Tag Archives: bureau of labor statistics

10 Re-careering Tips - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

10 Re-careering Tips

10 Re-careering Tips:

1. Check out the hot — and not-so-hot — fields.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics gives indications of which fields expect to grow versus lose jobs, so keep that in mind when you’re deciding whether or not to become a social worker (should be a good bet) or a television anchor (not so much). But don’t throw a dart and pick a so-called hot job. Read on.

2. Don’t start from scratch.

Re-careering doesn’t have to mean throwing out your years of work experience. If you’re an IT professional laid off from a tech company, you don’t have to become a nurse. Brush up on privacy law, network security or database management, and apply with a health care organization.

3. Follow your heart.

Biotechnology might be the next big thing, but if you find it boring, don’t bother. One of the best predictors of success in a field is your passion for it. Good engineers of any type are usually in demand; mediocre ones are rarely in demand. What interests you?

4. Take into account the work environment and physical requirements.

Do you work well when the pace is fast? Or do you prefer to be introspective and analytical? Do you despise being on your feet all day, or are you miserable sitting in a cube?

5. Do a 360-review.

Call upon peers and colleagues — both former supervisors and employees — to assess your strengths and weaknesses. You might be surprised what others say are your best (and worst) qualities, and what you uniquely bring to a position.

6. Network, network, network.

Whether it’s getting to know fellow students, impressing an instructor, volunteering or doing an internship, it’s essential to make connections with people who can help you with your goals.

7. Seek professional help.

Maricopa County Community Colleges’ career centers are free and open to the public.

8. Go back to school.

It can be as simple as taking one course to earning a certificate or a degree.

9. Look for financial assistance.

Subsidized loans, Pell grants and scholarships are available, especially if you’ve lost a job. Even small scholarships add up. Call professional organizations in your field of interest and check the library for lists of scholarships many people don’t even know exist.

10. Differentiate yourself.

Instead of just earning a teaching degree, look into certificates such as English immersion or special education to make you more marketable and malleable.
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Re-careering tips sources:

Joe Patterson, assistant vice president and executive director of Thunderbird Online at Thunderbird School of Global Management; Ruthie Pyles, director of M.B.A. recruitment and admission, the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University; Scott Schulz, director of career and employment services at Glendale Community College
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Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

unemployment rate was unchanged at 9.6 percent after the economy lost 54,000 jobs in August

Nation’s Unemployment Rate Holds Steady

The nation’s unemployment rate was unchanged at 9.6 percent after the economy lost 54,000 jobs in August.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported today that government employment fell as a result of shedding 114,000 temporary workers hired for the Census. Private-sector payroll employment rose by 67,000.

“The August jobs report, albeit tepid, does show the economy is holding steady, despite speculation to the contrary,” says Frank Armendariz, Arizona regional director at Manpower. “This is consistent with what I’m seeing in the market, as well as what the quarterly Manpower Employment Outlook Survey (MEOS) has been reporting for the past three quarters. Our quarterly MEOS survey measures employers’ intentions to increase or decrease the number of employees in their work force during the next quarter, and we’ve seen consistent results in our Phoenix-area survey this year.”

According to the BLS, the number of jobless Americans stands at 14.9 million. The number of long-term unemployed (those who have been out of work 27 weeks or more) declined last month by 323,000 to 6.2 million. In August, 42 percent of the nation’s unemployed had not worked for 27 weeks or more.

Government employment fell by 121,000, largely due to the loss of Census 2010 workers. Total private employment continued a rising trend. The BLS reports that since its most recent low in December 2009, private-sector employment has risen by 763,000.

“The fact that we’ve seen eight straight months of private-sector job growth is very encouraging and is consistent with what I’m seeing — employers are continuing to hire each quarter, but in limited quantities, with a majority of firms holding steady with their current labor force,” Armendariz says. “This is an improvement from last year when we were seeing mass layoffs and very little hiring.”

Employment gains were seen in health care, mining and construction. The manufacturing sector lost jobs, while employment in retail trade was essentially unchanged.

“The recession brought about huge changes in the labor market in a very short period of time,” Armendariz says. “Now we’re seeing new jobs come back very slowly. At the current pace, it will take years for us to get back to pre-recession employment levels. As a result, the limited labor market growth we’re experiencing feels almost imperceptible in comparison to the free fall we took in the wrong direction last year.”