Tag Archives: banner good samaritan medical center

health.education

Record number of physician residents at Banner Good Sam

A historic number of doctors are being trained now for the future of medicine at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center. There are 291 doctors training in Banner Good Samaritan’s eight medical residency and nine fellowship programs for the 2014-2015 academic training year as part of the hospital’s Graduate Medical Education (GME) program which is accredited by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education.

“Training these physicians is an important investment in the quality health care for all Arizonans,” said Steve Narang, MD, Chief Executive Officer at Banner Good Samaritan. “Doctors are more inclined to practice medicine near to where they trained, so we’re obviously very pleased by the number of physicians who are training at Banner Good Samaritan.”

The GME program at Banner Good Samaritan is affiliated with the University of Arizona College of Medicine (UA-COM) and has been training physicians over the past 60 years. Recently, Banner and the University of Arizona Health Network (UAHN) in Tucson signed a Principles of Agreement document that is anticipated to lead to UAHN joining Banner Health and a 30 year affiliation commitment from Banner Health to support the UA-COMs in Tucson and Phoenix.

This affiliation will include the operation of academic medical centers connected to the COMs in both cities. Banner Good Samaritan will be established as the academic medical center in Phoenix, and UAHN – University and South campuses will continue serving in that role for the COM in Tucson. Third and Fourth year COM students in Tucson and Phoenix will rotate into clinical areas in Banner Health affiliated academic medical centers.

Much like the evolution of health care, the advancements in medical education are astounding, Narang said, adding that thanks to technology, today’s physician residents and fellows have a wealth of health information and training resources at their fingertips. From smartphones to simulation education, the digital age has transformed medical teaching, he added.

“While technology has most certainly changed the ways in which residents are taught, the core principles, values and standards that define academic medicine at Banner Good Samaritan remain constant,” Narang said. “Banner Good Samaritan’s superior teaching stems from the commitment by physician educators to the highest standards of patient safety and quality throughout the teaching process.”

Following is the list of Residency and Fellowship programs at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center:

Residency Programs:
· Family Medicine
· Internal Medicine
· Internal Medicine/Pediatrics
· Obstetrics & Gynecology
· Oral Maxillofacial Surgery
· Orthopedic Surgery
· Psychiatry
· Surgery

Fellowship Programs:
· Cardiology
· Interventional Cardiology
· Structural Cardiology
· Endocrinology
· Gastroenterology
· Geriatric Medicine
· Medical Toxicology
· Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine
· Sports Medicine

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Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics Expands

Integration, collaboration and education are hallmarks of the Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics, a co-management partnership linking The CORE Institute and Banner Health. Recently, the relationship between the two healthcare leaders was strengthened with the expansion of Banner CORE Center to Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona.

One of the state’s oldest and most well-regarded academic teaching hospitals, Banner Good Samaritan, has spent more than six decades teaching and training the doctors of tomorrow. The partnership with The CORE Institute enhances the hospital’s scope of orthopedic services, including expanded orthopedic residency and fellowship training programs and a more robust framework for orthopedic trauma care.

“We’re building upon Banner Good Samaritan’s reputation as a provider of superior medical education and Level 1 trauma care by creating a more comprehensive program capable of managing even the most complex orthopedic cases,” said David Jacofsky, MD, Chairman and CEO of The CORE Institute. “At Banner Good Samaritan, the Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics model will focus on complete musculoskeletal health with sub-specialty programs for everything from spine, hand, and foot and ankle care, to sports medicine, joint replacement and trauma.”

Expansion to Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, which began with orthopedic trauma coverage in October followed by the launch of elective procedures in February, comes on the heels of the successful implementation of Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics at four other Banner Health facilities across metropolitan Phoenix: Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center in Sun City West, Banner Thunderbird Medical Center in Glendale, Banner Estrella Medical Center in West Phoenix, and Banner Desert Medical Center in Mesa.

DeLyle Manwaring, Senior Vice President of Hospital Service Line Integration for The CORE Institute, highlights improved quality of care, better outcomes and enhanced patient experience as key benefits of the Banner CORE Center collaborative model. According to Manwaring, this manner of bringing together physicians and hospital leaders with a shared objective of improving patient care, outcomes and overall volume does not exist elsewhere in the Phoenix market.

“We’re providing cutting-edge care via an innovative model based on the highest level of collaboration,” he said. “Other healthcare organizations across the country are watching what we’re doing, and they have expressed interest in replicating the model being implemented at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center.”

Being at the forefront of innovation, both in practice and principle, isn’t new to either The CORE Institute or Banner Health. The organizations’ willingness to innovate, push boundaries, explore all options, restructure when and where necessary, and settle for nothing less than the absolute best has earned much deserved distinction in their respective fields. Their collaboration sets a new standard for orthopedic care in Arizona and beyond.

“Given the hospital’s scope of services and position as a teaching hospital, the co-management model for musculoskeletal health at Banner Good Samaritan requires some restructuring in both orthopedic care and education,” noted Jacofsky. “This will touch multiple aspects of the hospital, but the end result will solidify a reputation as a world-class teaching hospital.” Patients often turn to the very hospitals in which physicians train.

“Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center has a long-standing reputation of being the place where the sickest patients from across the region come for care,” commented Steve Narang, MD, CEO of Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center. “This isn’t just a coincidence.”

Indeed, Banner Good Samaritan’s position as a destination medical center is the well-deserved product of a commitment to medical excellence. Banner Good Samaritan invested more than $40 million last year alone in physician residency programs spanning 17 clinical specialties, including orthopedics. Jacofsky says the Banner CORE Center partnership will enhance orthopedic training by giving residents and orthopedic fellows greater access to highly trained specialty teams, including those dedicated to trauma care at the Good Samaritan facility.

“Orthopedic trauma cases at Banner Good Samaritan have tripled in just the first 90 days of this venture,” noted Jacofsky. “Numbers don’t lie. There’s a reason more people are coming to this hospital.”

Creating top-notch teaching programs attracts the best and brightest physicians, nurses, therapists, pharmacists and others who are committed to delivering excellent care, conducting medical research and advancing the field of medicine.

“Our partnership with The CORE Institute is an investment that will ultimately shape the entire service line and distinguish Banner Good Samaritan as a leader in orthopedics,” said Narang. “As such, we will continue to attract leading orthopedic specialists and, in turn, patients who want the best possible care.”

The inevitable result of integrating clinical care teams, enhancing medical education, investing in the tools and technologies to deliver leading-edge care, and centering the entire orthopedic service line on evidence-based protocols is an unmatched, highly-coordinated care experience.

While still in its infancy, the co-management model at Banner Good Samaritan has resulted in enhanced orthopedic education, expanded capabilities, an influx in physicians on staff and a new framework for educating patients.

Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics treats injuries and disorders affecting the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, tendons and cartilage. From total and partial joint replacements, to sports injuries, congenital conditions, arthritic and degenerative disorders, fractures and spine conditions, Banner CORE Center has the experience and expertise to treat virtually any orthopedic injury or ailment.

stem.cell

TGen-led study finds link to Parkinson’s disease

The absence of a protein called SMG1 could be a contributing factor in the development of Parkinson’s disease and other related neurological disorders, according to a study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The study screened 711 human kinases (key regulators of cellular functions) and 206 phosphatases (key regulators of metabolic processes) to determine which might have the greatest relationship to the aggregation of a protein known as alpha-synuclein, which has been previously implicated in Parkinson’s disease. Previous studies have shown that hyperphosphorylation of the α-synuclein protein on serine 129 is related to this aggregation.

“Identifying the kinases and phosphates that regulate this critical phosphorylation event may ultimately prove beneficial in the development of new drugs that could prevent synuclein dysfunction and toxicity in Parkinson’s disease and other synucleinopathies,” said Dr. Travis Dunckley, a TGen Assistant Professor and senior author of the study.

Synucleinopathies are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by aggregates of α-synuclein protein. They include Parkinson’s, various forms of dementia and multiple systems atrophy (MSA).

The study — SMG1 Identified as a Regulator of Parkinson’s disease-associated alpha-Synuclein Through siRNA Screening — was published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

By using the latest in genomic technologies, Dr. Dunckley and collaborators found that expression of the protein SMG1 was “significantly reduced” in tissue samples of patients with Parkinson’s and dementia.

“These results suggest that reduced SMG1 expression may be a contributor to α-synuclein pathology in these diseases,” Dr. Dunckley said.

TGen collaborators in this study included researchers from Banner Sun Health Institute and Mayo Clinic Scottsdale.

Tissue samples were provided by the Banner Brain and Body Donation Program. The study was funded by the Arizona Parkinson’s Disease Consortium, which includes Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Sun Health Research Institute, Barrow Neurologic Institute, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Arizona State University, and TGen.

The study is available at: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077711.

Narang Headshot

Narang named CEO of Banner Good Samaritan

Steve Narang, MD, chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, Ariz., has been named chief executive officer at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, effective April 26. He will assume the role from current CEO Larry Volkmar, who will continue to serve as CEO until April 25.

Banner Health Arizona West Region President Kathy Bollinger said Dr. Narang will have the opportunity over the next several weeks to work closely with Volkmar to ensure a smooth hand-off of responsibilities. “The collaboration between these two Banner leaders will ensure a smooth transition,” she said.

Dr. Narang, a pediatric physician, has served as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s since June 2011. Prior to coming to Banner Health, Dr. Narang served in a variety of medical director and teaching positions in Louisiana, including medical director of graduate medical education and medical director of pediatric emergency services at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

“I’m looking forward to working with an outstanding team at Banner Good Samaritan,” said Dr. Narang. “We will work together to take its distinguished history of excellent clinical care, teaching and research and create a distinct value proposition around the delivery of high-value and innovative academic medicine in one of the country’s highest performing health systems.”

Bollinger said that Dr. Narang distinguished himself during the interview process as a visionary leader that is highly driven to deliver results. She said Dr. Narang’s impressive relationship-building strengths will be focused on engaging employees, physicians and the community around the excellence that is the foundation of Banner Good Samaritan’s 100-year legacy. “These strengths, combined with Steve’s background as a practicing physician, will be particularly effective in Steve’s engagement with the graduate medical education program,” she said.

Bollinger said it makes her especially proud that Dr. Narang’s selection reflects Banner’s commitment to internal opportunities for growth, development and promotion.
“In his experience as a physician, teacher, medical director and, most recently, as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center, Dr. Narang has amply demonstrated leadership attributes that are critical to Banner’s future as a leading health system in the nation,” she said. “The future is indeed very bright.”

Dr. Narang received his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and completed his pediatrics residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He has a master’s degree in health care management from Harvard University in Boston.

Cardiac care - AZ Business Magazine April 2008

Banner Good Samaritan Recognized for Heart Program

Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center has been named to the Becker’s Hospital Review list of “100 Hospitals With Great Heart Programs,” recognizing outstanding hospitals and cardiology programs in the United States.

Hospitals on the list were chosen for their excellence in heart care and research based on clinical accolades, recognition for quality care and contributions to the fields of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery. The Cavanagh Heart Center at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center continues to be recognized as a leading provider of cardiac services and vascular research. The center offers complete diagnosis, treatment and educational services, focusing on highly specialized surgical and minimally invasive heart care treatment, intensive care, telemetry, cardiac rehabilitation and cardiovascular research.

“It’s the hard work of our physicians, nurses and technicians that has earned us this honor,” said Larry Volkmar, chief executive officer of Banner Good Samaritan. “Our facility is dedicated to providing world-class heart care to the Valley through our in-facility and home care services.”

Surgeons at the heart center were some of the first in the nation to implant the left ventricular assist device to treat heart failure in patients not eligible for heart transplants. The hospital’s surgeons are also the only physicians in Phoenix who perform pulmonary artery endarterectomy to treat clot formation in the pulmonary artery. Additionally, heart and vascular researchers at Cavanagh have helped innovate several new technologies, including an implantable device that monitors the heart and alerts patients when a heart attack may be imminent — even with no symptoms. The center is also one of the few hospitals in Arizona to offer a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) program for people suffering from severe aortic stenosis.

Heart disease remains the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Banner Good Samaritan and other hospitals on the Becker’s Hospital Review are working to combat this statistic through innovative clinical research, high-quality care and state-of-the-art treatments. These hospitals have also extended their services beyond the confines of their facilities by educating their local communities about heart health, helping sharpen our country’s focus on preventive care and population health.

RED Awards 2012 - Banner Health

RED Awards 2012: Developer of the Year, Banner Health

On March 1, AZRE hosted the 7th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2011 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and a record 116 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. This year, the winner for Developer of the Year was Banner Health.


Developer of the Year

Banner Health

Honorable Mention for Best Healthcare Project: Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

Banner HealthBanner Health continued its strategic investment in healthcare during 2011 spending hundreds of millions of dollars to ensure the healthcare needs of Arizona residents are met. In September, Banner Health opened phase one of its signature $109M Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center on the Banner Gateway campus in Gilbert. This 130,000 SF facility ushered in a new era of cancer care in Arizona.

In 2011, Banner Health also:

  • Began construction in Maricopa on the 80,000 SF Banner Medical Center, a public/private partnership with the city, creating $130M in economic impact over the next decade.
  • Expanded its pediatric unit at Banner Thunderbird adding 16 beds. The $1.5M expansion is part of a $290M campus expansion project that has added nearly 200 beds.
  • Opened a 100,000 SF, $21M new emergency department at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa with 103 patient spaces.
  • Began a $71M, 136,000 SF million expansion of Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center’s Surgical Services department.

bannerhealth.com


Video by Cory Bergquist


RED Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Banner Good Samaritan

Banner Good Samaritan Earns Top Ranking For Kidney Transplant Centers

The National Institutes of Health funded a study by a Web-based service, called Konnectology which has identified the top 10 kidney transplant centers in the United States, and at the top of their list is Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center.  All 246 kidney transplant centers in the United States were assessed using publicly reported data from the transplant centers and Medicare.

“We, at Banner Good Sam are very proud of this most recent accolade for our Transplant Center,” said Lauren Rutledge, Director of Banner Good Samaritan Organ Transplantation Center. “Our goal is to treat every patient dignity, respect, and excellent patient care.”

Banner Good Samaritan is Arizona’s oldest and most experienced transplant center. The first kidney transplant in Arizona was performed at the hospital on Violet Lopez in 1969.  There have been almost 3,200 kidney transplants performed at Banner Good Samaritan in the years following.

Konnectology found wide variations in patient outcomes among transplant centers. While the average survival rate for three years after transplant is high at 90 percent, survival varies widely depending on the center. The new method reveals that the risk of death is three times higher at the worst center compared to the best. A highly accurate scientific method was used to assess the transplant centers based on patient outcomes, experience and wait times.

Patients are referred to the Banner Good Samaritan Transplant Center from all over the western United States and are cared for by a skilled team of transplant surgeons and an interdisciplinary team dedicated to providing the best care available to patients requiring a transplant. The team provides an integrated approach to care that helps patients and their families before, during and after the transplant. This includes the highest standards of hospital and outpatient medical care, combined with a comprehensive network of support led by transplant nursing coordinators and social workers.

For more information about Banner Good Samaritan, visit bannerhealth.com.

Arizona Ambulance - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Life-Saving Trauma Units Take Hours Of Hard Work And Planning

When Disaster Strikes

The mass shooting in Tucson on Jan. 8 that left six people dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Tucson) and 12 others wounded outside a Safeway grocery store dramatically demonstrated the responsiveness of our state’s emergency trauma system. The fact that Giffords and the other victims were transported within minutes to University Medical Center (UMC), one of Arizona’s eight Level I trauma centers, and other Tucson hospitals, is a testament to the importance and value of emergency preparedness.

UMC was well prepared to transition from a quiet Saturday morning with zero patients in its trauma center to a sudden influx of critically injured patients with life-threatening injuries. Open communication between first responders and the UMC trauma center was crucial and enabled the trauma team to mobilize prior to patients arriving by air and ground transport.

Thanks to effective interaction between the first responding law enforcement officers, EMS and trauma center staff, the gunshot victims were given high-level care at the scene and during transport. According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for Arizonans ages one to 44. In 2009, Arizona’s Level I trauma centers treated 23,290 patients.

Arizona’s Level I trauma centers are located in Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Flagstaff Medical Center, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn and UMC. All eight of Arizona’s designated Level I trauma centers are in populated areas, yet serve the entire state.

Medical experts often cite the importance of transporting victims of traumatic injury to a trauma center within the “golden hour,” or the first 60 minutes after an injury has been sustained, to improve their chances of survival. It is during this most critical time that a life can be saved if specialized medical care is administered.

Due to Arizona’s geographical expanse, trauma centers and first responders must work together to ensure quality care is available as quickly as possible for all residents. This does not happen by chance, and depends largely on the tremendous behind-the-scenes efforts involved in emergency preparedness planning meetings and training classes.

Level I trauma centers like UMC have earned their distinguished designation by meeting stringent requirements, including specialty physician staffing, clinical capabilities, as well as research and community education. Level I trauma centers are required to be staffed around the clock by surgeons, anesthesiologists, physician specialists and trauma nurses. Their commitment to caring extends well beyond the walls of their individual trauma centers to serve the entire state.

Laurie Liles is president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare
 Association, www.azhha.org.

Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Good Samaritan Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Health Care Industry Has Flourished From Cottages To World-Class Facilities

A Century of Care

From cottages to world-class facilities, Arizona’s health care industry has flourished

Mayo Clinic Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 In the nearly 100 years since Arizona became a state, the health care sector has become a powerful economic force.

According to a study by Arizona State University’s L. William Seidman Research Institute, Arizona’s hospital community alone employs more than 80,000 people and contributes $11.5 billion to the gross state product. Indirectly, hospitals create about 120,000 additional jobs, more than the combined populations of Coconino, Graham and Santa Cruz counties.

Sisters of Mercy

It all started some 17 years before statehood in January 1895, when the Sisters of Mercy had collected enough money to rent a six-bedroom cottage at Fourth and Polk streets in Downtown Phoenix. Each room was equipped with two beds for TB patients, and thus was born St. Joseph’s Sanitarium, predecessor of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and the first hospital in Phoenix. Downtown Phoenix 1900s - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

In the mid-1940s, the nuns purchased 10 acres at Third Avenue and Thomas Road, which was part of an old dairy farm. Today, St. Joseph’s is a 670-bed, not-for-profit hospital that is one of the cornerstones of the state’s health care industry.

A second giant in health care, Good Samaritan Hospital of Phoenix, launched its first facility in an apartment building at Third Street near Van Buren in 1911. Initially incorporated as the Arizona Deaconess Hospital and Home, it opened with 15 beds.

One-hundred years later, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Downtown Phoenix is the flagship of Banner Health, with more than 662 licensed patient care beds. Banner Good Samaritan employs more than 4,200 health care professionals and support staff. Nearly 1,700 physicians representing more than 50 specialties work with Banner Good Samaritan staff to care for more than 43,000 inpatients a year.

Another early entry in the health care scene was the State Asylum for the Insane, which was rebuilt after a fire in 1911. In 1924, the asylum was informally renamed Arizona State Hospital.

Established in 1943 as a community hospital, Tucson Medical Center is among the 300 largest hospitals in the country. It is licensed for 650 adult and skilled nursing beds, and serves more than 30,000 inpatients and 122,000 outpatients a year.

St. Luke Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011In 1971, University Medical Center — a private, nonprofit hospital located at the Arizona Health Sciences Center adjacent to the University of Arizona in Tucson — was established. UMC is Arizona’s only academic medical center, and earlier this year it became an international focal point for neurosurgery and trauma care after a gunman shot and wounded U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) and killed six people.

In Northern Arizona, the Flagstaff Medical Center, a not-for-profit hospital, was founded in 1936. A part of the Northern Arizona Healthcare family, it has some 270 beds and its medical staff includes about 200 physicians. Among its specialties are cancer, heart and sports medicine.

Health care continues to be a concern on Indian reservations throughout Arizona, particularly in some of the remote regions. A relatively new program, the American Indian Research Center for Health is designed to improve the health status of Native Americans and increase the number of Native American scientists and health professionals engaged in research. Classes for the student-training component of the program are held at the University of Arizona.

Read more…

health care leadership awards - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

HCLA 2011- Institutional Or Education Program

Honoree: Home-Based Care Program, Cigna Medical Group

IHome-based Care Program, CIGNA Medical Group, 2011 Health Care Leadership Awardsn response to investigations concerning why some patients under a Medicare Advantage plan weren’t returning to their doctors, Cigna Medical Group established the Home-Based Care Program in 2004.

The program was created to assist these home-bound patients and to treat those who had recently experienced a severe health event and were about to face gaps in care.

The program has a team of physicians, physician assistants, registered nurses, practical nurses and social workers who visit patients in their homes to provide medical care. They monitor vital signs, provide treatment, review prescriptions, help patients take medications correctly, evaluate nutritional needs and coordinate with others to arrange community services.These interactions are recorded in an electronic health record and are shared with the patient’s primary care physician.

Patients in the program are maintaining, and in some cases improving, their health. There has been a 30 percent decrease in acute hospital admissions since the program began, due in large part to an improved ability to prevent life-threatening or severe changes in home-bound patients’ conditions.

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Mark Smith, System Director of Simulation/Innovation, Banner HealthFinalist: Mark Smith, M.D., System Director of Simulation/Innovation, Banner Health

In 2005, Dr. Mark Smith conceptualized and developed the first of Banner Health’s simulation centers at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center. He currently serves as the system director of simulation and innovation for Banner.

Banner Health, one of the nation’s largest not-for-profit health systems, hopes to reduce medical errors and improve patient care by using high-tech mannequins that help simulate a variety of medical conditions and emergencies in its educational training centers. In 2009, Banner opened a second medical simulation training center in Mesa with more than 70 mannequins and a full-size emergency department, intensive care unit, pediatric/neonatal ICU and operating room.

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Finalist: Water Watchers Program, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Water Watchers Program, Phoenix Children's HospitalArizona has the country’s second-highest number of child drownings. This devastating statistic is why the Injury Prevention Center at Phoenix Children’s Hospital created the Water Watchers program.
Water Watchers raises awareness about water safety, provides information about child drowning risks and teaches drowning prevention through a variety of outreach events throughout the year.

Water Watchers was co-founded by Druann Letter and Carol Achs, the mother and grandmother of Weston Letter, who drowned in 1998 at the age of three. The program has been recognized by the National Drowning Prevention Alliance, as well as the National Water Safety Congress.

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Surgeons working on a Haitian earthquake victim

Arizona Medical Centers Provide Opportunities For Doctors To Help In The Wake Of Haiti’s Disaster

When a massive earthquake struck Haiti on Jan. 12, the video images of the horrifying destruction moved millions around the world to tears. Here in the Valley, the news also moved many physicians to take action and head to Haiti. Four of those doctors making the journey were David Beyda, Grant Padley, Ara Feinstein and Jonathan Hodgson.

When each of these doctors felt the desire to travel to Haiti and help, the first thing they had to figure out was which group to travel and work with. For Beyda and Feinstein, the decision was easy. Beyda, a clinical care physician at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, also is medical director for Mission of Mercy, a nonprofit group that helps provide needy children in 22 countries, including Haiti, with physical and spiritual necessities. Beyda himself makes six-to-eight trips per year, and had just been to Haiti in November.

“When I heard about the earthquake, I assembled a team and we were there within four days,” he says.

Beyda and his team packed all of their own supplies, chartered a jet out of Miami with another organization and spent a week in the middle of Port-au-Prince working on trauma rescue and intervention. In that time, he estimates they helped more than 750 people.

Feinstein, who works in trauma surgery and critical care at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix, traveled to Haiti with the International Medical Surgical Response Team (IMSuRT), a group he’s been a member of for seven years. According to Feinstein, IMSuRT is the only federal disaster team with surgical capabilities. This was Feinstein’s first international deployment with the group, but he was well prepared.

“The team has several drills every year where we are required to set up the whole tent system and go through drills with the equipment,” he says. “We have to take a lot of courses and continue our education online.”

The IMSuRT team “showed up in Haiti as a full hospital,” Feinstein adds. Team members brought their own anesthesiologists, critical care nurses, equipment, food, water supply and all other necessities.

Hodgson, a neurologist at Gilbert Neurology, traveled to Haiti with a group from his church, which had done mission work in the Dominican Republic.

For Padley, an orthopedic surgeon with his own practice who also works at Banner Estrella Medical Center in Phoenix, the decision on which group to work with was not as obvious. He ended up joining a team from Orlando, Fla., that had a specific need for his specialty.

“Once I saw (the disaster) unfolding, there was a big pull on my heart to go down there,” he says. “There was an urgent need, they were in need of someone with my specialty, I volunteered and it just came together.”

Unlike the others, this was Padley’s first mission, but it was something he had always wanted to do.

“Some people in my group had gone on missions before, but they all said this wasn’t like any mission they had been on,” he adds.

Padley spent his time performing orthopedic surgery at Haiti Adventist Hospital, where he dealt with a lack of air conditioning and swarms of flies. The resilience of his patients earned his admiration.

“They still had hope,” he says. “They had gratitude for us being there. They put trust in us.”

Beyda notes that the most challenging parts of emergency relief work are the upsetting psychological effects and emotions for all involved.

“It’s a horrific place to be,” he says. “You go down there with an open mind knowing you’re going to see horrific things.”

Hodgson says it was sometimes hard to comprehend “the suffering and devastation,” but adds that he also witnessed miracles.

“Over that week I was there, my (young) patients started to become children again,” he says. “It was really neat to see that change.”

For Feinstein, the challenges were more practical.

“It is a huge transition from doing surgery here, where I have everything available to me at all times, to in an environment where the things I need to care for patients may not be readily available,” he says. “It required some improvisation. Some things were repurposed.

“Now when I have an obstacle, I realize it’s OK. We can do all right without that one special piece of equipment or high-tech stuff.”

Despite their considerable skills and talents, the devastation in Haiti left all four doctors humbled.

“It’s not about us,” Beyda says. “It’s about what we offer others, as servants to those who are seeking help. We do the best we can. It’s not about being a hero, it’s about being a servant and doing what you can do.”