Tag Archives: banner desert medical center

pt

CORE Institute Opens 5th Physical Therapy Location

To support its growth and complement their orthopedic practice in the East Valley, The CORE Institute announced it has opened a new Physical Therapy location on the Banner Desert Medical Center campus at 1450 S. Dobson Rd. Suite A-302 in Mesa.

“The CORE Institute is excited to expand our physical therapy services to effectively serve our patient’s needs,” said Dan Neal, PT, MSPT, Vice President of Physical Therapy of The CORE Institute. “Expanding our physical therapy services will allow patients to receive a continuum of care from the clinic through the physical therapy, thus allowing us to track results and utilize best-in-class care to promote optimal outcomes for our patients.”

The CORE Institute has six clinic locations and five physical therapy locations across the Valley and accepts most insurance plans. Mesa Physical Therapy is open from 7 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. To make an appointment or for more information, call 1.866.974.2673 or visit www.thecoreinstitute.com.

Sun Health

Banner Desert Welcomes Neurosurgeon

Dr. Nevra King, a neurosurgeon, has joined Banner Desert Medical Center. King comes to Phoenix from the United States Air Force where she served as Director of Neurotrauma and staff neurosurgeon at Wilfred Hall Medical Center at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas.

Dr. King was born and raised in Turkey where she earned her medical degree from the University of Istanbul and completed a neurosurgical residency at the Bakirkoy Psychiatric and Neurological Diseases Hospital in Istanbul.

After coming to the United States, Dr. King completed a Neurosurgery Observership at Barrow Neurological Institute and a Neurosurgery Fellowship at the University of Arizona Medical Center. She would later complete her general surgery internship at Abington Memorial Hospital in Pennsylvania and a neurosurgery residency at the University of New Mexico Hospitals in Albuquerque. Dr. King specializes in brain and spinal trauma, brain tumors and spinal disease and degeneration.

“I am thrilled to be back in Arizona and to be a part of the team at Banner Desert,” King said. “I look forward to working with the staff and expanding my expertise in neurosurgical pathology including brain and spine diseases.

King served in the United States Air Force, received an “Outstanding Neurosurgery Award” and is a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons and American Medical Association. She also received the Most Compassionate Physician Award and Patient Choice Award.

Sun Health

Physician Joins Banner Desert Medical Center

Dr. Tristram Horton, a neurosurgeon, has joined the team at Banner Desert Medical Center as Director of Cerebrovascular and Endovascular Neurosurgery. Horton comes to Arizona from the University of Michigan, where he served in the Department of Neurosurgery as a clinical lecturer.

Dr. Horton is a neurovascular surgeon, capable of doing both open surgery and endovascular procedures. Dr. Horton is the only dual fellowship-trained physician in this specialty in the state. Dr. Horton treats patients with aneurysms, vascular malformations, ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke, as well as carotid artery disease. His practice includes treatment of both adult and pediatric patients.

Early in his career, Dr. Horton completed a neurosurgical residency and neuroendovascular surgery fellowship at Penn State University. He then completed a cerebrovascular fellowship at the University of Michigan.

“We are pleased to welcome Dr. Horton and his unique expertise to Banner Desert,” said Rob Gould, CEO of Banner Desert Medical Center. “Neurologists and neurosurgeons have been eager to join our team since he joined us to have the opportunity to work with him.”
Dr. Horton is a member of American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, AANS/CNS Joint Cerebrovascular Surgery Section and the National Neurotrauma Society.

becky-armendariz

Armendariz named PR director for Banner East Region

Rebecca Armendariz, 27, public relations specialist at Banner Health, has been named public relations director for Banner Arizona East Region, effective June 24. She will oversee the public relations efforts at the following Banner Health facilities: Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Behavioral Health Hospital, Banner Desert Medical Center, Banner Gateway Medical Center, Banner Goldfield Medical Center, Banner Heart Hospital, Banner Home Care and Hospice and Banner Ironwood Medical Center.

Rebecca Armendariz has served as a PR specialist at Banner Health since September 2008. She is also the vice president of the board of directors for Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona, where she has held a board position since November 2009. Prior to joining Banner Health, Armendariz was an account coordinator at a local PR agency.

Armendariz received a bachelor’s degree from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University in 2008.

healthcare

Banner Goldfield Medical Center will open on Friday

Banner Goldfield Medical Center (formerly Arizona Regional Medical Center) will open its doors for patient care at 7 a.m. on Friday, June 14.

The hospital has been temporarily closed for one month while Banner systems and practices were implemented. During that time, new technology and equipment was installed and hospital staff underwent training.

Banner Goldfield Medical Center, located on Ironwood and Southern roads in Apache Junction, Ariz., will provide state-of-the-art, patient-centered care to the communities of Apache Junction and Gold Canyon. The 30-bed hospital will offer an array of medical care, including: emergency services, intensive care, medical/surgical care, progressive care, surgery, imaging, pharmacy and lab.

Banner Goldfield is part of nonprofit Banner Health. Banner Health was recently recognized as a top health system in the nation by Truven Health Analytics. As a Banner Health facility, Banner Goldfield will uphold Banner’s standard of efficient and effective medical care.

The hospital will utilize electronic medical records to ensure the highest level of patient care management and recordkeeping. In addition, the highly skilled on-site care team will be paired with the latest medical technology to provide excellent patient care. Patients in the Intensive Care Unit will be monitored by the Banner iCare team, which provides 24-hour remote monitoring of patients by physicians and nurses via closed-circuit cameras and technology. Banner iCare staff will work hand-in-hand with physicians and nurses at Banner Goldfield to provide an added level of care for patients.

Banner Goldfield will work closely with Banner’s neighboring health facilities and specialty hospitals in the East Valley to meet the health care needs of each and every patient. Patients requiring advanced heart care will have access to Banner Heart Hospital, a center that consistently ranks among the top hospitals in the U.S. for heart care. Patients in need of pediatric care will have access to experts and an array of pediatric services at Cardon Children’s Medical Center. In addition, Banner Health offers specialized care to East Valley residents in the areas of cancer, high-risk obstetrics, orthopedics and weight loss on the campuses of Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Desert Medical Center, Banner Gateway Medical Center and Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Banner Goldfield Medical Center is located at 2050 W. Southern Ave. in Apache Junction, Ariz. For more information, visit www.BannerHealth.com/Goldfield or call 480-733-3300.

Elizabeth Reich - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Elizabeth Reich, Make-A-Wish Foundation Of Arizona

Elizabeth Reich, president and CEO of Make-A-Wish Foundation of Arizona, discusses how Make-A-Wish was founded, its challenges, how they make wishes happen and more.

Elizabeth Reich

Title: President and CEO
Company: Make-A-Wish Foundation of Arizona


What is something people don’t know about Make-A-Wish?

Most people don’t know that it was founded here in Arizona in 1980 after some DPS officers and a customs agent learned of a boy with leukemia whose one wish was to become a police officer. They decided to help make his dream happen. He got a uniform, was checked out on mini-motorcycle, and the experience was very meaningful to him. When he died, he was buried in the uniform and he was issued. After the officers saw the impact the wish had on the boy and his family, they said , ‘We should do this again,’ and it grew into what it is today. We have 62 chapters in the U.S. and we are in 35 countries worldwide. Make-A-Wish is Arizona’s gift to the world.

Video by Cory Bergquist

What has been your biggest challenge in this struggling economy?

We are 100 percent dependent on dollars from people and corporations to make our wishes come true and those dollars are fewer and farther between. People know that Make-A-Wish does great things, but sometimes they don’t see them as necessary things.

How do you show them that they are a necessity?

Fortunately, a 2010 study of more than 2,000 Make-A-Wish families and volunteers shows the impact of a wish beyond that moment — the impact on the family, the impact on the volunteers and the impact on that child through the rest of his or her life. Many of our Make-A-Wish children live to be adults. That wish experience has impact on their ability to recover from their illness. So as a result of the wish impact study, we can now say our wishes are not a ‘nice to have,’ they are a ‘need to have.’

What is your most rewarding moment at CEO of Make-A-Wish?

It’s always the most recent moment. There was a young lady who graduated early from high school and was No. 3 in her class. Originally, her wish was to go to Italy. But her wish changed. She said, ‘I want to focus on school. I want to focus on becoming a doctor.’ So her wish was for a laptop computer. Not only was her wish for a laptop granted, but she got an iPad, an iPod, and a desk to put the laptop on. She was so gracious and so thankful. It’s something that is going to enrich her life for years to come and it was her one true wish.

Are there common threads in the wishes?

Our wishes fall into four categories: I wish to be, I wish to go, I wish to have, or I wish to meet. But more and more, kids today are adding a fifth category: I wish to give. They use their wishes to give back. We are working with one girl whose wish is to have a national forum where she can talk about the importance of being a bone marrow donor. We are working with morning shows right now to arrange a platform for her so she can get her message out.

How do you make the wishes happen?

We have wonderful staff members called wish managers. They have to be part travel agent, part logistician, be multi-skilled, and have to work in concert with our volunteers. When you’re granting 251 wishes, like we did last year, you’re dealing with a lot of logistics and a lot of juggling. I like to say that we cry here every day. We cry for good things and we cry for bad things. But we know what we’re doing makes a difference for that child and for that family and that feels so good.

Vital Stats: Elizabeth Reich

    • Joined Make-A-Wish Foundation of Arizona in 2010
    • Graduated from Whittier College with a degree in political science
    • Previous jobs include vice president of advancement at Childhelp; CEO at VisionQuest 20/20; and vice president of development at Banner Health Foundation
    • From 1998-2003, was executive director of what is now called The Governor’s Office for Children, Youth and Families, consisting of the Governors’ Divisions for Women, Children, Prevention of Family Violence, Drug Policy, Volunteerism, Community Outreach and Character Education
    • Raised money to support Banner Desert Medical Center and Banner Children’s Hospital in Mesa. Led the first stages of a capital campaign, successfully obtaining several seven-figure gifts

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

 

Hospital Construction - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Please Do Not Disturb: Hospital Construction Zone

During hospital construction, constant planning and communication are top priorities for healthcare builders

The foremost focus in upgrading or expanding a hospital is keeping the work concealed from the patients. So says Steve Whitworth, Kitchell’s Healthcare Division manager, about hospital construction.

It’s not like adding or enlarging a store in a retail center, which might force shoppers to step around a construction barrier for a few days or have the piped-in music occasionally punctuated by a floor sander.

“In a mall, people will be inconvenienced. In a hospital, a patient’s health is at stake,” Whitworth says. “In every single project we strive to be invisible. The ability to heal depends on the environment a patient is in. It‘s the only thing that matters at the end of the day.”

The dilemma is that hospitals, as much or more than other commercial real estate structures, need to continuously get bigger and better, he says.

“Planning, planning, planning,”  is the key to keeping healthcare facilities humming smoothly while making major renovations, says Jay Stallings, associate administrator at Banner Desert Medical Center, which unveiled a major emergency department makeover in August.

That mantra is echoed by other key players — from hospital administrators to construction engineers — who are continuously upgrading and expanding Arizona’s top hospitals to address medical care’s changing needs and technology advances while keeping the work virtually imperceptible to patients and staff.

Finding solutions

Banner Thunderbird Tower - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Unlike other types of commercial real estate overhauls or tenant improvements, healthcare property renovations come with a whole host of hurdles, from meeting infection control standards to keeping emergency entrances accessible.

The biggest hurdle — no down time.

“What makes a hospital unique, is that it’s a 24/7 facility. There’s never a good time to do the work,” says Sundt Construction’s Russ Korcuska, who has been piloting hospital construction projects in Arizona for two decades.

To maintain top-notch patient care, innovation and expansion is necessary, but upgrading existing facilities means you can’t turn off the power, the water or other utilities, you can’t block fire escape routes or ambulance entrances, you can’t let construction dust or other contaminants get in the air, and you can’t make a lot of noise or cause other disturbances that could impact patients or staff operations.

“If a surgeon is working on somebody’s brain, you can’t be creating vibrations on the other side of the wall,” Korcuska says. “It’s extremely challenging.”

That’s why planning an entire project and all possible contingencies to the tiniest detail before ever flipping a power switch is so critical, says DPR Construction’s Guy Sanders, who is just finishing up Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center’s three-story expansion of operating rooms and pre/post operative care areas.

Especially in renovating older hospitals where documentation of what’s in the ceiling and under the floor is not always complete or accurate, he says. “Knowledge of a campus is critical,” Sanders says. As is double-checking before digging.

During the Banner Good Samaritan project, he planned for alternative power sources to keep all ongoing operations running smoothly based on detailed building documentation. Still, during the planning process, he flipped a breaker and did a walk-through of the whole hospital to ensure the documentation was correct. It wasn’t.

Sanders found some equipment mislabeled and had to do some rewiring — and re-documenting.

Proper planning is crucial

Chris Jacobson of McCarthy Building Companies is just completing a major project at Banner Thunderbird Medical Center. He added a new six-story tower and emergency department expansion in the spot where the old ambulance entrance stood, and then renovated all the newly vacated space after 25 departments relocated to the tower. The project is slated to wrap in January.

It has been a five-year, multi-phased project, with planning for every phase starting almost a year in advance, he says.

Jacobson and his crew had to design everything from infection, noise and dust control to fire exits — and figure out how to get workers and materials in and out of the construction sites without bringing them through the hospital. They plotted everything, “even down to which tools to use.”

“You have to get creative about how to get the work done without coming in with a wrecking ball,” he says.

The biggest challenge was how to keep the existing emergency department functioning while “de-constructing” the old ER entrance. Jacobson says the solution devised in the planning process — building a covered bridge from a new temporary ambulance entry a short distance from the construction site — was key to McCarthy landing the job.

“It was a big challenge that nobody had figured out,” he says.

And that wasn’t the only temporary structure the construction experts had to design and build before even starting the main event. They crafted fire-rated, sound-insulated  temporary walls, new directional signage,  and a complete hospital kitchen in a trailer.

They even planned and built a temporary super-structure that looked like a massive, free-standing fire escape outside the hospital tower to get workers and materials to upper floors without ever opening a hospital door.

McCarthy used a similar technique for building out Yuma Regional Medical Center’s upper floors, which were pegged for expansion space when the hospital was first built. The engineers planned and built an outdoor elevator and trash chute to keep patients and staff below from commingling with construction workers or debris on indoor elevators.

At Banner Good Samaritan, DPR had to excavate an area between the central power plant and the new expansion. Before bringing in the backhoe, Sanders employed a “vacuum” truck to suck up some of the dirt and expose the utilities.

Among the most interesting planning tools McCarthy engineers use are laser scans of a hospital’s ceilings and floors to find exactly where all the pipes, wires and ducts are located, and 3D modeling software to virtually tuck new utilities amongst the old.

“The old way was you had guys with flashlights and measuring tapes,” Jacobson says.

Sometimes engineers have to detour planned utility upgrades to avoid a virtual collision. That’s much better than having workers face a real utility roadblock and have to rethink routes in the middle of a messy construction site, he says.

If planning is atop the experts’ priority list for minimizing patient disruption during construction, keeping everybody in the loop scores a close second place.

A critical component of both planning and construction stages of any healthcare project is communication with all the stakeholders, says Stallings, whose new triple-sized, state-of-the-art emergency department took seven years from drawing board to debut.

Stallings says involving every hospital department touched by the project from start to finish made the process as painless as possible for them and especially for patients.

“This was a collaborative project with physicians, staff, clinicians, infection control, environmental services,” he says. “All were impacted. We worked hand-in-hand with the architects and construction staff. We had weekly construction meetings, sometimes daily, with all who were impacted.”

“We provide an important service to the community. We couldn’t shut down the emergency department and continue to be a hospital,” Stallings says. “In the moment when somebody needs help, we have to be there. We take that very seriously. Our approach was  transparency (to patients), collaboration, a high level of communication and training.”

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2011