Tag Archives: bryan dunn

Paul Schoeffler joins Adolfson & Peterson Construction

Paul Schoeffler, Adolfson & Peterson

Paul Schoeffler, Adolfson & Peterson

Adolfson & Peterson Construction (A&P) announced the addition of Paul Schoeffler as senior preconstruction manager for the Southwest region.

Schoeffler has over 35 years of experience within the commercial construction industry, primarily in preconstruction roles with large commercial contractors.  Schoeffler will be responsible for working with clients to provide initial conceptual estimates, constructability reviews, and comprehensive preconstruction services from concept through final estimates to match target budgets. Paul brings specific expertise in the senior living, healthcare, office, retail, industrial, mission critical and advanced technology market sectors locally.

Schoeffler has been involved in the preconstruction efforts on numerous notable projects in the Phoenix metro area, including the Mayo Clinic Collaborative Research Building, Phoenix Sky Harbor’s Sky Train, Promenade at Beatitudes Senior Living Campus, Sagewood Senior Living Campus and McCarty on Monroe.  Schoeffler holds an engineering degree from the University of Missouri – Columbia and served in the U.S. Army.

“Preconstruction is an area our clients highly value and we’re committed to providing the best possible experience from the earliest stages of an endeavor,” states Bryan Dunn, senior vice president at A&P. “Paul’s knowledge, experience and enthusiasm are a welcome addition to our team.  We are very excited to bring Paul on board.”

Adolfson & Peterson accepts ALS ice bucket challenge

The ALS ice bucket challenge has gone viral and it doesn’t appear to be freezing anytime soon. Local construction firm Adolfson & Peterson recently accepted the challenge.

“After a challenge from our Colorado office, Adolfson & Peterson Construction’s Bryan Dunn and our Tempe office has ‘called-out’ Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell, among others, to participate in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge,” writes a spokesman for the company.

See their video below:

APS Hyder II solar power plant located in Hyder, Arizona.

Green development stays sunny side up

Debates over energy consumption, reduction and alternatives occur frequently in the increasingly “green” world. Arizona stands as a leader in the alternative energy market with the use of solar, geothermal energy and natural gas as alternatives to more traditional energy providers. Even through the decline of green building projects, as reported by Forbes, major companies and builders such as APS, SRP and Adolfson & Peterson (A&P) have completed large alternative energy projects in the last year.

Arizona Public Service, through the APS AZ Sun Program, and McCarthy Building Companies completed its third solar project, a large solar installation called the Hyder II in Yuma County last year. It uses more than 71,000 single-axis tracking photovoltaic panels to generate 14 megawatts of solar energy, which is enough to serve 3,500 Arizona homes. The project set a record year for APS with 410 megawatts of solar power and represented the largest annual increase in solar capacity, nearly tripling the total from 2012. APS contains more than 750 megawatts of solar capacity on its system after investing nearly $1B in solar projects, and serves more than 185,000 Arizona homes. Another large solar project built last year is the Fry’s Marketplace PowerParasol, which shades 74,800 SF, including 220 parking spaces, driveways, aisles, grocery cart stations and sidewalks. It diminishes the heat-island effect, enables light passage to allow the growth of plants and generates 1,013,140 kilowatt hours of solar energy.
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Geothermal energy is another popular source of renewable energy in Arizona. Both SRP and A&P developed geothermal projects in 2013. Geothermal energy produces electricity from naturally occurring geothermal fluid, and steam forms when production wells access superheated water reservoirs thousands of feet beneath the Earth’s surface. As opposed to wind and solar that are affected by the weather, geothermal is a more reliable source of renewable energy. SRP purchased 50 megawatts of geothermal energy from CalEnergy. The project will annually offset 460 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, the equivalent of 40,000 cars. SRP also has an agreement to purchase geothermal energy from the Hudson Ranch facility in California and Utah’s Cove Fort plant.

A&P’s latest geothermal project is Lookout Mountain Elementary School where it constructed a closed-loop system that allows the ground’s heat to warm the building during the winter and reverse the process in the summer by transferring heat back into the ground. The system does not use any chemicals, untreated water or Freon. A&P expect it to last up to 30 years and the underground wells to last up to 75 years. The classrooms’ energy consumption will be reduced by 40 percent and the low maintenance and operations costs will save the school district up to $1.8M over the next 20 years.

Although there are many green projects occurring, there is a decline in contracts. Bryan Dunn, senior vice president of A&P, states that “the disconnect between the demand and not seeing as many ‘green contracts’ is that there are more and more building owners viewing a formal certification process as expensive and lengthy. Tight budgets don’t allow for the upfront costs associated with a formal green certification. Instead, they are looking to incorporate the energy saving and durability aspects of green building into their projects without a formal certification of the building.”

Dunn also says solar technology may be played out. He is seeing trends with technology, such as waste-to-energy, bio-mass and bio-gas and geothermal energy. “Clients are considering several types of alternative technologies on single projects…Utilizing multiple solutions also keeps overall and total project costs down, benefiting everyone in the long run,” he adds.

Besides the cost of green projects, Scott Canada from McCarthy explains that projects may be slowing because of supply and demand. “There may be a near-term slowing of new projects while Arizona’s energy consumption begins to grow again, with the improving economy. Energy, including renewables, often cycles between a period of expansion and pause,” he says, adding that solar costs are continuing to drop, making it an attractive energy source, especially with the abundance of sunshine in Arizona. In its latest forecast, APS predicts renewable energy, gas in particular, will double in Arizona by 2029.

Sustainability Discussions at the GoGreen Conference

GoGreen Conference ’11 Sustainability Panel Discussions (Part II)

In the first part of the GoGreen Conference ’11 coverage, we reported that sustainability education and patience were the buzzwords of many of the panel discussions. Here’s why:

The panel discussion titled “Green Your Workplace: High Impact Change at Your Business,” moderated by Ed Fox, chief sustainability officer for APS, focused on how to turn the idea of going green and sustainability into governance. This challenge small and large businesses face was the topic of discussion among the panel, which included:

  • Bryan Dunn, senior vice president of Adolfson & Peterson Construction;
  • Jonce Walker, sustainability manager of Maricopa County;
  • Anthony Floyd, LEED AP, green building program manager of the City of Scottsdale;
  • and Leslie Lindo, president and co-founder of IKOLOJI.

Fox began the discussion asking the panelists how one would convince the leaders of companies to pursue incorporating green elements into the workplace.

Floyd suggested offering incentives and marketing materials and free literature to spur interest. Lindo agreed providing incentives to employees will help encourage them to make the changes second nature. She also suggested owners become educated themselves and have a strong advocate in the office.

Walker took a different approach and said reducing consumption to afford sustainability is one step a business can consider taking. The company must be efficient and through this efficiency, it will convince others that the extra cost will be worth it.

Walker continued to say that it helps to know all the benefits of turning your particular business green — environmental, economical, etc. — and know your audience.

“Ninety percent of clients are bottom-line driven,” Dunn said. They want to save energy and save money, he added. Two ways companies can do this is by making their own operations more efficient (switching your lighting to LED, for example) while also anticipating changes in the marketplace.

Dunn also said behavioral modifications must take place. You can switch to LED, but the appropriate actions must be taken by the staff, i.e. remembering to turn off the lights.

But what was stressed was the acceptance of risk. While making your business more environmentally friendly and sustainable will help you save money in the long run, it will take some time to get there with few obvious returns. Or, as Fox put it, the few “low hanging fruit.”

In the following discussion, “Applying Sustainabilty Best Practices to Impact Community Equity and Diversity,” moderated by Dr. George Brooks, owner of Southwest Green and NxT Horizon Group and including Greg Peterson, founder of Urban Farm; Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward; and Rosanne Albright, Brownfields Project Manager of the City of Phoenix, regenerative sustainability was the hot topic as well as education.

“Nature regenerates itself, not just sustains itself,” Peterson said. “Education is the key piece to sustainability.

Urban farming (or growing and sharing food), recycling land via the Brownfields Land Recycling Project, and the importance of parks and open space in the state were all covered in this discussion.

“Energy, food, health, poverty — they are all connected,” Brooks said. “Local sourcing and urban farms can help offset the costs of energy.”

Peterson’s final thoughts?

“It’s really a grassroots movement,” he said. “For those of you in the government, get out of our way.”

Visit the GoGreen Conference website at gogreenconference.net.

 

Best of the Best Awards 2011, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Best of the Best Awards 2011: Real Estate Commercial

Winner: CB Richard Ellis

CBRE, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011CB Richard Ellis has been serving clients in Arizona since 1952, growing to become a dominant player in the commercial real estate market. From landlord and tenant leasing to the acquisition and sale of all property types, the company has earned a reputation as a respected leader in the business community with its vast market knowledge and enduring culture of client service. CBRE believes that the truest measure of its success comes from providing superior service to its clients — delivered by knowledgeable, creative and tenured employees, many boasting more than 20 years in the marketplace. It is this dedication to teamwork and commitment to excellence that makes it possible to serve the diverse needs of clients.
Year Est: 1952  Brokers: 101
Principal(s):
Craig Henig (Arizona/Phoenix),
Tim Prouty (Tucson)
CBRE logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 20112415 E. Camelback Rd.
Phoenix, AZ 85016
602-735-5555
www.cbre.com/phoenix



Finalist: Ryan Companies US Inc.

Ryan Companies US, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Ryan Companies US Inc. is a 73-year-old family-owned business whose reputation for building high-quality projects and positive customer experiences has earned it repeat business with customers, subcontractors and business partners. Since opening its Southwest regional office in Phoenix in 1994, Ryan has developed and constructed more than 16 million square feet of office, retail and industrial space in Arizona. Its 80 employees are committed to exceeding expectations of customers that include UniSource Energy (Tucson Gas & Electric), W.L. Gore and Associates, The Musical Instrument Museum, Target, Avnet, AT&T, Humana, US Bank, ConocoPhillips, Taser International and more.


Year Est: 1994
Principal(s): J. Strittmatter, T. Holzer, M. Ryan Carson, C. Carefoot, A. Riley, M. McGowne, S. Jordan

Ryan logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

3900 E. Camelback Rd., #100
Phoenix, AZ 85018
602-322-6100 www.ryancompanies.com



Finalist: Adolfson & Peterson Construction

Adolphson & Peterson Construction, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011Over the past 20 years, Adolfson & Peterson Construction (A&P) has been committed to building sustainable projects throughout the Southwest. A&P is an industry leader in delivering Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified projects and high performance green buildings. Going beyond green building, A&P takes into account the purpose of the projects it undertakes, the communities impacted by its operations and A&P’s own business practices. Sustainable is much more than building green. It defines A&P’s business practices with a LEED Gold office, hybrid vehicles in the fleet, in-house carbon reduction programs, and job-site recycling on all of its projects.
Year Est: 1946
AZ Staff: 66
Principal(s): Bryan Dunn, SVP
Adolfson Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 20115002 S. Ash Ave.,
Tempe, AZ 85282
480-345-8700
www.a-p.com


Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011