Tag Archives: ASU

bioscience

Arizona Biomedical Corridor advances

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and the City Council today approved the Phoenix Industrial Development Authority to issue up to $180 million in revenue bonds to finance Mayo Clinic’s new proton beam radiation therapy center.

The Council also approved a two-year extension of its agreement with ASU and Mayo Clinic to continue collaborative planning efforts to develop the Arizona Biomedical Corridor in northeast Phoenix.

The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, the corridor’s anchor, will be the only center in the Southwest to provide proton beam radiation, a technology that precisely delivers radiation to a tumor while protecting surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The 165,000-square-foot underground facility will help Mayo medical teams treat about 2,000 patients, including children, each year beginning in spring 2016.

“Mayo Clinic’s newly consolidated cancer center is exciting for our community because it helps to deliver top-notch care to our residents and contributes to the innovation-based economy we need,” said Stanton.

“I am thrilled we are taking the next step in our partnership with ASU and Mayo Clinic on the Biomedical Corridor in District 2,” said Vice Mayor Jim Waring. “This project will be a great economic driver for the city and the state, and only enhance Phoenix’s image as an international destination for medical care.”

“Arizona cancer patients will no longer have to travel far to receive proton beam therapy,” said Wyatt Decker, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. “Proton beam therapy, with fewer side effects and greater precision, is particularly beneficial for children and younger patients. We’re pleased to be offering this important treatment soon in the fight against cancer, right here in our community.”

Stanton also announced that the Arizona State Land Department has accepted the application by KUD International, a private developer, to play a key role in developing biomedical and advanced technology research on the site. As a result, the department plans to auction 225 acres of land within the proposed corridor by the end of this year.

ali_pic

Kindness defines Sorority Secrets founder

Often times when one thinks of a great business mogul, words like “cutthroat” and “cunning” pop into their heads. But what about an accomplished business person who has made their success by going down a different path?

Ali Matthews, vice president of 224 Apparel and co-founder of The Sorority Secrets, has not emerged as a successful businesswoman by stepping on any toes or stabbing any backs, but by using a different weapon— kindness.

“She cares deeply and has a passion for bettering her surroundings, both in her personal life and in her business life,” said Karen Okonkwo, another co-founder of The Sorority Secrets.

Matthews met Okonkwo at Arizona State University in 2003 during sorority recruitment. After dreaming of being in a sorority for as long as she could remember, Matthews joined the Delta Epsilon chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta.

“I was one of those girls that was dying to be in a sorority when I was in high school,” she said. “I couldn’t wait.”

She served as recruitment chair, a position that is responsible for planning formal recruitment to find new members for the chapter, while she was in Theta. A self-proclaimed perfectionist, Matthews openly admits that she struggled with letting others help her with recruitment.

“I don’t like sharing tasks with other people,” she said. “[Recruitment] was such a great experience to learn that I can trust other people to help me. I always put a lot of pressure on myself to succeed.”

After graduating with a degree in communications in 2008, Matthews started a business to design recruitment packages for sororities. Although this venture was short-lived, she embraced it as learning experience.

“You learn so much more from failure than you do from success,” she said. “I would never say that my first business was a failure by any means, but I learned a lot from it. I try to learn every single day, and I challenge myself every single day.”

Sorority involvement led to Matthews’ next business venture when Okwonko approached her and another Theta sister, Sakura Considine, with the idea for The Sorority Secrets in 2012. The blog had its first anniversary in January.

“I think the best part, for me, about being a part of Sorority Secrets is that it is a platform to do good,” Matthews said. “We have an opportunity to help people.”

Although the website is filled with predictable content like beauty tips and baking recipes, The Sorority Secrets also shares an unique variety of content such as “Big Sis Tips” to help with filing taxes or inspirational stories about girls coming together to form a non-profit for a sister with cancer.

Despite her involvement in The Sorority Secrets, Matthews primary business endeavor is her clothing company that she started with her fiancé Jonathan Radow.

Matthews and Radow met during a business meeting for her first business venture. Following an instant connection, the two began to date. Radow owns BMSS, a lifestyle management company that offers private jet, credit card processing and real estate services. Radow wanted to add an apparel division to his company, and when he met Matthews on February 24, 2010 everything fell into place.

“He always wanted to do apparel, he met me, it made sense, so we just decided to go for it,” Matthews said.

Named after the day they met, 224 Apparel specializes in Greek and corporate clothing, ranging from sorority recruitment shirts to company uniforms. After founding this company just over 3 years ago, it has expanded across more than 50 college campuses solely based off of referrals. Although Matthews has a natural sense of style, the success of her company can be attributed to a combination of her hard work and personality.

“Out of all the other people I have worked for, she is so dedicated to her business and to her clients,” said Jacqueline Meyer, an intern for 224 Apparel. “She loves making her clients happy and coming back for more, whether it be more clothing or even someone to talk to.”

Matthews stands apart from other business owners because she not only takes on clients, but she forms genuine relationships with the people she is working with.

“Ali is professional, timely, creative, and also has awesome interpersonal skills,” Okonkwo said. “People gravitate toward her positive energy, because she sincerely cares about you.”

The company is currently moving into a bigger office to allow for more room to grow. The future of 224 Apparel is bright with Matthews’s drive, passion and charisma leading the way.

“You have to love it. You have to have the passion for it, and it’s like you’ll never work a day in your life, but you’ll never work that hard in your life either.”

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks Top 30 Again

U.S. News & World Report announces its prestigious annual list of the “Best Graduate Schools” in the country today. For the seventh year in a row, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University ranks Top 30 nationwide among full-time MBA programs. The school’s evening MBA program also ranks Top 20 among part-time MBA programs.

“We’re happy the new rankings confirm we’re achieving consistent excellence here at the W. P. Carey School of Business,” says the school’s dean, Amy Hillman. “We have a phenomenal group of faculty, staff and students who repeatedly boost us to the top, year after year.”

On the new rankings list, the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program comes in at No. 27, the best ranking for any Arizona school. The numbers are largely based on the positive reputation of schools among corporate recruiters — who offer students jobs — and among top administrators from peer business schools in the know.

“We are proud to offer one of the three least expensive programs in the Top 30,” explains Stacey Whitecotton, the W. P. Carey School’s senior associate dean of graduate programs. “We also have one of the two smallest programs in the Top 30, allowing us to keep the class sizes small and personal.”

The W. P. Carey School’s evening MBA program ranks No. 18 for part-time MBA programs nationwide. The evening program is offered in both Tempe and north Scottsdale, and it’s the highest ranked part-time MBA program in Arizona. The school also offers other part-time programs not eligible for inclusion in this particular set of new rankings: an acclaimed online MBA program that U.S. News & World Report ranked No. 2 nationwide earlier this year and a weekend MBA program that mixes online learning and campus classes every other Friday and Saturday.

The new U.S. News & World Report rankings also include other graduate-level “specialties” lists. The W. P. Carey School’s renowned supply chain management program ranks No. 3 for supply chain/logistics. The information systems program ranks No. 12 in its category. In addition, ASU’s Ph.D. program in economics ranks No. 36.

Other recent high rankings for the W. P. Carey School of Business:

> U.S. News & World Report ranks the school’s undergraduate business program No. 27 in the nation.
> Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s online MBA program Top 10 worldwide.
The Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 28 worldwide.
> The University of Texas at Dallas ranks the W. P. Carey School Top 25 in the United States and Top 30 worldwide for business-school research productivity.
The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the W. P. Carey School No. 21 in the world for economics/business.

engineering

ASU’s engineering schools merge

Arizona State University is merging its two successful engineering schools. The move will enhance and expand engineering education opportunities, lead to growth in the number of engineering and technology graduates, strengthen and increase the impact of research and simplify engagement for industry.

This is a natural next step for ASU’s successful College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) and the Polytechnic campus, where the college is located. Both are now about a decade old.

CTI will be renamed the Polytechnic School, and will be housed within ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. The school will continue to have unique programs, and the engineering and technology programs will be expanded at the Polytechnic campus.

The Arizona Board of Regents approved the change Feb. 5.

“For ASU to pursue its mission of innovative education and research, there needs to be continuous evolution and improvement of the university’s schools and campuses,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “By incorporating the Polytechnic School within Fulton Schools of Engineering, a top 50 nationally ranked engineering school, Poly will attract more students and expand research possibilities faster than could have been done otherwise. The Polytechnic School brings to Fulton a number of high-quality applied engineering programs and additional research facilities and programs.”

In recent years, ASU has constructed new academic facilities at Poly, built a residential life academic village, and added new recreation facilities. The goal remains to have 15,000 to 20,000 students there.

“The merger of CTI and the Fulton Schools represents a logical fusion of two very successful programs,” said ASU Provost Robert Page. “It will provide our students with a better-defined set of program options and allow new synergistic connections among our faculty.”

Both CTI and the Fulton Schools share a strong interest in innovative, experiential education, student success and use-inspired research directed toward solving societal challenges in areas such as energy, health, sustainability, education and security.

The Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering is one of the largest engineering schools in the United States, with more than 10,000 students. CTI has more than 3,500 undergraduate and graduate students. The Fulton Schools undergraduate program ranking from U.S. News & World Report puts them in the top 25 percent of ranked programs. Both schools have faculty that have been honored with the highest awards in their fields.

Mitzi Montoya, who has served as vice provost and dean of ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation since 2011, has been promoted to vice president for entrepreneurship and innovation in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development and university dean for entrepreneurship and innovation. In this new role, Montoya will synthesize activities across campuses and continue to enrich the entrepreneurship and innovation ecosystem.

During her time as dean of CTI, Montoya spearheaded several initiatives designed to promote and support entrepreneurship. She was pivotal in bringing TechShop – a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio with locations nationwide – to the ASU Chandler Innovation Center. She also launched iProjects, which connects ASU students with industry to solve real business problems.

housing.prices

Phoenix Home-Price Rebound May Be Over

The big home-price rebound in the Phoenix area may officially be over. For the first time since last summer, the market experienced a month-to-month decrease in the median single-family-home sales price. A new report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University reveals that and other details about Maricopa and Pinal counties, as of January:

> The median single-family-home sales price was $196,900.
> Demand is very low, from both investors and normal homeowner-occupiers.
> Phoenix-area home prices are finally back in line with the Consumer Price Index, as if the recession and recovery had never happened.

Valley home prices started quickly rising after hitting a low point in September 2011, but they began slowing down this past July. Finally, this January, the median single-family-home sales price hit $196,900 — down 4 percent from December. It was the first month-to-month drop since the normal summer seasonal blips, and it’s largely due to a big drop in demand/sales activity.

“January is usually the quietest month of the year for sales, but this January was far weaker than January 2012 and 2013,” says the report’s author, Mike Orr, director of the Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Despite the huge price increases between January 2013 and 2014, the total dollars spent on homes here this January actually dropped by 7 percent. This is the second lowest level of demand we’ve seen in 14 years, behind only 2008.”

Still, the median single-family-home sales price remained up 21 percent from last January, when it was at $163,000. Realtors will note the average price per square foot was up 19 percent. The median townhouse/condo price was up about 17 percent.

“The price gains now are weak, but it’s not clear that they’ll get much weaker or stronger,” explains Orr. “We’ve already seen a significant change in the market, which has completed its rebound from the artificially low prices between 2009 and 2011. Pricing is back to the level it would have attained if it had increased from 2000 in line with the Consumer Price Index.”

Demand from both investors and ordinary owner-occupiers is way down. Even though the available supply of homes for sale was up 47 percent from Feb. 1 of last year to Feb. 1 of this year, sales activity plummeted. Sales of single-family homes were down 23 percent from last January to this January. Sales of townhomes and condos were down 18 percent.

Luxury homes are one of the only bright spots in the market, with homes above a half-million dollars representing 14 percent more of the sales transactions this January than last January. However, even the supply of luxury homes is quickly rising, so sellers in that space will face tougher competition in 2014.

Investors continue looking to other parts of the country for bigger bargains, since Phoenix prices have risen. In January, the percentage of residential properties bought by investors was down to 21.1 percent from the peak of 39.7 in July 2012.

New home sales were also down 21 percent from last January to this January, representing the steepest fall in new-home closings in several years. Millennials and those who lost their homes to foreclosure or short sale in the recession appear more interested in renting than buying. That’s led to an upward trend in multi-family construction permits. It could also lead to higher rental rates in the next two years, during which time, home sales may continue to be relatively slow.

“The market conditions suggest prices will struggle to make any further upward progress in 2014,” Orr adds. “With February through June the strongest part of the year, we may yet see a little forward movement, but it’s likely to be tentative at best. The real test will come in the second half of the year, which is likely to see lower prices unless demand takes a distinct turn for the better.”

Foreclosure levels remain below the normal, historic trends for Maricopa and Pinal counties. Foreclosure starts – owners receiving notice their lenders may foreclose in 90 days – were down 55 percent from January 2013 to this January. Completed foreclosures were down 54 percent.

Orr’s full report, including statistics, charts and a breakdown by different areas of the Valley, can be viewed and downloaded at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/realtyreports. A podcast with more analysis from Orr is also available from knowWPCarey, the business school’s online resource and newsletter, at http://knowwpcarey.com/index.cfm?cid=13.

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Developer of the Year

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Arizona Board of Regents

Winner of Best Public Project: McCord Hall
Finalist in Best Education Project: 
ASU Downtown Sun Devil Fitness Complex & McCord Hall
Finalist in Most Challenging Project: ASU Downtown Sun Devil Fitness Complex

Whether it’s bringing groundbreaking development to Arizona’s college campuses or facilitating adaptive reuses of existing structures, Arizona Board of Regents is behind many standout projects this year. ASU developed two modern fitness complexes in 2013 as well as the stunning new school for W. P. Carey graduate programs at McCord Hall. Looking forward, ASU will redevelop its Sun Devil Stadium, the College Avenue Commons (Block 12) project on its main campus and see the groundbreaking of its law center in downtown Phoenix as well as a redevelopment of the Annex along College Avenue north of the main campus. The University has the largest enrollment numbers in the nation and the aggressive development to match. That doesn’t mean University of Arizona and Northern Arizona University aren’t also aggressively developing. ABOR recently requested $1B from the state legislature for research development totalling 1,675,400 SF, which will include projects for all three universities.

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Merit for Iconic Development

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Manzanita Hall
Developer: American Campus Communities
Contractor: hardison/downey construction
Architect: Studio Ma
Size: 218,000 SF
Location: 600 E. University Dr.
Completed: October 2013

manzyThis merit award winner can be appreciated by all the locals who have had generations of their families get the Sun Devil experience among the halls of this dormitory…To add to its local significance, this building also happens to serve as an underground pull box that feeds utilities from an underground tunnel system to ASU’s public safety and IT departments as well as the State DPS radio loop.


Honorable Mention:
Melrose Gateway Monument
Developer: City of Phoenix
General Contractor: Weitz
Architect: Gensler

Gensler_City of Phoenix_Melrose Final Rendering_night The 80-foot steel Melrose Gateway Monument, arched above the threshold of the Melrose Neighborhood District in central Phoenix, was fully fabricated and constructed in Phoenix. The steel was made from recycled content, its design abstracted from an organic floral pattern that strives to give a brand identity to the mid-century modern influences apparent in the neighborhood and its businesses.

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Best Public Project

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


McCord Hall
Owner: Arizona Board of Regents, for and on behalf of Arizona State University
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: RSP Architects
Design Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
Size: 128,000 SF
Location: 450 E. Lemon St., Tempe
Completed: June 24, 2013

ASU McCordThe W. P. Carey School of Business’ new state-of-the art facility, McCord Hall, is home to Arizona State University’s graduate, MBA and executive education programs. Consisting of instructional spaces, administrative offices, student and career services and social spaces, this monumental structure is designed to last a century on ASU’s Tempe campus. The structural slab and roof structure are a post-tensioned concrete that can be re-tensioned years from now to renew their strength. The building boasts numerous sustainable features, including a façade-specific shading system and a roof designed for a photovoltaic array that can provide electricity for buildings across the whole campus.

Lizzie Kim

Kim Named to ASU Center for Emergency Management

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Leezie Kim, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, has been named to the ASU Center for Emergency Management and Homeland Security Advisory Council.

The ASU Center’s advisory council executives provide extensive expertise from all sectors of emergency management and homeland security. The council advises the center regarding solution innovations and research, and affords insight into emerging trends, needs and requirements such that the center is at the forefront of solution delivery, innovation, research and academic preparation.

Kim is a partner in the Quarles & Brady Corporate Services Group. Her practice focuses on helping clients navigate the laws of national security and international business transactions as well as health care and restaurant business transactions. She returned to the law firm following four years of service as a White House appointee to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and as general counsel to Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano.

While serving as deputy general counsel for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in Washington, D.C., Kim became involved with aviation security, border entry matters and customs issues at airports, including the federal response to the 2009 Christmas day airline underwear explosive attempt and the implementation of the new airport security procedures thereafter. In 2012, Kim was appointed to the Phoenix Aviation Advisory Board by Mayor Greg Stanton and the City Council.

Kim earned her law degree from the University of Virginia and her undergraduate degree from Rice University.

Panel will discuss Cybersecurity at GPEC

Members of Arizona’s business community are invited to the February meeting of the Arizona Aerospace & Defense Forum for a discussion centered on cyber-security including risks, trends and what businesses need to keep their businesses safe and secure online.

This event will be hosted at the offices of Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) located at 2 N. Central Ave Suite 2500 Phoenix, Arizona 85004. The event is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb.11 from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. There will be networking from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m.

The forum will be led by panelists Bill Ross, vice president of information security solutions at General Dynamics C4 Systems; Ty Lindteigen, chief technology officer at SAIFE; Raz Yalov, chief technology officer of 41Parameters and Nadya Bliss, director of strategic project development at Arizona State University.

Greenberg Traurig, along with law firm Snell & Wilmer, were instrumental in the formation of the Arizona Chapter of the Aerospace and Defense Forum. Each month, the A&D Forum alternates from meetings in Phoenix and Tucson.

Registration required by going here.

Ivan Rosenberg, president and CEO of Frontier Associates is the executive director and co-founder of A&D Forum. Stephane Frijia, director, research and strategy at the Greater Phoenix Economic Council serves as Chapter Chair of the Arizona A&D Forum.

Currently, there are more than 700 international leaders involved in the A&D Forum. Other A&D Chapters are located in Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange County, Calif. In Arizona, there are more than 2,000 companies in the aerospace and defense industry providing more than 43,000 jobs and significant positive economic impact.

Rendering courtesy of Brick & West Design and RSP Architects

Wetta Ventures, ASU to redevelop College Ave.

Wetta Ventures and Arizona State University today announced a partnership to redevelop a portion of College Avenue as part of an adaptive reuse project that includes  the former ASU Annex.

Begun in December, the project will convert the Annex, a 7,323 square-foot-building on the corner of College Ave. and Sixth Street next to the Mona Plummer Aquatic Center, into a two-restaurant building. Wetta Ventures already has a commitment from local favorite Postino Winecafe for the northern space as well as interest from various restaurant operators for the second space. Postino is expected to open in August 2014.

The Annex is across College Avenue to the east of College Avenue Commons, a five-story, 137,000 gross-square-foot building now under construction that will house the Del E. Webb School of Construction, a prospective student visitors center, and Sun Devil Marketplace, a next-generation college store featuring dining and congregation spaces, books and soft goods, and the best of emerging digital technologies revolutionizing the world of books and publishing. College Avenue Commons will open summer of 2014.

“We are thrilled to partner with ASU on the transformation of College Avenue and to help bring to life the shared vision of creating a one-of-a-kind dining destination in Tempe,” said David Wetta, founder of Wetta Ventures. “The first phase, redeveloping the Annex, is a truly unique project.   We will reinvent this old structure to create a warm, inviting space that will be full of personality. The charming and humble design from the 1950s will be preserved, while integrating modern touches and functionality. We could not ask to be part of a more exciting project.”

The Annex now.

The Annex now.

The Annex, a 1950s schoolhouse turned multi-functional building that was once the Sun Devil weight room during the Frank Kush era, will be transformed into two building spaces connected by a central breezeway. The windows along the front of the building will be replaced with rollup glass garage doors, midcentury modern design and interior features such as wood ceilings, exposed brick and industrial ductwork. Two large patios for outdoor seating will run along College Avenue. Michael Rumpeltin of Brick & West Design is working in collaboration with RSP Architects on the architectural design of the project.

Postino Winecafe will occupy the northern 3,838 square-foot building and will have a 2,500 square-foot patio. A second restaurant will occupy the southern building that is 3,484 square-feet with a 1,640 square-foot outdoor patio.

Wetta Ventures recently completed Old School O7, an adaptive reuse and new construction project in Midtown Phoenix. The project consists of a 1948 church that has been repurposed as a restaurant, Taco Guild, a freestanding Starbucks and a 1955 school building that will serve as new shop space for a general retail tenant.

In addition to being an ASU alumnus, Wetta has a longstanding relationship with ASU through his membership in the President’s Club and membership in the Sun Devil Family Association.

“Creating a destination place on College Avenue, where downtown Tempe, the ASU Tempe Campus, and ASU public performance venues meet, is an important part of activating the street and making College Avenue a nexus for people to come together across campus and community,” said Morgan R. Olsen, ASU executive vice president, Treasurer and CFO.  “The presence of these destination dining venues as part of this exciting place will only enhance the creative environment ASU is fostering for its faculty, staff and students, and our community stakeholders.”

This development project will be done in conjunction with ASU’s College Avenue Streetscape project that is slated to begin this spring. Running along College Avenue between Sixth and Seventh streets, it will include green spaces, a shade structure, pedestrian walks, outdoor dining and event spaces and street beautification.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks No. 2 in the Nation

Online degree programs are skyrocketing in popularity, and if you’re looking for an online MBA or other graduate degree, then the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is an excellent choice. For the second year in a row, U.S. News & World Report ranks the school No. 2 nationwide on its list of “Best Online Graduate Business Programs.”

“Increasingly, people want the convenience of an online degree, but they don’t want to sacrifice the high quality of a recognized, top university,” explains Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “With the W. P. Carey School, you get the best of both worlds: the flexibility of an online format and the same stellar faculty members who teach in our other highly ranked graduate programs. The W. P. Carey School was one of the first highly respected business schools to launch online degrees more than a decade ago, and we use in-house course designers specializing solely in business classes.”

U.S. News & World Report already ranks the W. P. Carey School’s undergraduate business, full-time MBA and evening MBA programs among the Top 30 in the nation in their categories. This new ranking covers both the W. P. Carey School’s popular online MBA program and its online Master of Science in Information Management (MSIM) program. The list is based on student engagement, admissions selectivity, peer reputation, faculty credentials and training, and student services and technology.

“Students serving in the military, starting their own businesses, and traveling extensively for their jobs are among those who have chosen our online graduate business programs,” says Stacey Whitecotton, senior associate dean for W. P. Carey School graduate programs. “Participants have a dedicated financial aid specialist and a career center for those who want help with job searches.”

Again, the W. P. Carey School’s online MBA program garnered a No. 2 ranking last year, too. Among those who have completed the program: NFL Pro Bowl kicker Billy Cundiff and Lt. Col. Scott Coulson — a recipient of the Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and a Combat Action Badge for his service in Iraq — who completed his degree while serving in the U.S. Army in Afghanistan.

The 21-month MBA program allows students to meet at a face-to-face orientation just once at the ASU campus, then complete the rest of the courses online. Students work in small, personalized teams with peers from other industries, focusing on one course at a time. This is also one of the few online MBA programs in which students can earn their degrees with an area of emphasis, such as finance, international business, marketing or supply chain management.

The 16-month online MSIM program just launched in 2012 and is already drawing praise from those in the fast-growing information technology (IT) field. The degree is designed to provide professionals in any career area with a well-rounded education in IT and explain how they can apply that knowledge to their companies overall. American Express, Intel Corporation, Mayo Clinic and US Airways are among the companies that send students to the school’s MSIM programs. The W. P. Carey School’s MSIM programs have an exceptionally high retention rate, thanks to efforts by the world-class faculty and collaborative-learning training for students during orientation.

The W. P. Carey School also offers a weekend/online hybrid MBA and will launch an online version of its master’s program in business analytics (“big data”) this fall. All of the school’s online programs include small class sizes and comprehensive online-learning technologies that are easy to use. For more information, visit wpcarey.asu.edu.

bioscience

ASU joins STEM mentoring initiative

Today, the College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) at Arizona State University announced its partnership with the “Million Women Mentors” (MWM) initiative. MWM will launch Jan. 8, 2014 during National Mentoring Month, in Washington, D.C at the National Press Club. The initiative will support the engagement of one million science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) mentors – male and female – to increase the interest and confidence of girls and young women to pursue and succeed in STEM degrees and careers.

As a partner in the movement to increase the representation of women in STEM degree programs and careers, CTI has joined with MWM to help proliferate the opportunities for young girls to engage with STEM mentors. The partnership with MWM aligns with CTI’s recently developed Women’s Council for Science and Engineering that brings together partners from the community, college and industry to support academic initiatives and scholarships for women students pursuing STEM degrees at CTI.

“The underrepresentation of girls and women in STEM is of national concern,” said Mitzi Montoya, vice provost and dean of CTI. “It isn’t enough any more to just raise awareness, we need to start implementing change that will move the needle. As a partner in the Million Women Mentors program we are part of a national movement that can inspire more young girls to pursue STEM degrees and careers, as well as mentor and sponsor them along the way.”

In the past 10 years, growth in STEM jobs has been three times greater than that of non-STEM jobs. Today 80% of the fastest growing occupations in the United States depend on mastery of mathematics and knowledge and skills in hard sciences. While women comprise 48% of the U.S. workforce, just 24% are in STEM fields, a statistic that has held constant for nearly the last decade. While 75% of all college students are women and students of color, they represent only 45% of STEM degrees earned each year. Too many of these young women begin in STEM degree but leave those degree paths despite their good academic standing, often citing uncomfortable classroom experiences and disconcerting climate. Even when women earn a STEM degree, they are less likely than their male counterparts to work in a STEM field even though STEM jobs pay more and have a lower wage gap: 92 cents on a dollar versus 75 cents in other fields.

Even more concerning is the underrepresentation of women in engineering, specifically. In 2013, women made up only 19% of the national engineering class, a mere one percentage point increase from 2009. This, along with the need to increase representation in other science, technology and math fields is what drives special academic initiatives like the Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) club at CTI.

Million Women Mentors is a collective effort of more than 40 non-profit, media, education and government industry partners and nine corporate sponsors. Through efforts planned during National Mentoring Month, CTI will actively engage girls, mentoring and STEM. CTI will host a Badge Blast & Imagine Engineering Day for the Girl Scouts—Arizona Cactus—Pine Council, Inc., from 9am-3pm on January 25. The fun-filled day of hands-on badge activities and engineering-focused projects will engage girls in grades two through 12 with the opportunities found in STEM degrees and careers.

To become involved with CTI or Million Women Mentors you can find more information by visiting: innovation.asu.edu and MillionWomenMentors.org.

startup

Getting an angel to open the checkbook

Governor Jan Brewer touts her policies and business regulatory climate as the reason Arizona is growing new businesses. That may be a factor, but it’s not the major reason Arizona topped the Kaufman Foundation Index of Entrepreneurial Activity in 2012. If it were the case, Arizona would have been on top again in 2013—instead of plummeting to 20th nationally.

“Just because there are a lot of startups,” observes Barry Broome, CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, “doesn’t provide a measure of the economic growth in the Valley.” A startup can be someone opening a consultancy, a contractor or the next Apple. Self-employment is a form of startup. The challenge is nurturing a startup so it grows with high value jobs.

Local governments and the Arizona Commerce Authority see major value with growing Arizona startups into enterprises. Chris Mackay, economic development director in Chandler says, “There’s staying power when a business is local. It’s connected to the local community and if the economy falters, the owners are more willing to keep going locally as opposed to closing up shop.” That local staying power is one reason Mackay says Chandler makes big investments in growing future enterprises.

Planting the seeds

Arizona’s new economy needs startups to scale up into enterprises. Those growing small businesses become hiring employers offering high value jobs paying home-buying income. Government policy supporting businesses that can scale up is based on simple economics.

Businesses with more than 20 employees, says the Small Business Administration, generate two of three Arizona paychecks. Those same businesses cut checks for more than 70 percent of Arizona’s private payrolls. The value in 2012 was over $100 billion.

All new businesses are “startups,” but not all startup businesses will be entrepreneurial enterprises. “There is no relation between starting a business and starting a company,” says Dr. Daniel Isenberg, Professor of Entrepreneurship Practice and founding executive director of the Babson College Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Project in Boston. “Ninety percent of companies formed don’t grow high value jobs.”

Isenberg says that the difference between a start-up and enterprise is a matter of scale. He is an international advocate for scaling a business to grow as opposed to opening a business. An entrepreneur, he points out, is a business founder with a large company that just happens to be small right now.

Arizona State University, as the new American university, is at the cutting edge of helping turn ideas into enterprise. Recently, the college joined the elite ranks of schools offering a stand-alone degree in entrepreneurship. It’s on that list with Harvard Business School, Babson, and University of Texas. Its goal is getting new businesses that can grow into the market.

Locally grown

ASU says more than 70 percent of its W.P. Carey School of Business MBA graduates remain in Arizona. Keeping these graduates in state provides the human resources necessary to building new enterprises fueling the future economy.

“Starting a company — as opposed to just starting a business — is hard work,” says Isenberg. “An entrepreneur looks at the business and sees it growing. It’s a time of sleep deprivation, hard work, and endless pitches.” Few startups achieve quality growth—less than ten percent, he believes. “The golden triangle of a growing enterprise,” he continues, “is cash, customers and people.”

“An entrepreneurial endeavor isn’t limited to startups,” Isenberg emphasizes. “University research, family businesses, mature companies, all can be turned into a growing enterprise. Most startups tend to stay small.” The key to the economic contribution of startups in Arizona is scalability. He is adamant about it, “Ambition is not a dirty word. A business founder without ambition does not significantly contribute to overall economic growth.”

“There are a number of entrepreneurial success stories arising from a new direction for an existing, mature business,” Isenberg reports. Sometimes it takes a new owner with a vision; sometimes the existing management team finds a new direction. It can be a license from a university, a new product, or an innovative use of an existing product. Entrepreneurship can occur anywhere in a business’ lifecycle.”

Bringing ideas to market

Arizona colleges are on that licensing bandwagon. Entrepreneurs complain that it takes years to license patents or transfer technology from most universities. In ASU’s Office of Knowledge and Enterprise Development, the Arizona Furnace Technology Transfer Accelerator — first project of its type in the world — slashes technology transfer time from years to months. The AZ Furnace is a joint venture of ASU, University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University and Dignity Health. Funding partners include the Arizona Commerce Authority, BioAccel, and additional support from Thunderbird School of Global Management.

“There are hundreds of patents sitting on shelves at universities that could be in the market earning money for creators, colleges and businesses,” enthuses Gordon McConnell, assistant vice president, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Group in OKED. “We started a program to get patents into the market quickly.” The startups selected for incubation in AZ Furnace are either entrepreneurs in search of an idea to market or idea-creators ready to market through a business entity. The fledgling enterprises are capital-ready in 12 months or less.

Enterprise starts with a leader and a vision. The scale of the vision is what makes the difference, says Isenberg. The vast majority of business owners are thinking of a model that gets them to the point that they’re putting money in the bank. He says, “Entrepreneurs are thinking of a model that finds smart people, willing customers and puts the cash to back into the enterprise.”

“Angels invest in businesses they understand or CEOs they respect,” says Broome. “There’s a need for more of that in the Valley. We’re just not seeing the next Apple or Google evolving here.”

Gaining visibility

“The biggest challenge about getting angel and venture money is visibility,” says Brandon Clark, region coordinator for Startup Arizona.  “If you’re a promising digital startup locally, it’s a little harder to get noticed nationally being from a region not known for its digital startups.  That’s starting to slowly shift.” National publications, FastCompany and Entrepreneur Magazine, have eyed Arizona as an emerging technology region.

The development opportunity for the small business is capital. Combine the “Broome Factor”—known businesses; known leaders—with the large number of startups, and there are too many funding requests heading towards too few checkbooks.

What makes early investors open pocketbooks to startup businesses is scalability. Businesses with potential to grow create the greatest return on investment for the angels. “It’s also makes a difference to the local economy,” says Isenberg. “Local policymakers need to change their focus from ‘startup’ to a ‘high value growth business’.”

Cities like helping scalable startups — and provide resources that build success. There’s a loyalty factor when the business grows; it typically remains in the hometown that helped it succeed. This is important to Chandler, Mesa, Peoria, Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Surprise. These five cities have specifically invested in incubators and accelerators to nurture and graduate businesses achieving market traction. Chandler, Phoenix and Tucson have involvement with collaborative workspaces — Gangplank and Co+Hoots — as well.

While an employee or two in a collaborative workspace works well for a while, the time comes when a move up is needed. Clairvoyant, an enterprise and analytics startup now in Chandler Innovations started with Gangplank. “We grew from four employees in March to 12 in April,” smiles Amber Anderson, a firm partner and its business developer. “We needed a place to meet with clients and work with a growing team.” Still self-funded, the growing entity plans to hit 20 employees by January.

Mackay explains, “We help a company like this grow and hope that as it expands it continues to locate in Chandler.” To that end, the city is working with landlords in its Price Corridor to offer “teenage” space that lets a business move from the heavily subsidized rents and back office support of the incubator into its own place—without too much sticker shock.

Support from cities

The difference by which startup is accepted into a city’s incubator is the ability to scale up from the garage to commercial space; from one employee to more than 20. Chandler and Mesa are looking for businesses with this capacity. Innovations gives lab and office space to businesses that have formed entities — LLCs, corporations, partnerships — and a business plan. Mesa’s new Technology Accelerator is planned with a similar focus, but is looking for businesses at an earlier stage. Surprise’s Arizona TechCelerator wants to shepherd a business to the angel investor stage.

In Surprise, scalability is one of the criteria to be accepted into Arizona’s oldest incubator. The TechCelerator is looking for businesses offering something outside the box or creating a new niche. “The company has to be started before we’ll consider them,” says Julie Neal, the economic development coordinator for the city’s enterprise. “They need a mentor, a plan and have to know where they are going.”

“Scaling up is difficult,” says Isenberg, “but doing it right defines the difference between the successful entrepreneur with a growth business and a startup that just stays small. Marketplaces are competitive. The startup has to acquire customers. That means overcoming inertia or changing buyer behavior. While established companies are cruising on their business platforms, the startup has to hire people, start a company, raise money, and all the while, it’s competing in the marketplace. That’s tough work.”

After incubation, the business must gain market traction. At this phase, the fledgling enterprise has product going out and customers paying for it. The kinks are being smoothed, and it’s time to move up to the next stage and grow. Isenberg says that the high growth criterion is simply 20 percent annual increases in sales or staff for five years.

Getting capital

To make this leap requires high levels of capital — the checks venture capitalists cut. The biggest challenge in Phoenix is that there are few sources for local venture capital. The venturists hang out in places like Silicon Valley, Boston, San Diego and Seattle. “There are even a couple of funds with deep ties to the Valley,” worries Clark, “but they have very little involvement in local startups.”

Clate Mask, CEO of Infusionsoft, had to travel out of town for his venture capital. “At one time, I was told that a fund wouldn’t cut a check for a firm in Phoenix because we didn’t have the workforce for success,” he says. “That’s no longer true; venture funds are seeing that there is a real climate for success in the Valley.”

Another resource for a growing business is the Arizona Commerce Authority’s “Growing Your Arizona Business” services. The quasi-public agency provides mentorship, regulatory assistance, access to incentive programs and site selection. It also works as a liaison connecting the growing business with other business resources. The agency mentors businesses in accessing federal procurement and grant opportunities as well as serving as an entrée to international trade.

Overall, the major resource in Arizona for start-up businesses is the universities. Anemic legislative funding for the schools causes their efforts to help to face the same struggles growing businesses face. Their efforts to improve Arizona’s long-term economy are stymied by a declining source of capital.

“ASU is underfunded,” complains Barry Broome. “The school has done an amazing job despite being financially crippled by budget cuts. It’s suffering from a lack of resources to take its programs to scale.” “Scalability” is applicable to the business-development programs at the universities and other public agencies just as it is for growing enterprises.

“Getting money for those programs is the top job for the next governor,” predicts Broome.
Opportunity in Arizona will come from the core of businesses growing today. They will create the jobs for the new economy and drive economic success for the next generation.

ASU HR, McCarthy Nordburg

ASU HR Department Gets 17KSF of Tenant Improvement

McCarthy Nordburg announced the completion of the new Arizona State University HR Department to a second generation office building. The 17,000 SF second generation tenant improvement project addressed the tenant’s desire for an open collaborative space that incorporates ASU branding throughout. The reception area is the central hub for visitors and employees to gather. Jennifer Sasek and Jill Gibney were the design team from McCarthy Nordburg, Jokake Construction was the general contractor and Target Commercial Interiors provided the furniture.

microchip technology

Phoenix Joins Initiative to Promote Global Trade

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council announced the region has been selected as one of eight metro areas in the country to join a new exchange network created by the Global Cities Initiative, a joint project of Brookings and JPMorgan Chase. The Exchange is a network of metropolitan areas committed to promoting greater global trade and economic competitiveness. As part of the inaugural Exchange, Greater Phoenix will be required to design and implement a regional export plan in 2014.

In Greater Phoenix, the Global Cities Initiative will be led City of Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and a core leadership team including the following representatives:

> Joe Stewart, market manager – AZ & NV Middle Market, Chase
> Dennis Hoffman, professor and director, L. William Seidman Research Institute at the
W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University
> Barry Broome, president and CEO Greater Phoenix Economic Council

“A strong trade and export strategy is critical to our region’s economic vitality, so I’m honored to lead this initiative for Greater Phoenix,” Mayor Stanton said. “I look forward to working with my fellow mayors and business and community leaders to build a regional export plan that capitalizes on our unique assets and advances a stronger and healthier economic platform by expanding our global trade and investment strategies.”

Other participating groups include the Arizona Export District Council, Canada-Arizona Business Council, Intel and the Arizona Commerce Authority.

Brookings selected metropolitan areas to join the network after an extensive application process that evaluated regions’ readiness and capability to pursue the Exchange’s curriculum and commitment to fulfill its goals. Greater Phoenix joins Atlanta; Greenville, S.C.; Indianapolis; Jacksonville, Fla.; Milwaukee; Phoenix; Sacramento, Calif.; and Wichita, Kan., in the Exchange’s inaugural class, which will work together over the next four years to establish new metro-to-metro relationships and to share best practices in global economic development.

“For the Exchange, we selected metro areas that are committed to expanding their global economic reach by working together to identify regional competitive strengths and increase exports,” said Brad McDearman, Brookings fellow. “The eight metro areas selected for this round represent a growing group of U.S. metro areas that understand the need to embrace the global market to remain competitive in the 21st century economy.”

Over time, the network will expand to include additional U.S. and international cities working together to strengthen their local economies through increased engagement with the rest of the world. This builds on the Global Cities Initiative’s work, which equips metropolitan leaders with the information, policy ideas, and global connections they need to bolster their regions’ positions in the global economy.

“I’m delighted Greater Phoenix will be a part of this new network – it’s exactly the kind of innovative planning that is needed to ensure our community’s long-term economic success,” said Joe Stewart, market manager – AZ & NV Middle Market, Chase. “We have a long history of helping businesses connect to global markets and now the Exchange brings additional resources to help our region’s leaders design strategies to further create jobs and grow our economy through greater global engagement.”

The Global Cities Initiative supports the region’s existing efforts to implement the Brookings Metropolitan Business Plan (MBP), where business, university, political and civic leaders have adopted several core strategies to leverage  the region’s assets in a way that secures economic strength for Greater Phoenix through the 21st century. The Global Cities Initiative will serve to fulfill the MBP’s global export and foreign direct investment strategy. Further details about the MBP will be announced in early 2014.

“It’s fantastic that Greater Phoenix is participating in this initiative – a reflection of our unified commitment to attract and retain export-based businesses that are ultimately responsible for regional economic growth and prosperity,” said Dennis Hoffman, professor and director, L. William Seidman Research Institute at the W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU. “A strong research university is an important attractor for businesses seeking talent and knowledge capital that can help them succeed in global markets, and I am pleased to represent ASU in this initiative.”

Metro area leaders play a critical role in promoting trade and developing infrastructure. Regional economic development leaders representing both the public and private sectors can help local firms access new markets and align existing export services because they know their regions best. These leaders are also best equipped to coordinate regional assets—such as skills training, innovation capacities, and freight and logistics—to better support global trade.

“In Greater Phoenix, we are already making exports and foreign direct investment a central and consistent part of our broader regional economic development strategy. Adding this partnership with the Global Cities Initiative will only strengthen our results,” said Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. “I look forward to the collaboration involved – not only within our own regional leadership but also with the other participating metro areas – to advance and diversify our region’s economy and solidify our future prosperity.”

In December, the Greater Phoenix Exchange team will join those of the other accepted metropolitan areas at Brookings in Washington to participate in their first working group session, where they will learn how to develop an export plan as part of a global economic development strategy. Throughout the four-year Exchange, participating metros will periodically convene for in-person working groups and will continually engage in curriculum via conference calls and webinars.

Coinciding with the work of the Exchange, Greater Phoenix will host a forum in 2014, bringing together regional and national experts on trade. Greater Phoenix is the only metro participating in the Global Cities Initiative to host such a forum. Its proximity to Mexico and trade relationships position the region as the ideal host of a conversation on global trade and exports.

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8 ASU grads lead companies on Fast 500 list

Eight Arizona State University alumni are CEOs of companies named to Deloitte’s 2013 Technology Fast 500™ list, according to information released by Deloitte on Nov. 12.

The ASU alumni whose companies made the list include:

  • Sean Barry ’93 B.S., of Bridgevine, Inc.
  • Thomas  R. Evans ’76 B.S., of Bankrate, Inc.
  • Diana P. Friedman ’84 M.A., ’89 M.B.A., of Sesame Communications
  • Brian Gentile ’92 M.B.A., of Jaspersoft Corporation
  • Chet Kapoor ’90 B.S.E., of Apigee Corporation
  • John McDermott ’83 B.S., of Endologix, Inc.
  • Tim Miller ’89 M.B.A., of Rally Software Development Corp.
  • James Triandiflou ’92 M.B.A., of Relias Learning

The Deloitte Technology Fast 500 is the pre-eminent technology awards program in United States and Canada. Combining technological innovation, entrepreneurship and rapid growth, Fast 500 companies – large, small, public and private – span a variety of industry sectors, and are leaders in hardware, software, telecom, semiconductors, life sciences and clean technology.

For more information on the Technology Fast 500 list, visit www.fast500.com.

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ASU Polytechnic Students Take $2 Challenge

More than 30 students at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa, located at 7001 E Williams Field Rd, will abstain from modern-day luxuries and challenge themselves to live on two dollars a day and in cardboard-box houses from Nov., 12-15, 2013.  Students will convene outside the Student Union and begin building their homes at 10:30 a.m. on Nov. 12th.

The Two Dollar Challenge, a national experiential learning exercise and poverty action program, is designed to give students an opportunity to step out of their daily lives and more tangibly reflect upon the daily and prolonged challenges of living in poverty while raising awareness and funds to support economic development organizations.

This Challenge is distinct from your average charity drive for three reasons. First, it asks students to restrict their consumption and live by other rules designed to simulate poverty. This experience gives students a glimpse of how nearly half of the world’s population lives every day. Second, the Two Dollar Challenge participants will raise funds for the cause of their choice. Third, through the experience and accompanying discussion students are educated about the complexity of world poverty. Student groups can become immediate actors in the eradication of global poverty and gain the experience to become passionate leaders in the field for the future.

“This is our second year partnering with Esperança and our students are looking forward to the challenge,” said Mark Henderson, engineering professor and co-founder of GlobalResolve at ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation.  “During the three day Challenge, the students will clean dorm rooms, hold car washes and do other odd jobs to make money to purchase food and live.  It will be an eye-opening experience for them to see what poverty feels like.”

The students will also be holding a shoe drive to help fund Esperança’s programs.  Esperança is a nonprofit that improves health and provides hope for families in the poorest communities of the world through sustainable disease prevention, education and treatment.  The general public can drop off their gently used shoes at the Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa anytime during the three day challenge, Nov., 12-15, 2013.

“We’re excited to be a part of ASU’s Two Dollar Challenge,” said Tom Egan, executive director, Esperança.  “We offer programs and services in five countries and our volunteers are always surprised by the living conditions.  People in Bolivia and Nicaragua don’t always have access to clean water and food, they are disease stricken and don’t have stable homes to live in.  The Two Dollar Challenge is an opportunity for us to bring awareness to poverty locally, as well as nationally and internationally.”

NASA Star Vista

ASU engages with NASA’s Solar Research Institute

Arizona State University Foundation Professor Kip Hodges is co-investigator and ASU principal investigator for a node of the new NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI). SSERVI brings nine teams of researchers from NASA laboratories, universities, research institutions, and commercial enterprises together in a collaborative virtual setting to focus on questions concerning planetary science and human space exploration in the inner Solar System.

Through Hodges participation, ASU is affiliated with “Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration” team that is led by Jennifer Heldmann of NASA’s Ames Research Center. Other nodes of the virtual institute are based at Brown University, the Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory, the Lunar and Planetary Institute (Houston, Texas), NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center, the Southwest Research Institute (Boulder, Colo.), Stony Brook University, the University of Central Florida, the University of Colorado. All together, the new virtual institute embraces the research of nearly 200 scientists nationwide, providing them with a total of roughly $12 million per year over the next five years.

“I’m very pleased that, through Jen’s leadership, the NASA Ames node was selected to be an inaugural part of SSERVI”, said Hodges. “I think we have assembled a great team of researchers that cross the boundaries between planetary science and the engineering and implementation of new technologies to enhance our ability to do science on other worlds.”

In addition to researchers from the Ames Research Center and ASU, the NASA Ames team includes participants from: the BAER Institute; the Canadian Space Agency; Cornell University; Evergreen Valley College; Honeybee Robotics; Idaho State University; the Korean Institute of Geoscience & Mineral Resources; Los Gatos Research; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Purdue University; the SETI Institute; Studio 98; the University of Toronto; the University of Western Ontario; Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering; and NASA’s Goddard, Johnson, Kennedy, and Marshall Space Flight Centers.

The NASA Ames team will focus on the development of innovative strategies for scientific research on asteroids, the Moon, and the moons of Mars – as well as on samples returned from those bodies – through studies of planetary analog sites on Earth. Hodges notes that it is important to establish best practices for human and robotic exploration of space prior to the launch of real missions so that we can maximize the quality and quantity of science that can be done at our exploration targets.

“By studying geologic features on Earth that are similar to those we will encounter on other bodies, we better prepare ourselves for future explorations.” The NASA Ames node will be conducting such studies on volcanic landscapes in Idaho and at meteorite impact craters in northern Canada.

Hodges was recruited for participation in SSERVI as a consequence of his research group’s work on determining the ages of impact events on Earth and the Moon.

“On coming to ASU in 2006, it was one of my goals to establish a world-class center for noble gas geochronology and geochemistry in the School of Earth and Space Exploration. Thanks to investments by ASU, the National Science Foundation, and NASA, the laboratory my research group has worked hard to put together enables some very creative work, including our pioneering use of laser microprobe technologies for dating impact events”, Hodges says.

Recent work of this kind has focused on a variety of terrestrial impact sites and on lunar impact rocks brought back during the Apollo 16 and 17 missions. Many members of Hodges’ research group – research scientists Mathijs van Soest and Jo Anne Wartho, postdoctoral associates Marc Biren, Frances Cooper, and John Weirich, and graduate students Cameron Mercer and Kelsey Young – have contributed to building the laboratory’s reputation as a leading facility for impact dating.

“Our participation in the work of the NASA Ames node of SSERVI permits us to expand our work on terrestrial impact sites in a way that will feed forward into future studies of samples returned from exploration targets like near-Earth asteroids, our Moon and the moons of nearby planets, or Mars. We are excited to be part of such a great effort, and look forward to helping NASA write the next chapter in the history of space exploration,” states Hodges.

housing.prices

Phoenix Housing Market Affected by Government Shutdown

The government shutdown may have dampened interest in buying Phoenix-area homes this fall. A new report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University shows the latest data for Maricopa and Pinal counties, as of September:

* The median single-family-home price was up about 33 percent from last September, to $199,000.
* However, demand is waning, and that may be at least partly due to the recent government shutdown creating economic uncertainty.
* Meantime, housing supply continues to rise, with more people willing to put their homes on the market as prices go up.

Phoenix-area home prices have been rising since hitting a low point in September 2011. The median single-family-home price rose 32.7 percent — from $150,000 to $199,000 –from last September to this September. Realtors will note the average price per square foot went up 22 percent. The median townhouse/condo price went up 30 percent, to $117,000. However, the price gains are expected to slow down.

“Since the beginning of July, the Phoenix-area housing market has cooled dramatically,” says the report’s author, Mike Orr, director of the Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “The main change is a steep fall in demand, which we can see in the 12-percent drop in single-family-home sales activity just between August and September alone. Going forward, we anticipate a much slower rate of price appreciation than the furious pace we have witnessed over the last two years.”

Orr says the recent government shutdown may be at least partly to blame for the hard brakes on the housing market.

“The sudden weakness in owner-occupier demand since July is unusual and unexpected,” says Orr. “Poor consumer sentiment and concern over the government shutdown seem to have accelerated the decline. We also have no government information available yet on new-construction permits because of the shutdown.”

On the positive side, the number of available homes for sale continues to rise, after the area experienced a very tight supply for months. Active listings, not including those already under contract, went up 32 percent from Oct. 1 of last year to Oct. 1 of this year. More people appear willing to put their homes up for sale as prices rise.

“If the current trend continues, supply will exceed demand by the end of the year,” says Orr. “We now expect a balanced market to prevail during November. This is great news for buyers since they will experience less competition and be in a strong position to negotiate.”

The luxury market continues to perform well, thanks to the rising stock market and a big increase in the availability of jumbo loans. Sales of $500,000-plus, single-family homes grew an incredible 51 percent from September 2012 to September 2013.

However, cheap homes are tough to find, with fewer foreclosures coming onto the market. Foreclosure starts – owners receiving notice their lenders may foreclose in 90 days – dropped 61 percent from last September to this September. Completed foreclosures declined 63 percent. Orr expects foreclosures to keep falling over the next several years, thanks to tight underwriting standards.

Institutional investors and out-of-state buyers continue to lose interest in the Phoenix area, since better bargains can now be found elsewhere. The percentage of homes and condos bought by investors in September was down to 22.7 percent, from the peak of 39.7 percent in July 2012. Also, the percentage of Maricopa County residences sold to owners from outside Arizona was only 16.4 percent, the lowest percentage since January 2009.

Orr’s full report, including statistics, charts and a breakdown by different areas of the Valley, can be viewed and downloaded at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/realtyreports. A podcast with more analysis from Orr is also available from knowWPCarey, the business school’s online resource and newsletter, at http://knowwpcarey.com/index.cfm?cid=13.

JohnCreer

John Creer to lead ASU real estate activities

John P. Creer was named Assistant Vice President for Real Estate Development at Arizona State University (ASU). Creer comes to ASU from Coldwell Banker Commercial in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he has worked as a commercial real estate broker since August 2011. Morgan R. Olsen, ASU’s Executive Vice President, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer, announced Creer’s appointment.

“With his nearly 30 years of experience in commercial real estate development, consulting, property and asset management and venture capital, John Creer possesses the expertise to lead the university’s complex real estate activities,” Olsen said. “His skill set will be of great value to our Real Estate Development Office as ASU continues the development of the athletic facilities district and other strategic real estate initiatives.”

Creer’s most recent professional accomplishments with Coldwell Banker include brokering transactions with national and regional companies such as UPS, US Bank and Obagi Medical Products, Inc. He is a licensed real estate broker in Utah and is a licensed real estate agent in California. Creer holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting, with an emphasis in corporate and partnership taxation from the University of Utah.

“I’m excited to work with Dr. Olsen and the real estate team to develop and maximize the value of real estate assets to benefit Arizona State University,” Creer said. “President Crow and Dr. Olsen have created a refreshing atmosphere in a public institution that is on the leading edge of public-private partnerships. I believe my public and private development experience will bring an added dimension to ASU’s growth trajectory in relation to its real estate development initiatives.”

Prior to his Salt Lake City relocation, Creer worked for Grandview Advisors, LLC, Vanir Construction and the Trammell Crow Company on professional service contracts with the Los Angeles (California) Unified School District. One of his notable ventures with his partners at Grandview Advisors was the development of a master planning process and protocol to support a $7-billion, voter-approved capital investment program for 585 public school sites across the Los Angeles area.

Earlier in his Los Angeles work, Creer was responsible for the development and execution of a $2.3 billion master plan for 41 new San Fernando Valley K-12 school sites. He managed a $200-million charter school development program and started an asset management division to monetize underutilized real estate owned by the school district through public-private partnerships.

Previously in his career, Creer was chief financial officer for a Los Angeles venture-backed technology transfer company. He formerly served as managing partner of a Salt Lake City commercial development firm and was the chief financial officer of a Salt Lake City technology start-up company. Creer also performed various development, leasing and property management roles for a Salt Lake City commercial and industrial real estate development firm.

“With his wealth of knowledge and history of success in a broad range of real estate development ventures, I’m confident that John Creer can build on our achievements in the real estate arena,” Olsen said. “We are pleased to welcome him as part of the ASU Business and Finance team, and look forward to working with him in meeting the university’s complex real estate needs and developing new revenue streams to support ASU’s evolution as a New American University.”

Visit https://cfo.asu.edu to learn more about the office of ASU Business and Finance.

JohnCreer, ASU-website

John Creer Joins ASU Real Estate Development Office

John P. Creer was named Assistant Vice President for Real Estate Development at Arizona State University (ASU). Creer comes to ASU from Coldwell Banker Commercial in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he has worked as a commercial real estate broker since August 2011. Morgan R. Olsen, ASU’s Executive Vice President, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer, announced Creer’s appointment.

“With his nearly 30 years of experience in commercial real estate development, consulting, property and asset management and venture capital, John Creer possesses the expertise to lead the university’s complex real estate activities,” Olsen said. “His skill set will be of great value to our Real Estate Development Office as ASU continues the development of the athletic facilities district and other strategic real estate initiatives.”

Creer’s most recent professional accomplishments with Coldwell Banker include brokering transactions with national and regional companies such as UPS, US Bank and Obagi Medical Products, Inc. He is a licensed real estate broker in Utah and is a licensed real estate agent in California. Creer holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting, with an emphasis in corporate and partnership taxation from the University of Utah.

“I’m excited to work with Dr. Olsen and the real estate team to develop and maximize the value of real estate assets to benefit Arizona State University,” Creer said. “President Crow and Dr. Olsen have created a refreshing atmosphere in a public institution that is on the leading edge of public-private partnerships. I believe my public and private development experience will bring an added dimension to ASU’s growth trajectory in relation to its real estate development initiatives.”

Prior to his Salt Lake City relocation, Creer worked for Grandview Advisors, LLC, Vanir Construction and the Trammell Crow Company on professional service contracts with the Los Angeles (California) Unified School District. One of his notable ventures with his partners at Grandview Advisors was the development of a master planning process and protocol to support a $7-billion, voter-approved capital investment program for 585 public school sites across the Los Angeles area.

Earlier in his Los Angeles work, Creer was responsible for the development and execution of a $2.3 billion master plan for 41 new San Fernando Valley K-12 school sites. He managed a $200-million charter school development program and started an asset management division to monetize underutilized real estate owned by the school district through public-private partnerships.

Previously in his career, Creer was chief financial officer for a Los Angeles venture-backed technology transfer company. He formerly served as managing partner of a Salt Lake City commercial development firm and was the chief financial officer of a Salt Lake City technology start-up company. Creer also performed various development, leasing and property management roles for a Salt Lake City commercial and industrial real estate development firm.

“With his wealth of knowledge and history of success in a broad range of real estate development ventures, I’m confident that John Creer can build on our achievements in the real estate arena,” Olsen said. “We are pleased to welcome him as part of the ASU Business and Finance team, and look forward to working with him in meeting the university’s complex real estate needs and developing new revenue streams to support ASU’s evolution as a New American University.”

Earthfest Provides Free Resources to Teachers

ASU partners with India to transform teacher preparation

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College faculty are sharing a path of teacher development they hope will lead to a better education for India’s burgeoning population of school-aged children.

Called the India Support for Teacher Education Program (In-STEP), the year-long project funded by a $4.3 million grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development is bringing 110 India teacher educators to ASU for an intense, semester-long immersion in a world-class teacher education program. Teachers College also is collaborating closely with India’s Ministry for Human Resources Development to implement the program.

The coveted project was awarded to Teachers College over other U.S. education institutions due to its large-scale program of teacher preparation, close partnerships with more than 180 diverse, preK-12 schools and proven ability to manage complex international programs, according to Ara Barsam, senior director of grants and associate research professor.

“Engaging globally is a key ASU aspiration,” he said. “The In-STEP project provides a tremendous opportunity for us to expand our impact beyond metropolitan Phoenix and the United States to where our Teachers College model is being recognized worldwide.”

Barsam wants the program to equip and inspire the 53 Indian teacher educators who converged on ASU this fall, and the 57 coming next September, to new levels of professional performance. In preparation, he traveled to India in July to assess the needs and strengths of the Indian participants through focus groups and interviews before they arrived in the U.S.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Dedicates New McCord Hall

One of the nation’s largest and highest-ranked business schools dedicated a brand new, state-of-the-art facility today. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University held a ceremony to mark the official opening of its 129,000-square-foot McCord Hall.

“We believe we’ve built the most advanced learning environment available for graduate business students,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman. “Every detail was designed to teach students in a way that makes them better contributors to today’s work environment. The building has an emphasis on collaboration, discussion-based learning and flexibility.”

The new building is being added to the school’s two existing structures, which were renovated during this project. Together, they will ease overcrowding for the 10,000-plus students who attend the W. P. Carey School. McCord Hall will be home to the school’s graduate and executive-education programs, including the Top 30 nationally ranked MBA programs.

The impressive facility features modern architecture, technologically advanced tiered and flat classrooms, a multipurpose event space, a new graduate-level career center, team rooms, study areas, outdoor assembly areas, a lounge for honors undergrads, and a health-conscious café. McCord Hall is also environmentally friendly, with less water and energy use than similar buildings and a solar array that returns power to the campus grid. The project totaled $57 million, and the return on investment is expected to be great.

“We estimate the project has already had an economic impact on the gross state product of $64 million and the creation of 880 jobs,” says Professor Dennis Hoffman, director of the L. William Seidman Research Institute at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Of course, the value of the construction does not include the added value that will accrue from the human capital produced in McCord Hall’s learning environment, allowing students to acquire knowledge and skills to compete in today’s economy.”

ASU President Michael Crow and Hillman presided over the dedication ceremony at the university’s Tempe campus. Philanthropist Sharon Dupont McCord and other building donors also took part. McCord and her late husband, Bob, are the major donors behind the facility’s name. More than $17 million in gifts and pledges from area companies and families, as well as other various sources, are helping to fund the building. Student support has been robust.

To learn more about the W. P. Carey School of Business, visit wpcarey.asu.edu. For more information about McCord Hall, go to http://building.wpcarey.asu.edu/. Donations to the building campaign can still be made at asufoundation.org/wpcbuilding. The W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA, evening MBA, online MBA and undergraduate business programs are all currently ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.