Tag Archives: BOMA

San Tan Corporation

BOMA Greater Phoenix’s 2014 TOBY Award Winners

A Night at the TOBY Awards
BOMA’s annual The Outstanding Building of the Year (TOBY) awards were presented Nov. 14 at downtown Phoenix’s Renaissance Hotel. The following winners have a chance to compete at a regional level. Last year, the Arizona Game & Fish Department building, managed by Lincoln Property Company, won an international TOBY Award.


Category: 500KSF to 1MSF

Renaissance Square

Renaissance Square

Renaissance Square
2 and 40 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix
Owned by: Hines
Architect: Emery Roth & Sons
Managed by: Steve Hamel, Hines

In 2007, Hines, on behalf of the Hines U.S. Core Office Fund, L.P., acquired Renaissance Square, an iconic 965,508 SF, Class-A, two-building high-rise office complex. The official building of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee has an Energy Star rating of 80.
 
 
 
 
 
 


Category: Earth

24th at Camelback II

24th at Camelback II

24th at Camelback II
2324 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Owned by: 24th an Camelback Phase II, LLC
Architect: Pickard Chilton and Kendall/Heaton Associates, Inc.
Managed by: Michelle Brown, Hines

24th at Camelback II is the second phase of a mixed-use master development in Phoenix’s Camelback Corridor. The 306,877 SF, 11-story office building has an Energy Star rating of 92.

MAX at Kierland

MAX at Kierland

Max at Kierland
16220 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale, Ariz.
Owned by: ARTIS REIT
Architect:Keating Khang Architecture
Managed by: Maricela Nunez, CBRE

MAX at Kierland is a six-story, Class-A office building located in the Kierland master-planned community. Developed in 2008, this ±258,312 SF building became the first to be LEED certified in north Scottsdale and has an Energy Star rating of 98.
 
 
 
 


Category: Medical Office Building

McDowell Mountain Medical

McDowell Mountain Medical

McDowell Mountain Medical
9377 E. Bell Rd., Scottsdale, Ariz.
Owned by: HCP, Inc.
Architect: Evolution Design
Managed by: Robyn Warnica, CBRE

The recently renovated McDowell Mountain Medical Building is approximately 84,752 SF with three stories of medical office space. McDowell Mountain is Energy Star benchmarked and in the process of confirming requirements to become Energy Star Certified.


Category: Suburban Office Park, Low-rise

Gainey Center

Gainey Center

Gainey Center I
8601 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale, Ariz.
Owned by: Principal Real Estate Investors
Architect: Opus West Architects & Engineers
Managed by: Katherine Slater, Metro Commercial Properties

Gainey Center I is a three-story, Class-A office building with 140,756 SF of rentable space. The building, constructed in 1999 on 5.54 acres, has an Energy Star rating of 87.

San Tan Corporation

San Tan Corporation

San Tan Corporate Center I and II
3100 and 3200 W. Ray Rd., Chandler, Ariz.
Owned by: Wells REIT II – San Tan Corp. Center
Architect: DFD Architectural
Managed by: Claudia Gilbert, CBRE

San Tan Corporate Center I & II (STCCI & STCCII) consists of two Class-A, three-story office buildings. Both buildings are Energy Star certified with ratings of 91 and 95, respectively.

Industrial Summit Header

BOMA Greater Phoenix hosts inaugural industrial summit

The industrial market is hot, leading the way for both investment and development prospects in 2014 with expected prospects rising to almost the same level as the apartment sector last year.

BOMA International is partnering with BOMA/Greater Phoenix to present its first Industrial Summit on Nov. 5 at the Renaissance Hotel Downtown Phoenix, 50 E. Adams St.

Registrants can hear from leaders in the industrial sector including developers, owners, CEOs, property managers and brokers in this half-day program which kicks off with a networking breakfast. The event is 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. Panelists will cover:

  • Current development opportunities;

  • Market trends and drivers;

  • Property management trends and challenges;

  • Attracting new talent to this growing sector.

Panelists include Bob Hubbard, Vice President, Designated Broker, LBA Realty;
Tony Lydon, National Director Industrial, Supply Chain & Logistics, JLL;
Megan Creecy-Herman, Sr. Director, Liberty Property Trust and NAIOP 2014 Chairman; Mark Bowen, Vice President, Regional Director, DCT Industrial Trust;
Anna Riley, Regional Director of Management, Ryan Companies US; and
Gene Laramee, Director Asset Services, CBRE.

For more information: www.BOMAPhoenix.org.

Event registration.

 

Mark Covington, Exec QA, WEB

Leasing the sun

Mark Covington Executive Director Building Owners Management Association of Greater Phoenix

Mark Covington
Executive Director
Building Owners
Management Association of Greater Phoenix


BOMA Greater Phoenix has been working toward the efficiency and sustainability of its members and other commercial buildings for many years.

Its Kilowatt Krackdown energy benchmarking and tuning program has engaged almost 500 commercial buildings in the Valley of the Sun since 2009 and has helped Phoenix to grow from No. 23 on the list of Energy Star Certified buildings to No. 12 last year. That’s one of the reasons BOMA is so concerned to see the decision by the Arizona Department of Revenue (DOR) to tax leased rooftop solar systems.

According to the Department of Revenue’s own figures, the proposed tax on leasing systems would more than offset the utility savings for homeowners for at least the first several years of the lease and cost commercial property owners a large chunk of anticipated savings.

BOMA Phoenix’s membership and our Advocacy Committee actively supported a bill introduced in the state Senate last session to make leased solar energy devices or systems designed to serve on site electricity needs considered to have no value, and to add no value to the property for tax purposes. Unfortunately, this bill did not advance.

The DOR has recently begun sending valuation notices to Arizona companies that are involved in these solar leases. Two of the companies are now challenging the DOR in court. While BOMA hopes the lawsuit progresses successfully and the state reverses its plan to tax these systems, it is also encouraging legislators to revisit this issue in the next session.

Making efficient use of the abundant Valley sunlight is the right thing to do from a business and sustainability standpoint.

AZGF 10x4, WEB

Lincoln Property Co. wins International BOMA Award

Lincoln Property Company (LPC)’s LEED Platinum Arizona Game & Fish (AZGF) Department Headquarters in Phoenix is among only 14 buildings from across the world to earn an International BOMA “The Outstanding Building of the Year” (TOBY) award at this year’s BOMA conference, held last week in Orlando, Fla.

From left to right: Jamie Britton (Kimberly Clark, TOBY Award Sponsor), Steve Harrison (BOMA Fellow), Megan Watkins (accepting award for LPC and also is the BOMA Phoenix Vice President),  Susan Engstrom (BOMA Phoenix member and International Executive Committee Member), Karen Piper (BOMA Phoenix President), Mark Covington (BOMA Phoenix BAE),  Richard Greninger (BOMA International Chair & Chief Elected Officer).

From left to right: Jamie Britton (Kimberly Clark, TOBY Award Sponsor), Steve Harrison (BOMA Fellow), Megan Watkins (accepting award for LPC and also is the BOMA Phoenix Vice President), Susan Engstrom (BOMA Phoenix member and International Executive Committee Member), Karen Piper (BOMA Phoenix President), Mark Covington (BOMA Phoenix BAE), Richard Greninger (BOMA International Chair & Chief Elected Officer).

The TOBY awards are directed by the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) and are the industry’s most prestigious honor for excellence in building quality and management. Competitors for this year’s international award came from as far away as Beijing, China.

“This event is the Super Bowl of building awards,” said Megan Watkins, Lincoln Property Company’s Senior Property Manager and Vice President of the Arizona BOMA chapter. “It was clear that every winning team took great pride in their building and was honored for the recognition. I was equally honored to accept an international award on behalf of LPC while presenting the AZGF building to the world.”

“This award couldn’t have happened without the work of an outstanding team, led by LPC’s Senior Property Manager Lauren Grant, Mark Weise at the AZ Game and Fish building and all of our vendor partners,” added Lincoln Property Company’s Director of Management Services Alisa Timm. “BOMA leads our industry in promoting excellence, and LPC is proud to be a part of it.”

This is the first time that the Desert West Region of LPC has earned a BOMA award at the international level. The win follows the company’s recent local and regional TOBY wins for the AZGF project in the Government Building Category. It is a particularly significant recognition for LPC, as the company is both the project’s property manager and its original developer.

The AZGF headquarters totals 117,115 square feet at 5000 W. Carefree Highway in Phoenix. It was developed by LPC in 2007 and is the first-ever project to achieve LEED Platinum certification nationally for the organization. The property is owned by the Arizona Wildlife Finance Corporation and managed by LPC.

LPC’s property management effort at the AZGF headquarters includes a strong, longstanding partnership and forward-thinking processes that emphasize a healthy, cost-effective and productive workplace. Examples include a law enforcement branch, 24-hour fitness center, bunkhouse for visiting employees, facility and safety guidelines, and robust communications channels like intranet, web and group email systems that generate the fastest possible response times for maintenance and management needs. LPC also works hand-in-hand with AZGF to give back to the community through local organizations and volunteer opportunities. These efforts, combined with a strong on-site presence, have generated a 95 percent tenant satisfaction rate and routine 100 percent ratings for maintenance-related needs.

AZGF 10x4, WEB

Lincoln Property Co. advances to international TOBY awards

The Desert West Region of Lincoln Property Company (LPC) has advanced to the international “The Outstanding Building of the Year” (TOBY) awards competition for its management of the Arizona Game & Fish (AZGF) Department Headquarters in Phoenix. The awards program is directed by the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) and is the industry’s most prestigious honor for excellence in building quality and management.

Arizona Game and Fish Department Headquarters

Arizona Game and Fish Department Headquarters

LPC earned a local TOBY award for the AZGF project (in the Government Building Category) in November 2013. It then advanced to the regional TOBY awards, which it also won. LPC will now move on to the BOMA/TOBY international competition, held this June in Orlando, Fla.

“We have been a part of the Arizona Game & Fish property from day one—first as its developer and then, for the past seven years, as its sole property manager,” said Lincoln Property Company’s Executive Vice President David Krumwiede. “Our longevity and relationships here make this a very special honor for us.”

The AZGF headquarters totals 117,115 square feet at 5000 W. Carefree Highway in Phoenix. It was developed by LPC in 2007 and is the first-ever project to achieve LEED Platinum certification nationally for the organization. The property is owned by the Arizona Wildlife Finance Corporation and managed by LPC.

“This headquarters serves as a functioning business operation for Arizona Game & Fish and as their grassroots outreach point to the community,” said Lincoln Property Company’s Director of Management Services Alisa Timm. “It has been a pleasure to share this project’s story with the U.S. commercial real estate industry. We’d be privileged to share the story with the world as well, with a win at the BOMA international competition.”

LPC’s property management effort at the AZGF headquarters includes a strong, longstanding partnership and forward-thinking processes that emphasize a healthy, cost-effective and productive workplace. Examples include a law enforcement branch, 24-hour fitness center, bunkhouse for visiting employees, facility and safety guidelines, and robust communications channels like intranet, web and group email systems that generate the fastest possible response times for maintenance and management needs. LPC also works hand-in-hand with AZGF to give back to the community through local organizations and volunteer opportunities. These efforts, combined with a strong on-site presence, have generated a 95 percent tenant satisfaction rate and routine 100 percent ratings for maintenance-related needs.

Robert Bonilla cropped

Hines’ Robert Bonilla Named ‘Building Engineer of the Year’

The Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) of Greater Phoenix has named a Hines employee the Building Engineer of the Year. Robert Bonilla’s peers nominated him for the honor.

“This award is a direct reflection of the respect that Robert has gained among his colleagues in the Phoenix market and in the industry,” said Chris Anderson, managing director of Hines. “Robert’s tireless efforts as a leader in energy reduction and sustainability make him an invaluable asset to Hines.”

Bonilla is the general engineering manager at Renaissance Square. Since Hines acquired the property in 2007, Bonilla has led Renaissance Square to six consecutive ENERGY STAR(R) certifications, as well as a LEED(R) Gold certification. In 2013, the property won BOMA of Greater Phoenix’s Kilowatt Krackdown award for having the highest reduction in kilowatt hours (kWH) year after year for a building over 500,000 square feet. Bonilla celebrated his 18th year at Hines this January.

SusanCannon, Cassidy Turle

Sue Cannon Joins Cassidy Turley

Sue Cannon, LEED Green Associate, has joined Cassidy Turley’s property management division as vice president in the Phoenix office.

Cannon will oversee all operations of the property management portfolio and staff in Cassidy Turley’s Arizona office. In addition, she will be responsible for strategic business planning and management of client relationships.

“Sue’s experience and expertise in real estate management, leasing and operations will enhance the strong Cassidy Turley team we have in Phoenix,” said Paul F. Klink, senior managing director and principal at Cassidy Turley. “She’s highly regarded by her colleagues and clients, and her proactive management style is directly in line with the goals we have for our property management team.”

Cannon has more than 20 years of experience as a licensed real estate professional, managing and overseeing property management services for institutional and large investor owners in Arizona. Most recently, she was the Director of Property Management for J&J Commercial Properties in Phoenix. Cannon has extensive experience supervising teams of property managers, accountants and maintenance personnel, as well as acting as a third-party manager for institutional owners of multi-million square foot portfolios.  She maintains an intense focus on problem solving and building outstanding relationships and is responsible for strategic business planning and management of client relationships.
A graduate of the University of Arizona and a licensed Arizona realtor, Cannon is a member of BOMA.

Bins

Trash Talk: BOMA to Launch Golden Dumpster Awards

BOMA Greater Phoenix announced it will launch the Golden Dumpster Awards, a sustainability program that promotes and encourages waste reduction and environmental efficiency.

According to the City of Phoenix, city workers drive nearly 7 million miles to transport solid waste every year. The amount of trash sent to the landfill each year could fill Chase Field seven times.

In response to this, BOMA officials designed an awards program to motivate building managers to increase the amount of trash recycled to minimize waste production, city expenses and create a better environment.

“Most of our members’ buildings already have a recycling program in place, but getting reliable metrics to benchmark waste diversion is one of our program’s early challenges,” said Executive Director Mark Covington.

Covington said businesses will be rewarded for their efforts in recycling, waste reduction and education of their employees.

“We hope the awards give our members and other participants in the program inspiration to minimize the amount of waste we create, re-use what we can and properly sort and recycle more of our trash,” said Covington.

The Golden Dumpster Awards program is set to launch in 2014.

Phoenix Children's Hospital lobby

All Systems Go: The Benefits of Integrated Building Systems

PhoenixChildrensHospitalPipes

Phoenix Children’s Hospital is among the buildings adopting automated integration of mechanical systems, including the above-pictured water pipes.

If the main air handling unit at Phoenix Children’s Hospital suddenly fails, another equally powerful chiller kicks in within seconds.
Simultaneously, the medical complex’s high-tech control system sends an alarm to the 24-hour-monitored security panel and an alert to a facility technician’s hand-held device — essentially a text messaged work order to fix the downed system ASAP.
While a hospital has unique issues — among them, immobile patients and pricey medical equipment with critical temperature limits — linking building maintenance operations to each other and to the human beings who can fix them is an escalating trend within all commercial real estate sectors.
Chris Hernandez, president of Phoenix-based Hernandez Cos., which has been providing general contracting and maintenance services for office and industrial properties for 37 years, said 75 percent of his customers have some level of automation that integrates the mechanical systems.
“We see it with HVAC, electrical systems, plumbing,” he said. “Everything we do has a technology component. It’s a natural progression.”
Far from a burden to those who have to install, repair and/or maintain those mechanical systems, the real-time problem detection, auto shutdown of expensive equipment if the temperature exceeds safe operating ranges, and  immediate notification to a building engineer, are a boon to all parties involved, Hernandez said.
Even if it means getting a late-night gig.
“If you have an (HVAC) problem at 7 p.m., you can get somebody working on it and have it fixed by 8 a.m. when people get to work,” he said. “A building is a living, breathing place. It’s telling us when it needs attention.”
Property managers are on board, too.
At Gaedeke Group’s 2800 Tower, “You can turn up the heat from your smartphone while you are sitting at a concert,” said Laura Crosby, property manager for the 21-story Class-A office building in downtown Phoenix.
That’s a tenant perk, she said, but if the heat spikes because of a problem with the core cooling system, chief engineer Rod Harmon’s cell phone gets buzzed.
Harmon can check, via Wi-Fi, any of the building’s 400 heat pumps, diagnose the problem, press a virtual reset button and/or turn a faulty unit on or off.
“It’s the direction everything is headed,” he said.
All PCH’s critical building operations are integrated through technology that provides multiple levels of redundancy and ensures patient and employee safety and satisfaction aren’t compromised, said Farid Melki, facility management director.
If there is a fire detected anywhere on the 34-acre campus, for example, the system alerts the fire department, shuts down elevators, activates fire doors, and blasts notifications to impacted areas, the hospital safety officer, security, facilities technicians and hospital administrators.
PCH’s upgraded programmable building integration framework was installed three years ago when the hospital underwent a major expansion.
The payback was immediate, Melki said, in such quantifiable terms as energy savings, extending equipment life, keeping warranties valid, and eliminating the cost of redoing a procedure — say, if an MRI had to be shut down mid-scan because the room temperature topped 70 degrees.
Add to that unquantifiable measures such as keeping patients cool and comfy and a “crisis” invisible to all except those who need to resolve it, he said.
One category of commercial real estate contractors has watched job responsibilities expand with automation and integration, said Anderson Security CEO Kim Matich.
Since security may be an office or industrial property’s only 24/7 operation, it is often the primary recipient of building system alarms.
In the last decade, security operations have become more sophisticated to accommodate the trend, Matich said, and security personnel job descriptions have expanded to include making minor repairs to late-night malfunctions.
At the Galleria Corporate Centre in Scottsdale, for example, security as well as the on-call engineer get text alerts for building maintenance problems.
The problems can range from a wet sensor tripped to an exterior door opened to a chiller shutdown, Matich said.
The Anderson Security officer at Galleria is charged with making stop-gap measures, communicating with the on-call engineer, and, if requested by the engineer, taking instructions to fix the problem.

Lincoln Property Company’s Desert West Region manages 6 MSF of commercial space, including the 52-acre, 11-building Broadway 101 Commercial Park in Mesa.

Forever Changed: Since recession, CRE owners drive property management issues

A decade or so ago, commercial real estate property managers might be considered a generic lot.
Not that they didn’t have a full roster of responsibilities. They kept the buildings looking spiffy, made sure the trees were trimmed and the elevators inspected, and they provided standard financial reports of income and expenses to often faceless pension plan accountants or other absentee building owners.
To those investors, the bottom line was the only determinant of how well the property manager was caring for their assets.
Then the recession happened.

John Orsak, Hines

John Orsak, Hines

Tenants foundered and moved out or moved home. New businesses available to snatch up their suites or shop spaces were few, and vacancy rates shot up in all sectors of commercial real estate.
Building owners started paying attention to the detail above the bottom line, and property management changed forever, said John Orsak, director at international real estate firm Hines.
Increasingly, the building owners drive the business, determine how their properties are managed, what kind of reports they receive and when they get them, and have a say in just about every management aspect down to the light bulbs and landscaping — or at least how eco-friendly they are.
Savvy property management companies are meeting the newly involved building owners’ demands and tailoring boutique services for each client, from organizing food truck parties to developing “green” programs to feeding financial data into the owners’ proprietary reporting systems.
“It used to be the property manager had to make sure the trash was taken out, the lights were on, the tenants were comfortable and the owner got the reports,” said Orsak, who has been with Hines for 12 years. “That was enough then.”
Now sophisticated business owners want reports “their way” and on their reporting cycles, he said.
Hines manages 406 properties totaling 148.5 MSF, more than half of that for third-party owners. Among its Arizona properties are US Airways headquarters in Tempe, the Renaissance Square office complex in downtown Phoenix, and 24th and Camelback , two luxury office buildings with a combined 600,000 SF of space in the prestigious Camelback Corridor.

Alisa Timm

Alisa Timm, Lincoln Property Company

All have different management criteria and in common only the ultimate goal: to maximize property values by keeping the buildings full of contented tenants, Orsak said.
“In a recession, you focus inward,” he said. “That’s when everybody refocused.”
Alisa Timm, director of management services for Lincoln Property Company, which manages more than 150 MSF nationally, agreed. Lincoln’s Desert West Region, which includes Arizona, manages 6 MSF of commercial space, including the 52-acre, 11-building Broadway 101 Commercial Park in Mesa.
“The recession was a big factor,“ Timm said. The competition for tenants changed the playing field, and building owners, still eyeing the bottom line, saw the need for differentiating their buildings  from the many other nice but too-empty properties in the marketplace.
Instead of providing building owners with a checklist of services it offers, property management providers are sitting down with the owners to listen to their demands and tailor a plan to meet their needs, Timm said,
“There was a growing recognition that a property is nothing but a liability without tenants,” she said.
Before, especially in a desirable market, the issue was “what the landlord would give” in terms of tenant improvements and other incentives to woo a would-be business to the building, Timm said. “Now it’s a much different negotiation. I don’t think we’ll ever go back to that disconnect between landlord and tenant.”
Timm said the emergence of large, experienced building buyers, such as the big national REITs, has also changed the focus.
“Ownership of commercial real estate is different now. Owners are more sophisticated,” said Timm, who has been in the industry since 1986. “Almost anybody going into a building is looking at resale, maybe exiting in seven to 10 years.
“The sophisticated owners understand that property management is the key.”

Andi St. John, CBRE

Andi St. John, CBRE

Andi St. John, senior director of asset services at CBRE, has spent 17 years in property management. CBRE manages 22 MSF in 140 buildings throughout Arizona, including Biltmore Commerce Center in Phoenix and Raintree Corporate Center in Scottsdale.
“I see a change in property management because what a client needs has changed,” St. John said.
She agreed that a client’s goals— that is, whether to hold property for the short- or long-term— is a factor, as is a property’s desirability to tenants based on a host of factors from location to age to technology to sustainability.
“Government leases require sustainability (standards) and certain other tenants have that requirement in their leases,” she said. “Sustainability is critical in the market now. It’s the number one way to reduce expenses, which increases value.”
If an owner doesn’t see a return on investment in upgrades within the time frame they plan to hold a property, that’s a non-starter.
Instead of offering a standard contract for management services, CBRE approaches a building owner first in a consulting capacity to determine what the owner’s goals, budget and needs are, and then, in a collaborative effort, to devise  the sphere and direction of the management services, she said.

Cathy Zoccoli, The Muller Company

Cathy Zoccoli, The Muller Company

Cathy Zoccoli, senior property manager at Phoenix Corporate Tower at 300 N. Central Ave., sees it the same way.
“We have an owner’s perspective,” she said. “If they want X, we give them X. Building owners expect us to understand the building, get our arms around it.”
One owner may be into maximizing efficiency, another not willing to spend the upfront cash, she said.
The property manager’s job is to work with the owner to determine how to re-brand, revitalize and tweak a building’s operation to meet the owner’s goals, said Zoccoli , who has been in the business for 15 years, 11 of them in Arizona, the last five with California-based The Muller Company.
“It’s The Muller Company culture,” she said. “We are more of a boutique company.”

Sheryl Brisbin

Sheryl Brisbin

Not all building owners want to pilot their own portfolio.
Sheryl Brisbin, of Cushman & Wakefield, has spent the last 19 years in property management. She now oversees the Camelback Esplanade’s expansive mixed-use property.
Brisbin said a greater number of building owners want to inject their initiatives, but many still want to tap a solid property management company’s broad experience and expertise to determine standards for everything from budgeting to reporting to marketing.
“It’s very owner specific, depending on the type of asset and the type of owner, from small mom and pop (owners) to large institutional owners,” she said.
Brisbin said recent ups and downs of the economy have made property management issues “increasingly complex.”

Portales I Exterior 2, WEB

BOMA Greater Phoenix TOBY Awards 2013

This year’s BOMA Greater Phoenix TOBY Awards were presented Nov. 15 at the Renaissance Phoenix Downtown.

AZRE Magazine would like to congratulate the seven winners of this year’s BOMA Greater Phoenix TOBY Awards.

Portales Corporate Center II

Portales Corporate Center II

100,000- 249,999 SF Category: Portales Corporate Center II
4800 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale
Owned by: Principal Real Estate Investors
Architect: DFD Conoyer Hedrick
Managed by: Julie Schulze, Property Manager and Leasing Consultant, Forum Property Services, LLC

Portales Corporate Center I

Portales Corporate Center I

250,000-499,999 SF Category: Portales Corporate Center I
4800 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale
Owned by: Principal Real Estate Investors
Architect: DFD Conoyer Hedrick
Managed by: Julie Schulze, Property Manager and Leasing Consultant, Forum Property Services, LLC

 

Freeport-McMoRan Building

Freeport-McMoRan Building

Corporate Facility Category: Freeport-McMoRan Building
333 N. Central Ave., Phoenix
Owned by:  National Electrical Benefit Fund
Architect: Smith Group
Managed by: Mary Anne Lanoue, General Manager, Transwestern

Arizona Game and Fish Department Headquarters

Arizona Game and Fish Department Headquarters

Government Building Category: Arizona Game and Fish Department Headquarters
500 W. Carefree Hwy., Phoenix
Owned by: Arizona Wildlife Finance Corporation
Architect: Will Architects
Managed by: Lauren Grant, Lincoln Property Company

McCauley Medical Office Building

McCauley Medical Office Building

Medical Office Building Category: McAuley Medical Office
500 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix
Owned by: LaSalle Investment Manager
Architect: BLM Group
Managed by: Mercedes Marquez, Real Estate Manager, CBRE

Park One

Park One

Renovated Category: Park One
2111 E. Highland Ave., Ste. 100, Phoenix
Owned by: MS MCC Park One, LLC
Architect: Phoenix Design One
Managed by: Lorraine MacGregor, Property Manager, McCarthy Cook & Co.

San Tan Corporate Center

San Tan Corporate Center

Suburban Office Park Low Rise Category: San Tan Corporate Center I & II
3100 and 3200 W. Ray Rd., Ste. 135, Chandler
Owned by: Wells REIT II-SanTan Corporate Center, LLC
Architect: DFD Architectural
Managed by: Maricela Nunez, Real Estate Manager, CBRE

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www.bomaphoenix.org

Read about BOMA’s Tools of the Trade and BOMA’s Mentoring Program.

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Game and Fish, WEB

Lincoln Property Company Grows Portfolio to Highest Point in Office’s History

The Desert West Region of Lincoln Property Company (LPC) this week pushed its management portfolio to the highest point in the office’s history with the assignment of 7025 North Scottsdale. Under the leadership of new Director of Management Services Alisa Timm, the firm also retained 100 percent of its nearly 6 million-square-foot portfolio in 2013 through multiple sales transactions, and expects continued and significant expansion in 2014.

 

Alisa Timm

Alisa Timm

The announcement came on the same day that LPC earned The Outstanding Building of the Year (TOBY) award by the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) for management of the Arizona Game and Fish (AZGF) Department Headquarters. Located at 5000 W. Carefree Highway in Phoenix, LPC developed the project in 2007. It was the first-ever project to achieve LEED Platinum certification nationally for the organization and LPC has retained the management assignment for the campus ever since.

We are known as a very successful property developer and owner, but we are also an exceptional property manager. In fact, 50 percent of our portfolio is third-party management,” said Timm, a 25-year industry veteran. “That we have retained these clients year after year, and through changes in ownership, is noteworthy and extremely unusual in a rising market like Phoenix, where volatility is increasing.”

Because LPC also owns and develops projects, we approach management assignments with an ownership attitude, which is different than other firms,” added Lincoln Property Company’s Executive Vice President David Krumwiede. “I consider our team the most elite managers. We have the talent, and we give our experts the time and resources they need to fully commit to a project’s goals in a very sophisticated way.”

For AZGF, this includes a strong partnership and forward-thinking processes that emphasize a healthy, cost-effective and productive workplace. Examples include a 24-hour fitness center, bunkhouse for visiting employees, facility and safety guidelines, and robust communications channels like intranet, web and group

AZ Game and Fish

AZ Game and Fish

email systems that generate the fastest possible response times for maintenance and management needs. LPC also works hand-in-hand with AZGF to give back to the community through local organizations and volunteer opportunities. These efforts, combined with a strong on-site presence, generate a 95 percent tenant satisfaction rate and routine 100 percent ratings for maintenance-related needs.

LPC’s management portfolio now also includes 7025 North Scottsdale. Totaling 91,148 square feet, the three-story, Class A office building provides direct frontage to Scottsdale Road, adjacency to market-leading amenities and prime mountain views. LPC’s new Senior Property Manager, Lauren Grant, will oversee the project. With almost 10 years of commercial real estate experience, Grant has managed more than 2 million square feet of Class A office and retail product in Arizona and California.

The new assignment joins an LPC property management portfolio that also includes contracts retained through sales transactions of Broadway 101 Commerce Park, an 11-building, 808,000-square-foot mixed-use project in Mesa, Ariz., and Sky Harbor Business Center (formerly Lincoln Sky Harbor), a 130,000-square-foot project located next to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Property management is paramount to a building’s success, but it becomes particularly critical in challenging economic times,” said Timm. “We are honored that our clients retain us year after year. You know you are succeeding when owners come back to you time and again.”

Under direction by Timm, LPC expects to continue to grow that presence in 2014, with an emphasis on office, industrial and retail assignments, and with plans to grow its new Las Vegas office as well as expand into Utah and New Mexico in the next 24 months.

Megan Watkins

Lincoln Property's Megan Watkins Named to BOMA Board of Directors

The Desert West Region office of Lincoln Property Company announced that Senior Property Manager Megan Watkins has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Building Owners and Managers Association of Greater Phoenix (BOMA).

“BOMA provides important resources to the commercial real estate community in the Valley – especially in the areas of education, advocacy and leadership development,” said Tammy Sidles, director of management services, Lincoln Property Company, Desert West Region.  “We are proud to have Megan represent Lincoln Property Company on BOMA Greater Phoenix’s board of directors.”

Watkins manages Lincoln Property Company’s Paradise Village Office Park, a 5-story, multi-tenant office building located near exclusive Paradise Valley.

“As a member of BOMA Greater Phoenix since 2004, I have always found it extremely rewarding,” Watkins said. “I am very excited to make an even greater contribution to the organization and our industry by serving as a board member.”

Lincoln’s Desert West Region, which includes Arizona, Nevada, Utah and New Mexico, is based in Phoenix and has been operating since 2001.

 

Larry Cassel

Veteran Commercial Real Estate Professional Larry Cassel Passes Away

Commercial Properties Incorporated (CPI) is saddened by the passing of a property management professional.

On March 30, Larry Cassel, Director of Property Management, passed away due to ongoing medical complications.  Larry Cassel joined CPI in April of 2005 and was a dynamic part of the company’s management team. He was 60.

Larry Cassel possessed more than 34 years of property management experience which he utilized in overseeing the company’s portfolio of managed projects.  Those who had the opportunity to work with Larry truly valued his leadership, professionalism, and warm personality.

Joining the team to fill Larry’s shoes is a seasoned veteran who is no stranger to the property management industry in Phoenix.  Susan M. Cannon brings 29 years of commercial property management and leasing experience to the Director of Property Management position with Commercial Properties Incorporated.

Cannon’s diverse background includes the management of office parks, buildings and office condominium projects, industrial facilities and retail centers.  Prior to joining CPI, Susan was a Senior Property Manager at Colliers International, where she managed a portfolio of 1.2 MSF in the Greater Phoenix Metropolitan Area.

Cannon acquired her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Arizona, holds an Arizona real estate license and is an active member of BOMA.  As Director, Susan is responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of CPI’s property management division, and overseeing a portfolio of more than 100 projects, comprising nearly 4.5 MSF.

The entire team at CPI will miss Larry Cassel ’s energetic work ethic and gregarious personality.

To learn more about CPI, visit cpiaz.com.

TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

BOMA Greater Phoenix TOBY Awards 2011

This year’s BOMA Greater Phoenix TOBY Awards were presented Sept. 9 at the Wyndham Phoenix Downtown.

AZRE Magazine would like to congratulate the 10 winners of this year’s BOMA Greater Phoenix TOBY Awards.

TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011MEDICAL BUILDING
McAuley Medical Office
OWNED BY
LaSalle Investment Manager
MANAGED BY
Margaret Foster, Senior Real Estate
Manager, CBRE
Suburban Office Park Low-Rise
Target Financial Services Tempe
TOBY Awards - November/December 2011UNDER 100,000 SF
Mesquite Corporate Center
OWNED BY
Mesquite Partners I, LLC, A Division
Of DPC Development
MANAGED BY
Marie Dunn, RPA, Real Estate
Manager, CBRE
TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011100,000-249,999 SF
US Airways Headquarters
OWNED BY
US Airways Inc.
MANAGED BY
Darwyn Harp, General Property Manager, Hines
 TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011250,000-499,999 SF
24th @ Camelback
OWNED BY
Gll Properties Fund I, LP
MANAGED BY
John Orsak, Property Manager, Hines Interests Limited Partnership
 TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011CORPORATE FACILITY
Jeffrey D. McClelland Flight Center
OWNED BY
US Airways Inc.
MANAGED BY
Darwyn Harp, General Property Manager, Hines
TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011RENOVATED
Scottsdale Financial Center
OWNED BY
BPG Properties Limited
MANAGED BY
Jackie Baumgarten, Real Estate Manager, CBRE
TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011500,000-1 MSF
One & Two Renaissance
OWNED BY
Hines U.S. Core Office Fund, L.P.
MANAGED BY
William Fehmer, GPM and Monica Greenman, PM, RPA, Designated Broker, Hines GS
TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011SUBURBAN OFFICE PARK LOW-RISE
Target Financial Services Tempe
OWNED BY
Target
MANAGED BY
Cina Brady, CRE Building Operations Manager, Target
TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011INDUSTRIAL OFFICE PARK
Goodyear Commerce Center
OWNED BY
Hanover Goodyear LLC
MANAGED BY
Christine L. Manola, RPA, CPM, CCIM, LEED AP, NorthMarq Real Estate Services, LLC
TOBY Awards - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011EARTH
USAA Phoenix Campus
OWNED BY
USAA
MANAGED BY
Kip Linse, CCIM, RPA, CPM; Executive Director Real Estate Services, USAA

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Read about BOMA’s Tools of the Trade and BOMA’s Mentoring Program.

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Young Professionals - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Young Professionals Mentoring Up

BOMA’S YOUNG PROFESSIONALS REAPING BENEFITS OF LEARNING FROM ESTABLISHED INDUSTRY LEADERS

The young professionals of BOMA Greater Phoenix knew that the seasoned veterans they met at the organization’s events were a wealth of information.

Some had 20 or more years experience in property management and had weathered their share of mistakes and industry ups and downs.

So how could young professionals tap into that brain trust? They appreciated the peer mentoring available through BOMA’s special events and conferences, but they wanted more.

Like good problem-solving professionals, they came up with an answer: a formal mentoring program — Mentor Society of BOMA Greater Phoenix.

Since its inception in August, the Mentor Society has served as a way for people at the front-end of their careers to glean information, knowledge and wisdom from seasoned professionals in a personal, one-on-one setting.

“These are people who have been in the industry for 10, 20, 30 years and they have all this knowledge,” says Jamie Strecker, a property manager with FM Solutions and a member of BOMA Phoenix Young Professionals Group (YPG). “They’re what we’re calling our ‘elite.’ ”

Mentors who agree to be in the program are listed on the BOMA website, as are associate members — vendors who have worked in fields that serve or are affiliated with property management.

The program is self-managed, Strecker says, which means young professionals can contact a mentor on their own initiative by going to the BOMA website and clicking on a mentors’ biography and contact information.

They are then free to contact that person to set up a 30-minute interview.

Mentors must have at least five years experience in the commercial real estate industry, be a current member of BOMA, and have served on three or more committees or have sponsored five or more events.

Mentors agree to be an active participant by providing insight into the industry, to maintain confidentiality and professionalism, and to respond to a request within 24 hours.

The goal of the program is to increase knowledge among the young professionals of BOMA and to help the next generation of professionals feel vested in their fields and in the BOMA organization, says Colleen LeBlanc, a general manager with Universal Protection Services and an associate member of the YPG.

BOMA is all about building relationships, she says, and this is a great way to do that and strengthen the organization’s base. It’s also a good way to get your business in front of key players in the field.

Young Professionals Group member Mike Amico says he was eager to speak with mentor Tom Pritscher, an associate member mentor who is a commercial general contractor with ties to the facilities management profession since 1993.

Pritscher, Amico says, always seemed to draw a crowd at BOMA functions, so when he called him to “pick his brain” about how to develop network contacts and how to best take advantage of his BOMA ties, he knew Pritscher would have sound advice.

“It turned into a very good conversation,” says Amico, who is an insurance agent at Bennett & Porter Insurance Services, where he specializes in commercial property. “I felt like it was a very valuable use of my time. I asked Tom for 30 minutes and he gave me an hour.”

Pritscher, president of TEPCON Construction, Inc. in Tempe, says he was honored to be included as a mentor, and says he sees the value in passing down experience and knowledge. The Mentor Society is also a great way to take networking to a higher level.

“Even if you didn’t learn anything, you walk out of there knowing someone you didn’t know before,” he says. “But for people to share their experience with you at no cost is tremendous.”

He says, only half joking, “I’m thinking I may want to talk to a property manager — really, you can never stop learning.”

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Read about BOMA’s Tools of the Trade here.

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

AZRE Magazine Digital Issue

AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

AZRE Magazine November/December 2011:

Grand Designs

This issue, find out how AIA Arizona Members are bringing their skills to the global issue. Plus, the Arizona Commerce Authority is 1-year old; how are they making a difference? And as part of our centennial series, take a look at some architectural achievements that have graced Arizona’s diverse landscape. Also, AIA-Arizona members are bringing their skills to the global stage, and our special section covers BOMA, Building Owners & Managers Association, which discusses its mentoring program for young professionals, as well as the TOBY Awards 2011, and much more.

Take it with you! On your mobile, go to m.issuu.com to get started.

BOMA Greater Phoenix

BOMA Greater Phoenix: TOBY Awards 2010

This year’s BOMA Greater Phoenix TOBY awards 2010 were presented Sept. 10. BOMA Greater Phoenix would like to congratulate the local award winners, and the Collier Center (a 2009 winner), which garnered a 2010 Inernational TOBY award in the Earth Category.

BOMA Greater Phoenix TOBY Awards

The Scottsdale Forum: 100,000 – 249,999 SF

Owned By: ING Clarion Partners

Managed By: KYSA Beringer, Real Estate Manager, CB Richard Ellis


BOMA Greater PhoenixPortales Corporate Center Phase I: 250,000 – 499,999 SF

Owned By: Principal Real Estate Investors

Managed By: Julie Schulze, Property Manager/ Leasing Consultant, Forum Property Services


BOMA Greater PhoenixMesquite Corporate Center: 100,000 SF

Owned By: Mesquite Partners I. A Division of DPC Development Company

Managed By: Marie Dunn, RPA, Real Estate Manager, CB Richard Ellis


BOMA Greater Phoenix ADOA: Government

Owned By: Capitol Mall II

Managed By: Shannon Dutton, RPA, Real Estate Manager, CB Richard Ellis


BOMA Greater PhoenixCentral Park Square: Renovated

Owned By: Arizona Central Credit Union

Managed By: Michelle Bachand-Gill, LEED AP, Real Estate Manager, CB Richard Ellis


BOMA Greater PhoenixSan Tan Corporate Center I & II: Suburban Office Low-Rise

Owned By: Wells reit II San Tan Corporate Center I & II

Managed By: Maricela Nunez, Real Estate Manager, CB Richard Ellis


BOMA Greater PhoenixEsplanade III: Earth

Owned By: AEW Capital Managment

Managed By: Heather Sikita, Real Estate Manager, CB Richard Ellis


BOMA Greater PhoenixThe Phoenix Plaza: 500,000 – 1MSF

Owned By: GE Asset Managment

Managed By: Diana Rivers, CPM LEED AP, O+M, Senior Real Estate Manager, CB Richard Ellis


BOMA Greater PhoenixHohokam Towers: Corporate

Owned By: Muller Hohokam

Managed By: Tiffany Lauchlan, CPM, Senior Property Manager,  The Muller Company


 AZRE Magazine November/December 2010

BOMA - AZRE Magazine November/December 2010

BOMA: Bad Times Call For Good Managment

Building Owners and Managers Association ( BOMA ) suggests energy conservation and retention can help commercial property managers ride out a tough economy.

Dwindling capital budgets. Old mechanical systems that don’t stop aging because the economy is in a recession. Tenants lured away by cheaper lease offers. Buildings in receivership.

While good management practices may have helped position some properties to better withstand the economic turmoil, today they are more important than ever in helping managers find solutions to these problems. That means retaining tenants and keeping a property well maintained, despite fewer dollars.

“Retention is absolutely key in a down market,” says Marii Covington-Jones, a real estate manager for CB Richard Ellis’ asset services division, and BOMA member.

Covington-Jones manages the Mesa Financial Plaza at 1201 S. Alma School Rd., which is wending its way through receivership. When she began managing the high-rise, it was 75 percent occupied. Today, occupancy is at 50 percent.

Real estate professionals across the Valley are facing similarly declining rates. According to figures from CBRE, the vacancy rate for Metro Phoenix went from 12.62% in 2005 to 26% in 2010.

Declining tenancy rates mean declining dollars.

“The first thing that happens in an economic downturn is your capital budget goes away,” says Susan Engstrom, senior real estate manager of The Great American Tower, a 24-story building at 3200 N. Central Ave. Engstrom manages the 25-year-old tower for Tiarna Real Estate Services.

Covington-Jones and Engstrom say good property management practices are helping to shave operating costs and do what it takes to keep tenants.

BOMA – Saving Energy Is Good Business

Covington-Jones estimates that efforts to reduce energy consumption have saved $2 a square foot in the 323,000 SF building. When she began managing the tower, it scored in the 30s on the U.S. government’s Energy Star scale. It now scores in the 90s.

Management professionals, particularly those overseeing older buildings, can look into:

  • Installing a variable frequency drive on major motors to regulate start-up and start-down based on usage.
  • Installing energy-management controls on boxes in each suite, so they can be remotely turned off during non-business hours.
  • Establishing programs for after-hours energy use. Covington-Jones says she implemented an “On-demand Saturday” scheduling system, which regulates after-hours usage. “… only using what someone actually needs,” she says.
  • Getting serious about recycling. Engstrom says taking cardboard out of the trash pickup reduced the tower’s trash bill by 35%, from about $1,700 a month to just less than $1,000 a month.

Do What It Takes To Lease

Property managers must continue leasing in a down market, Engstrom says. When ownership recognized that prospective tenants were tightening their budgets, it cut $3 or $4 a square foot from the pro forma lease agreement, helping them continue leasing throughout the previous year. Today, the tower is 83% occupied.

Getting approval for such changes is more difficult when a property is in receivership, Covington-Jones says, but fortunately there are steps a manager can take that don’t require outlays of capital or everyone’s signature.

It is particularly important to work closely with leasing agents, even joining them on walkthroughs with prospective clients. Covington-Jones says it is wise to walk through “every inch” of a building at least once a month to assess what can be done to a suite to make it more attractive or to ensure it is clean enough to show.

Retention, Retention, Retention

Being responsive to tenants’ needs is paramount and doesn’t always cost money. That means property managers must be vigilant to avoid the trap of deferred maintenance, Engstrom says. Hiring a good chief engineer is worth the cost, she says, particularly one who knows the building’s operating systems inside and out, and has the expertise to keep them maintained.

While it may be more difficult to keep a building clean and secure during lean times, it can be done. Engstrom recommends keeping long-time vendors, such as a janitorial firm, to prevent disruptions to service and having to work through learning curves with new vendors. That may mean a manager has to renegotiate a contract, but good vendors often are willing to do that in order to hold onto business.

If a manager must hire a cheaper contractor for landscaping or cleaning, he or she should insist on monthly inspections.

“Sometimes you may have to be a little more on top of people,” Covington-Jones says.

She has had to get creative to lower maintenance costs, even picking up a paintbrush to help spruce up some worn planters. Replacing perennials that needed lots of water with lantana also saved about $4,500 a year.

Being attentive to tenants’ needs always has been important, and it doesn’t always cost money, Engstrom says. But in today’s market, it is one more tool in her arsenal that helps keep the property viable.

AZRE Magazine November/December 2010

 

Al O'Connor - AZRE Magazine November/December 2010

BOMA Instructor Al O'Connor A Go-To Man

BOMA Instructor Al O’Connor, Chief Engineer for The Great American Tower, a Go-To Man

Being a good chief engineer for an office building is a lot like being a good magician. Everybody loves what you do, but not everyone realizes how much hard work, practice and expertise goes into making your job look easy.

Take for example Al O’Connor, building engineer at The Great American Tower, 3200 N. Central Ave. Inside and out, visitors can see O’Connor’s handiwork: a clean, well-maintained, 24-story tower that houses a variety of professionals from attorneys and account payroll firms to various shops.

But what they don’t often see is the expertise required to keep a 25-year-old high-rise functioning well enough to make tenants feel comfortable, secure, and as if they want to stay put.

“If a tenant doesn’t feel content in a building, he won’t stay when the lease expires,” says Susan Engstrom, senior real estate manager for Tiarna Real Estate Services. O’Connor estimates he cut operating expenses by $1 PSF in the 335,000 SF building by automating the HVAC and lighting controls, and by raising the building’s Energy Star rating from 81 to 90. Updating inefficient mechanical and electrical systems helped save $45,000 in recurring annual maintenance, as well.

“The way the market is right now, if our building was operating the way it was five years ago, we wouldn’t be realizing the savings,” he says.

An engineer’s ability to maintain a building is an invaluable form of tenant relations. Poor air conditioning, broken elevators, dead landscaping, plumbing leaks — all sap energy from what should be a vibrant workplace.

O’Connor has overseen the building’s mechanical and operating systems for five years as part of Tiarna. In that time, tenants have faced no serious system failure of any kind, Engstrom says.

Typically, a chief engineer monitors and keeps all of the building systems working, including those for air conditioning, electricity and water. While they call in vendors as needed to do upkeep or repairs, engineers often perform day-to-day preventive maintenance and minor repairs.

Most important, they keep the property manager updated on the state of the building and what long-term work needs to be planned and budgeted.

“It helps if I can make an informed decision rather than allow someone to take advantage of me,” O’Connor says.

O’Connor has shared his expertise as an instructor with the Building Owners & Managers Association of Greater Phoenix, which promotes the interests of the commercial real estate industry in the Valley. One of its aims is to educate building management professionals about best practices.

O’Connor has taught BOMA’s Building Design courses, where participants can work toward the association’s Real Property Administrator (RPA) or Facilities Management Administrator (FMA) designations. The designations signify that a recipient is well-versed in all aspects of property management and building maintenance, respectively.

In fact, the U.S. Navy last year asked O’Connor to teach these subjects and Building Designs and Operations to its naval building administrators in Reston, Va.

For more information about BOMA and Al O’Connor, visit bomaphoenix.org.

AZRE Magazine November/December 2010