Tag Archives: ATP


Lisse named Arizona Telemedicine Program medical director

Jeffrey R. Lisse, MD, professor of medicine and medical director of the University of Arizona Arthritis Center’s Osteoporosis Program, has been named medical director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP).

As ATP medical director, Dr. Lisse will oversee the clinical operations of the Arizona Telemedicine Program. This includes recruiting physicians to provide telemedicine services over ATP’s state-wide broad-band telecommunications network. He will preview cases to certify their suitability for management by telemedicine, conduct chart reviews, and oversee ATP quality assurance programs. Dr. Lisse also will have responsibility for maintaining contact with ATP rural site coordinators, helping train rural site physicians to serve as telemedicine case presenters and participating in ATP training programs. 

A specialist in rheumatology, Dr. Lisse’s experience with ATP has included providing tele-rheumatology for patients in rural communities for a number of years. He also has provided tele-consults with physicians and patients with rural medical sites and the Arizona Department of Corrections via the ATP network. With an ongoing shortage of rheumatologists in Arizona, the consults are crucial to the quality of care provided to patients with arthritis around the state, and ATP is working to expand both the academic and clinical aspects of tele-rheumatology, Dr. Lisse said.

Dr. Lisse’s appointment as medical director was effective March 1. He succeeds Ana Maria Lopez, MD, who was medical director of the ATP from its inception in 1996 through Feb. 28, when she left the UA to serve as associate vice president for health equity and inclusion at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center, in Salt Lake City.

“It’s an honor to serve the Arizona Telemedicine Program as medical director,” Dr. Lisse said. “It’s also going to be hard to follow in Dr. Lopez’s footsteps. She set the bar very high.”

Dr. Lisse has been with the UA Arthritis Center since 2000, when he joined the UA College of Medicine – Tucson as the Ethel McChesney Bilby Endowed Chair for Osteoporosis. He was chief of the rheumatology section of the Department of Medicine from 2000 to 2013 and served as the UA Arthritis Center’s interim director from 2005 to 2008.

Prior to coming to the UA, Dr. Lisse spent 17 years at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, where he was professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Rheumatology. Before that, he was a staff associate at the National Institutes of Health Southwest Studies Field Section in Phoenix, while serving as an internal medicine consultant for the Phoenix and Sacaton Indian Health Service hospitals.

Dr. Lisse graduated with honors from Georgetown University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, D.C., in 1976. He completed his internal medicine residency at the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital in San Francisco in 1979, followed by a fellowship in rheumatology at the University of California, San Diego, which he completed in 1983.


Ronald S. Weinstein, MD, founder and director of ATP, said, “Dr.Lisse is highly respected by our medical staff as well as physicians and patients throughout the region. He is very popular among our staff and our students, and an excellent role model. Dr. Lisse is a critically important addition to our executive team.” 


Dr. Weinstein also praised Dr. Lopez’s service as medical director of ATP for the past 19 years. “I had the great pleasure of working with Dr. Lopez since she was chief resident in internal medicine here at the University of Arizona,” he said. “Her contributions to the field of telemedicine include the creation of breast cancer survivor tele-support groups, which were funded by the Susan G. Komen Foundation for years.”    


Arizona Telemedicine Program names advisory board

The award-winning Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) at the Arizona Health Sciences Center of the University of Arizona has announced the appointment of the National Advisory Board of the Telemedicine and Telehealth Service Provider Showcase (SPSSM), to be held Oct. 6-7 at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Phoenix.

The 24 nationally recognized thought leaders and health-care innovators have made major strides in the telemedicine arena. Members of the board are:

• Joseph S. Alpert, MD, professor of medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson; editor-in-chief, The American Journal of Medicine

• David C. Balch, MA, chief technology officer, White House Medical Group, Washington, D.C.

• Rashid Bashshur, PhD, senior adviser for eHealth, eHealth Center, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor

• Anne E. Burdick, MD, MPH, associate dean for telehealth and clinical outreach, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

• Robert “Bob” Burns, commissioner, Arizona Corporation Commission, Phoenix

• Daniel J. Derksen, MD, director, Center for Rural Health; professor of public health policy; University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, Tucson

• Charles R. Doarn, MBA, editor-in-chief, Telemedicine and e-Health Journal, family medicine, University of Cincinnati, Ohio

• Joe G.N. “Skip” Garcia, MD, UA senior vice president for health sciences; interim dean, UA College of Medicine – Tucson; professor of medicine, Arizona Health Sciences Center, University of Arizona

• Robert A. Greenes, MD, PhD, professor of biomedical informatics, College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University, Phoenix

• Paula Guy, chief executive officer, Global Partnership for Telehealth, Inc., Waycross, Ga.

• Deb LaMarche, associate director, Utah Telehealth Network, Salt Lake City

• James P. Marcin, MD, MPH, professor, pediatric critical care, University of California – Davis Children’s Hospital, Sacramento

• Ronald C. Merrell, MD, editor-in-chief, Telemedicine and e-Health Journal, emeritus professor of surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond

• Thomas S. Nesbitt, MD, MPH, associate vice chancellor and professor, family and community medicine, University of California – Davis Health System, Sacramento

• Marta J. Petersen, MD, medical director, Utah Telehealth Network, Salt Lake City

• Joseph Peterson, MD, chief executive officer and director, Specialists On Call, Reston, Va.

• Ronald K. Poropatich, MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh

• Lisa A. Robin, MLA, chief advocacy officer, Federation of State Medical Boards, Washington, D.C.

• Brian Rosenfeld, MD, executive vice president and chief medical officer, Philips Telehealth, Baltimore, Md.

• Jay H. Shore, MD, MPH, associate professor, Centers for American Indian & Alaska Native Health, University of Colorado, Aurora

• Joseph A. Tracy, MS, vice president, telehealth services, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, Pa.

• Wesley Valdes, DO, medical director, Telehealth Services, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah

• Nancy L. Vorhees, RN, MSN, chief operating officer, Inland Northwest Health Services, Spokane, Wash.

• Jill M. Winters, PhD, RN, FAHA, president and dean, Columbia College of Nursing, Glendale, Wisc.

“This is the first national meeting addressing telemedicine service provider issues. It’s long overdue!” said Ronald S. Weinstein, MD, ATP director and SPS honorary co-chair.

SPS will focus on building partnerships for bringing quality medical specialty services directly into hospitals, clinics, private practices and even patients’ homes. The goals are to improve patient care and outcomes and to increase market share for both health-care providers and telehealth service providers they partner with.

The convention is co-hosted by the ATP, the Southwest Telehealth Resource Center and the Four Corners Telehealth Consortium, which includes the Arizona Health Sciences Center at the University of Arizona, the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center and the Utah Telehealth Network.

More information about SPS is at www.TTSPSworld.com.


Arizona Telemedicine Names Associate Director

Nancy Rowe, a national leader in the telemedicine field, has been named associate director for outreach for the Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP).

Rowe will work toward expanding ATP’s connections with hospitals and other health-care providers in Northern Arizona. She also will assist in marketing and training efforts. Rowe assumed her new role with ATP on Jan. 6.

Rowe has served for more than 10 years as director of telemedicine for the Northern Arizona Regional Behavioral Health Authority (NARBHA), the agency that administers state-funded behavioral health care in Flagstaff and other Northern Arizona communities.

Under her stewardship, NARBHA’s telemedicine network grew from 12 to more than 80 sites and won the 2010 Award of Excellence in Health Information Technology from the National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare. Rowe also implemented online telepsychiatry training courses and was responsible for establishing contracts between NARBHA and health-care organizations throughout Northern Arizona.

She is the immediate past chair of the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) Business and Finance Special Interest Group, which won the ATA’s 2013 Special Interest Group and Chapter Achievement Award.

“We couldn’t have a more accomplished person in this role,” said Ronald S. Weinstein, MD, co-founder and director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program.

“Nancy has done a remarkable job of building NARBHA into one of the leading telemedicine mental health providers in the world.” While at NARBHA, Rowe developed strong relationships with all the communities of Northern Arizona, Weinstein noted, making it possible for NARBHA-affiliated doctors to handle more than 100,000 patient encounters.

“I have worked collaboratively with the ATP for many years, and am thrilled to be joining this group of talented people,” Rowe said. “I’m looking forward to the challenge of expanding the ATP’s presence and strengthening its partnerships in Northern Arizona.”

Rowe graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in English from St. Lawrence University in Canton, N.Y. Before joining NARBHA in 2001, she spent 13 years at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis; first as senior editor for its University Relations department, and then as communications coordinator for the College of Biological Sciences.


Arizona Telemedicine Sets Standard of Innovation

Investments by state governments in their own state universities can yield large returns and help create new industries.  In Arizona, telemedicine is a good example of a success story.

The Arizona Telemedicine Program’s Telehealth Technology Innovation Accelerator (TTIA) supports the development of telemedicine programs in independent health-care delivery systems throughout Arizona. The Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) operates one of the largest broadband health-care telemedicine service networks in the United States, delivers federally funded distance education and training programs throughout the Southwest and supports clinical studies on innovative health-care delivery systems.

Headquartered at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, the ATP began in 1996, when then-State Representatives Robert “Bob” Burns (R-Glendale) and Lou Ann Preble (R-Tucson) championed the creation of an eight-site telemedicine program.  Ronald S. Weinstein, MD, a pioneer in telemedicine and telepathology, was recruited as its founding director. Since then, the eight-site Arizona Telemedicine Rural Network has grown 20-fold, and now extends to 160 sites in 70 communities.

“Our goal from the start was to use state funding as seed money for something far greater,” said Dr. Weinstein. “Our University of Arizona physician faculty members and basic scientists saw an opportunity to create a new type of federation of telemedicine programs, in which the UA would have multiple roles for an Arizona state-wide consortium of telemedicine programs. These roles now include creating and operating a shared broadband telecommunications network; developing inclusive training programs that address the telemedicine training needs of personnel across the entire health-care industry in Arizona; and promoting telemedicine, telehealth and mobile health (or mHealth).”

Today, a number of nationally recognized telemedicine programs are affiliated with ATP.  Personnel in these programs have received telemedicine training and technical assistance from ATP in Tucson and Phoenix or online.

The Yuma Regional Medical Center (YRMC) in Yuma, Ariz., signed on with ATP in 2006.  Greg Warda, MD, and his YRMC staff now have daily access to pediatric cardiologists led by Daniela Lax, MD, at The University of Arizona Health Network (UAHN) in Tucson. Doctors in YRMC’s 20-bassinet Neonatal Intensive Care Unit have immediate access to UA telecardiologists in Tucson over the Arizona Rural Telemedicine Network. Immediate medical decisions can be made about transferring babies born with life-threatening congenital heart defects to Tucson or Phoenix hospitals with world-class pediatric cardiothoracic surgery specialists on their staffs. Said Dr. Warda, “I can’t say enough about the cardiologists in Tucson. They’ve all been wonderful.”

Each week, the UAHN cardiology group consults on four to five YRMC cases by telemedicine video conferencing and UA cardiologists also spend a day and a half each month in Yuma following up on the babies and children they have diagnosed. ATP engineers are available 24/7 to provide technical support for this pediatric service, which has handled more than 400 expedited cases in the past five years.

Another innovative program—Phoenix-based Banner Health’s eICU (electronic intensive care unit) program, one of the largest in the nation—utilizes clinical decision support systems (CDSS), computerized diagnostic aids that automate continual analysis of patient vital signs and provide electronic access to electronic health records, lab results, medications, medical imaging and other patient data. The CDSS alerts care teams to adverse trends as well as to acute events. Spotting adverse trends in a patient’s status is challenging in any care environment due to factors such as caring for multiple patients simultaneously and routine shift changes, but is critical to preventing adverse outcomes. The CDSS allows remote intensivists (physicians who specialize in the care and treatment of patients in intensive care units) and bedside care teams to focus their efforts on the patients who need them the most.

Banner’s eICU enterprise is built around a CDSS developed by faculty in the Department of Anesthesia at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md., and is led by Deborah Dahl, vice president for patient care innovation and director of telemedicine at Banner. Currently, 430 eICU rooms at 20 Banner hospitals are equipped with a fixed two-way audio-video system linked to a call center in Mesa, Ariz., from which intensivists remotely monitor patients. In addition to providing the Banner Health “teleteam” video access, the system continuously gathers data from the bedside monitors and each patient’s electronic medical record. A single intensivist can follow hundreds of patients a day by telemedicine. The eICU system saves Banner Health tens of millions of dollars a year. It improves patient care, results in discharging patients earlier and lowers 30-day readmission rates.

Another ATP teaching affiliate, the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, has a network of rural telestroke sites. Bart M. Demaerschalk, MD, professor of neurology and director of the telestroke and teleneurology programs at the Mayo Clinic, and Ben Bobrow, MD, professor of emergency medicine at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix created a state-wide rural telestroke and teleneurology program that serves 1,500 patients annually, preventing permanent brain damage and death. Their telestroke network is bringing “golden hour” diagnostic services to patients at Bisbee’s Copper Queen Community Hospital and other rural hospitals in Casa Grande, Cottonwood, Flagstaff, Globe, Kingman, Parker, Show Low, Tuba City and Yuma. (The “Golden Hour” for neurology patients is the one-to-three hours after stroke symptoms first appear, when the majority of strokes may be averted by intravenous thrombolytic therapy.)

The “granddaddy” of telemedicine services in Arizona is teleradiology, the most commonly used telemedicine application in the United States. Faculty in the UA Department of Medical Imaging (formerly Department of Radiology) pioneered the development of digital radiology, the foundational technology for teleradiology. Today, teleradiology services like those developed at the UA a decade ago are offered by hundreds of teleradiology companies in the United States. Since 1998, UA radiologists have diagnosed more than 1.3 million radiology cases for patients in 25 communities in Arizona and adjacent states.

“Today a number of our outstanding telemedicine programs, owned by different health-care organizations, work together on telemedicine challenges ranging from legal and regulatory issues to telecommunications challenges to reimbursement issues of mutual concern,” said Dr. Weinstein. The ATP is proud of the fact that “the Arizona State Legislature had a strong sense of ownership of the ATP at the time of its creation 17 years ago, and is engaged in these activities of ATP more than ever today.”

Dr. Weinstein noted, “Telemedicine is everybody’s business.”