Tag Archives: attorney

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2014 ACC Awards

Az Business is recognizing the vital role that in-house counsel plays in business with the Arizona Corporate Counsel Awards. The 2014 finalists and winners were honored at a reception on Thursday, January 16 at the Ritz Carlton, Phoenix.

The 2014 ACC awards winners are:

Public Company of the Year
John Pons, Cole Real Estate Investments
Darrell Sherman, Taylor Morrison
Randall S. Theisen, Alliance Bank

Private Company of the Year
Jill Harrison, W.L. Gore & Associates

Nonprofit Company of the Year
Matthew Stocklager, Dignity Health

Up and Comer of the Year
Michael Mason, Pinnacle West Corp (APS)

Private Legal Department of the Year
GoDaddy

Public Legal Department of the Year
Sprouts Farmers Market

Litigator of the Year
Michael Walker, Insight Enterprises

IP Attorney of the Year
Dan Oseran, eBay

General Counsel of the Year
Erin Lewin, Avnet

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Colliers International Closes 92,200 SF, $12M Office Building Sale in Phoenix

Colliers International in Greater Phoenix recently negotiated the sale of a 92,233 square-foot Class-A office building located at 3333 E. Camelback Road in Phoenix for $12 million, or $130/square foot.

Fenway Properties of San Diego acquired the property. Fenway plans to upgrade the common areas and develop new, spec suites to accommodate tenants of various square footage requirements.

The seller was Noffsinger Manufacturing Company of Greely, Colo.

Todd Noel, senior vice president; Keith Lambeth, senior vice president; and Ryan Timpani, senior associate; served as the Colliers International in Greater Phoenix brokers for both parties.

“The office building represents a strong investment for Fenway due to the building’s strategic location within the prestigious Camelback Corridor submarket, quality construction and timeless finishes,” Noel said.

Built in 1984, the two-story building comprises multiple suites ranging from 1,214 to 17,930 square feet.

Kristen Rosati, a shareholder at Polsinelli in Phoenix, is president of the American Health Lawyers Association.

Rosati leads American Health Lawyers Association

Attorney Kristen Rosati, a shareholder of the national law firm Polsinelli, has assumed the office of President of the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA). The AHLA has more than 12,000 members and is the nation’s largest educational organization devoted to legal issues in the health care field.

Rosati is a member of the firm’s Health Care Practice which is the fourth largest in the country according to the AHLA and Modern Healthcare. She’s a national thought leader in the electronic health industry and will use her term to advance outreach to younger members; increase support for existing programs in the areas of leadership, training and mentoring; expand the use of technology and social media in providing benefits to members; and continue the tradition of collegiality for which the organization is known.

“I am excited to assume the role of President of AHLA at this important juncture in health care law.” said Rosati. “Creating a strong foundation for the next generation of lawyers as well as continuing to support the unique programs that distinguish AHLA as the leading health care organization for lawyers in the country, is an honor that I am proud to accept.”

Rosati has been an active member of AHLA for many years, serving on the organization’s Board of Directors and Executive Committee, and as Chair of the Programs Committee, Chair of the Finance Committee, Chair of the Professional Resources Committee, Chair of the Quality Council, Chair of the Health Information and Technology Practice Group, and Chair of the HIT Think Tank.

“Kristen has enormous respect among the healthcare bar because of her deep expertise in health information and technology, her prodigious work ethic, and her commitment to collegiality among her peers,” said Chief Executive Officer of the American Health Lawyers Association Peter Leibold. “Kristen is leading the Association in a direction that will provide significant benefit to members and continue the organization’s recent membership growth.

In her legal practice at Polsinelli, Rosati heads up the “Big Data” initiative. She plays a key role in assisting hospitals, physicians and other health care providers migrating to electronic health records as they tackle the legal complexities associated with HIPAA compliance, electronic health records roll-outs, health information exchange, data sharing for research and clinical integration initiatives and ACO’s, and clinical research compliance and clinical trials contracting.

“Kristen’s leadership in AHLA will not only benefit the organization, but it will also serve as a model for all of Polsinelli’s lawyers as we look for ways to be more in tune with our clients and the industry generally,” said Polsinelli’s Health Care Practice Chair Matt Murer.

Employee Theft

Identity Thieves Targeting the Deceased: Plan Now

Identity theft is always a difficult and frustrating situation and could take many years to repair the damage done to one’s credit. However, today millions of Americans are being haunted with an even more disturbing situation: learning that a criminal is using the identity of a deceased loved one to apply for credit.

An ID Analytics study determined 2.5 million deceased Americans identities are stolen each year. Targeting the deceased is appealing to identity thieves because it can take up to six months for death records to be registered, giving thieves ample time to rack up charges. Thieves scour through obituaries to obtain the victim’s name, age and birthdate. They are then able to locate the Social Security Number through the Social Security Administration’s list of deceased Americans known as the “Death Master File.”

This could turn out to be quite a headache for surviving family members as they are left to manage the estates of their deceased loved ones. Luckily, a simple yet effective estate plan can safeguard you or your family members if identity theft after death does indeed occur.

For example, storing all important account information within your estate plan and designating a financial power of attorney to monitor your information after death will help reduce the risk of identity theft. It is also crucial to notify the proper Government agencies of one’s death right away which helps limit opportunities for identity theft occurring.

“Be proactive- plan your estate and have everything organized for your family before death so that your loved ones know exactly what needs to happen when you are gone”, said Jaburg Wilk Estate Planning attorney Michelle Lauer.” “An estate planning attorney can assist you in creating a highly effective estate plan which can reduce not only the risk of identity theft but also the hardships for your family”.

Flexible Workplaces

Arizona Employers Learn Workplace Violence Prevention

The Phoenix business community has already experienced several tragedies, with the first workplace shooting of the year in January, and the most recent incident involving a personal relationship issue erupting into another workplace shooting. Though the circumstances leading to these violent outbreaks differ, business owners and human resources professionals can learn from them and be prepared to prevent similar situations.

On Wednesday, June 5, expert speakers Dr. James Turner and Mountain States Employers Council (MSEC) staff attorney Dave Dixon will share a series of interactive vignettes designed to help employers to respond promptly, effectively and appropriately to inappropriate workplace behaviors that create disruption in the workplace, while also minimizing risks related to unlawful discrimination under the ADA, even as disability claims continue to rise. The workplace violence discussions and other significant employment and labor law trends and changes are part of this year’s Employment Law Update at the Sheraton Crescent Hotel, 2620 W. Dunlap Ave., in Phoenix.

While violent behavior can manifest for many different reasons, mental illness is often a root cause. Employers must discern between abnormal but harmless behavior and the signs of a violent progression. MSEC, a leader in human resource and employment law services, helps employers understand the legal and psychological aspects of mental illness; identify warning signs of aggression; and ward off or respond to escalated incidents.

“Whether in the workplace, or society-at-large, failure to effectively manage conduct that may or may not be related to mental illness may bring consequences from simple organizational inefficiencies to the more tragic and violent consequences we have all too frequently seen,” said Dixon.

For more information about MSEC’s services or the Employment Law Update, visit www.msec.org.

For 70 years, MSEC has hosted educational events such as the Employment Law Update for employers throughout the Western United States to maintain productive employer/employee relationships and to build effective, successful businesses.

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LaBianca Elected to Arizona Investment Council Board

Margaret LaBianca, an attorney and shareholder with Polsinelli, has been elected to the Arizona Investment Council (AIC) Board of Directors. LaBianca brings to the board extensive experience in energy, natural resources, and environmental regulatory compliance, utilization of public lands, and strategic development.

“I am honored to be elected to the Arizona Investment Council. The work of the Council has a significant positive impact on Arizona. I look forward to working with the board to achieve its goals and further support the development of Arizona’s energy infrastructure,” said LaBianca.

LaBianca will serve a two-year term. “We are excited to have Margaret join the board. Her commitment and knowledge in the field of energy and natural resources will bring additional strength to the board as we work to carry out the objectives in our 2013 strategic plan” said Gary Yaquinto, president and CEO of the Arizona Investment Council.

LaBianca is the current Chair of the State Bar of Arizona Environmental and Natural Resources Law Section and past Chair of the Maricopa County Bar Association Environmental Law Section. In 2012 she was recognized as one of the 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business and ranked by Chambers USA: American’s Leading Lawyers for Business in the category of Environmental. She earned her B.A. from Simmons College, her M.A. from Columbia University, and her J.D. from the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law magna cum laude.

law

JacksonWhite Names First Female Shareholder

JacksonWhite P.C. announced that attorney Susan Court was made a shareholder of the firm.  Court joins 12 other attorneys at JacksonWhite who share the distinction of shareholder.

Court joined JacksonWhite in 2005 and focuses her practice on elder law, probate, guardianships, conservatorships, and estate planning. Court assists clients with end-of-life issues including incapacity, mental illness and the transfer of assets before or after death. She is a member of the Arizona Fiduciaries Association as well as the State Bar of Arizona. Court is a former Maricopa County prosecutor and taught Business Law at Mesa Community College and Chandler Gilbert Community College. She is also active on the MCC Development Board, the J. Reuben Clark Law Society, and the Mesa Chamber of Commerce.

Founded in 1983, JacksonWhite P.C. offers a full-range of services to assist individuals, families and businesses with their legal needs. Since its inception, the Mesa firm has grown steadily to include 22 highly experienced attorneys and over 40 paralegals, legal assistants and staff. At this size, the firm is large enough to offer the efficiency and technical expertise of larger firms, yet small enough to provide clients with individualized, personalized attention. JacksonWhite has three offices around the state of Arizona including a Mesa, Casa Grande and Peoria location. For more information on a specific attorney or area of practice, visit www.jacksonwhitelaw.com or www.arizonaseniorlaw.com.

Michelle M

Phoenix Attorney Receives Top Pro Bono Award

Michelle M. Lauer, attorney at business law firm Jaburg & Wilk, P.C. has been awarded Top Pro Bono Attorneys in Arizona from the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services & Education.

The foundation initiated the award in 2001 to recognize attorneys who give their time and expertise to assist Arizonans who do not have available legal resources.

Lauer volunteers her services with Community Legal Services through the Arizona State Bar Volunteer Lawyers Program as well as the Probate Lawyers Assistance Project. Both programs provide legal assistance to low income individuals.

“It is thoroughly rewarding—gives me the warm and fuzzies to provide my services to those who need an attorney’s assistance,” said Lauer.

Lauer has worked over fourteen years in the legal industry gaining experience in Commercial Litigation, Probate, Adult Guardianships, Estate Planning and Appellate.

Jaburg Wilk is an AV rated Phoenix law firm, the highest level of professionalism according to the Martindale-Hubbell.

Benjamin Tietgen

Tietgen Joins Quarles & Brady's IP Group

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that Benjamin D. Tietgen has joined the firm’s Phoenix office as an attorney in the Intellectual Property Group.

Prior to joining the firm, Tietgen worked at Etherton Law Group, LLC in Tempe, Arizona. His practice focuses on the preparation of patent applications covering inventions in a variety of industrial and technological fields. Tietgen’s experience also includes drafting and negotiating IP asset licenses and assignments and developing IP portfolios for independent inventors and emerging companies across a broad range of high and low technologies.

He received his law degree from Arizona State University College of Law and his undergraduate degree from the University of Missouri.

Benjamin Tietgen

Tietgen Joins Quarles & Brady’s IP Group

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that Benjamin D. Tietgen has joined the firm’s Phoenix office as an attorney in the Intellectual Property Group.

Prior to joining the firm, Tietgen worked at Etherton Law Group, LLC in Tempe, Arizona. His practice focuses on the preparation of patent applications covering inventions in a variety of industrial and technological fields. Tietgen’s experience also includes drafting and negotiating IP asset licenses and assignments and developing IP portfolios for independent inventors and emerging companies across a broad range of high and low technologies.

He received his law degree from Arizona State University College of Law and his undergraduate degree from the University of Missouri.

Runoff Election, Early Voting Phoenix Mayor, Council

Andrew Thomas will run for governor

Former Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas says he’s planning to run for Arizona governor in 2014.

Thomas served as county attorney from 2005 until he resigned in 2010 to unsuccessfully run for Arizona attorney general.

A three-member disciplinary panel of the Arizona courts disbarred Thomas about a year ago for failed corruption investigations that he and county Sheriff Joe Arpaio launched against officials with whom they were having political and legal disputes.

Thomas is a Republican and he joins a growing list of candidates for governor.

Democrat and former Arizona Board of Regents Chairman Fred DuVal, Republican and ex-Tempe Mayor Hugh Hallman and Americans Elect party candidate John Mealer have already formally filed to run.

Republicans Sen. Al Melvin and Secretary of State Ken Bennett have formed exploratory committees.

Jaclyn Foutz

Jaclyn Foutz Joins Andante Law Group

Andante Law Group of Daniel E. Garrison, PLLC announced that Jaclyn D. Foutz has joined the firm as an attorney.  Her practice is concentrated in commercial litigation, bankruptcy, reorganization and capital recovery.  She represents creditors in collection and enforcement matters, as well as in all facets of bankruptcy proceedings and advising clients on creditors’ rights.

Daniel E. Garrison, Managing Partner of Andante Law Group stated,  “We are pleased to have Ms. Foutz join our firm.  She is a very talented litigation and bankruptcy attorney who will compliment our firm’s corporate restructuring, business bankruptcy, loan workouts and enforcement, and commercial litigation practice.

Prior to joining the Andante Law Group, Ms. Foutz was with Ballard Spahr LLP in Phoenix.  She began her legal career clerking for Justice Andrew Hurwitz at the Arizona Supreme Court.  Before re-entering private law practice, Ms. Foutz founded and was General Counsel to the Human Tribe Project, a patient support and fundraising website.

She earned her BS from the University of Arizona in 2000 and her JD in 2005 from Arizona State University, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law.  She is licensed in both state and federal courts in Arizona and U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan.

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Polsinelli Shughart attorney Appointed to Solar Task Force

Michael Patterson, an international business attorney with Polsinelli Shughart has been appointed to the Arizona Governor’s Solar Energy Advisory Task Force. Patterson brings to the committee a dedication to the growth of business in Arizona and an in depth knowledge of business and securities transactions, corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, and finance and compliance.

“I am honored to serve with my colleagues on the Governor’s Solar Energy Advisory Task Force as we work to identify ways to further strengthen Arizona’s solar industry and propose solutions to impediments in solar-energy development,” said Patterson.

Patterson also has considerable experience related to international business transactions and disputes. He previously lived and worked in Mexico City and Costa Rica working both in nonprofit initiatives and as a U.S. lawyer assisting U.S. companies.

“Arizona is uniquely positioned to expand its solar presence both nationally and internationally. I am excited to be able to contribute to the development of our State’s solar energy incentives, policies and best practices,” said Patterson.

The Governor’s Solar Energy Advisory Task Force was created by an executive order signed by Governor Jan Brewer in 2011.

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Does your teen Drive While InTEXTicated?

A new Arizona bill could ban Valley teens from using their cell phones while driving, or more cleverly put, “driving while inTEXTicated.” Eighty two percent of teens ages 16 and 17 own a cell phone, while 52% of them admit to using their cell phone while driving and 34% say that they have texted while driving. Supporters of this bill say that legally banning new drivers from using their cell phone while driving will protect our Valley teens and teach them a valuable life lesson: concentrate on driving. Three major concerns are addressed by the bill as it aims to protect our teens and keep our roads safer:

1. Teen are the least experienced drivers and do not need any distractions behind the wheel.

There is a reason that Arizona law has created a regulatory process for drivers to earn their licenses- it creates an opportunity and a controlled environment for new drivers to gain experience and learn the rules of the road. The famous Spiderman movie quote, “With great power comes great responsibility,” is completely applicable in this situation. Teenagers are just learning the rules of the road and the power that their vehicle and freedom possess, yet they must be responsible with that power and all that it entails. In order to truly learn safe driving skills, a teen must be fully aware of what is around them and not distracted by their cell phones. For example, a safe driving distance is at least 500 feet, or three car lengths, between you and the car in front of you, yet an inexperienced driver has not quite figured out the visual measurement or how to quickly gauge that distance; one glance at their phone can turn that “safe” zone into a dangerous accident. On average, the minimal amount of time a driver takes away from the road while texting and driving is 5 seconds… if you are driving at 55 MPH, this is equivalent to driving the length of a football field. A lot can happen in that five seconds, which is why it is imperative for new drivers to fully focus on driving and the other vehicles on the road.

2.     Teens are the most tech savvy generation and use their phones more than any other age group.

Teens text, email, use apps, take pictures, make calls, tweet and post to Facebook all from their phones- their tiny device holds their entire social world in the palm of their hands. If a teen is texting while driving, they are 23 times more likely to be in an accident, if they are dialing their phone they are 2.8 times more at risk for an accident, talking or listening on their phones while driving puts teens 1.3 times more at risk for an accident and even if they are only reaching for their device, they are 1.4 times more likely to be in a car accident.

3.     Teens are less likely to think about the long-term consequences of a car accident.

Teenagers have a tendency to think that they are invincible; therefore they are less likely to think about the serious consequences of being involved in a car accident, or even worse, if they are the cause of a serious car accident and hurt someone else. This “superhuman” mentality is why it is important that teens are constantly reminded, educated and made aware of the consequences of using their phone while driving- which is the main goal of this bill. Laws are based on the simple ideology of mental conditioning and behavioral change- simply put, laws are linked to the famous psychology experiment, Pavlov’s dog.

If we implement laws that remind our drivers not to use their phones while driving, they will be conditioned to not “drive while inTEXTicated” throughout their lives, ultimately making our roads safer.

Those against the bill say that the bill is placing too many restrictions on drivers and unnecessarily punishing teens, yet the goal of bringing claims against drivers that break the rules of the roads is to make our roads safer for everyone. The bill puts an extra burden on the least experienced drivers and holds them accountable for their actions and the possible harm that they put all drivers in when they use their phones behind the wheel.  The young drivers that the bill targets are the most tech savvy, they are the least likely to think long term consequences of dividing their attention, and they are the drivers that need the most concentration on the roadway obstacles, therefore this bill would greatly protect the public while adding little inconvenience to the general population.

Currently, the use of cell phones is banned only in certain cities in Arizona and in the case of an accident cell phone usage must be proved as the cause of the wreck in order to hold the motorist responsible for the accident. If the bill passes, the fact that the youth was on the cell phone while driving would be an argument for the youth’s liability of the wreck.  The records of the cell phone should be available during any claim process.

To read the bill in its entirety, visit http://www.azleg.gov/legtext/50leg/2r/bills/sb1056s.pdf.

 

Tommy Richardson is an attorney with Friedl Richardson Trial Lawyers, a Phoenix-based personal injury law firm founded in 1997 with a mission to make the community safer by helping people injured due to other’s breaking the rules.

Arizona Shooting

Phoenix attorney dies after shooting

A lawyer wounded by a gunman in a Phoenix office shooting this week has become the second victim to die in the attack, authorities said Friday.

Mark Hummels, 43, had been on life support at a Phoenix hospital after Wednesday morning’s shooting that killed a company’s chief executive and left a woman with non-life threatening injuries.

Hummels died Thursday night, a publicist for his law firm told The Associated Press early Friday.

Colleagues of Hummels described him as a smart, competent and decent man who was a rising star in his profession and dedicated to his wife, 9-year-old daughter and 7-year-old son.

The gunman — Arthur Douglas Harmon, 70 — was found dead early Thursday in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, police said.

Police said Friday that they recovered two pistols believed used in the office shooting from Harmon’s rental car along with an AR-15 rifle.

Forensic research is being done to determine the owner of the weapons, police spokesman Sgt. Tommy Thompson said.

Harmon opened fire at the end of a mediation session at a north-central Phoenix office building over a lawsuit he filed last April.

Steve Singer, 48, a father of two and CEO of Scottsdale-based Fusion Contact Centers LLC, died hours after the shooting.

Harmon targeted Singer and Hummels and “it was not a random shooting,” police said. A 32-year-old woman not involved in the mediation was caught in the gunfire near the building entrance and suffered a gunshot wound to her left hand.

Fusion had hired Harmon to refurbish office cubicles at two call centers in California.

Hummels worked with the Phoenix law firm Osborn Maledon and focused on business disputes, real estate litigation and malpractice defense. He died Thursday night, publicist Athia Hardt told The Associated Press early Friday.

He was a reporter for the Albuquerque Journal and Santa Fe New Mexican before he left to go to law school in 2001. He graduated first in his class at the University of Arizona’s law school.

Santa Fe New Mexican editor Rob Dean said in a statement Friday that Hummels “was an accomplished journalist and an even better person. He had the intelligence to understand difficult problems and a hunger to do important work.”

Hummels was admitted to the Arizona bar in 2005.

“This is a day of just unspeakable sorrow,” said 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Andrew Hurwitz, who hired Hummels straight out of law school to serve as a law clerk from 2004 to 2005 while Hurwitz was serving on the Arizona Supreme Court.

According to court documents, Harmon was scheduled to go to a law office in the building where the shooting took place for a settlement conference.

Harmon represented himself in the lawsuit, and Hummels represented Fusion.

Fusion said Harmon was paid nearly $30,000 under the $47,000 contract. But the company asked him to repay much of the money when it discovered the cubicles couldn’t be refurbished, according to the documents.

Harmon argued Fusion hung him out to dry by telling him to remove and store 206 “worthless” work stations after the mix-up was discovered. Harmon said Fusion then told him the company decided to use a competitor.

Harmon’s lawsuit had sought payment for the remainder of the contract, $20,000 in damages and reimbursement for storage fees and legal costs.

The company countersued Harmon, protesting the sale of his home to his son for $26,000 and asking a judge to prevent Harmon from getting rid of other assets. Harmon said the company’s claims that the home was fraudulently transferred to his son were unfounded.

Goldwater Institute

Valley attorney launches ‘triage’ service

Valley attorney and well-known venture capitalist, Morris Callaman, Esq., has launched a new type of non-traditional law firm – he describes his work as triage attorney.

As a concierge attorney, Callaman offers personalized problem solving to his clients in almost every area of practice. Rather than specialize in one specific subject matter, like family, corporate or contract law, Callaman assumes the role of general counsel to his clients and advises them on the best resolution to their situation. After understanding the issue and helping the client fully understand the situation, Callaman calls on his network of experts to solve the problem.

The idea was developed after years of using his corporate experience as the youngest Principal at accounting firm Ernst & Young, as well as his degrees in business, engineering, and law to operate a private micro venture capital firm. Callaman realized the unique needs of his clients spanned much greater than securing financing and start-up advising.

“My clients first need an ethical problem-solver, and they trust me, and that’s what I do. Many times, my clients need someone they can trust with highly confidential or personal issues – whether it’s a high-profile divorce or the bankruptcy of a highly visible company. My clients don’t have the time to be searching for the best litigator for their problem or best tax counsel for their project, so they call me and I make a plan, assemble the best team to get the job done, and guide my clients through the process.”

His model of practice is similar to that of the triage team in a hospital emergency room. However, instead of passing the client off to the most qualified expert, he oversees the entire case from start to finish, creating highly personalized solutions.

Callaman believes that the traditional law firm model has become destructive to the profession and often to business in general.

“As a society, we don’t admire lawyers as we used to,” said Callaman. “Still, lawyers tend to get into law because they have a sense of ethics and concern for others. Too often, the traditional processes make it feel as if lawyers have somehow lost their way. I’m interested in changing that with this new model of law practice.”

Callaman has been hired to resolve issues with regulators, navigate corporate turnarounds, guide celebrity divorces, litigate contract cases, and negotiate financings.

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/morriscallamanesq or call 480-250-4315.

Lauren Garner

Jaburg & Wilk attorney elected as Fellow to ACTEC

Attorney Lauren Garner of the law firm Jaburg & Wilk, P.C. has been elected as a Fellow to the prestigious American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC).  Membership in ACTEC is by election of the regents of the College. Individual lawyers meeting the criteria for membership are nominated for membership by fellows of the College and subjected to careful review by both state and national membership selection committees, prior to consideration by the regents of the College.

The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC) is a nonprofit association of lawyers. Its members are elected to the College by demonstrating the highest level of integrity, commitment to the profession, competence and experience as trust and estate counselors.

“We are pleased with the work Lauren has done for the probate community and for the State Bar of Arizona” said Gary Jaburg, Managing Partner of Jaburg Wilk.  “Lauren’s is a great asset to Jaburg Wilk and to our clients”.

 

Fennemore Craig has implemented a new way to communicate with its clients

Local Law Firm Enhances Attorney-Client Communication With Red Phone

Fennemore Craig, the oldest and one of the largest law firms in Arizona, has implemented a new way to communicate with its clients. The “Red Phone” is an iPod Touch in a red case that has pre-programmed information linked to a specific case and group of lawyers that translates case-related information between client and attorney.

Fennemore Craig Red PhoneHow does this increase communication? Clients are provided with the iPad or iPod Touches to send delicate attorney/client information through email, camera functions and Skype — a system that allows face-to-face interaction via video and voice communication. When a client needs to talk, a special number programmed into the phone calls all the attorneys linked to the case and one must answer at all times.

The Red Phone has already been assisting families incapacitated with seriously-injured loved ones who may be in a place with no Internet access or office setting with equipment such as a phone, fax machine or computer.

James Goodnow, an associate for Fennemore Craig, believes this new program will impact the practices’ relationship with its clients in a tremendous way.

“We want our clients to always have human communication,” says Goodnow. “The immediate response time has gotten positive reviews from the clients.”

The camera function allows clients to take case-relevant photos and send them immediately to their attorney.

Documents that pertain to the case can be sent with preloaded email addresses directly to the attorneys involved, and clients can review papers sent from the office.

Videos conferences are used to inform parties involved of the evidence retained.

“Instead of reading about our clients, the other lawyers will see them,” says Goodnow. “We can also show them how a case will be presented to a jury.”

It also allows attorneys to update the patient’s condition.

Fennemore Craig 2011

The phone costs nothing to clients. After the case has been resolved and there is no need for communication, the phones are returned to Fennemore.

Everyone with a case at Fennemore is eligible for the phone. iPads are given to those who are less tech savvy and don’t have internet access. Everyone else receives an iPod Touch.

The Fennemore Craig Law Firm was founded more than 110 years ago in Phoenix. The firm has over 120 attorneys with offices in Phoenix and Tucson. They are looking out for the best interest of their clients and know the Red Phone will enhance their abilities to do so.