Tag Archives: bo calbert

Builders, WEB

Confidence Builds: Developers see aggressive optimism in marketplace

Investing in spec buildings may – or may not – be an anomaly in the marketplace. Dan Withers, president of D.L. Withers Construction says he’s seeing risk-taking entrepreneurs coming back into the market.
“It’s been difficult for people to assess the timing in this recession,” he says. “There is enough optimism out there that we are seeing projects starting.”
Kitchell Vice President Dick Crowley is less effusive but still optimistic.
“In our core markets, we’ve noticed limited appetite for our customers to build speculative projects,” he says. “Lenders are still holding on to more conservative underwriting strategies.”
“Developers are being cautious, but we’re seeing more activity,” echoes Bo Calbert, president of McCarthy Building Companies’ Southwest Division. “Some industries are being a little bolder than others, such as hospitality, higher education and renewable energy. We’re building three large hospitals, but most big healthcare projects seem to be in a holding pattern.”
On the design side of the market, Rebecca Timmer, a corporation relations representative for Dibble Engineering says a few companies have broken ground on large spec projects but not many.
“We’re seeing end users dictating the decision,” Timmer says. “If they find what they need in an existing building, it is cheaper to go that route.”
Michael Rauschenberger, DPR Construction corporate office leader for the Southwestern United States, has been asked to look at proposals for a number of large buildings, including office towers, over the past months.
“Maybe about half of those will be built, but even if it’s just half, add it to Hayden Ferry, State Farm, and the number of projects in the southeast Valley, and that’s a lot of big projects coming on the market,” he says.
Many builders kept afloat during the recession with smaller projects and tenant improvements. “By volume, they were a big part of the market,” says Timmer. “As things are improving, we’re starting to see increases in volume for projects of all sizes.”
McCarthy reports that its job order contracting business is busy. “We’ve expanded that division,” says Calbert. “It results in a significant incrase in the amount of work we can do for our longstanding and new clients on smaller projects. To make it work, we have to be efficient and bring personal expertise into the jobs.”
Withers agrees, “There is a definite upturn for small business expansion. The result is existing building expansion and infill of existing buildings. That fuels an overall expansion and optimism in the marketplace.”
Pulling out a proverbial crystal ball, Crowley says, “Kitchell is cautiously optimistic as we see the global and national economy improving. This will impact Arizona and lead to increased job creation. Arizona will be a top job growth market over the next five years.”
“The need has truly increased and, at this moment, it looks good out there,” forecasts Rauschenberger.
“I see continued optimism,” agrees Withers, adding, “Barring other negating factors like our Congress, and world politics and economics.”

BannerEstrellaMedicalCenter

Banner Estrella Hospital Awrded Top Safety Designation

The Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health (ADOSH) Consultation Department awarded McCarthy Building Companies with top safety designation, naming the $161M Banner Estrella Hospital Expansion a “STAR Site” through the state’s Construction Voluntary Protection Program “C-VPP.”  ADOSH representatives conducted an audit of safety and health management systems and practices at the six-story, 279,000 SF tower project, which will serve the west Valley. The expansion project, which is set to open to patients in March 2014, also contains additional obstetrical suites, additional neonatal intensive care unit capacity, new cardiac catheterization labs and a new endoscopy suite. The Banner Estrella Hospital tower expansion is currently the only hospital construction project in Arizona with a STAR approval.

VPP is the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) highest program of safety recognition across all United States OSHA organizations. It recognizes employers and workers in private and federal workplaces who have exemplified effective safety and health management systems to achieve injury and illness rates more than 50 percent below the national average.

“After a two-day audit of the McCarthy Banner Estrella Hospital expansion, which included McCarthy employees and more than 11 subcontractors on-site, we found that all members of the project were committed to a safe working environment,” said Jessie Atencio, assistant director and consultation and training program manager for ADOSH. “This is the second approved STAR site for McCarthy and we would like to congratulate them for a job well done.”

“The safety of our employees and construction crews is a top priority at McCarthy, and earning this designation on another major community project is an accomplishment for which we can all be proud,” said Bo Calbert, President of McCarthy Southwest Division. “Our safety professionals constantly evaluate and enhance safety practices on our job sites, allowing us to share and improve every project, and share best practices with our clients and improve construction safety across the industry,” he added.

To qualify for VPP status, employers must submit an application to OSHA and undergo an onsite evaluation by a team of safety and health professionals. VPP participants and sites earning the “STAR Site” designation are re-evaluated every three to five years in order to remain in the programs. VPP participants are exempt from OSHA programmed inspections while they maintain their VPP status.

BannerEstrellaMedicalCenter

Banner Estrella celebrates construction topping-off

Banner Estrella Medical Center, recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the Valley’s top 10 hospitals, celebrated a major construction milestone today with a topping-out ceremony for the $161 million new patient tower.

Construction of the six-story, 279,000-square-foot tower at Banner Estrella, located at 9201 W. Thomas Road in Phoenix, will deliver 178 additional private patient beds to serve the growing West Valley, bringing the total number of beds at Banner Estrella to 392 at build-out. The lower level through fourth floor will be completely built out, and the fifth and sixth floors will be shelled for future build-out as needed by the community. The new tower will also contain additional obstetrical suites, additional neonatal intensive care unit capacity, new cardiac catheterization labs and a new endoscopy suite. The second tower is anticipated to open to patients in March 2014.

“When we opened in 2005, we promised residents that we would grow our services to meet the growing health care needs of the community,” said Deb Krmpotic, chief executive officer of Banner Estrella. “This project demonstrates our commitment to that promise and to the community we are honored to serve.

“We believe this project will strengthen our position as the leading provider of care in the Southwest Valley by providing our community much-needed inpatient beds, maternity beds, surgical treatment capacity and emergency room capacity to care for both children and adults,” she added.

Banner Estrella’s new patient tower is the first hospital structure in metro Phoenix to be built using concrete since the early 1980s. Aside from being more cost-effective, using concrete enabled the tower expansion to be completed earlier than a steel structure. Concrete also provides structural advantages of dampening vibration and, with medical equipment becoming more sensitive to movement, concrete offers important advantages long-term.

“Topping-out of the growing campus is an important milestone to achieve, marking our progress towards the successful completion of the hospital’s campus expansion that will serve the west Valley community,” said Bo Calbert, president of McCarthy Building Companies’ Southwest Division. “Thanks to collaboration with our partners, the choice to use concrete for the tower structure provides for easily adapting to the community’s long-term health needs, and allowed us to fast-track the project in order to meet demands sooner.”

During the topping-out ceremony, the final beam, signed by Banner Estrella staff and members of the design and construction team, was placed atop the tower. A mesquite tree was also lifted atop the structure, which is a tradition of recognizing project milestones achieved without injury. The mesquite tree will later be planted on campus.

McCarthy - Bo Calbert - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

First Job: Bo Calbert, SW President McCarthy Building Companies

Bo Calbert, Southwest President McCarthy Building Companies, discusses his first job as a caddy and the things that helped him get to where he is today in the construction industry.


Bo Calbert

Title: Southwest President
Company: McCarthy Building Companies

What was your first job?
When I came home from the last day of sixth grade, my father said, “Son, it’s about time you got a job.” We lived right across the street from Hickory Hills Country Club in Springfield, Mo., which is where (deceased PGA star) Payne Stewart learned to golf and where his father was a big golfer. So I walked across the street and got a job as a caddy. It was tough. I’d get there at seven in the morning, had to sweep all the sidewalks to earn the privilege to caddy, and at the end of the day I had to pick up all the balls on the driving range.

What did you learn from that first job?
Working as a caddy at a country club was all about service and dependability, and developing relationships were important. If you didn’t build good relationships with people, they wouldn’t request you to be their caddy.

Describe your first job in your industry.
It was building a high-rise office building in Houston, and I was low man on the totem pole. I was the field engineer, doing all the layout. It was a concrete frame, and I was holding the dumb end of the tape. I got a battlefield promotion because the lead engineer hurt his back. I’d been out of school six weeks when I got that promotion.

What lesson did you learn in your first industry job that still helps you today?
If you’re willing to take responsibility and you’re not afraid to ask for the tough jobs, you will get a lot of recognition early.

What were your salaries in your first job and in your first industry job?
I got $1.60 an hour to shag balls and $3.50 to caddy for 18 holes. My first salary was $22,000 a year in the construction industry.

Who would you consider as your biggest mentor?
Chuck Thompson was the chairman of 3D International, a large engineering construction firm. He’s the one who got me my first interview with McCarthy, and he is the smartest, most talented individual I know. If you had to credit someone with the development of construction management as a process, Chuck would probably get the credit. He’s got a tremendous amount of integrity. In our business, people put a lot of trust in you when they hire you to build their project. You have to have the integrity to make all the right decisions.

What advice would you give to someone starting today in your industry?
What worked for me is that I volunteered for tough assignments that other people might not want to do. Taking on challenges and getting the reputation as someone who is not afraid to take on those challenges is a key thing that people should do early in their career.

For more information on McCarthy Building Companies, visit McCarthy’s website at mccarthy.com.

Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2012