Tag Archives: ASU

Diane-Humetewa

Humetewa is first American Indian woman federal judge

Diane Humetewa, Arizona State University Special Advisor to the President for American Indian Affairs, has been named the first American Indian woman to serve as a federal judge.

Humetewa won unanimous approval in the U.S. Senate in a 96-0 vote and will serve in the federal District Court of Arizona.

“I feel privileged to serve in this new capacity and I am certainly grateful for all of the support that President Crow and the ASU community offered me throughout the confirmation process,” Humetewa said.

This isn’t the first time Humetewa has made her mark in history. She was the first American Indian female to be appointed as a U.S. Attorney in 2007. During a long career in public service, she also served as counsel to the U.S. Senate Indian Affairs Subcommittee, then chaired by Sen. John McCain. Before the Senate vote, Senator McCain informed the Senate body of the historic nature of the vote.

As a Professor of Practice in the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and Special Advisor to the President, Humetewa taught Indian law and worked to improve the retention and success of American Indian students at the university.

“Diane Humetewa has excelled in efforts to bring higher education to American Indian people on tribal lands throughout the state and to improve their academic experience at the university,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow.

“We look forward to following her progress as she continues her exceptional career in public service.”

Humetewa, who will leave ASU to serve on the federal district court, was chairperson of the ASU Tribal Liaison Advisory Committee and a member of the Provost’s Native American Advisory Council. She worked to promote higher education opportunities among Arizona’s tribes, notably with the Tribal Nations Tour that brought university students and staff to reservation communities.

Humetewa, a member of the Hopi tribe, was born and raised in Arizona. She began school on the Hualapai Reservation and traveled throughout Arizona’s Indian country with her father, who worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She maintains close ties to her family and culture on the Hopi reservation.

Humetewa received her Juris Doctor degree in 1993 from ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and her bachelor’s degree from ASU in 1987. She has served on the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Indian Legal Advisory Committee since 1997.

Broome

Broome taking part in Global Cities Initiative

As part of the Global Cities Initiative, a joint project of Brookings and JPMorgan Chase, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council president and CEO Barry Broome, will join various business and elected leaders for a discussion on the development of a metropolitan export strategy.

“The mayors and business leaders from the region have led in the transformation of our economy” said Broome. “Developing a metropolitan export strategy through the Global Cities Initiative is a critical step toward ensuring our economic future.”

The forum, Going Global: Boosting Greater Phoenix’s Economic Future, taking place today at ASU Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, will feature many speakers, including Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton, former U.S. Secretary of Commerce William M. Daly, Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program co-directors Bruce Katz and Amy Liu, and Chase market manager for Arizona and Nevada Curtis Reed, Jr.

The half-day event will center on preliminary market assessment findings on how the Greater Phoenix region can better position its global competitiveness. The city of Phoenix is part of a network of regions across the nation participating in the Global Cities Initiative’s Exchange to help develop global engagement strategies

Closing out the forum, U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker will join the program via satellite to make an announcement regarding the National Export Initiative.

The event will begin at 9:30 a.m. and conclude at 12:15 p.m.

Team Max

ASU real estate development students compete in challenge

Students in Arizona State University’s Masters of Real Estate Development (MRED) program at the W.P. Carey School of Business will be competing for up to $6,000 in the inaugural REIAC/Rockefeller Group Challenge starting at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 13 at the Ritz-Carlton Phoenix.

Three competing teams of graduating MRED students will each present a development solution for a storied asset of local Arizona commercial real estate including multi-family, retail and entertainment. MRED teams will demonstrate their strategy for the local development projects including acquisition, financing, entitlements and design.

Teams will have just 10 minutes to present followed by questions, with the winning team chosen by the audience. Winning team members will each receive a $1,000 cash prize, up to $6,000.

The REIAC/Rockefeller Challenge MRED case competition event is open to the public and cost is $35. The event includes a networking reception with appetizers and refreshments from 6-7 p.m. Seating is limited and reservations are required online at www.reiacsouthwest.org or call 623-581-3597.

The Southwest Chapter of REIAC, an exclusive organization of top real estate executives involved in developing, acquiring and/or financing real estate recently formed a partnership with ASU’s MRED program.

“REIAC is very excited to conduct this inaugural competition event for the MRED program, aligning top real estate experts and professional standards with academia for bettering the commercial real estate community as a whole,” said Todd Jarman, board president of REIAC Southwest and senior vice president, BBVA Compass.

The MRED student case study competition is sponsored by The Rockefeller Group who has a longstanding history of supporting education. The future W.P. Carey Evening MBA program will be located at The Rockefeller Group’s Chandler 101, an 844,000-square-foot mid-rise office development in Chandler’s Price Corridor

“We are extremely proud to be sponsoring this premier student competition of ASU’s graduate level program for demonstrating their mastery of a real estate investment and determining the feasibility of its development,” said Mark Singerman, REIAC board member and regional director-Arizona for The Rockefeller Group.

“Many of Phoenix’s real estate executives have ties to ASU and a significant number are also members of REIAC. The alliance allows for the students to have access to local real estate leaders and we’re looking forward to seeing the teams showcase their talents in the annual REIAC/Rockefeller Group Challenge,” Singerman said.

“The REIAC/Rockefeller Group Challenge provides students an experience that teaches them how to apply the theory of real estate in a practical way only available because of local industry support that comes from this Challenge,” said Mark Stapp, executive director of MRED, W.P. Carey School of Business at ASU.

REIAC provided $5,000 in scholarships for the 2013/2014 academic year. Requirements of the scholarship program include being a full-time student, an Arizona resident and preferably, having the desire to work locally upon graduation.

Julie_Wrigley

Wrigley donates millions to ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability

As climate change threatens the world’s eco-systems, conservationist and philanthropist Julie Ann Wrigley is on a mission.

Turning to higher education for solutions, Wrigley has made a new $25 million philanthropic investment in Arizona State University’s Global Institute of Sustainability, bringing her total commitment to sustainability research and programs at ASU to $50 million. Her most recent support will advance research on how current human activity impacts the Earth’s capacity to sustain populations of all species.

In recognition of her leadership, ASU is renaming the institute: the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability.

“ASU and Julie Wrigley have been dedicated partners in building the nation’s most comprehensive program in sustainability teaching, learning and discovery, and we could not have done it without her generous investment and leadership,” says ASU President Michael M. Crow, a member of the steering committee of the American College & University President’s Climate Commitment.

“She recognized and trusted that our university is one of the rare places that can tackle issues of sustainability across disciplines and find real-world solutions. Julie shares our commitment to making the world a better place for future generations and, through her partnership with us, is helping to invent that future.”

Wrigley’s commitments have helped to transform ASU — a university known for innovation and risk-taking — into a global center of sustainability education and discovery. For example:

  • The first comprehensive degree program in the country. ASU School of Sustainability alumni are employed in fields such as government, business, education, nonprofits and NGOs, recycling and waste, energy and environmental design, food and farming, finance and more.
  • Use-inspired research, including work done through ASU LightWorks, which has led to the development of technologies such as high-power, low-cost, rechargeable zinc-air batteries for renewable energy storage; an energy-efficient electrochemical process to capture and store carbon dioxide from power plant emissions; ultra-thin silicon solar cells designed to increase the amount of electricity that can be produced through direct conversion of sunlight; and developing microbial systems that restore water purity and generate usable energy by capturing waste products from water.
  • Across four campuses, ASU invested $52 million in sustainability projects in fiscal year 2013, including energy efficiency, dining, transportation, renewable energy and other projects. The university’s waste sent to landfill is down 24 percent from 2007 despite the university adding 29 percent in space and 33 percent in enrollment through 2013. Greenhouse gas emissions are down 15 percent from 2007; and ASU has 23.5 MWdc of solar generating capacity, which is more than 43 percent of the university’s daytime peak load.

“Julie’s continued support is an affirmation that we’re going in the right direction, and a challenge to continually strive to do more,” says Rob Melnick, Wrigley Institute COO and executive director. “We have launched the nation’s first School of Sustainability, and we continue to grow enrollment and expand the degrees and programs we offer, so we can educate as many future leaders as possible. We have built a foundation for collaborating across academic disciplines and internal and external partnerships — and even institutional and international boundaries — to approach our sustainability research in innovative ways.”

“I spend as much time working on my world of sustainability as I spend on my other business endeavors,” says Wrigley, CEO of Wrigley Investments LLC, also has sat on the board of the World Wildlife Fund, Keep America Beautiful, the Nature Conservancy and the Peregrine Fund.

“And to me, that’s how you can make an impact.”

For more information: http://sustainability.asu.edu.

housing.prices

What Comes Next for housing market?

The Phoenix-area housing market is experiencing a normal seasonal spring bounce in activity and prices, but what will happen next? A new report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University talks about the waves of consumers that will likely start returning to the housing market next year, for the first time since the recession.

Here are the latest details about Maricopa and Pinal counties, as of March:

> The median single-family-home sales price recovered from two months of drops and is back to a level similar to December.
> However, demand and sales activity are still dramatically lower than at this time last year.
> The report’s author examines why certain waves of consumers may start returning to the housing market over the next several years.

Phoenix-area home prices quickly rose from a recession low point in September 2011 until last summer, when the jumps slowed down. Then, this January and February, we saw the first two back-to-back monthly drops in the area’s median single-family-home sales price. This March, we saw that dip erased, but probably not for long.

“The bounce is a normal effect of the busy spring sales season, combined with a lot more high-priced homes in the current sales mix,” says the report’s author, Mike Orr, director of the Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “The period from March to May is almost always the strongest part of the year for demand, and it is highly probable we will see pricing fade again during the summer months, when the luxury, snowbird and active-adult markets go relatively quiet. We may still be looking at little to no annual price appreciation by the end of the year.”

The median single-family-home sales price was up about 17 percent from last March to this March – from $175,000 to $204,520. The average price per square foot was up 15.5 percent. The median townhouse/condominium sales price was up 16 percent. We no longer have a tight supply of homes for sale like we did at this time last year. Supply stabilized in March, with 64 percent more listings this April 1 than last April 1.

However, low demand continues to be a problem. Single-family-home sales activity was down 20 percent this March from last March. Some of the drop comes from regular home buyers, but also institutional investors are just not as interested in Phoenix, now that better bargains can be found in other parts of the country with more foreclosures. The percentage of residential properties purchased by investors in the Phoenix area this March was down to 17.4 percent from the peak of 39.7 percent in July 2012.

“The institutional investors are doing very little buying or selling in the Phoenix area at the moment,” says Orr. “Their focus has turned to property management, rather than acquisition or disposal.”

The areas doing especially well right now in Phoenix?

Luxury homes priced at more than $500,000 represented 11 percent more of the market’s sales activity this March than last March. High-end demand above $1.5 million was greater in the first quarter of this year than in any first quarter since 2007.
Rental homes are experiencing very strong demand. Interest is so robust that only a one-month supply is currently available on the market.
Multi-family construction permits are on a strong upward trend. In fact, Orr says the first quarter of 2014 was the second-highest quarter for multi-family permits in 12 years.

Meantime, single-family construction permits were down 18 percent this March from last March. New-home sales were down 15 percent.

Orr says, “A key underlying problem for current housing demand is lack of household formation due to many factors, including unemployment, falling birth rates, lower net migration and greater home-sharing, especially among millennials. However, we could see lenders become the most influential decision-makers in this situation. Many lenders are hurting for business, with applications at their lowest level since 2000, and some may become more forgiving, accepting lower credit scores for loans.”

Orr also predicts we’ll see the first major waves of consumers who lost their homes through foreclosure during the recession coming back into the market, starting next year. He says those who lost their homes at the beginning of the downturn will have spent their required seven years in the “penalty box,” and they’ll reemerge from 2015 to 2019. He adds it’s just a question of how many of them want to try again at home ownership.

Orr’s full report, including statistics, charts and a breakdown by different areas of the Valley, can be viewed and downloaded at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/realtyreports. A podcast with more analysis from Orr is also available from knowWPCarey, the business school’s online resource and newsletter, at http://knowwpcarey.com/index.cfm?cid=13.

GA_tail lights 2

ASU opens 2 more PowerParasols

In order to line up more with Arizona State University’s goals of being carbon neutral on campus by 2025, the New American University has teamed up with start-up company, Strategic Solar, and has opened up two more PowerParasols on campus.

Morgan R. Olsen, executive vice president, treasurer and CFO at ASU, said that these projects are extremely helpful and important to ASU’s goal of being carbon neutral and a leader of universities in cutting the impact that these institutions have on the environment.

ASU’s partnership with Strategic Solar began when they first built one of the PowerParasols, which have photovoltaic solar panels and supplies great shade for the community, at Lot 59, a popular tailgating spot for Sun Devil fans. Now, two more of these structures were built, one PowerParasol was erected outside of ASU’s Memorial Union and the other was built at a major entrance onto campus at Gammage Auditorium.

“The PowerParasols created an area we can enjoy 12 months out of the year,” Olsen said. They also generate sustainable energy for the campus and add to the 25 megawatts of solar energy that ASU hosts across four campuses, Olsen said.

Since 2007, ASU has cut its green house emissions by 36 percent per student, while enrollment has increased by 33 percent, Olsen said. “We’re growing and we’ve achieved these great metrics,” Olsen said.

The PowerParasol at Memorial Union has 1,380 photovoltaic solar panels, which produce 397 kilowatts, and the PowerParasol at Gammage is a little larger with 1,716 panels on two different structures and it produces 494 kilowatts.

These structures aren’t only great at supplying shade during the day, but at night they have luminous lights that create a beautiful friendly environment.

JA Solar supplied all of the panels that were used for these projects. APS community Relations Manager Michelle Gettinger congratulated ASU and PowerParasol with this brand new innovative and green structure.

Bob Boscamp, president of Strategic Solar, said that ASU was the first to partner and share the vision of installing PowerParasols. The PowerParasols are patent pending Boscamp said and he hopes to open up more at ASU and across the nation.

Olsen said that this is one of many of ASU’s projects that are being done to help minimalize the impact that Universities have on the environment. Zero waste initiatives have been enacted, across the campus there are multiple recycling bins for students to utilize and whenever the school receives boxes from shipments ASU sends them back.

Also, at the recent Pat’s Run, ASU had crews making sure what was recyclable at the event was recycled and anything that was organic trash went to proper biomass facilities Olsen said.

MU_under_gold

ASU PowerParasol structures completed

At a time when market forces are shifting and reports of unrest and uncertainty in the solar industry are raging in Arizona, a local start up company has partnered with Arizona’s largest utility, APS, to deliver a project for the state’s most prominent and voracious consumer of solar energy, Arizona State University. But this time, the projects are as much about transforming space as they are about transforming electric power generation.

At a Grand Opening event this week, Arizona State University has announced the arrival of two new PowerParasol projects to its Tempe Campus – one at the center of the campus at the Memorial Union, and a second at a prominent entrance to the campus at Gammage Auditorium.

MU_cady_greenThese projects, unlike many more traditional rooftop solar installations, are meant to be seen and enjoyed. In each case, they change the nature of the space beneath them to enhance the experience on the ground.

“It’s not that the energy is unimportant,” said Bob Boscamp, President of Strategic Solar, “but what makes PowerParasol special are the other things it does. It provides shade but allows sunlight to come through, so plants grow and garden areas thrive. At night it provides lighting that can be ordinary or extraordinary, as we have done at Gammage and the MU.”

PowerParasol projects, created in part by DeBartolo architects, are unique to the spaces where they are deployed. At 25-feet, they are higher than a traditional carport or canopy solar installation. The construction elements include opportunities to do advertising and promotional signage, or to make significant additional architectural statements, which is what occurred with both the Gammage and Memorial Union projects.

GA_looking east from mill+HDR“The MU is our campus community center, it’s where students, staff and visitors congregate, but for many months out of the year, the Arizona sun creates an environment that is not very friendly,” said John Riley, ASU’s Sustainability Operations Officer. As we all know from living here, if you can find shade it makes a world of difference. The PowerParasol not only does that, but in our project it also provides lighting and elements that enable us to really put this space to use for our students and the public.”

At Gammage, the PowerParasol project is deployed in a wide median that runs along two single-lane roadways that enter and exit the campus, and that take visitors to the Gammage Auditorium parking lot. The project was designed to create an inviting entry with unique lighting features and signage opportunities for Gammage performances and events on campus.

MU_under the structureThe PowerParasol at the Memorial Union consists of three PowerParasol structures and covers nearly an acre of land from the MU to Hayden Library, including the popular Cady Fountain. It utilizes 1,380 photovoltaic solar panels and produces 397 kW DC. PowerParasol at Gammage is the larger project with 1,716 photovoltaic solar panels on two PowerParasol structures. It produces 494 kW DC. Arizona-based construction company Hardison/Downey, who has served on every PowerParasol construction job, handled both projects.

While the creative drive and demand came from ASU and the PowerParasol team, it took the energy of APS to make it happen.

“The fact is, these projects never happen without APS in this partnership,” said Bob Boscamp. “We are a small company with a big idea and it is not lost on us that we need help from other smart people – you can’t find better, smarter people than at ASU and APS. “

GA_tail lightsAPS is the primary energy supplier for Arizona State University and was the energy sponsor of the two PowerParasol projects. Not only did the company provide an incentive award, APS provided interconnection to the grid and helped support the logistics of project deployment.

“We are delighted to be a partner in these new projects at ASU,” said (name) of APS. “Renewable energy resources are an important part of our long-term generation plans and we are especially interested in innovative new technologies that have practical application and are the product of quality companies like Strategic Solar Energy. The PowerParasol is a game-changer and we are excited about where this can go from here.”

The new projects both utilize panels provided by JA Solar.

“Renewable energy resources are an important part of our long-term generation plans,” said Marc Romito, APS manager of Renewable Energy. “We are especially interested in innovative new technologies that have practical application. The PowerParasol is a game changer and we are excited about where this can go from here.”

Arizona State University now has three PowerParasol projects. The first was deployed in Lot 59 adjacent to Sun Devil Stadium and is used for tailgating before and after games, and for shaded parking for students.

MEETING OF THE MINDS: Jeff Ehret interviews CIIC founders Jefferson Begay and Urban L. Giff during the 2013 conference opening.

Building the bridge: CIIC Conference sets sights on university program

Entering its 11th year, Arizona State University’s Construction in Indian Country conference is a means to recruit prospective Native American construction students, educate local tribes and foster industry connections. It is also a key contributor to the CIIC endowment, which has raised $400,000 and put 14 students through the construction management program at ASU. It is currently supporting nine undergraduates, including Shane Cody who came to the program after working in the industry as a field laborer.

“I really enjoyed my working experience in the field, but I knew that obtaining a management position would require me to obtain a construction management degree from a university,” Cody says. Cody contacted the CIIC through the suggestion of his ASU adviser and has since landed two internships with DPR Construction offices.

Program chair Allan Chasey, at the Del E. Webb School of Construction, is proud of what the CIIC conference and endowment have accomplished, but when he stepped into his current role at the school a year ago, he says he saw more to the CIIC culture; he saw a full academically involved program. The first step toward making the conference into a year-round program was replacing an events coordinator with a program manager. The department landed Jerome Clark, who had extensive experience with the Intertribal Council of Arizona and an understanding of Chasey’s vision.

“The question we find ourselves asking more often is nation-building for tribes — what does it take for a tribe to build up their nations. build up its hospitals, roads, etc.,” Clark says.

The CIIC’s updated vision includes more conversations with tribes, research into tribal construction laws and potentially building a clearing house. But first, CIIC must address its 2014 theme, “Bridging Our Communities – Building for Our Futures,” — the key to its future as a program.

The Conference

11TH ANNUAL CONSTRUCTION IN INDIAN COUNTRY
April 28 to 30
Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino
5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Chandler
http://ciic.construction.asu.edu

Top Ten Sports Bars, Photo: Clintus McGintus, Flickr

ASU unveils innovative sports law programs

If you want to work with professional sports teams, big sporting events or promising student athletes, then you may be interested in the innovative new sports law and business program officially being launched this week by Arizona State University. The highly ranked Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU are collaborating on two new sports law graduate degrees you can earn in just one year. Classes begin this fall.

“I’ve worked in the sports law field for three decades, and can see we need professionals who have training in both law and business to help work on regulatory and revenue issues in the sports industry,” says professor Rodney K. Smith of the College of Law, director of the new programs. “I don’t know of any other program in the country that offers a master’s degree like this with just a single, intensive year of study.”

The two new one-year degrees are a master of legal studies (MLS), for those without a law background, and a master of laws (LLM), for those who already graduated from law school. In each program, students will work on 18 to 21 credits from the law school, and six to nine credits from the W. P. Carey School. This includes an externship, which might be for a professional sports team, a sports law firm or even a big event like a college bowl game. The programs are going to be small and personalized, accepting fewer than 30 people each in their first year. They will also focus on team-based learning and look at real-world issues, such as stadium problems, player unionization and contract negotiations.

Ray Anderson, ASU vice president of university athletics and a former executive vice president of football operations for the National Football League, will be a professor of practice in the programs. He wanted to be part of a high-quality sports offering, and this one is located in a metropolitan area with three professional sports teams, major golf events, college football bowl games and even next year’s Super Bowl.

“I am proud to be a part of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Sports Law and Business Program because it is the only one of its kind to offer a sports-focused graduate program that combines the strengths of a top law school with a top business school as its foundation,” Anderson says. “One of the reasons I came to Arizona State University from the National Football League is because of the vibrant Phoenix sports market, with its combination of sporting events representative of all major sports leagues and organizations. This fact, combined with a premier research university, will produce top-quality learning experiences for students in the curriculum.”

Courses in the new program will encompass both law and business areas, including “Sports Business Strategy and Industry Dynamics,” “Negotiations and Drafting in the Sports Industry,” and “Problems in Professional Sports Law and Business.” Big-name speakers from the world of sports are expected to participate, as well.

“The sports industry is complex and expanding,” says marketing professor Michael Mokwa of the W. P. Carey School. “The new program will provide skills and savvy for individuals seeking to make a real difference in the field.”

For more information about the new one-year degrees, visit law.asu.edu/sportslaw. A three-year juris doctorate program will also be added this fall for those who want to pursue their law degree with an emphasis in sports law and business.

grocery

Expect to Pay More for Certain Groceries

With California experiencing one of its worst droughts on record, grocery shoppers across the country can expect to see a short supply of certain fruits and vegetables in stores and to pay higher prices for those items. Professor Timothy Richards of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University recently completed some research on which crops will likely be most affected and what the price boosts might be.

“You’re probably going to see the biggest produce price increases on avocados, berries, broccoli, grapes, lettuce, melons, peppers, tomatoes and packaged salads,” says Richards, the Morrison Chair at the Morrison School of Agribusiness within the W. P. Carey School of Business. “We can expect to see the biggest percentage jumps in prices for avocados and lettuce – 28 percent and 34 percent, respectively. People are the least price-sensitive when it comes to those items, and they’re more willing to pay what it takes to get them.”

Industry estimates range from a half-million to 1 million acres of agricultural land likely to be affected by the current California drought. Richards believes between 10 and 20 percent of the supply of certain crops could be lost, and California is the biggest national supplier of several of those crops. For avocados, the state is the only major domestic source.

Richards used retail-sales data from the Nielsen Perishables Group, an industry analytics and consulting firm, to estimate price elasticities – how much the prices might vary – for the fruit and vegetable crops most likely to be affected by the drought. Those most vulnerable are the crops that use the most water and simply won’t be grown, or those sensitive to reductions in irrigation.

He estimates the following possible price increases due to the drought:

* Avocados likely to go up 17 to 35 cents to as much as $1.60 each.
* Berries likely to rise 21 to 43 cents to as much as $3.46 per clamshell container.
* Broccoli likely to go up 20 to 40 cents to a possible $2.18 per pound.
* Grapes likely to rise 26 to 50 cents to a possible $2.93 per pound.
* Lettuce likely to rise 31 to 62 cents to as much as $2.44 per head.
* Packaged salad likely to go up 17 to 34 cents to a possible $3.03 per bag.
* Peppers likely to go up 18 to 35 cents to a possible $2.48 per pound.
* Tomatoes likely to rise 22 to 45 cents to a possible $2.84 per pound.

“We predict the increased prices will change consumer purchasing behavior,” says Sherry Frey, vice president of Nielsen Perishables Group. “We’ve identified certain consumers who will be more heavily affected by the price increases — for example, younger consumers of avocados. In addition, there is a larger department and store impact retailers will need to manage. While some consumers will pay the increased prices, others will substitute or leave the category completely. And, for a category like avocados, there are non-produce snacking categories, such as chips, crackers and ethnic grocery items, that will be negatively impacted.”

Richards adds, “One other thing for shoppers to understand — Because prices are going to go up so much, retailers will start looking elsewhere for produce. This means we’ll see a lot more imports from places like Chile and Mexico, which may be an issue for certain grocery customers who want domestic fruit and vegetables.”

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W. P. Carey Honors Executive of the Year

Jim Davidson has played a key role in some of the biggest deals in the technology industry, including investments in Dell, Skype, Go Daddy, Alibaba, Avago, Seagate and Sabre Holdings, which operates Travelocity. For his impressive work in the investment arena, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University will honor Davidson – co-founder, managing partner and managing director of Silver Lake – with the school’s annual Executive of the Year Award next week.

“Jim Davidson has helped many businesses to strategically invest and grow into market leaders,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman. “He has been an active advisor in the technology industry for more than a quarter of a century and is considered a pioneer in the world of technology investments.”

Davidson co-founded Silver Lake in 1999 and has helped the technology-focused private-equity firm grow to manage more than $23 billion in assets and employ more than 200 professionals around the world. The firm’s portfolio currently includes or has previously included such companies as Alibaba, Ameritrade, Avago, Go Daddy, the NASDAQ OMX Group, Sabre Holdings, Seagate and Skype. The firm was also instrumental in the recent $25 billion deal in which Silver Lake partnered with Michael Dell to take Dell Inc. off stock exchanges to become private again.

Prior to his work at Silver Lake, Davidson was a managing director at Hambrecht & Quist, a technology-focused investment bank and venture capital firm that helped underwrite the initial public offerings (IPOs) of Apple, Netscape and Amazon.com. He was also a corporate securities attorney.

Davidson serves on the board of SMART Modular Technologies, a designer, manufacturer and supplier of flash memory cards and other digital storage products. He has also served on the boards of directors of many other Silver Lake investments, including Avago, Seagate and Skype. He is an active angel investor and advisor to several private tech companies and also serves on the boards of nonprofits, including the University of California, Berkeley’s Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology and the U.S. Olympic Foundation Board of Trustees.

Davidson becomes the 31st annual Executive of the Year chosen by the Dean’s Council, a national group of prominent executives who advise the W. P. Carey School of Business. Previous honorees include Howard Schultz, chairman and chief executive officer of Starbucks Coffee Company; Alan Mulally, president and chief executive officer of Ford Motor Company, and Mike Ahearn, chairman of the board of First Solar, Inc.

Davidson will be honored at a luncheon at the JW Marriott Camelback Inn in Scottsdale on April 17. The event, which starts at 11:45 a.m., is part of the Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series. For more information about the club or to reserve seats, call (480) 727-0596 or visit www.econclubphx.org. Tickets are $75 per person for non-club members.

Rugby, SL ONLINE

Rough Up Your Weekend at the Inaugural Fiat of Scottsdale Rugby Bowl

As one of the fastest growing sports in North America and in college sports, you may have noticed rugby is receiving more attention lately. Arizona has been a part of the rugby community for almost 40 years with Arizona State University’s club team. Scottsdale is looking to join with the first rugby event in the Valley – the Fiat of Scottsdale Rugby Bowl.

ASU Rugby debuted in 1975 and has ranked in the top 15 in the last five years and is currently ranked No. 11. Coach Gary Lane explains that unlike lacrosse or hockey, the rugby team does not play in a league division, but plays against everyone. They have had a tough schedule so far, but hope to move up in the ranks to No. 9 or No. 10 in the next couple of weeks. “I think we are doing pretty well,” states Lane, “We play U of A in two weeks at U of A. I think that will be a good test for how things are going.”

As a club team, ASU rugby does a lot of its own fundraising for travel expenses, tournaments, equipment and more. They tried new fundraising techniques this year including some crowd funding campaigns. They did not meet their goal, but did pretty well and hope their campaigns will be more successful in the future.

Lane also hopes to receive more exposure for the team and to receive team sponsorships. Lane emphasizes that the team is more than just a sports club, but also part of the community. The team participates in a lot of charity work for nonprofits such as the Special Olympics and Polo Plunge. They also support the women’s athletics at ASU and try to support the community in different ways. “It is a big part of our identity. We are very proud of that and we hope to set a benchmark for other teams at ASU,” says Lane.

ASU will compete against Brigham Young University (BYU) in the upcoming Rugby Bowl in Scottsdale. Lane says that the team is excited for the event and to compete against a difficult team. “It is our job to produce a game this is up to the stature of the event,” states Lane, “I’ve never been shy as a coach to take on big teams and see how we compare. You have to play at that level and if you don’t, why bother.”

Founder and owner of the Fiat of Scottsdale Rugby Bowl, Jason Rose, is also excited for the event. Rose explains that there is already a successful polo event in the valley, and he saw the chance to start a similar event with rugby. He explains that rugby is a growing sport and that there is a huge rugby footprint with the high-ranking teams of ASU and BYU. He states that the fans are about even so far according to ticket sales.

Rose hopes to generate visitors from different backgrounds form rugby enthusiasts to people who are fascinated and learning about rugby to people who simply want to enjoy an Arizona spring day.

There will be a myriad of other events including a motorcycle display, which will also donate money to a breast cancer charity, several local bands including the classic rock cover band Whiskey’s Quicker and Arizona’s premier Irish rock band Keltic Cowboys, a tug-o-war between ASU and BYU fans, World of Beer Garden, Scottsdale Cigar Lounge and even a barber shop. There is sure to be something for everyone, and all events take place inside the stadium so visitors can also watch the match.

For the future, Rose hopes to create a great Arizona event and the country’s best rugby event. He hopes to involve four, top college rugby teams in 2015, and also hopes to expand from thousands to tens of thousands of visitors. “It will be post-spring training and will be great for people looking for their football fix. Rugby has all of the hard hits like football but without the pads,” explains Rose.

Check out ASU’s rugby team and the Fiat of Scottsdale Rugby Bowl on April 12. Gates open at 11:30 am and tickets start at $12.

Kristen Stephenson headshot.jpg

Glendale adds economic development talent

The City of Glendale Office of Economic Development has a new talented team member to tout: Kristen Stephenson has joined the city as an Economic Development Specialist. Stephenson spent 12 years with the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC), where she provided crucial economic and competitive analyses, including tax policy, incentive analysis and economic impact modeling and was most recently GPEC’s leading Economic Analyst.

“Economic development is an engine for the city of Glendale and we are fortunate to have someone of Kristen’s intellectual acumen on our team who understands the Valley and state and the value of progress through business,” said Brian Friedman, Executive Director of Community and Economic Development. “Accurate, well-positioned market and economic information is critical to everything Glendale does to communicate our proposition, from engaging clients to reaching out to brokers and developers and Kristen’s expertise will help us continue to grow.”

While at GPEC she also oversaw and managed the daily activities of the organization’s research internship program and was responsible for tracking GPEC’s progress toward its goals. Stephenson has played an instrumental role in the development of the new Greater Phoenix Rising website in which she researched, organized and compiled vast amounts of data to fill the site and provided feedback on its creative direction. She earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Arizona State University and has actively participated in the Arizona Economic Roundtable, an association for business economists, for the past five years. Stephenson grew up in Glendale and currently resides in Glendale with her husband and two sons.

For more information about the Glendale Office of Economic Development, visit www.glendaleaz.com.

bioscience

Arizona Biomedical Corridor advances

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and the City Council today approved the Phoenix Industrial Development Authority to issue up to $180 million in revenue bonds to finance Mayo Clinic’s new proton beam radiation therapy center.

The Council also approved a two-year extension of its agreement with ASU and Mayo Clinic to continue collaborative planning efforts to develop the Arizona Biomedical Corridor in northeast Phoenix.

The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, the corridor’s anchor, will be the only center in the Southwest to provide proton beam radiation, a technology that precisely delivers radiation to a tumor while protecting surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The 165,000-square-foot underground facility will help Mayo medical teams treat about 2,000 patients, including children, each year beginning in spring 2016.

“Mayo Clinic’s newly consolidated cancer center is exciting for our community because it helps to deliver top-notch care to our residents and contributes to the innovation-based economy we need,” said Stanton.

“I am thrilled we are taking the next step in our partnership with ASU and Mayo Clinic on the Biomedical Corridor in District 2,” said Vice Mayor Jim Waring. “This project will be a great economic driver for the city and the state, and only enhance Phoenix’s image as an international destination for medical care.”

“Arizona cancer patients will no longer have to travel far to receive proton beam therapy,” said Wyatt Decker, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. “Proton beam therapy, with fewer side effects and greater precision, is particularly beneficial for children and younger patients. We’re pleased to be offering this important treatment soon in the fight against cancer, right here in our community.”

Stanton also announced that the Arizona State Land Department has accepted the application by KUD International, a private developer, to play a key role in developing biomedical and advanced technology research on the site. As a result, the department plans to auction 225 acres of land within the proposed corridor by the end of this year.

ali_pic

Kindness defines Sorority Secrets founder

Often times when one thinks of a great business mogul, words like “cutthroat” and “cunning” pop into their heads. But what about an accomplished business person who has made their success by going down a different path?

Ali Matthews, vice president of 224 Apparel and co-founder of The Sorority Secrets, has not emerged as a successful businesswoman by stepping on any toes or stabbing any backs, but by using a different weapon— kindness.

“She cares deeply and has a passion for bettering her surroundings, both in her personal life and in her business life,” said Karen Okonkwo, another co-founder of The Sorority Secrets.

Matthews met Okonkwo at Arizona State University in 2003 during sorority recruitment. After dreaming of being in a sorority for as long as she could remember, Matthews joined the Delta Epsilon chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta.

“I was one of those girls that was dying to be in a sorority when I was in high school,” she said. “I couldn’t wait.”

She served as recruitment chair, a position that is responsible for planning formal recruitment to find new members for the chapter, while she was in Theta. A self-proclaimed perfectionist, Matthews openly admits that she struggled with letting others help her with recruitment.

“I don’t like sharing tasks with other people,” she said. “[Recruitment] was such a great experience to learn that I can trust other people to help me. I always put a lot of pressure on myself to succeed.”

After graduating with a degree in communications in 2008, Matthews started a business to design recruitment packages for sororities. Although this venture was short-lived, she embraced it as learning experience.

“You learn so much more from failure than you do from success,” she said. “I would never say that my first business was a failure by any means, but I learned a lot from it. I try to learn every single day, and I challenge myself every single day.”

Sorority involvement led to Matthews’ next business venture when Okwonko approached her and another Theta sister, Sakura Considine, with the idea for The Sorority Secrets in 2012. The blog had its first anniversary in January.

“I think the best part, for me, about being a part of Sorority Secrets is that it is a platform to do good,” Matthews said. “We have an opportunity to help people.”

Although the website is filled with predictable content like beauty tips and baking recipes, The Sorority Secrets also shares an unique variety of content such as “Big Sis Tips” to help with filing taxes or inspirational stories about girls coming together to form a non-profit for a sister with cancer.

Despite her involvement in The Sorority Secrets, Matthews primary business endeavor is her clothing company that she started with her fiancé Jonathan Radow.

Matthews and Radow met during a business meeting for her first business venture. Following an instant connection, the two began to date. Radow owns BMSS, a lifestyle management company that offers private jet, credit card processing and real estate services. Radow wanted to add an apparel division to his company, and when he met Matthews on February 24, 2010 everything fell into place.

“He always wanted to do apparel, he met me, it made sense, so we just decided to go for it,” Matthews said.

Named after the day they met, 224 Apparel specializes in Greek and corporate clothing, ranging from sorority recruitment shirts to company uniforms. After founding this company just over 3 years ago, it has expanded across more than 50 college campuses solely based off of referrals. Although Matthews has a natural sense of style, the success of her company can be attributed to a combination of her hard work and personality.

“Out of all the other people I have worked for, she is so dedicated to her business and to her clients,” said Jacqueline Meyer, an intern for 224 Apparel. “She loves making her clients happy and coming back for more, whether it be more clothing or even someone to talk to.”

Matthews stands apart from other business owners because she not only takes on clients, but she forms genuine relationships with the people she is working with.

“Ali is professional, timely, creative, and also has awesome interpersonal skills,” Okonkwo said. “People gravitate toward her positive energy, because she sincerely cares about you.”

The company is currently moving into a bigger office to allow for more room to grow. The future of 224 Apparel is bright with Matthews’s drive, passion and charisma leading the way.

“You have to love it. You have to have the passion for it, and it’s like you’ll never work a day in your life, but you’ll never work that hard in your life either.”

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks Top 30 Again

U.S. News & World Report announces its prestigious annual list of the “Best Graduate Schools” in the country today. For the seventh year in a row, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University ranks Top 30 nationwide among full-time MBA programs. The school’s evening MBA program also ranks Top 20 among part-time MBA programs.

“We’re happy the new rankings confirm we’re achieving consistent excellence here at the W. P. Carey School of Business,” says the school’s dean, Amy Hillman. “We have a phenomenal group of faculty, staff and students who repeatedly boost us to the top, year after year.”

On the new rankings list, the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program comes in at No. 27, the best ranking for any Arizona school. The numbers are largely based on the positive reputation of schools among corporate recruiters — who offer students jobs — and among top administrators from peer business schools in the know.

“We are proud to offer one of the three least expensive programs in the Top 30,” explains Stacey Whitecotton, the W. P. Carey School’s senior associate dean of graduate programs. “We also have one of the two smallest programs in the Top 30, allowing us to keep the class sizes small and personal.”

The W. P. Carey School’s evening MBA program ranks No. 18 for part-time MBA programs nationwide. The evening program is offered in both Tempe and north Scottsdale, and it’s the highest ranked part-time MBA program in Arizona. The school also offers other part-time programs not eligible for inclusion in this particular set of new rankings: an acclaimed online MBA program that U.S. News & World Report ranked No. 2 nationwide earlier this year and a weekend MBA program that mixes online learning and campus classes every other Friday and Saturday.

The new U.S. News & World Report rankings also include other graduate-level “specialties” lists. The W. P. Carey School’s renowned supply chain management program ranks No. 3 for supply chain/logistics. The information systems program ranks No. 12 in its category. In addition, ASU’s Ph.D. program in economics ranks No. 36.

Other recent high rankings for the W. P. Carey School of Business:

> U.S. News & World Report ranks the school’s undergraduate business program No. 27 in the nation.
> Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s online MBA program Top 10 worldwide.
The Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 28 worldwide.
> The University of Texas at Dallas ranks the W. P. Carey School Top 25 in the United States and Top 30 worldwide for business-school research productivity.
The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the W. P. Carey School No. 21 in the world for economics/business.

engineering

ASU’s engineering schools merge

Arizona State University is merging its two successful engineering schools. The move will enhance and expand engineering education opportunities, lead to growth in the number of engineering and technology graduates, strengthen and increase the impact of research and simplify engagement for industry.

This is a natural next step for ASU’s successful College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) and the Polytechnic campus, where the college is located. Both are now about a decade old.

CTI will be renamed the Polytechnic School, and will be housed within ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. The school will continue to have unique programs, and the engineering and technology programs will be expanded at the Polytechnic campus.

The Arizona Board of Regents approved the change Feb. 5.

“For ASU to pursue its mission of innovative education and research, there needs to be continuous evolution and improvement of the university’s schools and campuses,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “By incorporating the Polytechnic School within Fulton Schools of Engineering, a top 50 nationally ranked engineering school, Poly will attract more students and expand research possibilities faster than could have been done otherwise. The Polytechnic School brings to Fulton a number of high-quality applied engineering programs and additional research facilities and programs.”

In recent years, ASU has constructed new academic facilities at Poly, built a residential life academic village, and added new recreation facilities. The goal remains to have 15,000 to 20,000 students there.

“The merger of CTI and the Fulton Schools represents a logical fusion of two very successful programs,” said ASU Provost Robert Page. “It will provide our students with a better-defined set of program options and allow new synergistic connections among our faculty.”

Both CTI and the Fulton Schools share a strong interest in innovative, experiential education, student success and use-inspired research directed toward solving societal challenges in areas such as energy, health, sustainability, education and security.

The Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering is one of the largest engineering schools in the United States, with more than 10,000 students. CTI has more than 3,500 undergraduate and graduate students. The Fulton Schools undergraduate program ranking from U.S. News & World Report puts them in the top 25 percent of ranked programs. Both schools have faculty that have been honored with the highest awards in their fields.

Mitzi Montoya, who has served as vice provost and dean of ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation since 2011, has been promoted to vice president for entrepreneurship and innovation in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development and university dean for entrepreneurship and innovation. In this new role, Montoya will synthesize activities across campuses and continue to enrich the entrepreneurship and innovation ecosystem.

During her time as dean of CTI, Montoya spearheaded several initiatives designed to promote and support entrepreneurship. She was pivotal in bringing TechShop – a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio with locations nationwide – to the ASU Chandler Innovation Center. She also launched iProjects, which connects ASU students with industry to solve real business problems.

housing.prices

Phoenix Home-Price Rebound May Be Over

The big home-price rebound in the Phoenix area may officially be over. For the first time since last summer, the market experienced a month-to-month decrease in the median single-family-home sales price. A new report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University reveals that and other details about Maricopa and Pinal counties, as of January:

> The median single-family-home sales price was $196,900.
> Demand is very low, from both investors and normal homeowner-occupiers.
> Phoenix-area home prices are finally back in line with the Consumer Price Index, as if the recession and recovery had never happened.

Valley home prices started quickly rising after hitting a low point in September 2011, but they began slowing down this past July. Finally, this January, the median single-family-home sales price hit $196,900 — down 4 percent from December. It was the first month-to-month drop since the normal summer seasonal blips, and it’s largely due to a big drop in demand/sales activity.

“January is usually the quietest month of the year for sales, but this January was far weaker than January 2012 and 2013,” says the report’s author, Mike Orr, director of the Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Despite the huge price increases between January 2013 and 2014, the total dollars spent on homes here this January actually dropped by 7 percent. This is the second lowest level of demand we’ve seen in 14 years, behind only 2008.”

Still, the median single-family-home sales price remained up 21 percent from last January, when it was at $163,000. Realtors will note the average price per square foot was up 19 percent. The median townhouse/condo price was up about 17 percent.

“The price gains now are weak, but it’s not clear that they’ll get much weaker or stronger,” explains Orr. “We’ve already seen a significant change in the market, which has completed its rebound from the artificially low prices between 2009 and 2011. Pricing is back to the level it would have attained if it had increased from 2000 in line with the Consumer Price Index.”

Demand from both investors and ordinary owner-occupiers is way down. Even though the available supply of homes for sale was up 47 percent from Feb. 1 of last year to Feb. 1 of this year, sales activity plummeted. Sales of single-family homes were down 23 percent from last January to this January. Sales of townhomes and condos were down 18 percent.

Luxury homes are one of the only bright spots in the market, with homes above a half-million dollars representing 14 percent more of the sales transactions this January than last January. However, even the supply of luxury homes is quickly rising, so sellers in that space will face tougher competition in 2014.

Investors continue looking to other parts of the country for bigger bargains, since Phoenix prices have risen. In January, the percentage of residential properties bought by investors was down to 21.1 percent from the peak of 39.7 in July 2012.

New home sales were also down 21 percent from last January to this January, representing the steepest fall in new-home closings in several years. Millennials and those who lost their homes to foreclosure or short sale in the recession appear more interested in renting than buying. That’s led to an upward trend in multi-family construction permits. It could also lead to higher rental rates in the next two years, during which time, home sales may continue to be relatively slow.

“The market conditions suggest prices will struggle to make any further upward progress in 2014,” Orr adds. “With February through June the strongest part of the year, we may yet see a little forward movement, but it’s likely to be tentative at best. The real test will come in the second half of the year, which is likely to see lower prices unless demand takes a distinct turn for the better.”

Foreclosure levels remain below the normal, historic trends for Maricopa and Pinal counties. Foreclosure starts – owners receiving notice their lenders may foreclose in 90 days – were down 55 percent from January 2013 to this January. Completed foreclosures were down 54 percent.

Orr’s full report, including statistics, charts and a breakdown by different areas of the Valley, can be viewed and downloaded at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/realtyreports. A podcast with more analysis from Orr is also available from knowWPCarey, the business school’s online resource and newsletter, at http://knowwpcarey.com/index.cfm?cid=13.

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RED AWARDS 2014: Developer of the Year

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Arizona Board of Regents

Winner of Best Public Project: McCord Hall
Finalist in Best Education Project: 
ASU Downtown Sun Devil Fitness Complex & McCord Hall
Finalist in Most Challenging Project: ASU Downtown Sun Devil Fitness Complex

Whether it’s bringing groundbreaking development to Arizona’s college campuses or facilitating adaptive reuses of existing structures, Arizona Board of Regents is behind many standout projects this year. ASU developed two modern fitness complexes in 2013 as well as the stunning new school for W. P. Carey graduate programs at McCord Hall. Looking forward, ASU will redevelop its Sun Devil Stadium, the College Avenue Commons (Block 12) project on its main campus and see the groundbreaking of its law center in downtown Phoenix as well as a redevelopment of the Annex along College Avenue north of the main campus. The University has the largest enrollment numbers in the nation and the aggressive development to match. That doesn’t mean University of Arizona and Northern Arizona University aren’t also aggressively developing. ABOR recently requested $1B from the state legislature for research development totalling 1,675,400 SF, which will include projects for all three universities.

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Merit for Iconic Development

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Manzanita Hall
Developer: American Campus Communities
Contractor: hardison/downey construction
Architect: Studio Ma
Size: 218,000 SF
Location: 600 E. University Dr.
Completed: October 2013

manzyThis merit award winner can be appreciated by all the locals who have had generations of their families get the Sun Devil experience among the halls of this dormitory…To add to its local significance, this building also happens to serve as an underground pull box that feeds utilities from an underground tunnel system to ASU’s public safety and IT departments as well as the State DPS radio loop.


Honorable Mention:
Melrose Gateway Monument
Developer: City of Phoenix
General Contractor: Weitz
Architect: Gensler

Gensler_City of Phoenix_Melrose Final Rendering_night The 80-foot steel Melrose Gateway Monument, arched above the threshold of the Melrose Neighborhood District in central Phoenix, was fully fabricated and constructed in Phoenix. The steel was made from recycled content, its design abstracted from an organic floral pattern that strives to give a brand identity to the mid-century modern influences apparent in the neighborhood and its businesses.

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Best Public Project

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


McCord Hall
Owner: Arizona Board of Regents, for and on behalf of Arizona State University
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: RSP Architects
Design Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
Size: 128,000 SF
Location: 450 E. Lemon St., Tempe
Completed: June 24, 2013

ASU McCordThe W. P. Carey School of Business’ new state-of-the art facility, McCord Hall, is home to Arizona State University’s graduate, MBA and executive education programs. Consisting of instructional spaces, administrative offices, student and career services and social spaces, this monumental structure is designed to last a century on ASU’s Tempe campus. The structural slab and roof structure are a post-tensioned concrete that can be re-tensioned years from now to renew their strength. The building boasts numerous sustainable features, including a façade-specific shading system and a roof designed for a photovoltaic array that can provide electricity for buildings across the whole campus.

Lizzie Kim

Kim Named to ASU Center for Emergency Management

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Leezie Kim, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, has been named to the ASU Center for Emergency Management and Homeland Security Advisory Council.

The ASU Center’s advisory council executives provide extensive expertise from all sectors of emergency management and homeland security. The council advises the center regarding solution innovations and research, and affords insight into emerging trends, needs and requirements such that the center is at the forefront of solution delivery, innovation, research and academic preparation.

Kim is a partner in the Quarles & Brady Corporate Services Group. Her practice focuses on helping clients navigate the laws of national security and international business transactions as well as health care and restaurant business transactions. She returned to the law firm following four years of service as a White House appointee to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and as general counsel to Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano.

While serving as deputy general counsel for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in Washington, D.C., Kim became involved with aviation security, border entry matters and customs issues at airports, including the federal response to the 2009 Christmas day airline underwear explosive attempt and the implementation of the new airport security procedures thereafter. In 2012, Kim was appointed to the Phoenix Aviation Advisory Board by Mayor Greg Stanton and the City Council.

Kim earned her law degree from the University of Virginia and her undergraduate degree from Rice University.

Panel will discuss Cybersecurity at GPEC

Members of Arizona’s business community are invited to the February meeting of the Arizona Aerospace & Defense Forum for a discussion centered on cyber-security including risks, trends and what businesses need to keep their businesses safe and secure online.

This event will be hosted at the offices of Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) located at 2 N. Central Ave Suite 2500 Phoenix, Arizona 85004. The event is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb.11 from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. There will be networking from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m.

The forum will be led by panelists Bill Ross, vice president of information security solutions at General Dynamics C4 Systems; Ty Lindteigen, chief technology officer at SAIFE; Raz Yalov, chief technology officer of 41Parameters and Nadya Bliss, director of strategic project development at Arizona State University.

Greenberg Traurig, along with law firm Snell & Wilmer, were instrumental in the formation of the Arizona Chapter of the Aerospace and Defense Forum. Each month, the A&D Forum alternates from meetings in Phoenix and Tucson.

Registration required by going here.

Ivan Rosenberg, president and CEO of Frontier Associates is the executive director and co-founder of A&D Forum. Stephane Frijia, director, research and strategy at the Greater Phoenix Economic Council serves as Chapter Chair of the Arizona A&D Forum.

Currently, there are more than 700 international leaders involved in the A&D Forum. Other A&D Chapters are located in Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange County, Calif. In Arizona, there are more than 2,000 companies in the aerospace and defense industry providing more than 43,000 jobs and significant positive economic impact.

Rendering courtesy of Brick & West Design and RSP Architects

Wetta Ventures, ASU to redevelop College Ave.

Wetta Ventures and Arizona State University today announced a partnership to redevelop a portion of College Avenue as part of an adaptive reuse project that includes  the former ASU Annex.

Begun in December, the project will convert the Annex, a 7,323 square-foot-building on the corner of College Ave. and Sixth Street next to the Mona Plummer Aquatic Center, into a two-restaurant building. Wetta Ventures already has a commitment from local favorite Postino Winecafe for the northern space as well as interest from various restaurant operators for the second space. Postino is expected to open in August 2014.

The Annex is across College Avenue to the east of College Avenue Commons, a five-story, 137,000 gross-square-foot building now under construction that will house the Del E. Webb School of Construction, a prospective student visitors center, and Sun Devil Marketplace, a next-generation college store featuring dining and congregation spaces, books and soft goods, and the best of emerging digital technologies revolutionizing the world of books and publishing. College Avenue Commons will open summer of 2014.

“We are thrilled to partner with ASU on the transformation of College Avenue and to help bring to life the shared vision of creating a one-of-a-kind dining destination in Tempe,” said David Wetta, founder of Wetta Ventures. “The first phase, redeveloping the Annex, is a truly unique project.   We will reinvent this old structure to create a warm, inviting space that will be full of personality. The charming and humble design from the 1950s will be preserved, while integrating modern touches and functionality. We could not ask to be part of a more exciting project.”

The Annex now.

The Annex now.

The Annex, a 1950s schoolhouse turned multi-functional building that was once the Sun Devil weight room during the Frank Kush era, will be transformed into two building spaces connected by a central breezeway. The windows along the front of the building will be replaced with rollup glass garage doors, midcentury modern design and interior features such as wood ceilings, exposed brick and industrial ductwork. Two large patios for outdoor seating will run along College Avenue. Michael Rumpeltin of Brick & West Design is working in collaboration with RSP Architects on the architectural design of the project.

Postino Winecafe will occupy the northern 3,838 square-foot building and will have a 2,500 square-foot patio. A second restaurant will occupy the southern building that is 3,484 square-feet with a 1,640 square-foot outdoor patio.

Wetta Ventures recently completed Old School O7, an adaptive reuse and new construction project in Midtown Phoenix. The project consists of a 1948 church that has been repurposed as a restaurant, Taco Guild, a freestanding Starbucks and a 1955 school building that will serve as new shop space for a general retail tenant.

In addition to being an ASU alumnus, Wetta has a longstanding relationship with ASU through his membership in the President’s Club and membership in the Sun Devil Family Association.

“Creating a destination place on College Avenue, where downtown Tempe, the ASU Tempe Campus, and ASU public performance venues meet, is an important part of activating the street and making College Avenue a nexus for people to come together across campus and community,” said Morgan R. Olsen, ASU executive vice president, Treasurer and CFO.  “The presence of these destination dining venues as part of this exciting place will only enhance the creative environment ASU is fostering for its faculty, staff and students, and our community stakeholders.”

This development project will be done in conjunction with ASU’s College Avenue Streetscape project that is slated to begin this spring. Running along College Avenue between Sixth and Seventh streets, it will include green spaces, a shade structure, pedestrian walks, outdoor dining and event spaces and street beautification.