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man looking at molecular structure model

Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Breaking New Ground

Arizona’s bioscience roadmap has helped guide the state into the future.

A political breakthrough, not a scientific one, may be the biggest spark for the Valley’s burgeoning bioscience industry.

“The bioscience industry is critical to our economic future,” says Greg Stanton, who took over as the new mayor of Phoenix in January. “While other industries have lost jobs during the recession, bioscience created them. I am proud to have been a leader in supporting bioscience industries. … As mayor, I will continue that leadership — building a diverse, robust economy with quality high-wage jobs for our future.”

In his inaugural remarks, Stanton said that his first priority as mayor is forming a new collaboration with Arizona State University, Mayo Clinic Hospital and others in the private sector to develop a major bioscience hub in northeast Phoenix.

The Desert Ridge Bioscience Technology Collaborative will be built around the 210-acre Mayo campus. The area Stanton hopes to develop into a bioscience hub is the area between 56th and 64th streets, Loop 101 and the Central Arizona Project canal. The mayor hopes to draw higher education institutions, research and development facilities, and technology-based businesses. “In over a decade of public service, Greg Stanton has always fought to support the bioscience industry,” says Robert S. Green, longtime Arizona bioscience advocate and past president of the Arizona BioIndustry Association. “His consistent leadership has been, and will continue to be, vitally important to the future economic growth of our state.”

The Desert Ridge Bioscience Technology Collaborative will be the second centralized bioscience hub for Phoenix. The city already has a bioscience high school, the University of Arizona’s Phoenix medical school, and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), which has spurred economic growth downtown. Stanton hopes to recreate the same success in northeast Phoenix, creating a second bioscience employment center for the city.

Stanton’s goals of bringing more high-wage jobs to Phoenix while building the city’s bioscience industry go hand in hand. Bioscience workers in Arizona earn an annual salary of $57,360, on average, compared with $42,090 for all private-sector employees, according to the Flinn Foundation. And average annual bioscience wages in Arizona have increased 47 percent since 2002.

The Desert Ridge Bioscience announcement also comes as the state enters the the final year of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap, a 10-year-plan to make the state’s bioscience sector globally competitive. Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap was launched in 2002 by a comprehensive study by Battelle, the U.S. leader in positioning regions to excel in technology and the sciences. Commissioned by the Flinn Foundation, the study concluded that Arizona possessed many of the essential elements needed to become a global leader in niche areas in the biosciences, but must strengthen its biomedical-research base and build a critical mass of bioscience firms and jobs.

The roadmap, led by a 75-member steering committee of statewide bioscience leaders, specifically aims to build research infrastructure, build a critical mass of bioscience firms, enhance the business environment for bioscience firms, and prepare a workforce of educated citizens.

Arizona Bioscience Timeline

The following is a timeline of significant events that happened in the bioscience industry in Arizona since 2001.

2001

• Flinn Foundation commits to 10 years of major funding (a minimum of $50 million) to advance Arizona’s bioscience sector.

2002

• Gov. Dee Hull appoints a task force to raise funds to attract the International Genomics Consortium (IGC) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

• Dr. Jeffrey Trent announces IGC’s move to Arizona and establishment of TGen, spurred by a $90 million package assembled from collaborating public and private sources.

• Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap, commissioned by the Flinn Foundation and drafted by Battelle, outlines recommendations for Arizona to become a national biosciences leader.

2003

• Gov. Janet Napolitano creates the Governor’s Council on Innovation and Technology to advance technology-related growth and economic development.

• TGen breaks ground on its downtown-Phoenix headquarters.

• The state Legislature approves $440 million for research-facility construction.

• Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee, piloted by former Phoenix Mayor Skip Rimsza, holds its inaugural meeting.

2004

• Gov. Janet Napolitano, UA President Peter Likins, ASU President Michael Crow, and Regent Gary Stuart sign memorandum of understanding to create the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, to include the UA College of Medicine-Phoenix in partnership with ASU.

• Maricopa County voters approve a bond issue that includes $100 million to expand bioscience and healthcare training for Maricopa County Colleges.

• Biodesign Institute’s first building, a $73 million, 170,000-square-foot facility, is dedicated.

2005

• TGen headquarters opens at the downtown Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

• Mayo Clinic opens a heart-transplantation program on its Scottsdale campus, becoming Maricopa County’s first hospital approved for performing heart transplants.

2006

• Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust commits $50 million to advance personalized medicine in Maricopa County.

• Arizona launches the Biozona brand to promote the state’s bioscience industry.

2007

• Cancer Treatment Centers of America selects Goodyear as the site for a 210,000-square-foot cancer hospital, the for-profi t company’s first hospital west of the Rocky Mountains.

• Classes begin for 24 students in the inaugural class of the UA College of Medicine-Phoenix in partnership with ASU.

• Bioscience High School opens. The specialty high school focuses on science education, in collaboration with downtown-Phoenix academic and scientifi c communities.

2008

• ASU’s SkySong opens in Scottsdale; mixed-use development houses ASU commercialization and tech-transfer programs plus local and international companies.

• Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl named “Legislator of the Year” for 2007-2008 by the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO), the nation’s largest biotech trade group.

• Gov. Janet Napolitano announces formation of the Arizona STEM Education Center to strengthen science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education.

2009

• TGen announces strategic alliance with Van Andel Research Institute of Grand Rapids, Mich. Jeffrey Trent assumes leadership of both institutions.

• Covance Inc. opens $175 million drug-development laboratory in Chandler. Facility may ultimately provide 2,000 high-wage jobs.

• A study of Arizona’s bioscience sector by Battelle finds that bio accounted for $12.5 billion in revenues in 2007 and more than 87,400 jobs.

• Chandler approves $5.7 million to establish bioscience- and high-tech-focused Innovations Technology Incubator.

2010

• VisionGate Inc., a Seattle medical-imaging company focused on early detection of cancer, announces that it is relocating its headquarters to the downtown Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

• Gov. Jan Brewer announces the creation of the Arizona Commerce Authority, a public-private partnership designed to attract firms in key growth areas, including the biosciences.

• The International Genomics Consortium secures $59 million in federal contracts to continue its role as the biospecimen core resource for the Cancer Genome Atlas Project.

2011

• Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon announces that Phoenix will be the headquarters for the nonprofit Institute for Advanced Health, founded by billionaire biotech entrepreneur Patrick Soon-Shiong.

• Phoenix Children’s Hospital opens its new 11-story, $588 million facility, accommodating

additional patients and new opportunity for recruitment of subspecialist researcher-physicians.

• An economic-impact report finds that for every $1 invested in Science Foundation Arizona by the state of Arizona, SFAz has returned $3.15 in investments from the private sector, venture capital, federal grants, and other sources.

• Chandler’s Innovations Technology Incubator, open a year, reached full capacity. Tenants include startup firms in the fields of biotechnology, bioinformatics, software design, nanotechnology, and medical devices.

2012

• Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says that his first priority as mayor is forming a new collaboration with Arizona State University, Mayo Clinic Hospital and others in the private sector to develop the Desert Ridge Bioscience Technology Collaborative in northeast Phoenix.

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

hcla-featured

2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Winners & Photos

David Lincoln and the Lincoln family earned Arizona Business Magazine’s first Lifetime Achievement Award to highlight the 5th annual, 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Thursday, March 8 at the Arizona Biltmore.

“Even though this is a lifetime award, I hope that I have a lot more life to live,” David Lincoln joked.

Thirteen other awards were presents to honorees, who heard keynote addresses from Dr. Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health and interim co-director at ASU’s Biodesign Institute; and Elizabeth Reich, President and CEO, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Arizona.

Congratulations to the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards finalists and winners!


View photos of the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards on our Facebook!


2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Winners:

Community Outreach: Ruth Rimmer, Director of Psycho/Social Research, Arizona Burn Center, Maricopa Integrated Health Systems

Institution or Educational Program: Arizona Institute for Breast Health

Insurance Provider or Executive: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Volunteer of the Year: Jean Reynolds, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Dentist of the Year: Tony S. Hashemian, DDS, A.T. Still University Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health

Nurse or Nursing Advocate: Dr. Anne McNamara, Grand Canyon University

Manager of the Year: Brain Shelley, Banner Del E. Webb

Hospital Executive of the Year: Rhonda Anderson, Cardon Children’s Medical Center

Hospital Administrator of the Year: Dr. Edgar Staren, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Researcher of the Year: Julie Robbins, Battelle

Healthcare Leadership Physician of the Year: Dr. Stephen Pophal, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Surgeon of the Year: Dr. David Jacofsky, The CORE Institute

Medical Center or Hospital: Thunderbird Medical Center

Lifetime Achievement Award: David Lincoln and the Lincoln Family


Photos of the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards reception and ceremony:

Photos: Cory Bergquist

[slickr-flickr tag="2012-hcla-reception" items="38" type="slideshow" id="77774765@N07"]


Presenting Sponsors:

CTCA Logo Quarles & Brady Logo
National Bank of Az Health Care Trust of America, Inc.

Event Sponsor:

Arizona Biltmore Resort

Dessert Sponsor:

Scan Health Plan Arizona

HCL Awards 2012 - Julie Robbins

HCL Awards 2012: Researcher, Julie Robbins


Researcher

Julie Robbins

Battelle

HCL Awards 2012 - Julie RobbinsJulie Robbins, who has been working in the healthcare industry for more than 25 years, is responsible for coordinating many Arizona research projects and educational seminars. In her position with Battelle, Robbins works as a research scientist, working closely with the Arizona Biomedical Research Consortium. Some of Robbins’ projects in 2011 included:

1. Arizona Public Cord Blood Banking Project. This project gave Arizona families the opportunity to store core blood in a public cord blood bank, which is the only one of its kind in Arizona. Participating hospitals include St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Maricopa Integrated Health System and Phoenix Baptist Hospital.

2. Arizona Virtual Bio-specimen Repository. This monumental project will allow researchers to share bio-specimens via a proprietary online platform. The repository will allow hospitals and researchers easier and faster access to critical bio-specimen samples. This pivotal project will keep Arizona on the forefront of biomedical research innovation.

3. Robbins has also created seminars to assist healthcare professionals in keeping their medical licenses current. The most recent seminar she put together was a two-day grant writing and research skills workshop.

battelle.org


Finalist

Dennis Crandall

Sonoran Spine Center

HCL Awards 2012 - Dennis CrandallIn 2000, Crandall founded the Sonoran Spine Research and education Foundation, a nonprofit organization that funds college scholarships for students with spinal deformities, spinal research projects, and educational seminars such as the annual Arizona Spine and Scoliosis Symposium and Fund Raiser for the National Scoliosis Association. Crandall has developed a new spinal instrumentation system that solves certain difficult spinal deformity problems which are not correctable with other technology. The challenge and gratification of alleviating pain and restoring function in patients with complex spinal disorders in what made Crandall choose his medical specialty.

sonoranspine.com


Finalist

Dr. Robert Kuske

Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists

HCL Awards 2012 - Robert KuskeKuske is the co-founder/medical director of Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists as well as its chief research officer. He and his partner founded ABCs in 2008 and have grown the practice into 50+ employees, three offices and seven practicing doctors in four short years. Today, he is co-principal investigator in the largest breast cancer radiation trial in history. His trial, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, is testing head-to-head six-week whole breast radiation versus five-day partial breast irradiation. Targeted to a randomized 4,300 women, Kuske is within a year of finishing the trial, and believes the results will cause a major shift in how breast cancer patients will be treated.

arizona-breast-cancer-specialists.com


HCL Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

GPEC - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

GPEC Leads Cooperative Effort To Draw More ‘Clean Tech’ Industry To Arizona

Insight into innovation: GPEC leads cooperative effort to draw more ‘clean tech’ industry to Arizona

Green technology is still a relatively small part of Arizona’s economy, but its potential for growth is a bright spot on the state’s horizon.

“At a time when other economic engines have been sputtering, anticipated green job growth among Arizona’s green economy firms is quite promising,” say authors of a report prepared for state economic development officials by The Council for Community and Economic Research. It is one of two recent reports that assesses the industry and its growth potential.

While there is no standard definition of “green tech” or “clean tech,” it has been described by Clean Edge, a clean-tech research firm, as “a diverse range of products, services, and processes that harness renewable materials and energy sources, dramatically reduce the use of natural resources, and cut or eliminate emissions and wastes.” So even defining “green tech” or “clean tech” can be difficult, The Council for Community and Economic Research acknowledges.

That is why the Greater Phoenix Economic Council ( GPEC ) is embarking on a 12- to 18-month study to better define Arizona’s clean tech sector, says its president and CEO Barry Broome.

It’s a big undertaking, Broome says, but an important one given the impact that clean tech, particularly renewable energy, will likely play in driving the state’s future economy.

In fact, Broome predicts that renewable energy — particularly solar energy companies and the extensive supply chains that grow up around them, as well as companies that produce energy-efficient technologies — will become major players in Arizona in the future.

“It’s going to be our biggest industry outside of healthcare,” he says. “In 10 years, 100 percent (of homes built in Arizona) will be solarized at some level.”

That economy includes not just traditional solar manufacturers, but also materials producers — companies that make smart meters, water-use monitors and biodegradable drywall, for example.

The numbers

Overall, Arizona was home to 30,716 green jobs in 2010, about 1.3 percent of total statewide employment, according to the research report, titled “Green Jobs in Arizona 2010.”

But it says green jobs were expected to grow at a healthy 8.6 percent clip in 2011, outpacing the projected rate of 0.7 percent for all other jobs.

A second report by Battelle, a non-profit research organization, parallels the assessment that the green economy in Arizona is still emerging, but can expect strong future growth, particularly in renewable energy, greenhouse gas reduction and energy-efficiency sectors.

One key factor in this growth is a state leadership that creates a business climate that promotes innovation, the report says.

Faces behind the numbers

If you want to put a name to those numbers, turn to Greg Armstrong, chief operation officer for Rioglass Solar, a Spanish company that makes tempered glass reflectors and is the primary manufacturer for Abengoa Solar, which is building a 280-megawat solar power plant near Gila Bend.

Rioglass placed its U.S. headquarters and manufacturing operation in Surprise and plans another $45 million in capital investments.

The company was considering sites in Denver, Albuquerque and even Mexico when it visited the Surprise location, Armstrong says. The method GPEC used to draw Rioglass Solar to Arizona is a good example of what the state needs to continue to do to lure renewable energy companies, he says.

GPEC organized a meeting on site, in a tent, that brought together all the principal players in the effort: state officials, Surprise representatives, utility employees and economic development officials.

That was a first for Rioglass, Armstrong says, and an indication of what came next:  Surprise waived some fees involved in the expensive process of siting the plant, invested in infrastructure upgrades and created an expedited permit package that enabled Rioglass to break ground in January and take occupancy by July.

For more information about GPEC, visit gpec.org.

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012