Tag Archives: Avnet

Bob-Gracz

Executive Q&A: Bob Gracz

Bob Gracz, vice president of corporate real estate at Avnet, Inc., took on the role of president of CoreNet Global Arizona just last year and is encouraged by the status of his platform goals to grow the membership and organization’s local activities through the instatement of new committee chairs. “I’m enthusiastic about what we’ve accomplished so far and am really excited that everyone is keeping the momentum going,” he said of his recently appointed chairs. Gracz took a few minutes out of his day to talk about the future of CoreNet Global Arizona and what the local chapter has planned for the next year.

You’ve been president of CoreNet Global Arizona’s chapter for just about a year. Looking back, what significant progress has been made with regards to your goals as a chapter president?
Primarily the main goal I wanted to accomplish was setting up a structure that allows us to grow and operate with discipline and accountability. We’ve been able to accomplish that. We’ve been able to set up a number of chair positions and define the required accountability and have the people drive themselves toward meeting goals. I’m very excited that one of the long-term goals in that structure was to create a senior advisory group. […] We recently appointed a chair of education, and we’re in the process of closing on the communications and marketing chair. […] Some of the evidence that the structure is delivering what the chapter intended to do, which was create networking and drive educational awareness to people in the local chapter, that evident by our growth and membership and more participation as local chapter associates. (See interviews with chapter chairs on page 46.)

How have your goals evolved over the last year?
It’s a journey and I firmly believe with the right structure, discipline and people — let’s face it, this is a volunteer situation so people have to be passionate — the program will be self-feeding.

What remains a core focus or concern for a majority members?
The main focus is continuous networking and learning more about how the business is evolving. You can roll the tape back 10 years and there was a lot of office space and what not and now the latest thing is all about work-remote management and companies are becoming extremely efficient at using space, and everybody feeds on that. So, you have an end-user that wants to learn more about how they can do that. You have a landlord that’s saying I need to better understand this so I can position my product to be ready now to help you. That’s really what we’re really bringing out there. It’s leading edge. It’s current time.

One of your platforms was to increase the number of meeting and training options. Have those gone into effect yet? 
We have a regular program schedule. We have about 10 programs once a month; the summer months are off-months. We have just introduced the education chair. The goal of the educational chair is to get us to the point to where we have four educational circumstances a year. Once we accomplish that, the desire will be to have at least four and one of them be one corporate CoreNet wants to bring here.

Have you seen an increase in membership?
Yes. When we first started this journey, we were at about 85. Today, we’re sitting on about 129. It’s been quite a big improvement and right in line with the metric we tossed out — 20 percent a year. I think the team’s up for it, and I’m looking for another 20 percent next year.

Who comprises a majority of CoreNet Global Arizona’s membership?
More often than not, the end-users are usually the minority. You usually have a larger broker content, but we’re having a good mixture of what I call the feeders — architects, title companies, interior design and companies that assist corporate real estate — and I think in our chapter we’re having a large success of bringing in the people who help us do our jobs.

Arizona State University student team members Haylee Hilgers, right, and Jason Hyacinthe won the EMC Green Data Center Challenge at the Avnet Tech Games.

Avnet Tech Games Winners Announced

Avnet, Inc., a leading global technology distributor, announced the 2014 winners of the Avnet Tech Games. Close to 200 students from Arizona community colleges and universities competed head-to-head for top honors in the Avnet Tech Games Arizona onsite competition on Saturday, April 12, 2014, at The University of Advancing Technology in Tempe. In addition, college students competing on a national level in the Spring Virtual Avnet Tech Games had their work displayed and winners were announced during the awards ceremony at the onsite competition. Thirty winning students collected $1,000 each in scholarship money.

A panel of judges including technology executives, engineers and other business leaders selected the winners based on the students’ ability to meet the technical requirements of a task, apply innovative approaches to the solution and demonstrate professional skills. Nearly 76 teams of students competed in the onsite and virtual Avnet Tech Games, including 8 Arizona community colleges and universities: Arizona State University, ITT Technical Institute, seven Maricopa County Community Colleges, Northern Arizona University, The University of Advancing Technology and University of Arizona.

The winners of the 2014 Onsite Avnet Tech Games are:

Cisco Networking Expert Battle
South Mountain Community College
Faculty Coach: Tom Polliard
Student Team Members: Huy Mai and Justin Woys

Desktop Domination
The University of Advancing Technology
Student Team Members: William Hartman and Kelly Stahlberg

Digital Design Dilemma
Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Faculty Coach: Bassam Matar
Student Team Members: Michelle Smekal, Niccolo Horvath and Neel Mistry

EMC Green Data Center Challenge
Arizona State University
Student Team Members: Haylee Hilgers and Jason Hyacinthe

HP Build the Fastest Computer
Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Faculty Coach: Eli Chmouni
Student Team Members: Troy Gerloff, Blake Knoll and Jeremy Morgan

Java Blitz
Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Faculty Coach: Rameen Kaliqu
Student Team Members: Zachary Peshke, Samuel Slater and Larry Standage

Robot Race Obstacle Course
Mesa Community College
Faculty Coach: Bruce Carlton
Student Team Members: Richard Dale, Spencer Hall and Federico Ortega

Solar Scrimmage
Mesa Community College
Faculty Coach: Bruce Carlton
Student Team Members: Justin Arispe, Drew Carlson and Jennifer Hooker

Since the inception of the Avnet Tech Games in 2006, nearly $300,000 in scholarship money and prizes have been awarded to hundreds of the approximately 2,680 students and 215 faculty members who have participated in the competitions.

“The Avnet Tech Games provide a great opportunity for students to test their technical and strategy skills by applying what they have learned in the classroom to real-life scenarios,” said Joal Redmond, vice president of public relations for Avnet, Inc. “Students also had the opportunity to improve their communications skills by participating in a networking workshop and then practice those skills by meeting with Avnet and sponsor executives during a networking hour. Students win, schools win and business wins with the Avnet Tech Games.”

The annual multidisciplinary technology competition, composed of eight separate events, required students to work in teams to test their knowledge, creativity, decision-making, problem-solving and technical skills. During the event, students showcased how they can make a difference in advancing business and improving quality of life by participating in competitions such as creating a solar-powered water-pumping system, racing to build a computer using refurbished parts and troubleshoot issues in the Windows 7 operating system.

2014 Spring Virtual Avnet Tech Games
The Virtual Avnet Tech Games were introduced in 2010 to expand the breadth of the onsite event by allowing students to compete on a national level. More than 115 teams competed in the Virtual Avnet Tech Games competition. The winners were:

Android App™ Showdown
ITT Technical Institute
Student Team Member: Bryan Geesey

Green Video Competition
Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Faculty Coach: Eli Chmouni
Student Team Members: Dustin Allen, Kendra Charnick, Joel Parker and Brian Weeks

JDA Supply Chain Challenge
Southern Methodist University
Student Team Members: Aaron Barnard, Matt Mulholland, Tushar Solanki and Meredith Titus

“Congratulations to everyone who participated in this year’s virtual and onsite Avnet Tech Games, especially our winners,” added Redmond. On behalf of Avnet, thank you to all of our sponsors, business partners and volunteers for helping to make this year’s event a success.”

Avnet Tech Games 2014 sponsors included signature sponsors CA, Cisco, CDW, Datalink, DPAIR, EMC, HP, JDA, Kyocera, Microchip, Nimble Storage and Sungard.

Cocktails & Clothes

Cocktails & Clothes Restocks AWEE Boutique

Looking for a chance to give your “less than loved” clothes a new lease on life? Cocktails & Clothes is the chance to donate new or gently used clothing to the Arizona Women’s Education & Employment (AWEE) free Clothing Boutique for participants to have for job interviews or first week on the job.

Clothes can be dropped off at the annual event tomorrow, March 4, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the 19th Hole at the Adobe Golf Club at the Arizona Biltmore Resort, 2400 E. Missouri Ave. The event includes a raffle featuring custom-designed gift baskets each valued at $300 or more, a live auction, cocktails and hors d‚oeuvres.

Tickets are $65 each and can be purchased at the door or by contacting Susan Lagasse at susanlagasse@awee.org or by calling (602) 223-4333).

Each year, Cocktails & Clothes provides hundreds of new and gently used professional dresses, suits, slacks, blouses, shoes, briefcases and purses, and slacks, shirts, ties, shoes and sports jackets for women, men and young adults entering or re-entering the workforce.

Sperry Van Ness is the Diamond Sponsor. Sapphire Sponsors are Alliance Bank of Arizona and Avnet. Topaz Sponsor is AmTrust Bank. Emerald Sponsors are DMB and Dunlap & Magee.

The event is organized by the Friends of AWEE. Committee members are Phyllis Dumond, Judi Butterworth, Jami Savage, Kathy Jorgenson, Heather Moos, Nicole Ridberg, Carol Vernon, Sharon Contorno, Judy Jones, Arica Bec, Alison Harris, Roseann Marchett, Joe Hogan, Wendy Carlos, Victoria Benavidez and Shannon Ellermann.

For more information, visit www.awee.org.

law

Honoring excellence in corporate counsel

Effective corporate counsel has never been more important than it is in today’s new economy.
Az Business magazine is recognizing the important and vital role that in-house counsel plays in the success of a business with the Arizona Corporate Counsel Awards (ACC Awards). The 30 finalists and winners were honored Thursday, January 16 during a ceremony and dinner at the Ritz Carlton Phoenix. Here are the finalists, in alphabetical order:

Melissa M. Buhrig
Vice president, assistant general counsel and assistant secretary
Western Refining
Since 2005, Buhrig has served as a founding member of the Western Refining legal department. Her responsibilities include corporate governance, compliance, and securities matters for the company. Prior to joining Western Refining, Buhrig was a shareholder in Barfield Law, a Miami, Florida-based boutique firm representing commercial insurers and business leaders in corporate and litigation matters. Before that, she was a founding member of the satellite litigation department in the Naples, Florida office of Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Cirsi, a national law firm.

Carolann Bullock
Human resources legal attorney
Intel Corporation
Bullock joined Intel in Chandlers as an HR legal attorney in 2010 following an extremely successful career in private practice. Bullock joined Ryley, Carlock & Applewhite in 1995 and was elected a shareholder in the firm just four years later. When she departed for Intel and the new challenge of an in-house legal role, she was chair of the firm’s well-respected Labor & Employment Practice Group. While in private practice, Bullock’s practice was devoted to counseling and defending employers faced with claims of sexual harassment, disability, gender, age, race, wrongful discharge and employment-related tort and contract claims.

Lawrence Cuculic
Vice president and general counsel
Best Western International, Inc.
Cuculic manages the legal department for Best Western, the largest hotel chain in the world, in a manner that is efficient, effective, and respectful. Cuculic is also actively involved in managing strategic direction, providing guidance on corporate legal issues, board and board committee matters and managing relationships with external counsel. Since his arrival at Best Western, Cuculic has been thrust into various complex litigation, including IP and antitrust class action matters. Through his guidance, Cuculic spearheaded legal victories for Best Western that resulted in a complete mitigation of damages.

Bob Desmond
Chief intellectual property counsel
Honeywell International, Inc. – Aerospace
Desmond is the chief IP counsel for Honeywell Aerospace, a $12 billion business unit of Honeywell International Inc. which has more than 7,000 employees in Arizona. Honeywell Aerospace’s Vice President of Engineering and Chief Technology Officer, summarized Desmond’s contributions to Honeywell Aerospace as follows: “Bob has developed a world-class intellectual property process within Honeywell Aerospace. He has not only refined and improved our intellectual property portfolio, but also created a sustainable process for refreshing its contents and ensuring the true business value of the IP is being properly realized. He has set the standard for Honeywell and the broader aerospace industry.”

Ruth Franklin
Corporate contracts counsel
ON Semiconductor
Franklin leads an international team of six member,s including both lawyers and contract professionals who are charged with negotiating semiconductor manufacturing sales agreements with customers throughout the world. These negotiations can span many months and typically involve describing every aspect of the manufacturing and supply processes within ON Semiconductor. Franklin is fond of saying that this is a job she is passionate about because it uses all the various areas of expertise that she has built up over her career: detailed lawyering, strategic planning and tactical negotiations.

GoDaddy in-house legal department
GoDaddy
GoDaddy’s legal team is led by General Counsel and Corporate Secretary Nima Kelly. GoDaddy’s 13-lawyer legal team counsels this rapidly-growing Internet company as it accomplishes its mission of empowering its customers to easily start, confidently grow and successfully run their own ventures. GoDaddy currently serves more than 12 million paying customers worldwide with 4,300 employees working in 21 states and eight countries. Under Ms. Kelly’s leadership, GoDaddy’s legal department has been re-engineered to efficiently deliver high-quality legal advice at the pace needed to keep up with its business partners. Divided into Intellectual Property, M&A/International, Litigation/Employment, Agreements and Internet Policy functions, its lawyers work as a cohesive team and are encouraged to “roll up their sleeves,” become intimately involved with their clients’ day-to-day activities and help them accomplish their business goals. Issues range from the serious (patent litigation and international expansion) to the sublime (the Super Bowl ads and talent agreements with Kid Rock, Snoop Dogg and Ke$ha for the annual blowout Holiday Parties). The team also works to develop effective and responsible Internet policy for GoDaddy and the global online community.

Jill Harrison
In-house counsel
W.L. Gore & Associates Inc.
Harrison has served as one of the corporate counsel at Gore for nearly nine years. She leads the medical device manufacturer’s product liability litigation and counseling practice globally. For much of her tenure at Gore, Harrison also led strategic counseling and litigation in the area of non-competes and trade for Gore’s Medical Products Division and provided extensive employment law counseling and litigation management for sales associates in the division. Harrison also assumed a significant leadership role in developing and implementing an innovative integration program for new legal team members to effectively facilitate their participation in the company’s global legal team.

John T. Jozwick
Senior vice president and general counsel
Rider Levett Bucknall
Rider Levett Bucknall hired Jozwick by contract in 2002 for a temporary assignment analyzing claims made by subcontractors in a major wastewater treatment plant project. As word spread with clients about his expertise in analyzing construction disputes, forensic claims, and construction defects, Jozwick was offered a full-time role. Under his direction, the company’s claims department grew from one temporary contractor to five full-time employees. Jozwick also played a major role in developing advisory services into a significantly profitable service. Today, the advisory service line offers clients risk analysis, claims analysis, dispute resolution, expert witness and dispute avoidance services.

Alan Kelly, Scottsdale Lincoln Healthcare Network’s legal team
Senior vice president and general counsel
Scottsdale Lincoln Healthcare Network
Kelly has been an in-house lawyer at Scottsdale Lincoln Healthcare Network for the past nine years. By creating an efficient and modern legal department, Kelly has been able to provide advice to everyone from executives to operational employees. His continued innovation led him to improve the SLHN Risk Management Department so that it can effectively manage all of the complex risk that a $1 billion company is faced with. Kelly’s strong leadership is as highly valued as his skills as an innovator. Johnathan Wallach, one of Kelly’s employees, said, “Alan has been a true mentor who actively promotes initiative in all people who work for him.”

Margaret Koppen
Deputy general counsel
Standard Microsystems Corporation
Koppen is Standard Microsystems’ main transactional attorney. Kim Van Amburg, senior vice president and general counsel at Casino Del Sol Resort, said that during her 10 years at the company, Koppen has been able to hone a “specific expertise in negotiating terms of sale agreements with her employer’s customers,” some of which are the world’s largest semiconductor companies. Koppen has been instrumental in “increasing efficiency, production, and accountability without increasing the size of the legal department.” Her contributions to the company have helped double the company’s revenue. She teaches the University of Arizona College of Law’s first-ever contract drafting course, which she developed.

David Koval
Vice president and general counsel
Kitchell
Koval went to Kitchell in 2004 as an employee for one of the company’s subsidiaries, Kitchell Contractors. In this role, he brought credibility to the company through refining legal processes, streamlining and creating uniformity in subcontractor relationships and evaluating the company’s risk. His results earned the respect of everyone at Kitchell and he was eventually tapped by CEI Jim Swanson to oversee all legal activities for the 60-year-old company. Kitchell’s interests include real estate development, commercial construction, program and construction management and air conditioning wholesale supplies.

Erin Lewin
Senior vice president and general counsel
Avnet, Inc.
Lewin leads Avnet’s 98-member global legal department and provides advice and guidance to the company’s business leaders. “Erin has demonstrated her ability to effectively guide a global team that deals with a complex, multinational legal environment while serving as a leader who fosters collaboration and employee engagement for her team,” said Avnet CEO Rick Hamada. In 2013, Lewin’s team oversaw the legal aspects of 12 acquisitions with a combined deal value of $367 million and combined revenue value of $1.2 billion, as well as the divestiture of two subsidiaries.

Kelly LoCascio
Chief compliance office and executive vice president
Angel MedFlight
LoCascio has been with Angel MedFlight, a worldwide air ambulance company, since 2008. In 2008, LoCascio was named one of the top 50 pro bono attorneys in Arizona and stays involved in the community by volunteering for the American Cancer Society, FreshStart and HomeBase Youth Services. She is a member of the American Bar Association, the Association of Corporate Counsel, and the Executive Women’s Golf Association. In addition to practicing law and volunteering, LoCascio was crowned Ms. Arizona Woman in 2007. This competition is part of the Arizona United States Pageants. She also ecompetes in triathlons.

Michael Mason
Senior counsel, labor and employment
Pinnacle West Capital Corp.
Mason is a strategic partner helping his internal clients solve legal problems in a changing industry. Mason transitioned two years ago as a shareholder at a large national firm, Greenberg Traurig, to a role with Pinnacle West. Mason often works to build consensus with various teams to reduce the threat of litigation. He challenges external counsel to be creative but cognizant of the costs of litigation. Mason served as the young lawyer representative to the State Bar Board of Governors for several years and currently sits on the Executive Council for the Labor and Employment Section for the Arizona State Bar.

L. Richards McMillan
Senior vice president and general counsel
Freeport McMoRan
McMillan has been senior vice president and general counsel of Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. since October 31, 2007. McMillan served as senior corporate and securities law attorney of FCX since 1995. The Tulane University Law School graduate joined FCX after a 30-year career with the law firm of Jones, Walker, Waechter, Poitevent, Carrère & Denègre, L.L.P., where he served as partner. McMillan served as head of Jones Walker’s corporate and securities section and also served as a member and chairman of the Jones Walker’s Executive Committee.

David Mulvihill
Vice president and general counsel
Make-A-Wish Foundation of America
Mulvihill is general counsel of the Make-A-Wish, a national nonprofit organization with 74 chapters that grant the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions. A substantial portion of Mulvihill’s time is spent protecting the Make-A-Wish name and trademarks from infringement by sound-alike organizations and others. In connection with these efforts, he has worked closely with various state charity officials, as well as with the U.S. Senate Finance Committee and the Federal Trade Commission. Prior to joining Make-A-Wish, Mulvihill was a partner in a firm in Pittsburgh, where his practice focused on commercial litigation.

Carmen L. Neuberger
Senior vice president and general counsel
Phoenix Children’s Hospital
A hospital that is a part of the ever evolving health care environment “requires a knowledgeable talented and dedicated general counsel,” said Debra Stevens, director of marketing and communications for Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Neurberger not only possesses the knowledge and talent Stevens speaks of, but she essentially developed the hospital’s entire legal department. During this process, Neurberger was able to create a program which allows the hospital to manage and control its own risk. She is also credited with developing and implementing a code of ethics, and improving the relationship between the legal and human resources departments.

Daniel Oseran
Privacy counsel
eBay
Oseran has worked in the information technology and legal fields for more than a decade, ensuring legal compliance, designing network infrastrcuture and managing large project teams. He also enforced information technology laws on behalf of the 5th largest District Attorney’s office in the country, and prosecuted the first state level case of Internet anti-piracy in the United States. Oseran advises business units on developing privacy-protective products, campaigns, websites and other programs. He also manage internal tools to report compliance and communicate policies. Before moving to eBay, Oseran led Paypal’s innovation and continuous improvement of the IT control framework, including the integration of multiple compliance requirements.

John M. Pons
Executive vice president and general counsel
Cole Real Estate Investments, Inc.
Pons has been instrumental in guiding the legal department at Cole in supporting the company’s overall mission in the acquisition, management and disposition of real property. The company has seen tremendous growth, listed on the NYSE and has lined itself up for a merger/acquisition that is poised to make it one of the 15 largest REITs in the United States. Pons’ demeanor and guidance has helped make Cole’s legal department high-functioning, highly collaborative and highly-engaged. Before attending law school, Pons was a captain in the United States Air Force where he served from 1988 until 1992.

Deanna Pickering
General counsel
Lumension Security, Inc.
As the sole in-house lawyer, Pickering manages legal issues across the globe and is often called upon to do the day-to-day legal work, such as customer contract review, that helps the organization save money on outside lawyers. But as the general counsel for a software company with operations in North America and Europe and a sales force throughout the world, Pickering has to help the organization move forward with strategic initiative and work with other executives to manage risk, solve legal issues, and support and direct outside lawyers in a competitive and rapidly changing business environment.

Daniel J. Quigley
General counsel
Tohono O’odham Gaming Enterprise
Quigley began his representation of the Tohono O’odham Nation with respect to its gaming operations in 1995. However, it was in 2003 that the Tohono O’odham Gaming Enterprise created its own in-house legal department and hired Quigley as its first general counsel. Quigley has faithfully represented the Nation’s gaming interests through a time when it has experienced exponential growth. Among his more noteworthy triumphs are the successful campaign for the 2002 Indian Gaming Initiative (passed by Arizona voters in 2002) and subsequent Gaming Compact negotiations with the State of Arizona.

Darrell Sherman
Vice president, general counsel, secretary
Taylor Morrison
Sherman joined Taylor Morrison as vice president and general counsel in June 2009 and helped the home builder launch a successful IPO in 2013. He is responsible for the company’s legal affairs including transactions, governance, litigation and regulatory matters. Prior to joining Taylor Morrison, Sherman was general counsel at Centex for four years in the Southwest and Mountain States Regions and associate general counsel at Del Webb/Pulte for five years. Prior to joining the homebuilding industry, he was a finance and real estate attorney at the law firm of Snell & Wilmer in its Phoenix office.

James Silhasek
Executive vice president and general counsel
Discount Tire
Silhasek manages the legal and real estate departments and is specifically involved in all real estate acquisitions, matters of taxation and complex business litigation. Silhasek began his association with Discount Tire in 1980, while in private practice, and joined the company in 1988. During his association with Discount Tire, it has grown to become the world’s largest tire and wheel retailer with more than 870 locations in 28 states. Silhasek received his Juris Doctor from Creighton University Law School and a Master’s of Law in taxation from Georgetown University Law Center.

Sprouts Farmers Market, Inc.
Legal department
The natural and organic grocery chain hired its first in-house counsel, Brandon Lombardi, in January 2012 and he set about assembling an in-house legal department that could provide the needed legal services with the quality, acumen, and responsiveness that he and his fast-paced client demanded. Sprouts’ recent success, including the IPO which was shepherded from commencement to completion by Lombardi and his team, serves as a model for how to aggressively yet responsibly build a business. That success could not have been achieved without Sprouts’ legal department. That this 10-person team did not exist two years ago makes their accomplishments even more impressive.

Karen Stein, IO’s legal department
General counsel
IO
Stein oversees all legal and risk management functions of the company. She holds a Juris Doctor, with honors, from Emory University, an MBA from Loyola University with a concentration in finance, and a Bachelor of Science degree in business from the University of Maryland, where she graduated magna cum laude. She has practiced law since 1994, focusing on business transactions, licensing, and intellectual property. Before joining IO, Stein practiced at the Troutman Sanders law firm in Atlanta and served as the Assistant general counsel for the PGA Tour for 10 years.

Matthew Stockslage
Vice president and associate general counsel
Dignity Health
Stockslage is the senior legal leader for Dignity Health’s Arizona and Nevada service areas, which includes six hospitals — including the world-renowned Barrow Neurological Institute — and more than 40 affiliated outpatient sites. As one of three regional legal leaders reporting to Dignity’s general counsel, Stockslage supervises a staff of 11 and is the lead attorney for joint venture transactions and relationships across the Dignity system. He has helped implement a restructuring of the Dignity legal department, its work flows, reporting relationships and client accountabilities to facilitate Dignity’s implementation of healthcare reforms and to accommodate its growth strategy to become a national healthcare provider.

Randall S. Theisen
Executive vice president, general counsel, assistant secretary
Western Alliance Bancorporation
Theisen has served as general counsel of Western Alliance Bancorporation and its three bank affiliates includes Alliance Bank of Arizona, BankWest of Nevada and Torrey Pines Bank since February 2006. Theisen joined WAL from Squire Sanders & Dempsey and has more than 20 years of legal experience representing financial institutions in banking, corporate and financial services law. He was named a “Leading Lawyer 2006” and “Best of the Bar 2005.” He serves on the Business Law Committee and Consumer Financial Services Committee for the American Bar Association. He is also a member of the Arizona Bankers Association.

Michael Walker
Senior associate counsel, labor and employment/litigation
Insight Enterprises, Inc
Walker is the sole litigator and labor and employment lawyer for Insight in the United States and Canada. Insight is a Fortune 500 company that provides hardware, software and related services to business and government agencies. Walker is “stunningly successful” at preventing, resolving, and promptly defending claims that go through litigation in labor and employment, commercial matters and in actions brought by government agencies according to Mark Rogers, association general counsel for Insight. Walker has also been able to reduce spending on several categories of work. “Above all, (he) is a practical problem solver and has excellent business judgment,” Rogers said.

Stuart Zigun
Assistant general counsel
Emerson Network Power
Colleagues say Zigun in the kind of attorney every business wishes it had. Zigun has an exceptional depth of understanding of his clients’ business and products and is intimately familiar with the company’s strategy and direction. In more than 30 years as an in-house counsel, Zigun has never had an agreement he worked on be litigated. This is a testament to his ability to successfully resolve disputes. Zigun, who earned an undergraduate degree in industrial engineering from Cornell and his law degree from Boston University, has represented large public companies that include Raytheon, Motorola and Emerson.

technology

Avnet Offers Insights on 2014 Global Supply Chain Trends

As the calendar turns from business management planning to implementation and execution for 2014, global technology distributor Avnet, Inc. offers insights into trends that will influence the global supply chain in the new year and beyond. With a supply chain ecosystem spanning more than 300 franchised suppliers and 80 countries, Avnet helps its global customers navigate the changing global supply chain landscape to decrease lead times and improve time to market.

According to Capgemini Consulting’s 2013 study,1 55 percent of companies surveyed recognize that supply chain management can be a source of competitive advantage. Further, collaboration with supply chain partners results in a supply chain that allows companies to outperform the competition.

“As our global customers examined their financial performance last year, many experienced the positive value that a fully integrated and globally coordinated supply chain has on their business,” said Lynn Torrel, senior vice president global supply chain and strategic accounts at Avnet. “Collaboration is one of the most critical elements in an effective supply chain, and we expect to continue to see more companies fully integrate their supply chains throughout their extended network of suppliers and customers. Although we anticipate several factors to influence supply chain management this year, we also expect that those who employ a systematic approach to orchestrating their business ecosystem will continue to achieve the maximum financial impact.”

Avnet’s supply chain experts have identified several factors to consider when implementing a fully integrated supply chain this year. These include:

  • Risk Management – Despite a growing awareness of supply chain risks and the importance of mitigating them, few organizations employ a comprehensive risk management strategy. As margins for error in the supply chain become slimmer, more organizations will realize they have the power to mitigate the impact of many supply chain disruptions. Proactively assessing potential risk and developing a risk management strategy is critical to a company’s ability to continue to manage supply to meet demand, as well as the expectations of business stakeholders, regardless of the economic or environmental challenges.
  • Counterfeiting – Members of the electronics supply chain have become more proactive in their efforts to ensure part authenticity and guard against counterfeiting, and industry initiatives and certifications have helped crack down on counterfeits. While the war on counterfeits will continue, technology manufacturers will be better equipped to combat these issues as tools to help identify parts that could cause disruption to the electronics supply chain become more pervasive.
  • Big Data – Business applications of big data analytics will continue to expand from demand-related sales, marketing and customer service and manufacturing, into more supply side areas such as procurement, inventory management, and supply risk management. Implementation and the impact on supply chains will be slow, yet steady this year.
  • Manufacturing Strategies – While many companies are considering reshoring and near shoring strategies, few have relocated their manufacturing operations. As labor rates normalize around the globe, and more powerful tools in network design and analytics become available to better manage supply chains across multiple regions and product segments, reshoring and near shoring will become more actionable. As organizations focus more on the customer experience, regional markets, value density of goods, and risk mitigation strategies, the benefits of reshoring and near shoring become more evident.
  • Segmentation – As customers continue to diversify their manufacturing strategies, so does the need for segmenting their supply chains based on multiple end-to-end metrics such as cost, expected service levels and both manufacturing and final delivery locations. Segmentation is key to customer satisfaction, yet it is not yet ingrained into the end-to-end view of most organizations’ supply chains. This often overlooked strategy can help manufacturers develop a greater understanding of the costs associated with delivering products to different customer sets around the globe.
140054736

Avnet Acquires Remaining Interest in MSC Investoren GmbH

Avnet, Inc. (NYSE: AVT) announced that it has acquired the remaining interest in MSC Investoren GmbH (“MSC Group”). This completes a two part transaction in which the majority interest was acquired on October 1, 2013. MSC is a recognized value-add distributor focused on electronic component distribution, embedded computing technology, and display solutions as well as design and manufacturing.

Patrick Zammit, president of Avnet Electronics Marketing EMEA, said, “The completion of the MSC acquisition allows us to begin realizing the full benefits of one of the best recognized distributors in the European market. Over the last few weeks we have been able to lay out the future strategy of Avnet Electronics Marketing EMEA including MSC and have received positive feedback from customers and manufacturing partners. Our plans to create a focused ‘embedded and display solutions’ business unit in EMEA will allow us to serve the technology value chain deeper and wider and accelerate profitable growth in the region.”

Founded in 1979, MSC Group has developed into a consultative partner for customers in the automotive, industrial automation, telecom, information systems and medical device markets. MSC Group’s competence in system design, system integration and board-level assembly allows it to address customers’ specific needs in leading-edge vertical markets. In calendar year 2012, MSC generated revenue in excess of US$450 million, with embedded computer technology (including display solutions) accounting for almost 50 percent of its sales.

toasted-marshmallows

The Dish: Marshmallows

You’ll never have to eat those stale, flavorless blobs from the grocery store again, once you learn how to make your own marshmallows! Imagine: cinnamon spice marshmallows topping off your hot chocolate on a cool fall evening, vanilla bean marshmallows toasted atop your sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving or blushing, pink rose water marshmallows dipped in dark chocolate for Valentine’s Day…The possibilities are endless with these gooey little morsels!

With the holidays right around the corner, marshmallows make excellent gifts. Place several marshmallows, some graham crackers, and a chocolate bar in a box for a homemade s’more kit. You can also wrap marshmallows in cellophane and place in an nice mug with a packet of gourmet hot chocolate for another great gift idea!

Try replacing the corn syrup with honey, agave or even molasses for an interesting twist. Virtually any flavor can be added from lemon juice to rum! Try adding different extracts or spices or even a pinch of salt on top of each to cut the sweetness. You can even use food coloring and cookie cutters to make them fun and festive. The only limit to the possibilities is remembering to keep all the ingredients proportionate (i.e. if you want to add 2 TBSP of limoncello, remove 2 TBSP of water).

Though the recipe may look long, these could not be easier to make. All you need is a mixer and your imagination!

Homemade Marshmallows 

• Vegetable oil or spray for coating pan

• About 1 cup confectioners’ sugar for coating pan and marshmallows

• 3 (1/4-ounce) envelopes powdered unflavored gelatin

• 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

• 1 cup light corn syrup

• 1/4 teaspoon salt

• 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 

Pastry brush; 1 (9-inch) square baking pan; small, fine-mesh sieve; 4 1/2-quart or larger stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment; candy thermometer

Brush the bottom and sides of a 9-inch square baking pan with vegetable oil.

Put 1/2 cup water in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Sprinkle the gelatin into the bowl and stir briefly to make sure all the gelatin is in contact with water. Let soften while you make the sugar syrup.

In a heavy 3- to 4-quart saucepan, combine the granulated sugar, corn syrup, salt, and 1/2 cup water. Place over moderate heat and bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Put a candy thermometer into the boiling sugar syrup and continue boiling (the mixture may foam up, so turn the heat down slightly if necessary), without stirring, until the thermometer registers 240°F (soft-ball stage). Remove the saucepan from the heat and let stand briefly until the bubbles dissipate slightly.

With the mixer on low speed, carefully pour the hot sugar syrup into the softened gelatin. Gradually increase the mixer speed to high and beat until the marshmallow is very thick and forms a thick ribbon when the whisk is lifted, about 5 minutes. Beat in the vanilla.

Scrape the marshmallow into the prepared pan (it will be very sticky) and use a wet spatula to spread it evenly and smooth the top. Let stand uncovered at room temperature, until the surface is no longer sticky and you can gently pull the marshmallow away from the sides of the pan with your fingertips; at least 4 hours or overnight.

Dust a cutting board with confectioners’ sugar. Use a rubber spatula to pull the sides of the marshmallow from the edge of the pan (use the spatula to loosen the marshmallow from the bottom of the pan if necessary) and invert onto the cutting board. Dust the top with confectioners’ sugar.

Brush a long thin knife or a chef’s knife with vegetable oil and dust with confectioners’ sugar to prevent sticking; continue dusting the knife as necessary. Cut lengthwise into 8 strips, then crosswise into eighths, to form a total of 64 squares. (For larger marshmallows, cut lengthwise into 6 strips, then crosswise into sixths, to form a total of 36 squares.) Coat marshmallows, one at a time, in confectioners’ sugar.

Tip: A larger pan such as a 9 x 13″ or even a jelly roll pan can be used as well. Recipe can make up to 70 marshmallows. 

DO AHEAD: Marshmallows can be stored, layered between sheets of wax paper or parchment in an airtight container in a dry place at cool room temperature, for up to 30 days.

Click below for a printable version of this recipe

Marshmallows

flu

Who Should Get Their Flu Shot?

Getting your flu shot is even more critical when you are pregnant or have recently given birth, a University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix faculty member warns.

“Influenza is more dangerous in pregnant women than other women because the changes in the immune system while you are carrying your child,” said Maria Manriquez, MD, who is also an obstetrics/gynecological physician at Maricopa Medical Center. “That’s why it is imperative that pregnant women get their flu shot now that we are entering the season.”

The first Arizona flu case was reported earlier this month.

According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, influenza is five times more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women than in women who are not pregnant. Pregnant women undergo changes in their immune systems, heart and lungs while pregnant making them more susceptible. Pregnant women with the flu also increase their risk of premature labor and delivery, the CDC says.

Vaccination during pregnancy has been shown to protect both the mother and child up to six months of age. Flu vaccines are not given to children until six months after they are born.

“Millions of pregnant women have received flu shots over the last several years and it has not been shown that it did any harm to mothers or babies,” Dr. Manriquez said. “In fact, it likely saved many of these women from getting sick or passing on sickness to their infant.”

The CDC said women at any point in their pregnancy can receive a flu shot and should get the vaccine rather than the nasal spray. Physicians also say women should get inoculated after they have given birth, even if they are breastfeeding, and can receive either type of vaccine.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Honors Top Business Leaders

Three top business leaders will be honored for their innovation and achievements, when they are inducted into the W. P. Carey School of Business Homecoming Hall of Fame this month. They include the head of a famed jewelry company, a high-profile business founder from China, and a corporate leader at one of Arizona’s biggest companies.

On Oct. 17, they will join previous Arizona State University alumni inductees from such diverse organizations as the American Red Cross, Motorola, the U.S. Air Force, Wells Fargo Bank, XM Satellite Radio and the Arizona Diamondbacks.

“These stellar inductees represent strength, leadership and accomplishment in the business world,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman. “They demonstrate how far our students can go and have gone in making their mark on the global economy.”

The 36th annual W. P. Carey School honorees are:

> Eddie LeVian, chief executive officer of the Le Vian Corporation, who has made Chocolate Diamonds® a red-carpet staple in Hollywood. LeVian earned a business degree from the W. P. Carey School in 1979 and took his innovative marketing ideas back to his family’s fine jewelry business in New York. The company’s sales have more than quadrupled over the past decade, and the LeVian family is active with many charities, raising $75 million in the past decade alone.

> Canglong Liu, a high-profile business leader in China, who founded one fertilizer factory in 1979, which grew into a conglomerate of major companies, including the Sichuan Hongda Group, now with 30,000 employees and 60 subsidiaries around the world. Liu is chairman of businesses that focus on finance, minerals and real estate. He is also a member of the national committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference and the standing committee of the All-China Federation of Industry and Commerce. The Hongda Group has given $8 million to AIDS prevention and research in China. Liu received his MBA from the W. P. Carey School’s prestigious executive MBA program in Shanghai in 2007.

> MaryAnn Miller, chief human resources officer and executive leader of corporate communications for Avnet, a Phoenix-based Fortune 500 company with more than 18,000 employees and customers in 80 countries. Avnet is one of the largest distributors of electronic components, computer products and embedded technology in the world. Miller has more than 30 years of experience in human resources and operations management, and is responsible for leading the company’s human resources, organizational development and corporate communications worldwide. She is also a member of the Avnet Executive Board. She received her MBA from the W. P. Carey School’s executive MBA program in 2001.

About 200 alumni, business leaders and students are expected to attend the Homecoming Hall of Fame event on Thursday, Oct. 17 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa in Phoenix. A reception starts at 5:30 p.m., followed by the awards ceremony.

Space is limited. For more information on tickets or sponsorship, go to www.wpcarey.asu.edu/homecoming or call (480) 965-2597.

rsz_davecheatham_velocityretail_small_2013

Retail Overview: Big Boxes, Big Decisions

 

As a building owner of a vacant big box (or perhaps soon-to-be-vacant), there are a lot of factors that affect the return on your investment and the success of your asset.

From our experience in working with owners as they analyze their asset, we have found that one common denominator applies to every situation — the owner must be armed with specific market information so that they can make educated decisions.

Market intelligence or market analytics play a key role in nearly every building sale or lease. While it is important to know the vacancy rate in the market, it is even more important to drill down to specifics about your product type and market area.

Following are some questions you can ask yourself about your building or asset:

>> How many vacant big boxes are in the immediate trade area (what is my competition)?

>> Are the big boxes of the same product type? Neighborhood, vs. power center, vs. anchored, vs. unanchored?

>>  What is the average length of time these boxes are on the market before they lease or sell?

>> What deals have been completed recently which are similar? What was the rental rate, or concessions such as free rent or TI dollars?

>> Who would be the typical tenants to lease or buy the space? Are they already in the area?

>> Will the other tenants in my shopping center be able to stay open if the anchor space is vacant? If so, for how long?

Chances are you do not know all of these answers, or even know where you can get this information. However, we believe that these answers are critical to a successful outcome for your asset. Whether you want to lease and hold it as an investment, or whether you want to sell it as is, the information you gather to make that decision is critical.

Velocity Retail Group has allocated significant resources over the past two years to create a structured research vehicle aimed specifically at big box owners. We have drilled down to specific product types within cities, market areas and regional areas. Additionally, understanding absorption, vacancy and new construction are critical factors to any real estate decision.

Over the past year, we have been asked to present our information to various economic, industry and governmental groups throughout the Valley. The feedback we receive from these presentations has been extremely positive. In order to help share this information in a format that communicates the analytics succinctly we have created a video podcast series for our clients.

Click on the video at the bottom of this article to watch the eight-minute market overview recapping 2012.

Dave Cheatham is Managing Principal of Velocity Retail Group. He is an authority on retail real estate in the disciplines of brokerage, project leasing, development, consulting and advisory services. He is a senior advisor to merchants, entrepreneurs, investors and senior retail executives throughout the industry.

boeing-phantom-ray

It takes fuel to win tech race

Many of us can relate to thinking of Arizona’s economy as an automobile race. To win, you need a smooth race course, a fast car, a winning driver and high-powered fuel.
Carrying that analogy into Arizona’s technology sector, it’s clear that a lot of resources have been invested and progress has been made in building a world-class race course.  We’ve made tremendous strides in creating a business climate and technology environment for facilitating both private and public sector support to address the needs of Arizona’s technology businesses.

The Arizona Technology Council has worked collaboratively with many different technology champions to build this course. Technology issues are supported by the Governor’s office, the state’s legislature, the Arizona Commerce Authority, the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and more.

Technology incubators and shared space facilities such as Gangplank in Chandler, Avondale and Tucson; Hackspace and Venture Catalyst at ASU’s SkySong in Scottsdale; BioInspire in Peoria; Innovation Incubator in Chandler; AzCI in Tucson; and AZ Disruptors in Scottsdale are making sure that today’s innovators are being given the right support, tools and environment to create the next big thing.

Collectively, our wins have included the passage of a tax credit for qualified research and development that is the best in the nation, the creation of the first statewide Arizona SciTech Festival and the birth of the Arizona Innovation Institute, to name a few.
Arizona’s technology industry also has great race cars. These are the technologies and intellectual property that create wealth and jobs driven by both Fortune 500 companies and entrepreneurs.  Companies such as Intel, Microchip Technologies, Freescale, ON Semiconductor and Avnet can all be found here.  Nearly all of the largest aerospace and defense prime contractors in the nation are located in Arizona, including Boeing, Honeywell, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and General Dynamics.

The state’s entrepreneurial spirit is reflected in companies such as WebPT, Infusionsoft, Axosoft, iLinc and Go Daddy that were founded in Arizona along with the many innovators that are coming to the table every day with new ideas rich in technology.

These companies large and small are driven by some of the greatest race car drivers the nation has produced.

But when it comes to fuel, Arizona’s economy has always been running close to empty. We lack the vital capital needed to win the race. Having access to angel investors, venture capital and private equity as well as debt instruments is critical to Arizona’s success.
The situation has not been improving on the equity side of the fuel equation. To offer some relief, the Arizona Technology Council is proposing legislation that would create a system of contingent tax credits to incentivize both in-state and out-of-state investors to capitalize Arizona companies.  This program, called the Arizona Fund of Funds, would allow the state to offer $100 million in tax incentives to minimize the risk for those seeking to invest in high-growth companies.  The state government’s role would be to serve as a guarantor through these contingent tax credits in case the investments don’t yield the projected results.  Expect more information on this important piece of legislation as it advances.

On the debt side of the fuel equation, there are encouraging signs that the worst of the credit crunch may be over. Early-stage companies need access to debt instruments, or loans. Capital is needed for equipment and expansion. A line of credit can help early-stage companies through ongoing cash-flow issues. But loan activity is still modest in Arizona for small companies. It remains heavily weighted toward the strongest corporate and consumer borrowers.

Capital goes hand in hand with innovation, high-paying jobs and cutting-edge technology, products and services. Before Arizona’s economy can win the race, we will need to become more self-sufficient at providing the fuel necessary to be a winner.

Steven G. Zylstra is president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council.

customer.service

ASU Center becomes a resource to teach service

Customer service was once viewed as the cost of doing business.

“Across almost every industry, leaders are focusing on service as a way to compete in today’s competitive marketplace,” says Mary Jo Bitner, academic director for the Center for Services Leadership at Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business.

But times have changed. Companies that are in search of new revenue streams are finding that in addition to providing great customer service, offering value-added services to their product lines are helping their bottom lines. And the help them make the most of the opportunities, many are seeking help from the ASU Center, which focuses on research and executive education in managing and marketing services.

“Customer demand and the competitive challenges posed by the commoditization of many products has pushed many goods-based companies to take another look at services as a source of revenue and profit,” says Stephen Brown, director of the Center for Services Leadership, who has spent the past 20 years tracking the growing importance of services as a product. “Many are following market leaders to become goods-and-services companies.”

For example, Boeing has broadened its offerings by adding the lucrative market of services to its aircraft manufacturing. The Hewlett Packard and Compaq merger created a new company whose major product is services. IBM’s impressive financials over the past decade — in shining contrast to its competitors — were largely the result of its service businesses.

“In 2001, we were launching our first fee-based service business,” says Steve Church, president of Avnet Integrated and chief corporate business development and planning officer. “We wanted to offer more services and solutions. We knew a lot, but there was a lot we didn’t know.”

Church says Avnet’s membership in the center — which concentrates on expanding service innovation by combining the latest scientific insights from the academic world with the best of business strategy in the real world — allowed the company to “build a culture of service excellence that focuses on the customer and gives each a great customer experience.”

The Center, which was created in 1985, remains the only one of its kind in the United States, devoted to research and education in the services field.  Its research findings form the foundation of the Center’s executive education program, attended by managers and executives of leading firms.  Member companies include AT&T, Charles Schwab and Co., Ford Motor Company, IBM, Mayo Clinic and others, who sponsor research, fund scholarships, host MBA student teams and participate in executive education.

Many member companies sponsor research that is published in academic journals, and shared at the Center’s executive education forums. Bitner, for example, has been studying the effects of self-service technologies (SST), working with Ford and a major pharmaceutical benefits management company.

“The Center is really a tremendous resource for any company that has a strategy to to improve customer serve or add services to augment its products,” Church says. “We learned that by getting our employees engaged in customer service, we built customer loyalty, it helped us compete, and it enhanced our financial performance.”

SkySong

Innovation unites Arizona’s economic engines

When Arizona became a state 100 years ago, it was easy to identify its economic engines, those industries, innovators and locations that drove the state’s economy and employment.

They all started with C — copper, cotton, citrus, cattle and climate.
A decade later, it’s not so easy.

“We must find ways to diversify our economy, including investing in bioscience and technology, health science and innovation,” Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says. “We are coming out of the recession, and we need to move forward in a strategic way.”

Today’s economic engines are doing just that. They innovate, they collaborate, and the only one that starts with C is CityScape, and the only copper you’ll find there is Copper Blues Rock Pub and Kitchen and the cotton is at Urban Outfitters.

But today’s economic engines have to clear vision and direction for driving Arizona’s economy during its second century.

The Biodesign Institute at ASU
What it is: The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today’s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
Economic impact: The Biodesign Institute has met or exceeded all of the business goals set in mid-2003 by attracting more than $300 million in external funding since inception, and generating more than $200 million in proposals advanced in 2011 alone.
Companies it has helped grow: Licensed next-generation respiratory sensor technology to a European medical device developer; executed an exclusive license agreement for DNA sequencing technology to Roche, which includes a sponsored research agreement to develop devices in collaboration with Roche and IBM; and launched two Biodesign Commercial Translation companies.
Latest news: Led by electrical engineer, Nongjian Tao, ASU researchers have formulated a new sensor technology that will allow them to design and create a handheld sensor that can contribute to better diagnosis of asthma.
Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health at the Biodesign Institute at ASU: “By establishing biosignatures centers, we hope to build a global network that will provide the scale necessary to overcome scientific limitations while creating a global platform to share methods, results and experiences.”

CityScape
What it is: A highrise mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix consisting of residential, retail, office, and hotel components. The project covers three downtown Phoenix city blocks and is located between First Avenue and First Street, and between Washington and Jefferson streets.
Economic impact: Officials credit the evolution of Downtown Phoenix — led by CityScape — with helping the Valley land the 2015 Super Bowl, which will bring an economic impact of an estimated $500 million.
Companies it has helped grow: In addition to entertainment venues and top-notch restaurants, business leaders calling CityScape home include Alliance Bank, Cantor Law Group,  Fidelity Title, Gordon Silver, Gust Rosenfeld, Jennings, Strouss and Salmon, PLC, Polsinelli Shughart, RED Development, Squire Sanders and UnitedHealthcare.
Latest news: The 250-room boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix by Kimpton, opened in June.
Jeff Moloznik, general manager, CityScape:  “The most progressive and entrepreneurial talent in the Valley have convened at CityScape. The impact our tenants’ businesses have brought to Downtown Phoenix is noticeable and significant. In an area that once lacked a central core, there is now energy, creativity, enterprise and excitement all day, every day in once central location.”

Intel

What it is: Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.
Economic impact: Since 1996, Intel has invested more than $12 billion in high-tech manufacturing capability in Arizona and spent more than $450 million each year in research and development. Intel is investing another $5 billion in its Chandler site to manufacture its industry-leading, next-generation 14 nanometer technology.
Companies it has helped grow: Intel has been a catalyst for helping to create Chandler’s “tech corridor,” which includes Freescale, Microchip Technology, Orbital Sciences, Avnet, Amkor, and Marvell Technologies.
Latest news: Intel and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) are developing a customized engineering degree for some of the chip maker’s Arizona-based employees. The program is based on CTI’s modular, project-based curriculum and upon completion will provide a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree from ASU, with a focus in materials science.
Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny: Intel likes the partnership it has with Chandler, likes doing business in Arizona, and they’re a very good corporate citizen.”

Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport

What it is: Formerly Williams Gateway Airport (1994–2008) and Williams Air Force Base (1941–1993), it is a commercial airport located in the southeastern area of Mesa.
Economic impact: The airport helped generate $685 million in economic benefits last year, and the airport supports more than 4,000 jobs in the region.
Companies it has helped grow: Able Engineering & Component Services, Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Embraer, CMC Steel, TRW Vehicle Safety Systems Inc..
Latest news: The Airport Authority’s Board of Directors announced Monday the airport will undergo a $1.4 billion expansion. There is also an effort to privately raise $385 million to build two hotels and office and retail space near the airport.
Mesa Mayor Scott Smith: “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has gone through tremendous growth and expansion and has truly arrived as a major transportation center in the Valley.”

SkySong

What it is: A 1.2-million-square-feet mixed use space that gives entrepreneurs and innovators the resources they need  to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off.
Economic impact: Projected to generate more than $9.3 billion in economic growth over the next 30 years, according to an updated study by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.
Companies it has helped grow: Emerge.MD, Channel Intelligence, Adaptive Curriculum, Alaris, Jobing.com/Blogic, webFilings.
Latest news: Jobing, an online company that connects employers and job seekers nationally, relocated its corporate headquarters from Phoenix to SkySong.
Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane: “It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute. SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

Talking Stick

What it is: This economic engine encompasses a complex that includes the 497-room Talking Stick Resort, Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River, Casino Arizona at Talking Stick Resort, Talking Stick Golf Club, and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the spring training home of the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Economic impact: Salt Rivers Fields аt Talking Stick accounted fоr 22 percent оf the the attendance for Cactus League baseball, which generates more thаn $300 million а yeаr іn economic impact tо the greater Phoenix metropolitan area economy.
Companies it has helped grow: In 2011, nearby Scottsdale Pavilions — which features 1.1 million square feet of select retail and mixed-use properties — became The Pavilions at Talking Stick. Pavilions has added Hobby Lobby, Mountainside Fitness, Buffalo Wild Wings and Hooters.
Latest news: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick will be one of the ballparks selected to host the first round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic in the spring.
David Hielscher, advertising manager, Casino Arizona and Talking Stick Resort: “Our property’s diverse, entertainment-driven culture and convenient locations allow us limitless opportunities for future expansion and development.”

Translational Genomics Research Institute

What it is: TGen is a non-profit genomics research institute that seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics.
Economic impact: TGen provides Arizona with a total annual economic impact of $137.7 million, according to the results of an independent analysis done by Tripp Umbach, a national leader in economic forecasting.
Companies it has helped grow: TGen researchers have collaborated with Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Ascalon International Inc., MCS Biotech Resources LLC, Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc., Silamed Inc., Stromaceutics Inc., SynDevRx Inc., and Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC). and many others.
Latest news: When TGen-generated business spin-offs and commercialization are included,  Tripp Umbach predicts that in 2012 TGen will produce $47.06 for every $1 of state investment, support 3,723 jobs, result in $21.1 million in state tax revenues, and have a total annual economic impact of $258.8 million.
Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals: “TGen is one of this state’s premier medical research and economic assets, and is a standard-bearer for promoting everything that is positive and forward-looking about Arizona.”

University of Arizona’s Tech Park

What it is: The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park (UA Tech Park) sits on 1,345 acres in Southeast Tucson. Almost 2 million square feet of space has been developed featuring high tech office, R&D and laboratory facilities.
Economic impact: In 2009, the businesses that call Tech Park home had an economic impact of $2.67 billion in Pima County. This included $1.81 billion in direct economic impacts such as wages paid and supplies and services purchased and $861 million in indirect and induced dollar impacts. In total, the Tech Park and its companies generated 14,322 jobs (direct, indirect, and induced).
Companies it has helped grow: IBM, Raytheon, Canon USA, Citigroup, NP Photonics, and DILAS Diode Laser.
Latest news: A 38.5-acre photovoltaic array is the latest addition to the Solar Zone technology demonstration area at Tech Park. Power generated from the facility will be sold to Tucson Electric Power Co., providing power for  about 1,000 homes.
Bruce Wright, associate vice president for University Research Parks:  “By 2011, the park had recaptured this lost employment (resulting from the recession) with total employment increasing to 6,944. In addition, the number of tenants had expanded from 50 to 52 reflecting the addition of new companies in the Arizona Center for Innovation and the development of the Solar Zone at the Tech Park.”

Untitled

AWEE presents 2012 Faces of Success

A formerly homeless veteran who lost his hearing from an explosion in Vietnam, an ex-offender who chose drugs over her children and today counsels individuals in similar circumstances, and a Baltimore transplant who had to rely on the financial support of family when she couldn’t find a fulltime job despite a steady work history will tell their turnaround stories and be honored at the 18th annual Faces of Success Luncheon on Thursday, Nov. 15 at The Arizona Biltmore Resort and Spa.

The annual fund-raising luncheon supports Arizona Women’s Education & Employment (AWEE), a workforce development organization using a diverse range of evidence-based training and support services to advance Arizona’s workforce and change the lives of women, men, young adults and special populations through the dignity of work.

Also at the luncheon, Michelle King Robson, who overcame life-threatening health issues to start the widely praised social health website EmpowHER.com for women will receive the Jeanne Lind Herberger Award.

More than 700 people are expected at the luncheon, which is presented by Bank of America.  Registration and reception begin at 11 a.m.   The highly entertaining, rapid-fire program of giveaways, raffles and remarkably moving stories of success will be co-hosted by television personality Tara Hitchcock and Alfredo J. Molina of Molina Fine Jewelers.  Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton will make brief congratulatory remarks.

Molina also has donated a stunning pair of 18-karat white gold earrings with .39 carats of brilliant diamonds surrounding black onyx for a raffle.  The earrings are valued at $4,990.  Raffle tickets are $25 each or 6 for $100 and can be purchased at the event or online at www.awee.org.

Individual tickets for the Faces of Success Luncheon are $100 each and also can be purchased online or the day of the event.  Sponsorships are still available.

The highlight of the annual luncheon comes midway through the program when the three Faces of Success take the audience through their personal journeys from rock bottom to steady employment and self sufficiency thanks to AWEE programs, services and support.

The 2012 Faces of Success are:

• Craig Leighton, a U.S. Marine Corp photographer whose life fell apart after returning from Vietnam in 1974 deaf and angry.  Leighton eventually found himself battling alcohol and drug addiction, homeless and in jail.  “I needed help,” he said.  “Coming out of prison, you have a choice:  Go back to your old behavior or start over.  AWEE is what saved my life.”

• Vicki Rainey, the mother of two children who grew up in Phoenix living a “wonderful childhood” until the family moved to a new neighborhood.  That’s when she started making a series of bad choices with alcohol, drugs and criminal behavior and wound up homeless and in and out of prison.  Prison let her come out of the meth-induced fog she had lived in for months when she chose the drug over her kids.  She learned about AWEE in prison workshops and classes, rebuilt her self-esteem and her life and is now the marketing manager at Recovery Opportunity Center.  “The simple fact is, I wouldn’t be where I am today without AWEE.”

• Tanya Smith moved to Phoenix from Baltimore after her mother died.  Smith wanted warmth and sunshine.  Unfortunately, she couldn’t find permanent work and ran out of money between assignments through a temporary agency, needing help from family members.  Surgery complicated matters.   After getting on AHCCCS, she was referred to AWEE where resume writing and interview training keyed her turnaround.  Today, she’s working fulltime in the Home Modification Division of the Arizona Department of Economic Security.

Jeanne Lind Herberger honoree Robson combines a successful track record as a businesswoman and entrepreneur with nearly two decades of civic and community leadership to lead one of the fastest-growing social health companies on the Web.  She started EmpowHER following her own personal struggle with a debilitating health issue and the challenges she experienced in finding the health resources she needed.  “I thought ‘If this happened to me, what is happening to women all over the world?’  At that moment, I decided I would dedicate my life to making sure no other woman would suffer as I had by creating the resources I wish I had when I was sick.”

Kathey Wagner, CEO, B-On The Obvious and Nicole Spracale, Senior Vice President, Jobing, are co-chairs of the 2012 Faces of Success Luncheon.  Bank of America is the Presenting Sponsor with additional support from: The Herberger Foundation, Bruce T. Halle Familiy Foundation, APS, B-On The Obvious, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Discover Financial Services, Jobing, EmpowHER.com, First Solar, Molina Fine Jewelers, SRP, State Farm, Lewis & Roca, MidFirst Bank, Wells Fargo, Avnet, Comerica Bank and University of Phoenix.

For sponsorship information, contact Chief Development Officer Jamie Craig Dove at jamiecraigdove@awee.org or by calling (602) 223-4333.  For ticket information, visit www.awee.org.

Avnet - Fortune Global 500

Avnet Ranked No. 414 On Fortune’s List Of Largest Corporations

Fortune magazine announced today that global technology distributor Avnet, Inc. ranked No. 414 on the 2012 Fortune Global 500, a list of the world’s largest corporations. With $26.5 billion in sales in fiscal year 2011, Avnet appeared on this global list for the first time in its history. In addition, Avnet was previously named No. 108 on the 2012 Fortune 500 list of largest U.S. companies, and No. 1 on the 2012 Fortune’s World’s Most Admired Companies list in the Wholesaler: Electronics and Office Equipment category for the fourth year in a row.

“Avnet’s emergence onto the Fortune Global 500 list is a direct result of our team’s commitment to accelerating the success of our valued customer and supplier partners around the globe,” said Rick Hamada, CEO of Avnet, Inc. “This milestone ranking is a reflection of Avnet’s long-term strategy to leverage our global scale and scope into local benefits for our partners, while continuing to invest in profitable growth through both organic initiatives and value-creating acquisitions.”

Companies are ranked on the Fortune Global 500 by total revenues for their respective fiscal years.

Avnet

Avnet Announces A Tender Offer For Internix

Avnet, Inc. announced that, through a wholly-owned subsidiary, it has launched a tender offer bid for all outstanding shares of Internix, Inc. (Internix), a publicly traded company on the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE: 2657), substantially expanding its presence in the Japanese market. Established in 1970 by founder the late Yoshiharu Fujisawa, Internix is an electronics components distributor representing both Japanese and foreign suppliers serving primarily Japanese original equipment manufacturers. The tender offer has been unanimously approved by the board of directors of Internix and is expected to be completed by the end of August 2012.

“This acquisition is another step in our multiyear strategy to expand our business in the sizeable yet fragmented Japan distribution market,” commented Harley Feldberg, president, Avnet Electronics Marketing, Global. “The Internix business will add complementary suppliers and an experienced engineering design-in team focused on collaborating with partners to create design chain solutions that are the most suitable for a given application. These talented technical resources enhance the breadth of our design chain services offerings in the Japan market. The combination of the businesses will not only increase our scale and scope in country but also leverage Electronics Marketing’s global logistics capability as we can provide complete supply chain support to Japanese OEMs wherever their products are manufactured.”

With operations in Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, the People’s Republic of China and Thailand, Internix distributes active and passive components from leading suppliers including AKM, Cirrus Logic, Honeywell, Maxim, Microchip, Microsemi, RICOH and SMSC. With approximately 280 employees, most with engineering backgrounds, Internix provides sales, design, support and services to a wide range of OEM customers in Japan and their operations throughout the region. For the 12 months ended March 2012, Internix generated revenue of approximately US$260 million.

“This acquisition brings us new suppliers and services, as well as many significant new customers including virtually all the major Japanese electronic OEMs, thereby positioning us to accelerate profitable growth,” stated Tom McCartney, president and representative director, Avnet EM Holdings Japan. “By adding Internix’s strength for design chain services for technologies based on analog integrated circuits, analog/digital mixed signal integrated circuits, high speed interfaces and system power management, we can provide complete solutions for our customers, especially in the telecommunications and networking, image processing and energy management system segments. We will also enhance our competitive position, take advantage of cross-selling opportunities with existing customers and provide global customer support,” he added.

Completion of the tender offer requires 66.7% of Internix’s outstanding shares on a fully-diluted basis be tendered and not withdrawn. Avnet has already received commitments to accept the offer from Internix and its shareholders representing 16.75% of the issued shares. The acquisition, which is subject to customary regulatory approvals, is expected to be immediately accretive to earnings and supports Avnet’s return on capital goal of 12.5%.

For more information on Avnet, visit their website at www.avnet.com.

magirus group - data center

Avnet Agrees To Acquire Magirus Group

Avnet, Inc. announced that it has agreed to acquire the Magirus Group, a leading pan-European distributor of data center solutions and services. Magirus Group is a leading value-add distributor of software, systems and related services encompassing virtualization, storage management, cloud computing, security, intelligent networks and information life-cycle management services. Through its professional services portfolio and knowledge of the IT sector, Magirus Group enables business partners to take new technologies to market in eleven markets throughout Europe and the Middle East. The transaction, which is subject to normal regulatory approvals, is expected to close in October 2012.

Phil Gallagher, president of Avnet Technology Solutions, Global, commented, “The acquisition of Magirus will significantly enhance our competitive position in Europe and the Middle East by expanding our suite of solutions in high-growth technologies. Magirus increased its revenue 20 percent in calendar 2011, delivering powerful, flexible and cost-effective data center solutions from a breadth of suppliers, including Cisco, VMware and EMC. We welcome the knowledge and expertise of their talented management team and staff, who will allow us to further enhance the value we provide to our customers and suppliers.”

Founded in 1981, Magirus Group has 400 business and technical professionals that help over 4,500 resellers, system integrators and IT service providers develop and deploy IT infrastructure solutions that bring together traditional server, storage and network operations so that constantly changing business requirements can be supported more efficiently. Its services span demand generation, pre-sales, consultancy, training, certification, implementation as well as support from its pan-European, multi-lingual support center. Magirus generated revenue of approximately US$530 million in the 2011 calendar year, and will be integrated into Avnet Technology Solutions’ EMEA business.

Graeme Watt, president, Avnet Technology Solutions EMEA added, “Magirus is a high quality focused business and represents an excellent expansion to our current operations as it adds complementary product lines across the region while meaningfully increasing our scale in important markets including Germany and France. Magirus’ position with market-leading suppliers in high growth technologies will bolster our solutions practices and create significant cross-selling opportunities in the combined customer base. Its business model is a strong fit with our strategy to provide more value-add services, and the combined expertise of both organizations will enable us to accelerate the success of our customers and suppliers.”

This acquisition is expected to be immediately accretive to earnings and achieve Avnet’s return on capital goal of 12.5% within two years.

For more information on Avnet and Magirus Group, visit Avnet’s website at avnet.com and visit Magirus Group’s website magirus.com.

avnet - cio 100 award honoree

Avnet Selected By CIO Magazine As A CIO 100 Award Honoree

Global technology distributor Avnet, Inc. announced that it was named to the 2012 CIO 100, which is developed by IDG’s CIO magazine. The 25th annual award program recognizes organizations around the world that exemplify the highest level of operational and strategic excellence in information technology (IT). CIO selected Avnet as one of the recipients for this award based on the company’s development of a data storage management system, which significantly enhanced Avnet’s business continuity capabilities for its main North American data center.

“Like most large companies, the amount of data that Avnet needs to store is growing at a tremendous rate,” said Steve Phillips, senior vice president and CIO, Avnet, Inc. “Our IT team focused on developing a technology-based solution to meet our current data storage needs while allowing for future growth, which will only accelerate as we look to offer more ‘bring your own device’ options for employees. I commend the team on their ability to develop an innovative system that effectively addresses both our short- and long-term business needs.”

The data stored in Avnet’s data center more than quadrupled in the last two years. To manage this growth, Avnet’s IT team completely redesigned its North American data storage backup systems and processes to optimize operational performance. The new data storage management system leveraged a variety of technologies, including state-of-the-art robotics, virtual tape and de-duplication. As a result, Avnet significantly enhanced its business continuity capabilities; decreased the time to recovery in the event of a system failure; positioned itself to manage the rapid, long-term growth of business critical data; reduced the power consumption in its data center; and improved the productivity of its data center team.

“For 25 years now, the CIO 100 awards have honored the innovative use of technology to deliver genuine business value,” said Maryfran Johnson, editor-in-chief of CIO magazine & events. “Our 2012 winners are an outstanding example of the transformative power of IT to drive everything from revenue growth to competitive advantage.”

Executives from the winning companies will be recognized at the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards Ceremony, to be held Tuesday evening, August 21, 2012, at the Terranea Resort in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif. Complete coverage of the 2012 CIO 100 awards will be online at www.cio.com on August 1, 2012, and in the August 1, 2012, issue of CIO magazine.

For more information on Avnet and the CIO 100 Awards, visit Avnet’s website at avnet.com and CIO’s website at cio.com.

Avnet Softball Classic

Avnet Hosts 9th Annual 16-Inch Softball Classic April 21st

Valley families looking for fun in the sun while watching the biggest big ball softball tournament around or businesses looking for a team-building exercise should check Avnet’s 16-Inch Softball Classic.

In addition to action on the field, there will be live music, Chicago style hot dogs and activities for the kids.

On Saturday, April 21st, 32 teams, 16 co-ed and 16 men’s teams made up of valley businesses will compete in the 9th Annual Avnet 16-Inch  Softball Classic at Tempe Sportsplex. Beginning at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, the teams will be compete in this single elimination Chicago-style softball tournament in support of Swing Fore Kids and the Spark of Hope/JDRF Foundation.

Sponsored by Emerson and Insight, the event will also include clowns painting faces and making balloons for all the kids; door prizes and raffles; and winners of the co-ed and men’s division win D-Back’s Suites. Second-place winners get Don & Charlie’s Gift Certificates.

As the highlight of the tournament, Chicago Cubs Hall of Famer Ron Santo’s family will take to the field and play in the Celebrity Team against the CEO’s at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 21st. The celebrity team also includes Dan Bickley, Mike Jurecki and Mike Bauer, along with valley sports and TV personalities.

CEO’s and Presidents who were invited include; Doug Parker of US Airways, Brad Casper from Phoenix Suns, Phil Gallagher of Avnet, Todd Davis of Lifelock, Bryan Sperber from PIR, Vienna’s Jim Dencek, Steve Dow of Emerson, Gene Holmquist of Insight, Steve Zylstra, president of AZ Tech Council and columnist for AZ Business Magazine.

For more information on Avnet and the 16-Inch Softball Classic, visit Avnets’s website at avnet.com.

Jim Teter, Goodwill - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Jim Teter, Goodwill Industries of Central Arizona

Jim Teter, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries of Central Arizona, discusses how the economic bust has affected Goodwill, why they’ve seen an increase in donations, employment at Goodwill, its future and more.

Jim Teter

Title: President and CEO
Company: Goodwill Industries of Central Arizona


Why did you decide to move to a nonprofit after all your years of success in for-profit industries?

I’ve always had a lot of respect for Goodwill’s mission and Goodwill’s board of directors was looking for a little bit different direction as we continued to grow. They were looking for someone that had business experience because we operate Goodwill like a business, but they also wanted someone who had some nonprofit experience as well. I’ve been involved in nonprofits as a volunteer for over 25 years, but I’ve run larger business operations. I think the board of directors found that appealing. It’s given me a chance to use all my experience to help make a difference for Goodwill. At the end of the day, that’s what it’s about: helping Goodwill be all it can be as we grow and get bigger.

Has the economic bust been a boon for Goodwill?

Because of the nature of what Goodwill does, which is a thrift retail business, we tend to fare a lot better in difficult economic times than most businesses. Up until 2007, we were growing 20 to 22 percent a year. In the years during the recession we’re still growing at 11 or 12 percent a year and reaching thousands and thousands of people and helping serve them. So this has been an opportunity for us to introduce some new people to Goodwill because a lot of people are looking for the values that they find when they shop at Goodwill, so our customer counts are up and our revenues are up. Those are all good things.

Are you seeing a shift in donations?

What we’ve found is that people tend to hang on things a little bit longer. People are not donating quite as much as they did before the recession. But the good news is we have more people donating. Our donation counts are up about nine percent year over year. I think that’s because people know that we are going to get the most value out of their donations, and we help a lot of people prepare for and find work. That’s what we are all about: helping people find work.

How has the increased unemployment rate impacted Goodwill’s goal of putting people to work?

People that are coming in the career centers today are quite diverse in their backgrounds and their experiences. Generally speaking, we still have a lot of entry-level employees that are seeking jobs, but we get a little bit of everything these days. We have people that have college degrees, masters degrees, PhDs. What we offer them is, at no cost to them, a very convenient way to go build resumes, learn skills they didn’t have so they can move into a different industry. A lot of people are finding that attractive and taking advantage of that.

Where do you see Goodwill ten years from now?

We believe we can continue to grow and help more and more people. The only reason we want to be bigger is because we can reach out and serve more people, help more people prepare for and find jobs. I kind of wish we could put ourselves out of business, but I don’t think that’s going to happen. We will be the first thing that comes to mind when people ask, ‘Who can help someone with employment and job training? That’s Goodwill.’ That’s where we would like to be in the next five to ten years.

Vital Stats: Jim Teter

    • Joined Goodwill in 2008
    • Before Goodwill, was Chief Operating Officer of Calence, LLC in Tempe
    • Graduate of Texas Tech University with a bachelor of science degree in industrial engineering
    • Has more than 26 years of experience with high-profile corporations such as IBM and Avnet
    • Co-chaired South Texas United Way’s business campaigns, served on the Board of the American Heart Association, was an active member of the Corpus Christi Economic Development Corporation and served on the external executive committee for Texas A&I University (now part of the Texas A&M University System)
    • Actively supported Respite Care of San Antonio, Hacienda de los Angeles in Phoenix and Paiute Neighbor Association in Scottsdale
    • Member of the Association for Corporate Growth, Arizona Business Leadership, Phoenix Community Alliance, Organization for Non-Profit Executives and Greater Phoenix Leadership

Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

Don Cardon, Arizona Commerce Authority

Don Cardon: The Driving Force Behind The Arizona Commerce Authority

A political appointee with a successful track record in the private sector, Don Cardon has become the face of the new and innovating Arizona Commerce Authority. While Gov. Jan Brewer is chair of the public/private economic development agency and sports mogul Jerry Colangelo serves as co-chair, it is Cardon, as president and CEO, who has his hands on the reins.

Leaders who have gotten to know Cardon better during the process of creating the Arizona Commerce Authority say he keeps his cool at all times, in good days and bad, is respectful of all points of view, is thoughtful, and someone who projects an element of stability for the state of Arizona.

But even more importantly, according to Roy Vallee, outgoing chairman and CEO of Avnet, are Cardon’s financial skills.

“Not only does he have numeric literacy, (he also has an)  understanding of financing, how to pull deals together and how to interact with banks and other sources of capital,” Vallee says.

Cardon began his employment with state government in March 2009 as director of the Arizona Department of Housing, and just a couple of months later Brewer appointed him director of the Arizona Department of Commerce, predecessor of the ACA. Before joining the state, Cardon was president and CEO of Cardon Development Group, creating low-income workforce housing projects in Phoenix, Gilbert, Eloy and Winslow, and was the visionary behind the group that helped create CityScape, a mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix.

Cardon’s stated intention was to see the ACA through its formative stage until a permanent president and CEO could be brought onboard, enabling him to return to the more lucrative private sector. But as the ACA board of directors took shape, comprising the cream of Arizona’s business and community leaders, Cardon was urged by Brewer, Colangelo and board member Michael Manson to remain.

“We sat him down and said you can’t create vision and hope with no structure or follow through,” says Manson, co-founder/executive chairman of Motor Excellence in Flagstaff. “That’s the worst kind of leadership. He realized that was true. We identified him as one of the few people in the state who had the political connections, the Commerce Department background and the business connections to make this work.”

Manson, who has founded several other companies, including PETsMART, says Cardon brings enthusiasm, energy and integrity to the ACA.

“He’s eternally optimistic and politically sensitive,” Manson says. “It takes a unique person to be politically rooted, but business oriented, and to be able to handle all of the political and business entities and very strong personalities it requires. He is truly focused on doing the right things for this organization.”

Indeed, focus is a key word in Cardon’s vocabulary. In guiding the ACA, the focus is attracting and retaining businesses in science and technology, aerospace/defense, renewable energy, and small business/entrepreneurship. He once told an interviewer: “You can’t just kind of throw a line in water and say whatever fish comes along you’ll take, which isn’t to say we won’t respond to any other opportunities. But you have to know what you’re trying to go after.”

At the Commerce Department, economic development was “a shotgun approach,” Cardon says. It was an approach he intends to avoid.
“There was no focus within the department,” he says. “Because of the lack of focus, I don’t believe the Legislature has had a great deal of confidence in our efficiency, our ability to accomplish what we set out to do. It was an agency that has really lost touch with what it’s really supposed to be about.”

Another ACA board member, Mary Peters, president of a consulting group bearing her name, touts Cardon’s private-sector background.
“Don understands what it takes to attract and retain businesses in Arizona,” says Peters, whose resume includes stints as federal highway administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportation in President George W. Bush’s administration from 2006-2009, and director of the Arizona Department of Transportation from 1998 to 2001.

“He knows how to put projects together and how to manage,” Peters says. “That’s the value I see in Don and what he brings in the transition from the Commerce Department, having that continuity. Having spent most of my professional career in the public sector, it’s helpful for me to have someone with that private-sector experience to realize what businesses are looking for. I have a different perspective. I know very well the regulatory side of government. I know what it’s like to work through issues with government agencies so those issues aren’t barriers to companies that would like to come into Arizona.”

When Vallee of Avnet, also on the ACA board, heard about a move to encourage Cardon to accept the top ACA job, even after a search firm had been hired and specs of the job had been outlined, his instant reaction was, “That’s fantastic.”

The reasons: Cardon had a good track record at the Commerce Department and had been intimately involved in the creation of the Commerce Authority.

“He understands the history and the purpose of what we’re trying to accomplish,” Vallee says. “This was a brand new entity, and if we recruit someone who had not been involved in creating it, that person would flounder for a while trying to figure out what the job is all about.”

Because the ACA is a public/private partnership, having a CEO with experience and expertise in both areas is considered a huge benefit.

“He is better able to manage that environment very, very well — better than anyone with one viewpoint or the other,” Vallee says.

Vallee mentions Cardon’s core values, especially integrity.

“We all want someone in that role we can trust,” he says. “People are going to want to do business with someone they can trust, whether it’s investment coming from within state or from outside. As people get to know Don and develop that trust, it’s going to be beneficial to economic development.”

Vallee pauses and adds, “Don is a good man and a good executive, which makes him a really great fit for this job.”

[stextbox id="grey"]For more information about the Arizona Commerce Authority, visit www.azcommerce.com.[/stextbox]

Arizona Business Magazine September/October 2011

 

Small Business Leadership Academy: Understanding Corporate Procurement Practices (Part II)

Small Business Leadership Academy: Understanding Corp Procurement Practices (Part II)

Small Business Leadership Academy: Understanding Corporate Procurement Practices (Part II)

One company’s purchasing is another company’s marketing.

If small and mid-sized businesses can keep that in mind, they will have discovered one of the secrets of success for a supplier, according to Joseph Carter, the Avnet Professor of Supply Chain Management at the W. P. Carey School of Business and instructor for the procurement classes in the 2011 Small Business Leadership Academy. Carter, a leading academic in the supply chain field, is also a Certified Purchasing Manager (C.P.M.) and Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM), designations granted by the National Association of Purchasing Management.

“The eye-opener for these business owners is self-awareness,” Carter said. “They are beginning to understand the role they play in their customers’ supply base.”

And that’s when procurement meets marketing.

“The owners of small businesses are so wrapped up in surviving that they don’t have the time – or the personnel – to specialize,” Carter said. “As a result many feel that their companies are under-appreciated by their customers.”

A company like SRP wants value from all of its customers, but a purchasing manager may be managing hundreds of suppliers. “A company, because it’s a large company, is not going to understand the supplier’s business and the supplier’s potential for adding value as well as the supplier does,” Carter said. Understanding the buying process and how the purchasing groups at large companies think enables suppliers to figure out what and when to communicate.

Suppliers must show how they add value to their customers’ enterprises. Sometimes that means understanding who the customer is. “The procurement officer is not your final customer,” Carter says. “Your customer is the user.” So small business owners cannot just try to compete on price. When dealing with procurement officers, they must elaborate on the total value that their company brings to the table, including “what’s in it for the procurement officer.” Elaborating on why working with their company will be worth the additional work of changing vendors, adding a new vendor, and the inherent risk of working with a new vendor, will enable that procurement officer to make that difficult choice with confidence.

The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U. S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

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For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

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avnet nyse anniversary

Avnet, Inc. Unveils Sculpture For 50th Anniversary

Avnet, Inc., one of Phoenix’s largest publicly-held companies will unveil a new sculpture outside its global headquarters in Phoenix on Monday, February 7th at 3 p.m. This year will mark the companies’ 50th anniversary on the New York Stock Exchange. For Roy Vallee, Avnet’s chairman and chief executive officer, this means only good things for the company.Duncan Niederauer and Roy Vallee

“There are very few companies that ever reach a milestone of this magnitude, and it speaks volumes about how our employers and leadership team have been able to adapt, innovate and succeed in accelerating the success of Avnet and our stakeholders,” Vallee said.

Vallee will be one of a number of Avnet executives participating in the unveiling. Among the executives attending are Rick Hamada, Al Maag, Ray Sadowski, Harley Feldberg and Phil Gallagher. Dignitaries also scheduled to attend include NYSE Euronext chief operating officer Lawrence Liebowitz and the Arizona artist who designed the sculpture Lyle London.

A sculpture may be a common way to commemorate a significant milestone, but for Avnet there is more personal meaning behind this one. Lester Avnet, who led the company in the 1950s and 1960s, was a well-recognized patron of the arts. The new sculpture will not only be a symbol of business accomplishments but also of a rich, artistic history.

This heritage of the arts and Avnet’s employees and business partners, who have made Avnet a $20B+ leader in technology distribution, will be recognized at the sculpture unveiling.NYSE Bell Ringing

Avnet, Inc. is one of the largest distributors of electronic components, computer products and embedded technology serving customers in more than 70 countries worldwide.

“Driven by the proliferation of technology, profitable organic growth and strategic acquisitions — 115 since joining the NYSE — Avnet has grown rapidly while demonstrating financial sustainability over the last 50 years on the NYSE, and it is well positioned to continue to thrive as an industry leader,” Vallee said.

For more information about Avnet, visit www.avnet.com

Roy Vallee, Chairman & CEO of Avnet - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

CEO Series: Roy Vallee

Long-time member talks technology, dealing with global economic problems, adapting to the changing world of technology, and more.

Roy Vallee
Title: Chairman and CEO
Company: Avnet

How you would you assess the current state of your industry?
Things are going pretty well for technology. Calendar 2010 will be a very good year by historical standards for our electronics business and our IT business. And in 2011, I would say things are going to normalize and grow at the secular growth rate for the industries. For us that’s good news because secular growth is kind of 1-1/2 to 2 times overall economic growth, so things are pretty good in technology.

You had a great first quarter. What do you think that portends for the economy in 2011?
Well, I’m not 100 percent sure, of course, but I think a couple of things are clear. Technology is leading this recovery. We’re growing a lot faster than the overall economy, certainly certain segments of the economy. So, I’m very pleased about that. And I think it also does indicate that we are at least in the early stages of a macro-economic recovery, even if it’s a gradual one … and hopefully that cyclical recovery will continue through 2011 and beyond.

Could this improvement possibly be a blip?
I think from an IT spending perspective that the possibility of it being a blip is there, but let’s maybe define blip. … Corporate psychology is such that it’s ready to invest in IT projects after it’s done swapping out the old hardware. I would also like to point out, though, that a significant part of our business is electronic components and a portion of those find their way into a variety of consumer goods, and that part of our business is quite strong, as well. So it’s not just corporate spending that’s driving our growth.

How is Avnet dealing with the various Global economic problems?
We deal in a variety of markets. Some of them are actually quite exciting right now; obviously places like China, India, Brazil, other parts of Asia Pacific, parts of Eastern Europe. There are parts of our business growing very rapidly these days. So the way we deal with that is we gear up and try to support the market that is there. In the areas where the developed countries have been hard-hit by the economic downturn and credit crunch, we simply dial the resources down. … we basically size our business to the amount of opportunity that exists on a local level.

In December, Avnet celebrated 50 years on the New York Stock Exchange. What do you think that says about your company?
It says a lot of things. First and foremost, adaptability: there have been a lot of economic cycles, there’s been changes in technology, there’s been changes in our industry structure at the fundamental value proposition of distributors like Avnet; there’s been globalization. So, the company being (on the NYSE) 50 years says we’re highly adaptable as an organization. … I think another thing it speaks to … is what I would call financial conservatism or fiscal discipline. And I think the third thing … is the culture. We’ve got a culture that is very grounded in our core values.

    Vital Stats



  • Joined Avnet in 1977
  • Appointed president of Hamilton/Avnet Computer in 1989
  • Elected to Avnet’s board of directors in 1991
  • In July 1998, he was elected chairman of the board and chief executive officer
  • Named to the Twelfth District Economic Advisory Council for the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in 2010
  • Member of the Arizona Commerce Authority board of directors
  • Member of the boards of directors for Teradyne and Synopsys
  • Inductee of the CRN Industry Hall of Fame
  • Participates in Greater Phoenix Leadership

Arizona Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011