonson added. The largest year-over-year percentage increase was in Kansas, where construction employment rose 9.0 percent (5,100 jobs), followed by Oklahoma (8.1 percent, 5,400 jobs); Arkansas (5.1 percent, 2,600 jobs); D.C. (4.6 percent, 500 jobs); and West Virginia (3.3 percent, 1,100 jobs).

Among the 39 states that lost construction jobs over the past 12 months, Nevada experienced the largest percentage decline (-19.5 percent, -14,500) while California lost the most jobs (-45,700, -7.9 percent). Other states experiencing large declines for the year include Idaho (-15.2 percent, -5,000 jobs); Vermont (-13.4 percent, -1,800 jobs); Montana (-10.5 percent, -2,500 jobs); and Missouri (-10.3 percent, -11,900 jobs).

Association officials said that temporary stimulus funding has helped the industry, but that most firms were worried about business levels for next year. They added that private, state and local demand for construction remains weak, while long-term federal infrastructure programs and tax rates remain in limbo. “We won’t see sustained job growth until the private sector picks up and long-term federal plans are clear,” says Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s CEO.

Construction Declines in 31 States

Construction Employment Declines In 31 States

Construction employment declined in 31 states between August and September with fewer people working in that field compared to last year in 40 states, the Associated General Contractors of America reported in an analysis of state employment data released today by the Labor Department.

Construction employment is likely to continue to worsen amid uncertainty about federal spending and tax rates for next year, association officials noted.

Arizona lost 700 construction jobs during that period. Compared to the same period last year, Arizona has lost 4,400 construction jobs.

“Construction firms are caught between a difficult present and an uncertain future,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “Looking ahead, nobody knows what will happen to the only thing keeping the current market from getting worse, federal spending, as long-term water, energy and transportation spending programs remain in limbo.”

Simonson noted that Rhode Island (-2.9 percent, -500 jobs) lost the highest percent of construction jobs for the month while California lost the most jobs (-2.5 percent, -13,300 jobs). Among other states losing construction jobs between August and September were Texas (-1.2 percent, -7,000 jobs), New York (-1.8 percent, 5,800 jobs), Ohio (-2.5 percent, -4,400 jobs), and Pennsylvania (-1.1 percent, -2,500 jobs).

Hawaii (4.9 percent, 1,400 jobs) and Minnesota (3.8 percent, 3,100 jobs) experienced the largest one-month percentage increase in construction employment between August and September. Besides those two states, another 13 and the District of Columbia added jobs, while construction employment was unchanged in four states. Other states with increases in construction employment included Florida (0.5 percent, 1,700 jobs), Georgia (1.0 percent, 1,500 jobs), Washington (0.8 percent, 1,100 jobs) and Illinois (0.4 percent, 700 jobs).

Simonson noted that nine states and D.C. added construction jobs for the year while employment in Alaska was unchanged. The largest year-over-year increase was in Oklahoma, where construction employment rose 9.8 percent (6,500 jobs), followed by Kansas (8.9 percent, 5,000 jobs), New Hampshire (8.0 percent, 1,800 jobs), the District of Columbia (4.5 percent, 500 jobs), and Arkansas (3.5 percent, 1,800 jobs).

Among the 40 states that lost construction jobs over the past twelve months, Nevada experienced the largest percentage decline (-19.3 percent, -14,200) in jobs while California lost the most jobs (-50,700, -8.8 percent). Other states experiencing large declines for the year include Vermont (-14.1 percent, -1,900 jobs), Idaho (-12.3 percent, -4,000), Colorado (-11.5 percent, -14,200 jobs), and Kentucky (-9.8 percent, -7,000 jobs).

Association officials cautioned that construction employment will continue to stagnate as firms, already coping with depressed private, state and local demand, contend with an uncertain federal marketplace. Adding to the confusion, officials said, was that tax rates for most small construction firms have also not been set for next year. “Adding uncertainty and confusion into an already bleak market is a good way to keep construction workers out of a job,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer.

Construction at an All Time Low

National Construction Employment Near 14-Year Low

The number of people working in construction is approaching a 14-year low now that the industry lost 21,000 jobs in September, while construction unemployment is at a September high of 17.2 percent, according to an analysis of federal employment figures released today by the Associated General Contractors of America.

The construction industry continues to suffer from declining investments in construction and broad uncertainty about the future of many federal infrastructure programs and tax rates, association officials noted.

“It has taken less than four years to erase a decade’s worth of job gains as the industry suffers from declining private, state and local construction demand,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “No other sector of the economy has suffered as much for as long as construction.”

Simonson noted that the 5.6 million people working in construction today is barely higher than the 5.59 million people who were working in construction in August 1996. He added that construction employment continued to lag behind other sectors of the economy. For example, while total private employment rose by 593,000 during the past 12 months, the construction industry lost 210,000 jobs. Meanwhile, the industry’s unemployment rate is nearly double the unadjusted national rate of 9.2 percent.

Most of September’s construction job losses came from the nonresidential sector as demand for commercial facilities and infrastructure projects remains weak, Simonson noted. Residential construction lost 2,500 jobs last month while nonresidential construction lost 18,100 jobs. Nonresidential specialty trade contractors were the hardest hit, having lost 19,500 jobs in September, the economist added.

Association officials noted that construction spending figures released late last month show private, state and local construction spending continues to decline. And while federal spending has increased, most of those investments have come from temporary programs like the stimulus and military base realignment programs.

While these temporary federal programs have helped the industry, many contractors are reluctant to expand payrolls while long-term federal programs that fund highway, transit, water system and aviation related construction remain in limbo, association officials said. They added that most contractors don’t even know what their tax rates will be for next year.

“Construction firms aren’t going to start hiring again until they can predict how busy they’ll be,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “Frankly it is hard for contractors to make any business decisions when they don’t know how much they’ll make or how much they’ll owe.”


Flagstaff lost the highest percentage of construction jobs

Flagstaff Tops The Nation In Percentage of Construction Jobs Lost

Flagstaff lost the highest percentage of construction jobs between July 2009 and July of this year, as 276 of 337 metro areas nationally saw declines, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

Flagstaff lost 700 construction jobs, a 32 percent dip from last year. The Chicago-Joliet-Naperville area lost the most construction jobs — 32,900, or 23 percent.

Statewide, Arizona lost 13,900 construction jobs (down 114,000 from 128,000), an 11 percent decrease. It was a decrease of 54 percent from the state’s peak in 2006, according to the AGCA.

The Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale area lost 8,600 construction jobs (down 86,600 from 95,200), a 9 percent loss; and Tucson lost 2,300 construction jobs (down 14,200 from 16,500), for a 14 percent dip. Yuma fared the best, experiencing just a 7 percent loss.

The employment figures, based on an analysis of federal employment data, demonstrate the widespread decline in demand for construction services that continues to outpace stimulus-funded work, association officials say.

“There is no doubt that we have seen an increase in stimulus activity this summer,” says Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “Unfortunately, that increase in stimulus activity is largely being overshadowed by continuing declines in overall demand for construction that are likely to persist well into next year.”

Other areas experiencing large declines in construction employment are: Las Vegas (14,800 jobs, 24 percent); Houston (14,700 jobs, 8 percent); Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale (10,700 jobs, 9 percent); and Seattle-Bellevue-Everett (10,400 jobs, 14 percent).

Simonson says that 31 metro areas actually added construction jobs over the past 12 months, while another 30 areas experienced no change in construction employment.

The construction economist said the impacts of the stimulus can be seen in the fact that many of the construction employment declines metro areas are experiencing are less severe than just a month ago. The year-over-year construction employment declines in cities such as Las Vegas, Houston and Seattle are less severe than the figures recorded in June, Simonson adds. However, he says that too few cities were adding construction jobs to have any widespread impact on construction employment.

“As much as we would hate to see how much worse the construction employment figures would be without the stimulus, the fact is our industry is continuing to suffer even as some areas of the economy have begun to expand,” says Stephen Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “And with regular, long-term infrastructure bills stalled in Congress, it looks like construction workers will have little opportunity to continue rebuilding our economy.”

Most Admired Companies - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

2010 Most Admired Companies Award Winners

Arizona Business Magazine and BestCompaniesAZ are honored to unveil the winners of our inaugural Arizona’s Most Admired Companies Awards.

With 43 winners, we think you’ll agree the awards selection committee has done an outstanding job in determining some of the most admired companies in our state.  Our primary goal in developing this program was to find those organizations that excel in four key areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, social responsibility and customer opinion.  This list features the most prestigious companies in our state, providing us the opportunity to learn from the best.

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 69
Recent Award: AIA Kemper Goodwin Award – 2009
WEB: www.a-p.com

AlliedBarton Security Services
Headquarters: Conshohocken, Penn.
Year Est.: 1957
No. of Employees in AZ: 1,047
Recent Award: Brandon Hall Research Award for Best Integration of Learning and Talent Management – 2009
WEB: www.alliedbarton.com
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American Express
Headquarters: New York
Year Est.: 1850
No. of Employees in AZ: 7,219
Recent Award: Fortune Magazine’s Most Admired Companies – 2010
WEB: www.americanexpress.com
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Arizona Charter Academy
Headquarters: Surprise
Year Est.: 2001
No. of Employees in AZ: 61
Recent Award: Elks Lodge Community Partner of the Year – 2010
WEB: www.azcharteracademy.com
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Banner Health
Headquarters: Phoenix
Year Est.: 1999
No. of Employees in AZ: 27,528
Recent Award: Gallup Great Workplace Award – 2009
WEB: www.bannerhealth.com
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BeachFleischman PC
Headquarters: Tucson
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 104
Recent Award: Accounting Today’s Best Accounting Firms to Work For – 2009
WEB: www.beachfleischman.com

To buy a print version of the 2010 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies
go to MagCloud.com

Arizona's Most Admired Companies November-December 2010