Tag Archives: ASU

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Leadership Forum: ‘Eyes of the world will be on Arizona’

The partnership between Starbucks and Arizona State University stirs up the way people can pay for college, have a family, and work at the same time.

Today, the 2014 Arizona Leadership Forum started off with the main message of, “We need you to lead us,” specifically speaking to attending business leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs. For quite some time, people have had the wrong impression of Arizona, but that’s about to change.

“Soon the eyes of the world will be on Arizona,” said Jathan Segur, executive vice president of National Bank of Arizona, referring to the 2015 Super Bowl, which will be played at University of Phoenix Stadium. “We will have the chance to talk about what’s right about Arizona.”

Segur’s speech set the tone of hope and optimism for the Leadership Forum.

Among those messages of hope, was one about the American dream to receive a high-quality college education. Unfortunately, it seems an unreachable dream for most. College tuition costs have risen 80 percent in the past 10 years. Therefore, only a select few can afford to go to college, and even fewer get to finish.

The Starbucks College Achievement Plan is the first of its kind, where a national company is taking the initiative to partner with an educational institution to give employees a second chance to live out their American dream. Due to the increasing college expenses, less than 50 percent of college students complete their degree.

“We employ a generation hit hard by our recession,” said Dervala Manley, vice president of global strategy at Starbucks Coffee Company.

Starbucks part-time and full-time employees from around the globe can now apply to receive funding towards their degree from Arizona State University. Freshman and sophomores attending ASU will be given a partial scholarship, accompanied with financial aid depending on their needs. Juniors and seniors will be given full tuition reimbursement with each year they continue to finish their studies. Students will have no obligation to stay at Starbucks after graduation.

Philip Regier, executive vice provost and dean of ASU online and extended campuses emphasized on how ASU wants to give everyone, no mater what their background, an equal chance to get a high-quality education. ASU has all 40 majors online as well as in person, making it more convenient for the working class.

“We did it [partnership] because we had a set of shared values,” Regier said.

This partnership between ASU and Starbucks is a leading example for an innovative state of mind in Arizona. Through the voices of the people, partnerships can form to benefit this generation. This partnership has created a way for aspiring college students to reach their highest potential in life.
“The face of Starbucks is not Howard Schultz, it’s the barista,” Hanley said.

scottsdael.kids

ASU is 11th in Teach For America corps members

Arizona State University ranked 11th in the nation among large universities for its number of graduating seniors joining Teach for America this year. Teach For America recently released it’s ranking of colleges and universities that contributed the greatest number of graduates to its 2014 teaching corps.

ASU moved up three spots from number 14 in 2013. It had 50 students commit to joining Teach for America. ASU is included in the “large schools” category among universities having 10,000 or more undergraduates.

“At ASU, students develop a commitment to change making,” said Nikki Gusz, strategic initiatives director in ASU’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. “It is hard to think of a role where someone can impact lives more than that of a teacher. We are inspired to see so many current students and alums continually drawn to making a difference in the lives of all students.”

Teach For America works in partnership with communities to expand educational opportunity for children facing the challenges of poverty. Founded in 1990, Teach For America recruits and develops a diverse corps of outstanding college graduates and professionals who make an initial two-year commitment to teach in high-need schools and become lifelong leaders in the movement to end educational inequity.

This fall, 10,600 corps members will be teaching in 50 urban and rural regions across the U.S. while 37,000 alumni work across sectors to ensure that all children have access to an excellent education.

Teach for America has partnered with ASU since 2006, when President Michael Crow helped launch a shared commitment to developing and supporting future education leaders. ASU’s Teach for America partnership received the ASU President’s Medal for Social Embeddedness in 2008. The partnership is institution-wide with its coordination headquartered in Teachers College, Gusz said. The organizations work on new innovation together, such as the Changemaking in Education class, focused on education innovation and offered in partnership with the Teachers College and Barrett, the Honors College.

Teach For America said this year’s teaching corps – which numbers 5,300 – is the most diverse in its history.

The organization said effective teachers come from all backgrounds and academic interests, and bring diverse perspectives and experiences to the classroom. Teach For America also has found that maximizing diversity supports its effort to attract the top talent our country has to offer.

Among the new corps members 50 percent identify as people of color (compared with less than 20 percent of all teachers nationwide), 47 percent received Pell Grants (an indicator of low-income background), and one-third are the first in their families to attend college.

Teach For America is known for attracting individuals with impressive professional, academic and leadership experience, and has long recognized the potential of teachers who share students’ backgrounds to serve as critical classroom leaders and role models.

For more information on Teach For America and other opportunities to Make Your Impact, visit https://eoss.asu.edu/makeyourimpact.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks Top 30 Again

U.S. News & World Report announced its highly anticipated annual rankings for undergraduate business schools. Once again, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is honored among the nation’s Top 30. This is the ninth time in 10 years the school has made the prestigious Top 30.

“We’re proud to strive for and achieve excellence year after year, thanks to our dedicated faculty, staff, students and alumni,” says Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “This ranking is determined by deans and senior faculty members at peer schools, who understand what it takes to create and maintain a fantastic business program.”

In addition to the No. 29 ranking overall, the undergraduate business program is also among the top 10 in the West. The school’s acclaimed supply chain management program ranks No. 3 nationwide in the specialty category for its field. In addition, the school has several other programs in the Top 30 in their specialties – accounting at No. 30, entrepreneurship at No. 19, management at No. 20, management information systems at No. 15 and marketing at No. 23.

The W. P. Carey School and its programs have achieved many other recent Top 30 rankings, as well, including:

• U.S. News & World Report ranks the school’s full-time MBA program No. 27 in the nation.
• U.S. News ranks the school’s online MBA No. 2 nationwide and the school’s evening MBA No. 18 among part-time MBA programs.
• Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s online MBA program Top 10 worldwide.
• The Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 28 worldwide.
• The University of Texas at Dallas ranks the W. P. Carey School Top 30 worldwide for business-school research productivity.
• The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the W. P. Carey School No. 22 in the world for economics/business.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School of Business, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

bioscience

ASU’s Arntzen Named Bioscience Researcher of the Year

image003Charles J. Arntzen, PhD, the founding director of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, has been named the 2014 Arizona Bioscience Researcher of the Year. The award is given annually to the life science researcher in Arizona who has made the most significant contribution to the advancement of knowledge and the understanding of biological processes.

“Charlie was instrumental in helping create an experimental drug called ZMapp that was recently used to treat U.S. aid workers infected with Ebola this summer,” says Joan Koerber-Walker, president and CEO of the Arizona Bioindustry Association. “His work has put Arizona on the map in new ways as people all over the world are fascinated by the idea that it is possible to produce medicine inside a plant.”

“Charlie’s work represents some of the best and brightest of Biodesign,” says Raymond DuBois, executive director of the Biodesign Institute. “By erasing traditional boundaries between the sciences, we are able to deliver unexpected solutions.”

Arntzen’s primary research interests are in plant molecular biology and protein engineering, as well as the utilization of plant biotechnology for enhancement of food quality and value, and for overcoming health and agricultural constraints in the developing world. He has been recognized as a pioneer in the development of plant-based vaccines for human disease prevention, with special emphasis on needs of poor countries, and for disease prevention in animal agriculture. His work developed the technology by which human proteins (such as ZMapp) can be expressed in and harvested from plants.

Arntzen is the Florence Ely Nelson Presidential Endowed Chair and Regents’ Professor in ASU’s School of Life Sciences. He serves on the board of directors of Advanced BioNutrition and is on the advisory board of the Burrill and Company’s Agbio Capital Fund and the Nutraceuticals Fund.

Prior to coming to ASU in 2000, Arntzen was president and CEO of the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research. He also served on President George W. Bush’s Council of Advisors on Science and the National Nanotechnology Oversight Board.

Arntzen will be honored at the AZBio Awards Gala on Sept. 17 at the Phoenix Convention Center. The AZBio Awards ceremony celebrates Arizona’s leading educators, innovators and companies. Each year AZBio honors bioindustry leaders from across Arizona illustrative of the depth, breadth and expertise of the state’s bioscience industry.

Past winners of the Arizona Bioscience Researcher of the Year Award include: Leslie Boyer, MD (The University of Arizona), Paul Keim, PhD (Northern Arizona University and TGen-North), Jessica Langbaum, PhD (Banner Alzheimer’s Research Institute), Milton Sommerfeld, PhD, and Qiang Hu, PhD (Arizona State University), Bruce Rittman, PhD (Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University), Rod Wing, PhD (Arizona Genomics Institute at the University of Arizona), and Roy Curtiss, III, PhD (Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University).

housing

No Housing Bubble Right Now in Phoenix

The Phoenix-area housing market is NOT creating another housing bubble to pop anytime soon. The latest monthly report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University shows a lack of enthusiasm from both buyers and sellers. Here are the latest details on Maricopa and Pinal counties, as of July:

• The median single-family-home sales price went up 8 percent from last July, but forward price movement is greatly slowing down.
• Activity in the market was also much slower this July than last July, with the number of single-family-home sales down 19 percent.
• The W. P. Carey School is launching an enhanced-content website where those interested in more in-depth housing-market statistics can get customized views of what’s happening.

Phoenix-area home prices dramatically recovered from the housing crash, quickly rising from September 2011 to last summer. This year, prices dropped a little, leveled off, and then finally, the median single-family-home price rose this summer. The median jumped 8 percent — from $194,000 last July to $210,000 this July. Realtors will note the average price per square foot also went up about 8 percent. The median townhouse/condo price went up about 6 percent to $130,000. However, don’t expect much more upward momentum.

“Most of the median-price increase over the last 12 months is because a greater percentage of the homes being sold are in the luxury market, not because home values overall are increasing,” says the report’s author, Mike Orr, director of the Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “We anticipate pricing will move sideways or slightly down over the next few months until supply and demand get back into balance.”

At the moment, both demand and supply are low in the Phoenix area. The amount of single-family-home sales dropped 19 percent from last July to this July. (The only bright spot is new-home sales, which increased their market share from 9 to 12 percent.) Investors have focused on other areas of the country with better bargains, so the percentage of residential properties they bought in July was just 13.6 percent, down from the peak of 39.7 percent in July 2012. Orr says other home buyers aren’t stepping in, and supply isn’t rebounding.

“Usually, when demand is weak for an extended period, supply starts to grow, as it did in the second half of 2005 and throughout 2006 and 2007, heralding the collapse of the housing bubble,” Orr explains. “However, this summer, supply is slowly weakening. It appears that the lack of enthusiasm among buyers has spread to sellers, instead of causing them to panic. Many sellers clearly have the patience to wait for better times and are unwilling to drop prices to dispose of their homes.”

Orr adds the choices for anyone who wants to buy a Phoenix-area house for less than $175,000 are pretty slim. For example, bargain foreclosures are few and far between. Completed foreclosures on single-family homes and condos are down 45 percent this July from last July.

The limited options at the low end of the market are also contributing to the booming demand for single-family rental homes. Orr says fast turnover and low vacancy rates have already pushed the rent on single-family homes in the most popular areas up 7.5 percent over the last 12 months. Affordable apartment and condo rentals have also become hard to find.

In order to better serve the public with more insight on the Phoenix-area housing market, Orr and the Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business are launching a new enhanced-content website today. In addition to the free news releases distributed by the school, those wanting more housing data can subscribe at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/realtyreports. The premium site includes statistics, charts, graphs and the ability to focus in on whatever interests you most about the market.

“Though we’ve already had a great response to our housing reports, we wanted to make our real estate information even more useful to people,” says Orr. “With the enhanced site, you’re able to customize your view to more closely examine data in particular price ranges, specific parts of the Valley, and even certain transaction categories. We think the real estate community will be really pleased with the new tools.”

Conquering Concussions

ASU, TGen Team Up for Concussion Research

Riddell, the leader in football helmet technology and innovation, and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), a leader in cutting-edge genomic research, today announced that the Pac-12’s Arizona State University and its Sun Devil football program will again participate in a genetic research study designed to advance athlete concussion detection and treatment.

Now in its second year, the joint research project will combine molecular information and head impact data from Sun Devil football student-athletes to identify whether the effects of sub-concussive hits are identifiable. The researchers will monitor the players’ changing molecular information throughout a season of typical head impact exposure associated with football practice and games. Representatives from the Sun Devil medical team and TGen will collect the molecular samples from the participating athletes, all of whom volunteered to partake in the study.

“This partnership represents another dynamic and innovative step toward ensuring that the health and well-being of our student-athletes remains our most important goal,” Vice President for Arizona State University Athletics Ray Anderson said. “Sun Devil Athletics continues to serve as a pioneering force in this important issue and is proud to participate in this world-class research study for the second consecutive year with two outstanding industry trendsetters in Riddell and TGen.”

Arizona State’s preferred helmet and protective equipment provider, Riddell, has again deployed its Sideline Response System (SRS) to obtain real-time head impact data from Arizona State football student-athletes. Riddell SRS provides researchers with a wide range of valuable information on the frequency and severity of head impacts a player receives during games and practices. Data gathered from the system will be combined with genetic information from players that experience concussion, with the objective of helping physicians diagnose concussion and better identify when a player might be expected to recover and return to the field.

“Player protection has become an essential part of football, and this cutting-edge partnership sets ASU apart from not only the rest of the conference, but every collegiate football program in the nation,” ASU Head Coach Todd Graham said. “We are not only looking out for our student-athletes while they are enrolled at ASU, but for the rest of their lives. You become a part of the brotherhood once you put on the maroon and gold, and that doesn’t end at graduation.”

Riddell will also utilize the player head impact data collected from the ASU and TGen research partnership to inform the development of new football helmets and further refine updates to smart helmet technologies like Riddell SRS and its recently launched Riddell InSite Impact Response System.

“We’re impressed by the enthusiasm exhibited by our partners, Arizona State University and TGen, as we enter the second season of our important research collaboration,” President of Riddell Dan Arment said. “They have matched our level of passion for football, and we are all committed to better protecting those that play the sport we love. We are left encouraged following the first year of our project and look forward to continuing on the path towards advancing concussion detection and treatment of athletes.”

The researchers at TGen are exploring whether the effects of sub-concussive hits are identifiable through blood-based molecular information. Their findings could prove pivotal to the game of football and other sports. Similar to last season, during this phase of the study the TGen faculty and staff are on the sidelines collecting samples and data. A baseline sample was collected from all participating players prior to their pre-season workouts. Since then, the researchers have followed the team through their daily workouts and will continue throughout the season.

Through the collection of samples over various points in time and the data generated by Riddell SRS, the goal is to identify the genomic changes in athletes exposed to routine head impacts during practice and games, athletes with diagnosed concussions that recover on both a routine time scale, and athletes with persistent symptoms following concussion that require additional treatment.

“As the mother of a young son who has played football, I’m keenly aware of the need to improve the current standards in place today for dealing with this issue,” said TGen Associate Professor Dr. Kendall Van Keuren-Jensen, whose technique for studying the collected samples drives this unique partnership. “As a researcher whose daily work looks for ways to determine the early warning signs of head injury, I get to see first hand how committed Arizona State University and Riddell are to student-athlete safety, and their determination to improve the game at all levels.”

Following the season long campaign, the researchers will gather post-season data and begin the analysis process with their colleagues at Barrow Neurological Institute and A.T. Still University. During this process, TGen will work closely with Barrow, whose B.R.A.I.N.S. (Barrow Resource for Acquired Injury to the Nervous System) program treats patients who have sustained a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury. The Barrow data will provide the researchers with additional concussion data and allow for comparison between data sets.

Meenakshi Wadhwa, director of the Center of Meteorite Studies in ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, holds lunar meteorite NWA 7611. The gift will be on display for the short term, but there are plans to use it for research purposes in future years.
Photo by Andy DeLisle.

ASU receives rare space rock gift

Arizona State University’s Center for Meteorite Studies recently received a precious gift. Aside from its price tag, what makes this space rock so special is where it came from: the moon.

The new sample belongs to the rare class of meteorites originating from the moon called “lunaites.” Of all known distinct meteorites in this world, of which there are tens of thousands, less than a hundred are thought to come from the moon.

The softball-sized meteorite donation is valued at about a quarter of a million dollars, and is likely to be the most significant single donation ever made to the center.

“Of the tens of thousands of known meteorites (most of which come from asteroids), only a very tiny fraction are lunaites. So this is a very rare kind, even among meteorites, which are themselves quite rare among rocks found on Earth,” says Meenakshi Wadhwa, director of the center and professor in ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration. “This new sample is probably one of our most prized pieces and, without a doubt, one of the most significant recent additions to our collection.”

Known as Northwest Africa 7611, this meteorite was found near the Moroccan/Algerian border in May 2012. It was subsequently purchased by the donor, Jay Piatek, from a Moroccan meteorite dealer. Piatek is an avid meteorite collector and owns one of the more significant private collections in the world. He is a supporter and generous donor to university and museum collections.

The center has six other lunaites in its collection, but their total weight is only about 60 grams. As such, this new lunaite, weighing 311 grams, represents a five-fold increase in the total mass of lunar material in the collection. The total known weight of the original specimen was 916 grams, and the mass donated to the center is the largest remaining mass (or main mass) of this meteorite.

Photo of the spectacular 311 gram lunar meteorite (NWA 7611) on display in ASU’s Center for Meteorite Studies. The cut and polished surface uniquely shows the great diversity of rock types on the lunar surface. Photo by Laurence Garvie.

Photo of the spectacular 311 gram lunar meteorite (NWA 7611) on display in ASU’s Center for Meteorite Studies. The cut and polished surface uniquely shows the great diversity of rock types on the lunar surface. Photo by Laurence Garvie.

“The chemistry, mineralogy and textures of lunar meteorites, or lunaites, are similar to samples that were brought back from the moon by the Apollo missions (1969-1972). These characteristics are quite distinct from other classes of meteorites and terrestrial rocks,” explains Wadhwa. “Lunaites can have a small amount of metal, but it is present in very small abundance compared to ordinary chondrites, for example, which are the most common types of meteorites.”

Classified as a lunar regolith breccia, this meteorite contains a mix of rock types from the moon’s mare and highlands. However, because there is very little mare material on the far side of the moon, this regolith breccia most likely came from the near side (that has both mare and highlands material).

The gift will be on display for the short term, but there are plans to use it for research purposes in future years.

“It is a beautiful, fresh-looking piece, with one cut and polished face that shows the internal texture and fabric of the rock – as such, it displays a unique snapshot of the lunar surface,” says the Center for Meteorites collections manager Laurence Garvie.

Consisting of specimens from around 2,000 separate meteorite falls and finds, meteorites in the center’s collection represent samples collected from every part of the world. Visitors may explore the collection weekdays, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., on the second floor of Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV.

college_students

Record 82,000 students choose ASU

While college enrollments may have slowed in recent years, Arizona State University continues to draw record numbers of academically qualified students who are eager to learn and embark on their journey to a better life.

As the fall 2014 semester gets under way Aug. 21, the university anticipates an enrollment of more than 82,000 undergraduate and graduate students – a new record for number of students enrolled and a nearly 8 percent increase from last year. Increases also are seen in number of transfer, international and veteran and veteran dependent students, and the student body is the most diverse ever.

“Students are choosing ASU because they know we are the right choice to help open their eyes to a new world filled with possibilities. They have come here to work hard and we are committed to teaching, guiding and mentoring them along the way,” said Kent Hopkins, ASU Vice Provost for Enrollment Services. “The Sun Devil family grows stronger every year and we are looking forward to seeing what our students envision and accomplish.”

Preliminary first-day enrollment shows records set across nearly all areas. Undergraduate enrollment grew to 66,309 and graduate school enrollment grew to 15,751 for a total of 82,060.

Getting ready to start the school year is Preston Adcock, from Glendale, a junior life sciences major in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences and a Barrett honors student. He has his dream set on going to medical school and working as an orthopedic surgeon or in emergency medicine. He is working in ASU Professor Carl Wagner’s organic chemistry lab.

“I like New College and West campus because it’s small enough to make friends on campus whether you live on or off campus,” Adcock said. “The professors are fantastic.”

Freshman enrollment this year grew to more than 11,000. Applications received were more than 46,000, a 25 percent increase over the previous academic year. The Fall 2014 freshman class is an academically strong group, with an average high school GPA 3.4 and average SAT score of 1113. More than half, 54 percent, are New American University Scholars at the Dean, Provost and President Scholarship levels, the most prestigious scholarships for first-time freshmen.

Transfer enrollment has grown to more than 8,800 – up nearly 13 percent from fall 2013. The transfer class is academically strong, with an average 3.1 transfer GPA.

Jonathan Williams transferred to ASU from Glendale Community College in Glendale (metro Los Angeles) California. He is currently studying communications, but plans to switch to journalism to pursue his career goal of becoming a sports journalist. He learned about the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication from friends at a USC football game and decided to apply, because “it’s better than the state journalism schools in California.” He’ll be working as a news reporter at the State Press this semester.

“I’m looking forward to the resources at a major research university, and delving into writing and photography as part of my job at the State Press,” Williams said. “For me, writing is a passion, and I want to be a journalist because I want to be able to write about what’s important and going on in the world, and keep people informed.”

International campus-based enrollment increased 33.6 percent to 8,787 students. The top 10 countries for international enrollment at ASU are China, India, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Canada, Kuwait, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Mexico. In addition, some 600 Brazilian students are calling ASU their educational home for the next academic year through their government-sponsored Brazil Scientific Mobility Program.

Viswajith Hanasoge Nataraja, from Bangalore, India, is pursuing his master’s degree in mechanical engineering at the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering and his area of interest is fluid mechanics and energy. He is a student worker in the University Sustainability Practices office, is actively involved in the Zero Waste at ASU initiative, and is vice-president of the Indian Student Association at ASU.

“I spoke to many friends here in the U.S. and in India, and to my lecturers in India, and their top recommendation was ASU because of its infrastructure, attention to detail and quality of the faculty. It also has excellent research facilities,” he said. “I enjoy being a part of ASU’s sustainability efforts, and think that this will also give me an edge in my professional skill set.”

Other milestones: The ASU student body is the most diverse, 34 percent, ever; new graduate enrollment increased more than 10 percent; and more than 4,000 veterans and veteran dependents have enrolled– a 25 percent increase in overall enrollment and a 62 percent growth in new graduate enrollment since last year.

Patrick Harris, a senior airman in the Arizona National Guard out of Tucson, is majoring in music education with a minor in youth services leadership. A sophomore from Newport News, Va., who served in the Air Force for four-and-a-half years, he found through research that ASU is one of the top schools for supporting military veterans and for music education.

“The experience at ASU has been getting even better, especially as I take advantage of the opportunities to get involved in activities and organizations. I’m part of the Sigma Alpha Lambda fraternity, and am involved with the marching band at Marco de Niza High School in Tempe, Scottsdale and Mesa Community Colleges’ bands, and Sonic Brass Band,” said Harris. “I’ve always wanted to teach music, and knew that I needed a degree to do so. I wanted to put in the work to achieve my dream.”

college student

ASU freshman class breaks records for enrollment

Arizona State University is welcoming an academically strong and remarkably diverse freshman class that includes many students who have distinguished themselves both inside and outside the classroom.

The new class of Sun Devils rises from the largest pool of freshman applicants in the university’s history, and among its ranks are a 16-year-old with four associate’s degrees, a retired Marine Corps sergeant, a first-generation college student from the top of her high school class, and twin sisters who perform with the Thailand Youth Orchestra.

“The more than 46,000 applications we received from aspiring freshman is a testament to ASU’s reputation as a premier university, and the quality of the students who are joining our community of higher learning signals great things for ASU’s future,” said Provost Robert Page.

The number of students applying for admission as first-time freshmen represented a 25 percent increase over the previous academic year. The Fall 2014 freshman class is an academically strong group, with an average high school GPA 3.4 and average SAT score of 1113. More than half, 54 percent, are New American University Scholars at the Dean, Provost and President Scholarship levels, the most prestigious scholarships for first-time freshmen.

Kevin Davies, from Kingman, is a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Dean’s Scholar. A sergeant in the Marine Corp infantry who served in the Middle East and Asia, he is a psychology major who has his sights set on being a doctor.

Davies said he is looking forward to “being around people again and challenging myself in a different way.”

Among this year’s class are 6,236 Arizona residents – some 450 students more than last year’s in-state freshman class. 62 percent of these students graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class.

Barrett, the Honors College celebrates a new record of 1,647 high-achieving first-time freshmen. The majority, 1,206, are Arizona residents. Among these honors students is 16-year-old Alexander (AJ) Gilman from Paradise Valley. A business and legal studies major in W. P. Carey School of Business, he enters ASU with 111 college credits and associate’s degrees in business, arts, science and general studies.

Gilman comes from a Sun Devil family and his mom has an accounting degree from W. P. Carey and a law degree from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. Hoping to follow in his mother’s foot steps, with his eyes set on law school, he chose Barrett “because it offered an individualized experience and a feeling of community,” which is important to him.

ASU continues to honor its longstanding commitment to socioeconomic diversity and access to education with more than 42 percent of enrolled Arizona residents reporting they will be the first in their family to go to a four-year college, and 39 percent coming from low-income families.

Sarah Rutkowski, from Chandler, is a first-generation college student who was awarded an APS scholarship. Also a first-generation immigrant whose parents came from Poland, Rutkowski overcame a challenging childhood and graduated in the top 4 percent of her class from Corona High School.

A record number of non-resident students also have made ASU their school of choice. 4,399 students representing all 50 states and 63 countries are members of this year’s class with the largest number – 1,173 – coming from California. ASU has increasingly becoming a school of choice for students from the Golden State.

Collectively, this year’s freshmen make up ASU’s most diverse class to date, in terms of their racial and ethnic backgrounds – 39.4 percent of the class.

Xochil Rina Goretsky, a Yaqui-Chicano-Jewish American from Mendocino, Calif., is a Barrett Honors student majoring in public health at the College of Health Solutions on the Downtown Phoenix campus. Her path to college has been a personal challenge after suffering a severe concussion in junior high school. She had to re-learn how to read, among other things, and said what kept her going was a desire to change the world.

After being accepted to ASU, the University of Arizona and Drexel University she chose ASU. “I felt ASU said, ‘We believe in you and are willing to invest in you because we know you are going to put in 110 percent,” said Goretsky. “I want to explore and I think this is the place to do it.”

More than 900 new international students will call ASU and the Phoenix-area home. Twin sisters Rittika and Ruchika Gambhir made a long journey from Bangkok, Thailand to attend ASU, and it was their only choice due to the “dedicated faculty,” “diversity of culture,” and “amazing atmosphere.”

Both students in the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts, Ruchika is a double major in oboe performance and music education and Rittika is a double major in bassoon and music education. Their goal is to become professional musicians working in a symphony orchestra in the U.S.

Many incoming freshmen have selected ASU due to the variety of academic environments it provides students across its five Arizona locations. Students choose from more than 300 academic majors and select the campus environment that is best fit for their academic, social and cultural needs. Students seeking a small campus experience with big university are part of the West campus environment with 385 new freshmen, the Polytechnic Campus with 579 new freshmen, or the ASU Colleges at Lake Havasu City with 33 new freshmen.

In addition, the Downtown Phoenix campus will welcome 1,318 new freshmen and Tempe Campus will be home for 8,320 first-time freshmen.

“No other university in the United States offers students these types of educational and campus environment experiences under one university name,” said Kent Hopkins, vice provost for enrollment services. “There is no place quite like Arizona State.”

ASU

More than 13,500 students moving into ASU

A strong demand for quality academic programs and the student experience at Arizona State University has led to a record number of students choosing to live on campus this year. More than 13,500 first-year and returning students move into residence halls this weekend.

Approximately 8,300 first-year students – an all-time record – will live in ASU’s residential colleges, while approximately 5,500 upper class students have chosen to live at Tempe, Downtown, Polytechnic and West campus residential locations.

First-year students at the Tempe, West and Downtown Phoenix campuses move in over the weekend on Saturday, Aug. 16, and Sunday, Aug. 17. First-year students at the Polytechnic campus move in on Monday, Aug. 18.

Cruise-ship or assisted move-in will be available on all four campuses. Student volunteers will be on-hand to answer questions and help ease the transition to living on campus.

Classes begin at all campuses on Aug. 21.

All first-year students will live in the university’s residential college housing model, which places students in specific halls based on their academic college enrollment. These residential facilities boast classrooms and multi-use rooms that offer space for tutoring, supplemental instruction, study groups, workshops and events. Residential colleges are essential to academic success and also help students quickly form social connections and build a community of peers and mentors.

“Living on campus supports student success,” said Jennifer Hightower, deputy vice president of student services. “Students have a greater sense of connection and involvement with their professors and peers and benefit from a more personalized experience at the university.”

Students representing all 50 states and more than 30 countries will enjoy assisted move-in and in-person help from a team of student volunteers.

carey school - graduate

T.W. Lewis Foundation awards scholarships

The T.W. Lewis Foundation and Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University have established a partnership to help honors students develop strong leadership skills. Together they are creating specialized classes to enhance the honors curriculum and better prepare students for their chosen careers. The focused classes are under development and will be available beginning in the 2015-2016 academic year. The T.W. Lewis Foundation began supporting Barrett through its scholarship program, which awards academic scholarships to Maricopa County high school seniors who are planning to attend Barrett. The Honors College currently has 25 T.W. Lewis Foundation Scholars within its program.

T.W. Lewis Foundation is the only partnership of its kind within Barrett. The importance the foundation places on leadership, career development and community involvement complement the vision of the Honors College. The financial support provided by T.W. Lewis Foundation is also essential for most students within the program, as up to 95 percent of Barrett students receive merit-based aid while 40 percent have need-based financial support in addition to their merit-based assistance.

The T.W. Lewis Foundation Scholarship Program began in 2002 and, to-date, has committed more than $2.6 million helping 130 Maricopa County high school seniors. Each of those scholars has received a $20,000 four year academic scholarship. Focused specifically to help the local students, the program has narrowed its efforts since it began 13 years ago, and is now solely supporting students that are attending Barrett. By having all the students at one school, it allows the scholarship to offer more things to students like special classes, conferences and career counseling.

“The purpose of the T.W. Lewis Foundation Scholarship Program is to provide high potential student leaders with self-awareness tools, career counseling, learning opportunities and financial aid so they can reach their potential and have a positive impact on the Valley and beyond,” says Tom Lewis, owner and CEO of T.W. Lewis Company and founder, with his wife Jan, of the T.W. Lewis Foundation. “Through the scholarship program and our partnership with Barrett, we are identifying tomorrow’s leaders now, then helping to prepare them for a life of achievement and service.”

The class of 2014 T.W. Lewis Scholars are from all areas of the Valley, reaching from Gilbert to Peoria. Applications are accepted each spring with recipients selected based upon leadership qualities, entrepreneurial potential, strong personal character, academic achievement and financial need. The 2014 recipients are:

• Ruth Hicks, Higley High School
• Carolina Loera, Marcos de Niza High School
• Crystal Loza, Metro Tech High School
• Thomas Murphy, Mesquite High School
• Malachi Payne, Marcos de Niza High School
• Troy Penny, Centennial High School
• Audrie Pirkl, Bourgade Catholic High School
• Kaitlyn Selman, Desert Vista High School
• Shimoli Shah, Corona Del Sol High School
• Spencer Wilhelm, Perry High School

Barrett is a unique experience for 5,000 students at ASU. While the university has an enrollment of more than 75,000 students, Barrett delivers a small, intellectual environment by providing its own housing, as well as a place to dine and study. In addition, it offers its students enriched academic courses and events. The new honors courses developed through the partnership will explore and enhance personal and professional development and include themed topics like: Life Lessons; Values, Character and Leadership; Decision Making and Risk Taking; and Success.

“It is meaningful for us to work with an organization like the T.W. Lewis Foundation that shares a common goal of cultivating young leaders to positively impact the community,” says Lexi Killoren, Director of Development at Barrett, The Honors College at ASU. “At Barrett, we often say this is where ability meets opportunity. Because of the time and financial resources Tom and Jan Lewis have invested in our program, our gifted students are able to garner much more than academic discipline during their time with us. They gain a deeper appreciation by interacting with corporate and
community leaders, delving into career opportunities and giving back to the community.”

Nicole France-Stanton, office managing partner, Quarles & Brady.

Stanton named ‘Woman Worth Watching’

The law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Phoenix Office Managing Partner Nicole Stanton has been selected by Profiles in Diversity Journal to be honored at its 13th Annual Women Worth Watching® Awards. Stanton will join trailblazing female leaders from across the country in this honor and will be featured in the September/October issue of the magazine.

“Women Worth Watching award winners are role models to young women beginning their careers, and an inspiration to women in the pipeline,” says Profiles in Diversity Journal editor, Kathie Sandlin. “We are proud to tell their stories on lessons learned and obstacles overcome.”

In addition to her position as office manager partner at Quarles & Brady LLP, Stanton is a member of the firm’s Commercial Litigation Group. Her experience includes defense of local and national law firms in legal malpractice actions and other business litigation disputes.

In the Phoenix community, Stanton serves as a founding board member and past president of the Women’s Metropolitan Arts Council of the Phoenix Art Museum as well as a member of Chart 100 Women. She also is an adjunct professor at Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, teaching professional responsibility. A graduate of Valley Leadership Class XXIX, Stanton was the YWCA of Maricopa County’s 2011 Tribute to Women honoree, in the Business Leader category. She also was honored as one of the “50 Most Influential Women in Business” by AZ Business Magazine.

Stanton recently has been appointed to serve as a member of the Business Court Advisory Committee, newly established by order of Chief Justice Rebecca White Berch, which is examining current processes for resolving business cases in the Superior Court of Arizona as well as reviewing business court models, processes, rules and procedures in other jurisdictions.

Stanton received her law degree, magna cum laude, from the University of Arizona and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Utah.

housing

Phoenix Housing Market in a Slump

The Phoenix-area housing market is officially in a slump. That’s according to a new report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, which reveals the latest details on Maricopa and Pinal counties, as of June:

* Though the median single-family home price went up 11 percent from last June, the forward price movement has dramatically slowed down from last year.
* Activity in the market remains sluggish, with single-family home sales down 11 percent from last June.
* A few slightly encouraging signs were for builders, who saw an uptick in new-home sales in June and their highest monthly total of new single-family construction permits in more than two years.

Phoenix-area home prices shot up from September 2011 to last summer, before slowing down and then even dropping a little earlier this year. Then, this June – after three months of almost stagnant prices – the median single-family-home price finally rose to $211,000. That’s up 11 percent from $190,000 last June. Realtors will note the average price per square foot went up about 10 percent. However, the report’s author says we’re not likely to see much more forward movement for a while.

“We’re in an 11-month slump in demand; sales were very low in the spring,” says Mike Orr, director of the Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “There are a few positive signs that demand may gradually start to recover during the second half of this year, but we are unlikely to see much help for pricing until 2015 because there is always a long delay – typically nine to 15 months — between any change in the market and the resulting change in pricing. Meantime, we may see a little downward correction, not a bubble bursting, as some have predicted.”

While sales of luxury homes continue to do OK in this market, demand for other categories remains weak. Sales of single-family homes and condos were down 11 percent from last June to this June.

Fewer investors are focusing their attention on the Phoenix area, now that better bargains can be found elsewhere. The percentage of Phoenix-area residential properties purchased by investors dropped all the way from the peak of 39.7 percent in July 2012 to 14.4 percent this June. That’s down around the historic norm for the Phoenix area. However, something is changing a little to create a different type of demand.

“We are finally seeing a change in the trend of low household formation,” explains Orr. “The nation saw some improvement in the second quarter of 2014. This means more people may be moving out and renting or buying their own homes.”

Perhaps in response to increased household formation, new-home sales had a pretty good month in June. For the first month all year, new-home sales topped the same time last year. In fact, new-home sales went up 5 percent just from May to June alone. New single-family construction permits also hit their highest monthly total since May 2012. Multi-family construction permits and rents continue on a strong upward trend, too.

Still, the supply of homes available for sale, especially at the lower end of the market, remains slim. Active listings (excluding homes already under contract) fell 5 percent during June. Also, new foreclosures aren’t broadly becoming available to create new supply. Completed foreclosures went down 35 percent from last June to this June.

Orr’s full report, including statistics, charts and a breakdown by different areas of the Valley, can be viewed and downloaded at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/realtyreports. A podcast with more analysis from Orr will also be available from knowWPCarey, the business school’s online resource and newsletter, at http://knowwpcarey.com/index.cfm?cid=13.

AZBio Pioneer Honoree Roy Curtiss, III, Ph.D. of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. Photo Courtesy of ASU.

AZBio honors ASU scientist Curtiss

Roy Curtiss, III, Ph.D., of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, has been selected as the recipient of the 2014 AZBio Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement by the Arizona Bioindustry Association.

“During his career, Roy Curtiss has had a profound impact on microbiology research and been a true pioneer in developing salmonella-based vaccines that are effective against a range of infectious diseases, which are still the leading cause of worldwide death,” said Joan Koerber-Walker, president and CEO of AZBio. “His contributions since being recruited to Arizona a decade ago have continued unabated, and he is now on the cusp of bringing his remarkable discoveries to the marketplace.”

“Roy’s lifelong dedication and achievements in bioscience research, education and innovation are really quite remarkable, and his efforts have inspired countless life science careers,” said Biodesign Institute Executive Director Raymond DuBois, M.D., Ph.D. “His passion and commitment in taking on the challenges of combating infectious diseases and the impact he is having on urgent societal problems make him a stellar example of the translational research spirit of the Biodesign Institute.”

Curtiss was drawn to ASU President Michael Crow’s vision of a New American University and a new state-of-the-art research enterprise, the Biodesign Institute, which opened in 2004. Shortly after arriving at ASU, Curtiss received the largest support of his career, more than $15.4 million from the Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He has also received generous and continued support from the National Institutes of Health throughout his career.

Curtiss’ primary focus is alleviating worldwide suffering and death from infectious diseases, particularly in the developing world. At Biodesign, he directs the Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, where he oversees a 130-member research team working on more than a dozen projects. He is also a professor in ASU’s School of Life Sciences and a member of the prestigious National Academy of Sciences.

One of his major projects is development of a next-generation vaccine against bacterial pneumonia. Bacterial pneumonia kills more children around the world each year than any other infectious disease, and the rising costs of vaccines has spurred researchers to develop new solutions. Curtiss and his global team are trying to perfect a safe, yet potent vaccine to fight pneumonia and can be tolerated even by newborn babies — and orally administered as a single-dose, low-cost solution. If successful, the new vaccine against bacterial pneumonia promises to outperform existing injectable vaccine in terms of safety, affordability, ease of distribution and effectiveness.

Preliminary studies have been successful, and the vaccine technology has moved forward to human clinical trials. In addition, his team is also targeting vaccine development for a host of other diseases, and to protect poultry and livestock against a broad range of bacterial marauders.

Before coming to ASU in 2004, Curtiss was the George William and Irene Keochig Freiberg professor of biology at Washington University in St. Louis, where he chaired the Department of Biology for ten years. His body of published work includes more than 250 reviewed articles. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and a doctorate from the University of Chicago.

A ceremony honoring Curtiss will take place at the AZBio Awards on September 17, 2014 at the Phoenix Convention Center. The AZBio Awards ceremony celebrates Arizona’s leading educators, innovators and companies. Each year, AZBio honors bioindustry leaders from across the state of Arizona who are illustrative of the depth, breadth and expertise of our bioscience industry.

Past recipients of the AZBio Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement include: David S. Alberts, M.D., Director Emeritus at the Arizona Cancer Center, Raymond L. Woosley, M.D., Ph.D., Chairman Emeritus of the Critical Path Institute, and Thomas M. Grogan, M.D., founder of Ventana Medical Systems, Inc.

For registration and more information, go to www.azbio.awards.com.

mars

NASA chooses ASU for Mars 2020 mission

Arizona State University has been selected by NASA to design, deliver and oversee the Mastcam-Z imaging investigation, a pair of color panoramic zoom cameras, on the next rover mission to be launched to the surface of Mars in 2020. Jim Bell, a professor in ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, will be the principal investigator overseeing the investigation.

NASA has selected the instruments that will be carried aboard the Mars 2020 mission, a roving laboratory based on the highly successful Curiosity rover. The instruments were competitively selected from 58 proposals submitted, two times the average number of proposals submitted for instrument competitions in the recent past and an indicator of the extraordinary interest in exploration of the Red Planet.

The Mars 2020 rover will be designed to seek signs of past life on Mars, to collect and store samples that could be returned to Earth in the future, and to test new technology to benefit future robotic and human exploration of Mars. The instruments onboard will help to build upon the many discoveries from the Curiosity Mars rover and the two Mars Exploration Rovers (Spirit and Opportunity) and will be the critical next step in NASA’s strategic program of exploring the Red Planet.

Bell will oversee an international science team responsible for creating and operating the cameras on NASA’s next, yet-to-be-named, Mars rover. Bell has been responsible for the science imaging systems onboard the NASA Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, and is the deputy P.I. of the color cameras on the Curiosity rover.

“These cameras will be the main eyes of NASA’s next rover,” says Bell.

The imaging system ASU will deliver is a pair of multispectral, stereoscopic cameras that will be an enhanced descendant of Curiosity’s successful imaging instrument called Mastcam. Mastcam-Z will be comprised of two zoom camera heads to be mounted on the rover’s remote sensing mast. This matched pair of zoom cameras will each provide broad-band red/green/blue (RGB) color imaging, as well as narrow-band visible to short-wave near-infrared multispectral capability.

Mastcam-Z will have all of the capabilities of Curiosity’s imaging instrument, but is augmented by a 3.6:1 zoom feature capable of resolving features about 1 millimeter in size in the near field and about 3-4 centimeters in size at 100 meter distance.

“The cameras that we will build and use on Mars are based on Curiosity’s cameras but with enhanced capabilities,” explains Bell. “Specifically we will be able to use our zoom capability to allow us to play a much more significant role in rover driving and target selection.”

Mastcam-Z’s imaging will permit the science team to piece together the geologic history of the site—the stratigraphy of rock outcrops and the regolith, as well as to constrain the types of rocks present. The cameras will also document dynamic processes and events via video (such as dust devils, cloud motions, and astronomical phenomena, as well as activities related to driving, sampling, and caching), observe the atmosphere, and contribute to rover navigation and target selection for investigations by the coring/caching system, as well as other instruments.

Bell’s large international science team will include Mark Robinson, School of Earth and Space Exploration professor and principal investigator for the imaging system on board NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera. Robinson brings significant experience in planetary geology and spacecraft imaging and will be responsible for characterizing the regolith from Mastcam‐Z images and assisting with camera calibration and mission operations.

In addition, Bell intends to involve a significant number of staff, undergraduate students, and graduate students in the mission. For example, SESE Research Scientist Craig Hardgrove and Technology Support Analyst Austin Godber are slated to play leading roles in the design, testing, and operations of the Mastcam-Z investigation.

Mastcam-Z remote instrument operations will be directed from the ASU Science Operations Center (SOC), housed in the Mission Operations Center located in the Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV on the ASU campus. ASU faculty, staff, and students will work closely with mission engineering leads at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

“We are very excited about playing such a critical role in NASA’s next Mars rover. And we are especially excited because this rover will be the first step in NASA’s Mars rover sample return mission,” says Bell. “We are eager are to play a role in the selection of the first Martian samples for eventual return to Earth.”

first solar - new ceo

Study: Humble CEOs Good for Business

Forget the stereotypes of arrogant, macho leaders who don’t care about anyone else’s opinion. A new study from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University shows humble CEOs significantly benefit a company and its management — likely more than the blowhards who think it’s their way or the highway.

“Humble CEOs are more open to making joint decisions and empowering others,” says Professor Angelo Kinicki of the W. P. Carey School of Business, one of the study authors. “Their behavior positively affects both top and middle managers, who then exhibit higher commitment, work engagement, job satisfaction and job performance. We see a trickle-down effect that seems to influence the company overall.”

The new research published in Administrative Science Quarterly comes from Kinicki, Anne Tsui and David Waldman of the W. P. Carey School of Business, as well Amy Ou of the National University of Singapore, Zhixing Xiao of George Washington University, and Lynda Jiwen Song of the Renmin University of China.

They interviewed the CEOs of 63 private companies in China. They also created and administered surveys measuring humility and its effects to about 1,000 top- and middle-level managers who work with those CEOs. The researchers specifically chose China because they needed a context in which CEOs would display a wide variety of humility levels. However, they believe the findings will generalize to many companies in the United States.

“Our study suggests the ‘secret sauce’ of great, humble managers,” explains Kinicki. “They are more willing to seek feedback about themselves, more empathetic and appreciative of others’ strengths and weaknesses, and more focused on the greater good and others’ welfare than on themselves.”

Kinicki says leadership behavior normally cascades downward, so it’s likely humility at the top effects just about everyone at a company. He points out a few examples of humble CEOs making news:

* Tony Hsieh of Zappos is a Harvard graduate, who helped boost his company to more than $1 billion in gross merchandise sales annually. He also helped drive Zappos onto Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” list, with innovative customer- and employee-pleasing policies, such as “The Offer,” where new employees are offered one-month’s salary to leave the company if they’re not dedicated and happy.

* John Mackey of Whole Foods has shown concern for the greater good through his advocacy of organic food and spearheading his company’s move to become the first grocery-store chain to set standards for humane animal treatment. He also announced in 2006 that he was chopping his salary to $1, putting caps on executive pay, and setting up a $100,000 emergency fund for staff facing personal problems.

* Mary Barra of General Motors has faced severe criticism for problems created at the company before she took the helm in January. However, she has been quick to apologize and maintain that she’s moving from a “cost culture” to a “customer culture” at GM. She has promised to do “the right thing” for those affected by recent recalls and the problems that led to them.

Kinicki knows some people may be surprised by the study results, but he summarizes, “It’s time we understood that humility isn’t a sign of weakness or lacking confidence, but rather, a good thing that can benefit us all.”

The full study is available at http://asq.sagepub.com/content/59/1/34.full.pdf+html.

ASU

ASU ranks among ‘best buy’ public colleges

Arizona State University has been named a “best buy” among public colleges and universities for 2015, according to Fiske Guide to Colleges.

ASU is among 22 public colleges in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom selected for their demonstrated commitment to quality academics and affordability.

According to Fiske, ASU is a place “where massive innovation is the norm and where an interdisciplinary culture is seen as the best means of developing world-changing ideas.” The research enterprise is growing in size and impact and the university is retaining and graduating more of its students.

In addition to highlighting the university’s top-rated academic programs in engineering, journalism, business, education, sciences, social sciences, sustainability, nursing, and health solutions, Fiske also offers an insight into the collaborative culture at ASU that is focused on student success.

According to an ASU kinesiology major quoted in the guide, “despite the challenging nature of the classes, professors are always willing to go above and beyond to ensure that the student is successful.” Another student quoted in Fiske said, “the courses are difficult, but the group aspect of most project work makes the hard work much less overwhelming.”

Fiske cites as an example of ASU’s world-class facilities the nine-acre Barrett, The Honors College residential community that was designed by students, faculty and staff members working together with renowned architects. Other residence halls on campus are quoted as having larger than average rooms that are well furnished, and a diverse menu of food items.

School spirit receives high marks at ASU, thanks to highly ranked Division 1 athletics. The countless opportunities available to students, to get involved in student organizations, research or internships; study abroad in more than 300 programs in nearly 60 countries; or interact with other students socially add to a Sun Devil’s college experience.

Representative of Arizona’s socioeconomic, racial and ethnic make up, 19 percent of ASU’s student population is Hispanic, five percent of all students are African American, six percent are Asian Americans, and nearly two percent are Native Americans. ASU offers merit-based scholarships to qualified students and is also home to the Pat Tillman Veterans Center that provides a number of academic and student support services to more than 2,300 veterans and their dependents, enrolled as undergraduate and graduate students.

ASU has been consistently ranked among the top universities in the United States and the world. The Center for World University Rankings, and the Academic Ranking of World Universities, both rank ASU as one of the top 100 universities in the world. The U.S. News and World Report list ASU as second on the roster of schools that are making the most promising and innovative changes in the areas of academics, faculty and student life. The Princeton Review has also named the university one of “The Best 378 Colleges” in a 2014 list.

trojan_colors_revealed_artists_concept

Asteroids named for 2 ASU faculty members

Two Arizona State University professors can add an unusual honor to the long list of accolades they have received: An asteroid has been named after each of them. This “out-of-this-world” honor has been conferred on professors Phil Christensen and Dave Williams. The two planetary geologists, both faculty members in ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, now have even more reason to be gazing at the night sky.

You know the names of our solar system’s planets, but you might not have realized that thousands of asteroids and minor planets revolving around the sun also have names.

Asteroid (10461) Dawilliams was discovered on December 6, 1978, by E. Bowell and A. Warnock at Palomar Observatory. It orbits about 2.42 astronomical units from the Earth in the Main Belt, the vast asteroid belt located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

Despite Hollywood’s love of Earth-smashing asteroid blockbusters, Williams has no worries that “his” asteroid will make doomsday headlines.

“It’s very unlikely that it will hit Earth, as it is in a stable orbit in the Main Belt,” explains Williams.
Also honored with an asteroid named for his work is Christensen, the instrument scientist for the OSIRIS-Rex Thermal Emission Spectrometer, a mineral-scouting instrument on the OSIRIS-REx mission to asteroid Bennu. He was also the principal investigator for the infrared spectrometers and imagers on NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey and Mars Exploration Rovers.

The asteroid is named (90388) Philchristensen and, like Williams’, it too is a Main Belt asteroid that is relatively small – approximately 4.6 kilometers (2.8 miles) across. It was discovered November 24, 2003 by the Catalina Sky Survey. It also poses no risk of collision with Earth.

“My research has long focused on Mars,” says Christensen. “But my broader interests involve all solar system bodies, and I’ve spent the last several years working on an asteroid mission. I really appreciate this honor.”

What’s in a name?
Having a namesake in the sky is no small honor. Unlike the selling of star names over the Internet, the naming of asteroids is serious business, presided over by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), an organization of professional astronomers.

Upon its discovery, an asteroid is assigned a provisional designation by the Minor Planet Center of the IAU that involves the year of discovery, two letters and, if need be, further digits. When its orbit can be reliably predicted, the asteroid receives a permanent number and becomes eligible for naming. Proposed names must be approved by the IAU’s Committee on Small Body Nomenclature.

Although many objects end up being named after astronomers and other scientists, some discoverers have named the object after celebrities. All four Beatles have their names on asteroids, for example, and there is even one named after James Bond – Asteroid (9007) James Bond.

“I was very surprised to receive this honor from the astronomical community. Only a select few of the Dawn at Vesta participating scientists, who did exemplary work during the mission, were so honored,” said Williams, whose expertise in mapping of volcanic surfaces has been key to developing geologic maps of planetary bodies that include Mars, Io and Vesta.

Christensen and Williams share this honor with several colleagues in the School of Earth and Space Exploration. The following all have namesakes in the sky:

• Erik Asphaug, professor – Asteroid (7939) Asphaug
• Jim Bell, professor – Asteroid (8146) Jimbell
• Lindy Elkins-Tanton, Foundation Professor and School of Earth and Space Exploration director – Asteroid (8252) Elkins-Tanton
• Ronald Greeley, professor emeritus – Asteroid (30785) Greeley, and Greeley’s Haven (on Mars)
• Sumner Starrfield, Regents’ Professor – Asteroid (19208) Starrfield
• Meenakshi Wadhwa, professor – Asteroid (8356) Wadhwa

Deliver on Your ROI, Business Meetings

Arizona MPI honors excellence with awards

The Arizona Sunbelt Chapter of Meeting Professionals International (AzMPI) recently recognized its members who went above and beyond to volunteer for the chapter. Winners include: Rising Star Award presented to Troy Peters with Video West; James A. Fausel Student of the Year Award presented to Shelby Wray, ASU; Committee of the Year Award presented to Sponsorship Committee; Host Property/Venue of the Year Award presented to TPC Scottsdale; Sponsorship of the Year Award given to kool Party Rentals; Member of the Year Award presented to Jacqi Marth, Destinations & Details; The Edward E. Scannell Award presented to Christina Tzavellas, CMP with CTZ and Associates; Supplier of the Year Award presented to Chip Headman, Williams & Associates; Planner of the Year Award presented to Susan Molinich, CMP, SMMC, American Express Meetings & Events; Presidents Achievement Awards were given to Jamie Cook, CMP, CMM, Strategic Meetings & Events and to Joanne Winter, AzMPI.

“We strive to promote excellence within the meeting industry through education, certification, advocacy and business-to-business networking opportunities for our members,” said 2013-2014 AzMPI President Jill Longfellow. “Anyone who plans or supports meetings in any capacity, whether an administrative assistant or a caterer, can benefit from what AzMPI offers.”

The 375-member Arizona Sunbelt Chapter of Meeting Professionals International was established in 1979. Meeting Professionals International is the meeting and event industry’s largest association for the $102.3 billion meetings and events industry. AZMPI offers monthly events providing education, and networking opportunities. MPI membership is comprised of more than 24,000 members belonging to 80 chapters and clubs worldwide. To learn more about AZMPI visit www.AZMPI.org or call 602-277-1494.

phoenix_housing_2909512_l

Phoenix Housing Shortage Coming?

The Phoenix area could soon see another shortage of homes for sale, like the one it endured from 2012 to 2013. According to a new report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, very weak demand is masking the fact that relatively few homes are coming onto the market for sale. The area only recently emerged from another shortage, when buyers had to battle each other for relatively few home options.

Here are the latest details about Maricopa and Pinal counties, as of May:

* The median single-family-home sales price was $205,000, almost unchanged for three months in a row.
* Activity in the market is extremely slow, with demand down around 20 percent from last May.
* This quietness is covering up the fact that the market’s supply of homes for sale has stabilized at about 10 percent below normal, which could lead to another shortage, if demand eventually picks up.

Phoenix-area home prices quickly rose from September 2011 to last summer, before slowing down and even dropping a little earlier this year. The median single-family-home sales price was $205,000 in May, about the same as it was in April and March. However, that’s still up about 11 percent from the median of $185,000 last May. Realtors will note the average price per square foot went up 6 percent year-over-year. The median townhouse/condo price went up 4 percent.

The market has now become extremely quiet, and further price increases are unlikely this year without some growth in demand. The amount of single-family-home sales went down 19 percent from last May to this May. Sales of townhomes and condos dropped 20 percent.

“Demand has been much weaker since July 2013,” says the report’s author, Mike Orr, director of the Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “The slight recovery in demand that had been developing over the last two months dissipated again in May. While move-up homeowners and second-home buyers are starting to compensate for the departure of investors who went to other areas of the country for better bargains, activity by first-time home buyers is still unusually slow.”

Orr says some home sellers even appear to be canceling their listings and waiting for another time when buyers have a greater sense of urgency. These families are: 1.) choosing to stay in their homes longer than they did 10 to 15 years ago; 2.) possibly stuck with negative or little equity in their homes, discouraging buying or selling; and/or 3.) wanting to stay in their current homes to preserve their very low mortgage interest rates.

That means the market’s short supply of homes isn’t expected to get much bigger in the near future. Though the supply of active listings went up 69 percent from June 1, 2013 to this June 1, it basically stabilized at about 10 percent below normal. Completed Phoenix-area foreclosures were down 50 percent from last May to this May, eliminating another possible significant source of supply. This could lead to another shortage like the recent one when we saw 95 offers on a single home.

“Between 2012 and 2013, we experienced a chronic housing shortage in Greater Phoenix,” explains Orr. “This shortage has just been temporarily masked by unusually low demand, but that could change at any time. The market has plenty of pent-up demand.”

Orr points out that population and job growth have recovered faster in the Phoenix area than home construction has. The level of single-family-home construction permitting remains very small by historic standards, and single-family new-home construction and sales remain about 65 percent below normal. One bright spot is Pinal County, where new-home sales went up 22 percent from last May to this May.

Meantime, multi-family construction permits and rental-home demand remain strong in the Phoenix area. Unemployment, falling birth rates and greater home-sharing are helping to drive this demand. The supply of single-family homes available for rent was down to 32 days on June 1. The fast turnover and low vacancy rates have already pushed rent up in the most popular locations.

Orr adds, “In Maricopa County, the percentage of properties purchased without financing in May was still at 25 percent. The normal range for cash buyers is only 7 to 12 percent, so mortgage lending still has a long way to go toward recovery.”

Orr’s full report, including statistics, charts and a breakdown by different areas of the Valley, can be viewed and downloaded at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/realtyreports. A podcast with more analysis from Orr will also be available from knowWPCarey, the business school’s online resource and newsletter, at http://knowwpcarey.com/index.cfm?cid=13.

SkySong 3 Progress, WEB

Theranos leases 20KSF at SkySong 3

A major consumer healthcare innovator shaping the future of lab testing will plant a significant flag at SkySong, the ASU Scottsdale Innovation Center.

Theranos, based in Palo Alto, Calif., has leased a 20,000-square-foot wing at SkySong 3, making it one of the largest tenants in the entire SkySong project. Beating all expectations, SkySong 3 is now over 80% leased as it nears its opening later this summer.

The move by Theranos means hundreds of jobs will be created at SkySong in the short term, with that figure increasing significantly as the company continues to grow.

Founded in 2003 by Elizabeth Holmes, Theranos is working to shape the future of lab testing and the way health information is collected, analyzed, and communicated. Theranos, in the words of one media outlet, “could turn the diagnostics industry upside down” and has the potential to save Arizona taxpayers $1.3 billion dollars over the next decade. Their service provides Phoenix-area consumers with convenient access to less invasive and more affordable clinician-directed lab testing from blood samples as small as a few drops collected from a tiny finger stick. Theranos has a national partnership with Walgreens and has been rolling out its Wellness Centers inside Walgreens stores across the U.S., including 25 locations and counting in central Arizona.

With its SkySong agreement, Theranos is expanding its footprint in the Valley. The company currently has an office in Kierland, and its signature presence at SkySong is the perfect fit for its rapidly growing entrepreneurial endeavor. CBRE acted as the company’s commercial real estate agent.

Sunny Balwani, President & COO of Theranos, said the company was drawn to SkySong because of its growing reputation as a center of innovation and technology.

“The Phoenix-area community’s reception to our company has been excellent,” Balwani said. “Our commitment to innovation will create hundreds of new jobs and positively impact Arizona over the coming months and years. The SkySong center is an ideal fit for our company, and we are excited to be a part of the project.”

Sharon Harper, President & CEO of Plaza Companies, the master developer of the project, said that Theranos is exactly the kind of company that will not only grow and thrive at SkySong, but will further the project’s mission as a home to innovation and entrepreneurship.

“You really could not ask for a better match in terms of innovative culture,” Harper said. “Elizabeth Holmes is the epitome of the word “entrepreneur”. She has a true passion to change the way laboratory testing is done and could change the way we detect and treat disease. We are thrilled to have Theranos become part of the SkySong family and we know that they will feel right at home in our innovative setting.”

With SkySong 3 approaching full occupancy, leasing is now well underway for SkySong 4.  The four-story, 150,000 SF building which will front Scottsdale Road south of SkySong Boulevard, is scheduled to break ground in late 2014.  Along with SkySong 3 and 4, the SkySong development team is now leasing a planned 10,500 square foot retail building to be built on the northeast corner of Scottsdale Road and SkySong Boulevard. It’s part of the overall mixed-use vision for SkySong, which will include 1.2 million square feet of development when completed.

SkySong, the ASU Scottsdale Innovation Center is a home to a global business community that links technology, entrepreneurship, innovation, and education to position ASU and Greater Phoenix as global leaders of the knowledge economy.

SkySong is a 42-acre mixed use development designed to:

• Create an ecology of collaboration and innovation among high-profile technology enterprises and related researchers;
• Advance global business objectives of on-site enterprises;
• Raise Arizona’s profile as a global center of innovation through co-location of ASU’s strategic global partners; and
• Create a unique regional economic and social asset.

Companies located at SkySong enjoy a special relationship with Arizona State University, which has more than 73,000 students at four metropolitan Phoenix campuses. Its campus in Tempe is the single largest campus in the U.S., and is located less than three miles from SkySong.

In addition to locating its own innovative research units at the center, ASU provides tenants with direct access to relevant research, educational opportunities and cultural events on its campuses. Through ASU’s on-site operations, tenant companies have a single point of contact for introductions to researchers, faculty and programs to address their specific needs.

thunderbird

Thunderbird School signs letter of intent to join ASU

The Thunderbird School of Global Management has signed a letter of intent to join Arizona State University.

The two schools released a statement Thursday that said both sides are working on a possible integration.

“This merger offers significant advantages to both institutions,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “Through the integration of Thunderbird with ASU, the Thunderbird historic global education vision will be sustained and extended, students at ASU and Thunderbird will have access to more courses and programs, ASU’s executive education programs can be broadened and expanded, and financial efficiencies will be created.”

A deal would provide broad educational cooperation, make Thunderbird staff part of ASU and put the Glendale-based school under the jurisdiction of the Arizona Board of Regents.

ASU and Thunderbird officials say they’re working diligently toward a final agreement by the end of this month.

Financial details of the deal haven’t been disclosed.

The statement says staff reductions are possible, but officials say the nature and the scale of the reductions still are being studied.

Ariel Anbar and ASU graduate student Yun Duan inspect a sample of 2.5 billion-year-old seafloor.

ASU biogeochemist among 15 top scientist-educators

Biogeochemist Ariel Anbar has been selected as Arizona State University’s first Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Professor. This distinguished honor recognizes Anbar’s pioneering research and teaching.

He is one of 15 professors from 13 universities whose appointments were announced by the Maryland-based biomedical research institute on June 30. The appointment includes a five-year $1 million grant to support Anbar’s research and educational activities.

Since the inception of the HHMI Professor program in 2002, and including the new group of 2014 professors, only 55 scientists have been appointed HHMI professors. These professors are accomplished research scientists who are working to change undergraduate science education in the United States.

“Exceptional teachers have a lasting impact on students,” said HHMI President Robert Tjian. “These scientists are at the top of their respective fields and they bring the same creativity and rigor to science education that they bring to their research.”

Anbar, a professor in ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the College of Liberal Art and Sciences, as well as a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist in the Global Institute of Sustainability, was named an ASU President’s Professor in 2013 in recognition of his pioneering online education efforts. He is deeply involved in using the medium to its fullest to help educate and encourage a generation that has grown up with the Internet.

A leading geoscientist with more than 100 peer-reviewed papers to his name, Anbar’s research focuses on Earth’s past and future as a habitable planet. This expertise feeds directly into his teaching in the highly successful class Habitable Worlds, developed through ASU Online. In Habitable Worlds, Anbar and course designer Lev Horodyskyj combine the power of the Internet, game-inspired elements, and the sensibilities of a tech savvy generation to teach what makes planets habitable and engage students in a simulated hunt for other habitable worlds in the cosmos. This innovative online course kindles student interest and learning. Beginning in fall 2014, it will be available outside of ASU as HabWorlds Beyond (www.habworlds.org), via a partnership with education technology company Smart Sparrow. Habitable Worlds has been taken by more than 1,500 ASU students and consistently receives outstanding student reviews.

The HHMI grant will enable Anbar to develop a suite of online virtual field trips (VFTs) that teach the story of Earth’s evolution as an inhabited world. The virtual field trips will be based on nearly 4 billion years of Earth’s geological record. These immersive, interactive VFTs will take students to locations that teach key insights into Earth’s evolution, fundamental principles of geology, and practices of scientific inquiry.

Anbar helped lead a multi-institutional team that developed a number of such VFTs for use in Habitable Worlds and elsewhere (vft.asu.edu), supported by the NASA Astrobiology Institute and the National Science Foundation. Now, working with ASU education technologist and doctoral student Geoffrey Bruce, ASU professor and geoscience education specialist Steven Semken, and partners at other institutions, Anbar will build virtual field trips covering the sweep of Earth history. He and his team will take students to some of the most important places on Earth to explore how the planet came to be what it is today.

“The goal is to develop powerful and engaging new tools to teach about Earth’s evolution,” explains Anbar. “In the near term, we will create VFT-based lessons that can be incorporated into existing introductory geoscience courses. Right away, that can impact the roughly 2,000 majors and non-majors who take such courses each year at ASU, as well as thousands of students elsewhere. In the long run we aim to create a fully online course like Habitable Worlds – I’m calling it Evolving World for now – that covers the content of one of the most important introductory geoscience courses, historical geology.”

Anbar’s plan could re-invigorate instruction in historical geology, which is taught in nearly every geoscience program. In addition to being fundamental to the field of geology, it provides vital context for the search for life beyond Earth, and for the changes that humans are causing to the planet. However, historical geology is best taught through field experiences, which are logistically challenging at large universities. Even when they are possible, it is impossible to expose students to all the most scientifically important sites because they are scattered around the globe. While VFTs cannot rival physical field trips, they are a big advance over teaching this material only through lectures.

“Most science classes teach science as facts and answers,” says Anbar. “With VFTs, as with Habitable Worlds, we are trying to teach that science is really a process – a process of exploration that helps us first organize our ignorance about questions to which we don’t have answers, and then helps us narrow the uncertainties so that we can replace ignorance with understanding.”

FBP Team Picture (Left to Right) - Lloyd Jones, Kim Sanderhoff, Scott Ferreira, Johan Bender

Free Bike Project rolls out new campus programs

Usually when someone is offering something for free, there is always a catch. With the Free Bike Project, the only catch is that for every free bike rented by a college student for an academic year, its founders donate a bike to someone in need overseas. The Free Bike Project was started by two students at the University of Southern California (USC) in 2011 and has now spread to 21 different campuses across the country. Last year, Free Bike Project started at Arizona State University (ASU) with 10 bikes and is looking to grow the program to the ASU’s downtown campus in Phoenix and to the University of Arizona (UA) in Tucson, Ariz. This fall, Free Bike Project is hoping to expand to 40 to 50 bikes on each campus with the additional 400 bikes it has just received from its sponsors.

The one “catch” is the $149 security deposit, which is for the bike and its lock. Once the academic year is over and if the bike is in good condition, users receive a full refund of the deposit. It is an easy online sign-up process. There is no monthly fee for having the bike, all the students have to do is take at least one picture of himself or herself with the bike, once a month and post it to Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. The more pictures that the students post to his or her social media sites, the more perks he or she will receive from the Free Bike Project. For example, the last couple of perks that were given out to Free Bike Riders were Kanye West concert tickets and 20 to 30 percent off North West Clothing merchandise for a year.

The Free Bike Project is partners with an organization called Bikes for the World. Its mission is to provide better transportation to people living in secluded villages overseas. These programs help children get to and from school easier and quicker than walking and is also making it safer for them. In May 2013, Free Bike Project and Bikes for the World donated 100 bikes to the Philippines. This year, Free Bike Project is hoping to get more riders across the country to be able to donate more bikes to remote villages in Africa.  

Currently, the Free Bike Project is only available for students and faculty of college campuses. It is working with sponsors and others to start additional programs for student and staff cyclists who already own bikes. One is a bike valet. The other, is called “Tool Time,” which offers free bike tune ups for students.

“We hope that eventually we can reach out into the community and branch out of college campuses, to be able to include everyone in this program,” says Scott Ferreira, CEO of Free Bike Project. Until then, Free Bike Project wants to encourage as many people as possible to continue riding bikes to live a happy green, healthy lifestyle.