Tag Archives: Brewer

Brewer

Brewer's Medicaid expansion plan secured

Arizona lawmakers have endorsed a key element of President Barack Obama’s health care law in a huge political victory for Republican Gov. Jan Brewer, after a lengthy fight over Medicaid expansion that divided the state’s Republican leadership.

The expansion that will extend health care to 300,000 more low-income Arizonans came after months of stalled negotiations, tense debates and political maneuvering as Brewer pushed the Medicaid proposal through a hostile Legislature.

She secured her victory Thursday after lawmakers passed Brewer’s $8.8 billion state budget that included the Medicaid expansion provided under a key provision of the Affordable Care Act. The Legislature’s Republican leadership called it “Chicago politics” and labeled Brewer a puppet master, but Brewer remained undeterred as she prepared to sign the measures into state law.

“The day has been a red-letter day for the people of Arizona,” Brewer told reporters after the budget votes Thursday. “It was a win, win, win all the way around.”

Brewer, an early critic of the Affordable Care Act, surprised the nation when she acknowledged the Medicaid expansion as the law of the land in her State of the State address in January. She noted that rejecting an expansion would mean Arizona taxpayers would subsidize care for those in other states while receiving no benefits themselves.

The expansion is expected to help reduce the amount of uncompensated care hospitals must absorb and help cut what Brewer called a hidden health care tax that people who buy insurance pay, through higher premiums, to cover others’ care.

After the Legislature secured her political win, Brewer softened her support for the health care law.

“Medicaid was here long before Obama health care. I have never liked Obama health care,” she told reporters after the vote. “It has nothing to do with Obama health care.”

The expansion is optional under last year’s Supreme Court decision upholding the health care law, and many Republican governors rejected it.

In all, 23 states plus Washington, D.C., are moving ahead with the expansion, while 15 states have turned it down. Another 12 states are still weighing options.

Nearly all the states refusing are led by Republicans. Several of the states accepting have Republican governors, but most are led by Democrats.

Washington will pick up the entire cost of the expansion for the first three years and 90 percent over the longer haul. It’s estimated that less than $100 billion in state spending could trigger nearly $1 trillion in federal dollars over a decade.

In Arizona, Republican leaders in the Legislature called the expansion a massive government overreach that would drive the federal government deeper into debt. They predicted the government promises of paying for the expansion would turn out to be false.

“This is the biggest mistake we’ve made in the Arizona Legislature this year and maybe ever,” said Republican Sen. Kelli Ward, of Lake Havasu City.

Republicans control the Legislature and all statewide elected offices in Arizona, but the Medicaid fight highlighted internal fractures between those who want smaller government and others who, like Brewer, who said broader health care access is good for the state.

“The bottom line here is greed,” said Sen. Al Melvin, a Tucson Republican who is running for governor and voted against the Medicaid expansion. “The people who want this know in their hearts that Obamacare is going to collapse under its own weight.”

A newly formed coalition of Democrats and moderate Republicans worked closely with Brewer to stand up to the conservative leaders who had blocked debate on the Medicaid expansion for six months. Lawmakers worked through the night Wednesday to get the plan through the House, and the Senate vote came hours later Thursday afternoon.

“I’ve never seen the case where a governor has rolled over her own party because she was throwing a temper tantrum,” said Republican Rep. Eddie Farnsworth, of Gilbert.

Senate President Andy Biggs said lawmakers had little information about what was in the budget before passing it.

“I am deeply and profoundly disappointed at the manner at which this came down,” he said.

Brewer dismissed the insults, predicting that all would be forgiven and Republican leaders would move forward together.

“Tomorrow they’ll probably say ‘I’m sorry’ or we will just forget it,” she said. “I just try to listen and let it go.”

It was a year of wins and losses for Arizona’s GOP.

The Legislature voted to adjourn its 2013 session early Friday morning after passing a slew of other bills, including an election overhaul that could make it more difficult for voters to obtain and return mail ballots. Biggs had to beg for extra votes to get the measure opposed by Democrats and voter outreach groups passed in the Senate.

Among the bills left on the floor was a proposal that would have prohibited abortion clinics from using Medicaid dollars to fund administrative costs and allowed for unannounced inspections, a top GOP priority.

Still, Brewer signed more than 100 bills advanced by conservative Republicans throughout the marathon session, including a measure that bars cities and counties from destroying guns turned over to police at community buyback events and instead requiring that they be resold. She also signed bills that will wildly increase campaign finance limits for state candidates and require unemployed workers to present documents showing they were fired before they can receive benefits.

Through it all, Brewer made it clear that the Medicaid expansion was her top priority. She held multiple rallies featuring low-income patients on the Arizona Capitol lawn and during the final month of the session, Brewer refused to sign any other bills until lawmakers passed a budget that included the health care expansion.

The Medicaid plan would cover people making between 100 percent and 138 percent of the federal poverty level and restore coverage to more than 100,000 childless adults who lost Medicaid coverage because of a state budget crunch. About 1.3 million Arizonans already are covered by the state’s plan.

Brewer

Brewer’s Medicaid expansion plan secured

Arizona lawmakers have endorsed a key element of President Barack Obama’s health care law in a huge political victory for Republican Gov. Jan Brewer, after a lengthy fight over Medicaid expansion that divided the state’s Republican leadership.

The expansion that will extend health care to 300,000 more low-income Arizonans came after months of stalled negotiations, tense debates and political maneuvering as Brewer pushed the Medicaid proposal through a hostile Legislature.

She secured her victory Thursday after lawmakers passed Brewer’s $8.8 billion state budget that included the Medicaid expansion provided under a key provision of the Affordable Care Act. The Legislature’s Republican leadership called it “Chicago politics” and labeled Brewer a puppet master, but Brewer remained undeterred as she prepared to sign the measures into state law.

“The day has been a red-letter day for the people of Arizona,” Brewer told reporters after the budget votes Thursday. “It was a win, win, win all the way around.”

Brewer, an early critic of the Affordable Care Act, surprised the nation when she acknowledged the Medicaid expansion as the law of the land in her State of the State address in January. She noted that rejecting an expansion would mean Arizona taxpayers would subsidize care for those in other states while receiving no benefits themselves.

The expansion is expected to help reduce the amount of uncompensated care hospitals must absorb and help cut what Brewer called a hidden health care tax that people who buy insurance pay, through higher premiums, to cover others’ care.

After the Legislature secured her political win, Brewer softened her support for the health care law.

“Medicaid was here long before Obama health care. I have never liked Obama health care,” she told reporters after the vote. “It has nothing to do with Obama health care.”

The expansion is optional under last year’s Supreme Court decision upholding the health care law, and many Republican governors rejected it.

In all, 23 states plus Washington, D.C., are moving ahead with the expansion, while 15 states have turned it down. Another 12 states are still weighing options.

Nearly all the states refusing are led by Republicans. Several of the states accepting have Republican governors, but most are led by Democrats.

Washington will pick up the entire cost of the expansion for the first three years and 90 percent over the longer haul. It’s estimated that less than $100 billion in state spending could trigger nearly $1 trillion in federal dollars over a decade.

In Arizona, Republican leaders in the Legislature called the expansion a massive government overreach that would drive the federal government deeper into debt. They predicted the government promises of paying for the expansion would turn out to be false.

“This is the biggest mistake we’ve made in the Arizona Legislature this year and maybe ever,” said Republican Sen. Kelli Ward, of Lake Havasu City.

Republicans control the Legislature and all statewide elected offices in Arizona, but the Medicaid fight highlighted internal fractures between those who want smaller government and others who, like Brewer, who said broader health care access is good for the state.

“The bottom line here is greed,” said Sen. Al Melvin, a Tucson Republican who is running for governor and voted against the Medicaid expansion. “The people who want this know in their hearts that Obamacare is going to collapse under its own weight.”

A newly formed coalition of Democrats and moderate Republicans worked closely with Brewer to stand up to the conservative leaders who had blocked debate on the Medicaid expansion for six months. Lawmakers worked through the night Wednesday to get the plan through the House, and the Senate vote came hours later Thursday afternoon.

“I’ve never seen the case where a governor has rolled over her own party because she was throwing a temper tantrum,” said Republican Rep. Eddie Farnsworth, of Gilbert.

Senate President Andy Biggs said lawmakers had little information about what was in the budget before passing it.

“I am deeply and profoundly disappointed at the manner at which this came down,” he said.

Brewer dismissed the insults, predicting that all would be forgiven and Republican leaders would move forward together.

“Tomorrow they’ll probably say ‘I’m sorry’ or we will just forget it,” she said. “I just try to listen and let it go.”

It was a year of wins and losses for Arizona’s GOP.

The Legislature voted to adjourn its 2013 session early Friday morning after passing a slew of other bills, including an election overhaul that could make it more difficult for voters to obtain and return mail ballots. Biggs had to beg for extra votes to get the measure opposed by Democrats and voter outreach groups passed in the Senate.

Among the bills left on the floor was a proposal that would have prohibited abortion clinics from using Medicaid dollars to fund administrative costs and allowed for unannounced inspections, a top GOP priority.

Still, Brewer signed more than 100 bills advanced by conservative Republicans throughout the marathon session, including a measure that bars cities and counties from destroying guns turned over to police at community buyback events and instead requiring that they be resold. She also signed bills that will wildly increase campaign finance limits for state candidates and require unemployed workers to present documents showing they were fired before they can receive benefits.

Through it all, Brewer made it clear that the Medicaid expansion was her top priority. She held multiple rallies featuring low-income patients on the Arizona Capitol lawn and during the final month of the session, Brewer refused to sign any other bills until lawmakers passed a budget that included the health care expansion.

The Medicaid plan would cover people making between 100 percent and 138 percent of the federal poverty level and restore coverage to more than 100,000 childless adults who lost Medicaid coverage because of a state budget crunch. About 1.3 million Arizonans already are covered by the state’s plan.

Jan Brewer

Brewer Declares May ‘Arizona Small Business Month’

Arizona State Governor Janice K. Brewer approved the Arizona Small Business Association’s (ASBA) proclamation to declare May 2013 “Arizona Small Business Month.” The proclamation will be presented at ASBA’s 1st Annual Arizona Small Business Conference on May 16 at The Phoenician Resort in Scottsdale during the “State of Small Business Breakfast.”

Speaking at the State of Small Business Breakfast will be Governor Brewer, Secretary of State Ken Bennett, National Small Business Association President Todd McCracken and ASBA CEO Rick Murray.

“Declaring May as ‘Arizona Small Business Month’ celebrates our small business community for their great contributions to our State as entrepreneurs, innovators and leaders,” says Murray. “We thank Governor Brewer for honoring Arizona’s small business community in this way, and presenting this proclamation at our upcoming conference.”

Join the State of Small Business Breakfast on Thurs., May 16 at 8-9:00 a.m. at The Phoenician Resort (6000 E. Camelback Road, Scottsdale). The breakfast is part of ASBA’s 1st Annual Arizona Small Business Conference, which will also feature the 20th Annual Enterprise Business Awards Luncheon honoring the National Small Business Association award winners in Arizona, an all day conference with breakout sessions, Networking Mixer, and a Business Expo (free admittance).

To register, visit www.azsmallbizcon.com or call (602) 306-4000.

Jan Brewer

Brewer Declares May 'Arizona Small Business Month'

Arizona State Governor Janice K. Brewer approved the Arizona Small Business Association’s (ASBA) proclamation to declare May 2013 “Arizona Small Business Month.” The proclamation will be presented at ASBA’s 1st Annual Arizona Small Business Conference on May 16 at The Phoenician Resort in Scottsdale during the “State of Small Business Breakfast.”

Speaking at the State of Small Business Breakfast will be Governor Brewer, Secretary of State Ken Bennett, National Small Business Association President Todd McCracken and ASBA CEO Rick Murray.

“Declaring May as ‘Arizona Small Business Month’ celebrates our small business community for their great contributions to our State as entrepreneurs, innovators and leaders,” says Murray. “We thank Governor Brewer for honoring Arizona’s small business community in this way, and presenting this proclamation at our upcoming conference.”

Join the State of Small Business Breakfast on Thurs., May 16 at 8-9:00 a.m. at The Phoenician Resort (6000 E. Camelback Road, Scottsdale). The breakfast is part of ASBA’s 1st Annual Arizona Small Business Conference, which will also feature the 20th Annual Enterprise Business Awards Luncheon honoring the National Small Business Association award winners in Arizona, an all day conference with breakout sessions, Networking Mixer, and a Business Expo (free admittance).

To register, visit www.azsmallbizcon.com or call (602) 306-4000.

Jan Brewer

Brewer, GM announce Chandler Innovation Center

Michigan-based General Motors (GM), together with Governor Jan Brewer, Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny, the Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA) and the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC), announced today GM has selected Chandler as the site of its fourth Information Technology Innovation Center.  These IT Innovation Centers enable GM to in-source the company’s innovation capabilities, strengthening its global competitiveness.

With the announcement, GM expects to invest $21 million in the new Chandler facility and hire 1,000 high-wage employees over the next five years.

“GM could have chosen to locate this premier facility anywhere in the country, so it is a tremendous credit to our state and everything we have to offer that GM has decided to build right here in Arizona,” said Governor Jan Brewer.  “Today’s announcement speaks volumes about the business-friendly environment we have created in Arizona, including our high-tech workforce, competitive tax policies and lean regulations. I could not be prouder of our state or what this announcement means for the future of the Arizona economy.”

With today’s GM announcement, Chandler joins previously disclosed locations for Innovation Centers in Warren, Mich., Austin, Texas, and Roswell, Georgia.

“The greater Phoenix area is a fantastic hub of emerging technical talent – from university graduates to working professionals. GM needs these kinds of world-class and skilled employees to be as successful as we want to be,” said GM Chief Information Officer Randy Mott.  “Chandler is the perfect addition to our overall Innovation Center market strategy, locating in great communities that are on the leading edge of innovation and technology.”

GM’s IT Innovation Centers are part of a companywide transformation to improve performance, reduce the cost of on-going operations and increase its delivery of innovation.

“This is exactly the type of technology employer we need in Chandler and in our state,” said Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny. “The GM Innovation Center is a perfect complement to Chandler’s Price Corridor, and furthers the City’s reputation as a regional hub for innovation and high-tech businesses.”

GM will begin recruiting and hiring software developers, database administrators and system analysts immediately.  The new Innovation Center is expected to be operational by first quarter 2014. Interested candidates can apply for positions at http://jobs.gm.com/.

“We are thrilled with GM’s selection of Arizona and its significant increased investment in our community.  The company’s long-term commitment grows and strengthens our economy in the form of quality jobs, high wages and capital investment, building on the technology and economic base in our state,” said Sandra Watson, president and CEO, Arizona Commerce Authority.  “It has been wonderful working with GM’s team throughout this process, and we look forward to a continued successful partnership for many years to come.”

“General Motors could not have found a better innovation partner than the City of Chandler, which has worked hard to earn its well-deserved status as one of the western U.S.’s top technology cities,” said GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome. “GM’s investment is testament to our skilled workforce and quality lifestyle, as well as competitive and uncomplicated business landscape. Indeed, today’s announcement is a win for the entire region, and we look forward to developing a lasting partnership with General Motors.”

medicaid program - new patient eligibility

Arizona Chamber Foundation issues Medicaid reports

The issue of Medicaid expansion continues to loom large in state policymaking circles, and the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s research arm, the Arizona Chamber Foundation, has produced new reports on this important topic.

The Foundation recently released a new Policy Brief titled The Business Case for AHCCCS Expansion. The brief outlines the impact of cost shifting and hidden health care taxes on Arizona businesses, along with the effect expansion of the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System – AHCCCS – will have on the state economy and budget. It’s an excellent overview of the issue and the reasoning behind the growing support from governors throughout the United States, including Governor Brewer.

In addition, the Foundation has released a FAQ sheet to help individuals better understand what AHCCCS is and what voters passed into law when they adopted Proposition 204 in 2000. It’s an outstanding primer on the state’s best-in-class Medicaid program, the ballot measure that extended coverage to childless adults and the challenges facing the state posed by uncompensated health care.

I encourage you to dig into both of these publications and to share them with your network.

Glenn Hamer is the president and CEO of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is committed to advancing Arizona’s competitive position in the global economy by advocating free-market policies that stimulate economic growth and prosperity for all Arizonans.

Download Understanding AHCCCS and Proposition 204 and The Business Case for AHCCCS Expansion.

Jan Brewer

Brewer rolls out sales tax reform plan

Gov. Jan Brewer is expected to announce details of her proposal for a comprehensive simplification of the Arizona’s sales tax collection system at a press conference Monday.

Brewer says the current system has so many twists and turns it is extremely difficult for businesses to pay what they owe. She says business owners serving multiple cities must file multiple tax returns and undergo multiple audits. She’s said she wants a system that has just one form and one filing per business.

Cities and towns have objected to one part of the proposal that would change how sales tax on new construction is collected. They say that will hurt growing cities by sending the taxes elsewhere.

Brewer plans to announce the introduction of legislation designed to implement her plan.

Brewer

Brewer appoints leader of utility agency

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer has appointed a former electric utility executive to serve as the new leader of a state agency that advocates for consumers on electric, gas, phone, water and telecommunication issues.

Patrick Quinn will take over as director of the Arizona Residential Utility Consumer Office on Monday.

Quinn replaces outgoing director Jodi Jerich.

Quinn served as president of Qwest Arizona from 2002-2008 and held several other positions at the company dating back to 1977.

He has been president of a business and political consulting firm since 2008.

Brewer

Will Bennett block Brewer from seeking 3rd term?

Arizona Secretary of State Ken Bennett says he might try to block Gov. Jan Brewer from getting on the ballot if she tries to run for another term.

Brewer has floated the idea that term limits don’t prevent her from running again because she wasn’t elected to the partial term she held after Democrat Janet Napolitano resigned in 2009.

Bennett himself is a possible candidate for governor. He has a committee to explore such a candidacy. He has said he believes that term limits bar Brewer from running again.

His office processes candidate filings but he told Phoenix station KTVK during an interview aired late Sunday that his office might not accept Brewer’s paperwork.

He noted that both he and Brewer swore to uphold the state Constitution.

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Brewer appoints Republican judge to Supreme Court

Arizona Court of Appeals Judge Ann Scott Timmer is Gov. Jan Brewer’s choice to fill a vacancy on the Arizona Supreme Court.

The 52-year-old Republican was one of three finalists nominated by a state screening commission.

Timmer replaces former Justice Andrew Hurwitz, a Democrat, and her appointment changes the court’s partisan makeup to four Republicans and one Democrat. Hurwitz resigned in June to become a federal judge.

Brewer’s three Supreme Court appointments have all gone to fellow Republicans.

Timmer was appointed to the Court of Appeals in 2000 by then-Gov. Jane Hull, another Republican.

Brewer says in a statement that Timmer embodies judicial restraint and respects the separation of powers between branches of government.

In 2003, Timmer authored a panel’s decision upholding the constitutionality of Arizona’s law banning same-sex marriages.