Tag Archives: building business

social media day

Tips for better business Tweeting

With more than 500 million Tweets sent daily, it’s likely your next customer is on Twitter. The challenge for companies is making their Tweets stand out and building their business by capturing a greater share of the growing market using Twitter.

“An effective Tweet can boost business by creating the highest engagement with followers, while building a devoted fan base,” says Bernard Perrine CEO of social media marketing company HipLogiq, developer of Twitter marketing application SocialCentiv.

Perrine explains techniques to construct ideal Tweets that are more likely to be heard above the crowd, be retweeted or favorited, and ultimately help drive sales:

• Find your brand voice. Your Tweets should reflect a professional voice. Be positive, engaging and conversational. Offer perspective or insight, even when retweeting to make your post stand out.
• Include multimedia to encourage interaction. Tweets should contain pictures, links or hashtags to catch the reader’s attention and trigger involvement.
• Pin a Tweet to highlight what’s important. Businesses can pin a specific Tweet to the top of their profile to showcase their special offers so that their followers don’t miss out.
• Avoid starting a Tweet with @username. Starting with @username makes that Tweet only visible to the sender and receiver. For greater visibility, try “Hey, @username!…” or insert a period before the username, “.@username….”
• Create exclusive and custom offers. Tweets with exclusive offers can spur interest to try your company’s products or services, can build customer loyalty, and make your Twitter community feel special. HipLogiq’s clients have the most response with 20 percent or more off and buy-one-get-one-free (BOGO) offers.
• Tweet less than six times per day. Followers become annoyed with accounts Tweeting more than five times per day or more than one Tweet per hour. (getspokal.com)
• Increase Tweet visibility. Request a retweet in the Tweet. Tweet 4-5x per day to increase retweets. Join trends by linking a Tweet to a hashtag and a trending word or phrase (#HipLogiq).

Spreeman Piano Innovations

Michael Spreeman, Owner Of Spreeman Piano Innovations

Michael Spreeman
Spreeman Piano Innovations
Title: Owner | Est.: 2004
www.spreemanpianoinnovations.com

From an early age, Michael Spreeman knew he was meant to work with pianos. Beginning at age 18, he experienced nearly every aspect of the industry — from servicing pianos for recording studios and artists, to technical consulting, to working as a high-end piano re-builder.

That young mindset has now come full circle with the establishment of Spreeman Piano Innovations. The company offers two models of pianos, a 7-foot-3-inch piano and a 9-foot concert grand piano. Each piano is custom built based on the client’s preferences, requiring an average of 5,000 hours of labor.
Creating a business within an industry with long-standing brand loyalty was a difficult task, but for Spreeman, it was a no-brainer.
“There is always a market for exclusive, high-quality product,” Spreeman says.

It all began when world-class pianist and composer Bob Ravenscroft asked Spreeman to redesign a piano for him. After receiving positive feedback from Ravenscroft, Spreeman went ahead with his dream of launching his own custom high-end piano building business. A five-year process of designing the ultimate piano — taking conventional technology and amplifying it — eventually resulted in the Ravenscroft 9-foot model.

The pianos are built with the finest materials, including flawless exterior cabinetry and cast iron frames that hail from one of the oldest manufacturing operations in Germany. The soundboard wood used in some of the pianos is sourced from the same forest used to create the famous Stradivarius violins. After finalizing the design for the pianos, Spreeman and his team showcased it to others in the industry. “Concerts and venues have given our pianos recognition as (a) high-end performance instrument, acceptance and support from the technical community, and has helped to secure our position in the market with other high-end manufacturers,”Spreeman says.

The transition from turning his passion into a successful business hasn’t beenan easy one, but it’s a journey that Spreeman has been more than happy to take. Instead of trying to do everything on his own, he has learned to seek assistance and advice fromthe business community. “By expanding my thinking to more of a ‘team’ or ‘collaborative effort’ approach, I have been able to assemble a core team whose skill sets are complementary,” Spreeman says.

The company employs Spreeman’s son, Andrew; Stephanie, the receptionist; and Robert Springer, who utilizes his high-tech skills to optimize the performance of the piano’s mechanical action. “As with any artist, I constantly seek out opportunities to further the knowledge base for my craft and interface with other successful business associates and artists,” Spreeman says. “Ultimately though, I’m just a guy with a dream, who is willing to take a risk and do whatever is necessary to fulfill it.”