Tag Archives: business training

Ballet Arizona

Top Things to Do This Week

It’s the week of Valentine’s Day, which means that this weekend will have plenty of lovely events to attend. Watch the sad love story of “La Bayadère: The Temple Dancer” at Arizona Ballet or see the majestic Arabian Horse Show and be awed by the beautiful creatures. No matter what you do this weekend, make sure beauty is part of it. Don’t forget to share photos of you enjoying these events with the hashtag #SL5 and follow us @scottsdaleliving on Instagram!

 

Art Laboe’s Valentine’s Super Love Jam

All the classic R&B oldies are coming to U.S. Airways this Thursday for a jamming love concert that will bring you back to the good old days. With 11 acts performing, such as The Intruders, Malo, and Sunny and the Sunliners listen to all the lovey songs that line your memories.

US Airways Center Feb. 14th @7:30 p.m. get tickets at ticketmaster.com

 

Arabian Horse Show @ WestWorld

Kicking off this Thursday is the 59th annual Arabian Horse Show. Thousands of exotic horses will be at the show trying to win and be presented as the best breed horse. Tickets can be bought from ticketmaster.com or at the door for $10.

 

VNSA Book Sale

Heaven is a library, or a book sale with enough books to fill an entire warehouse. The VNSA Book Sale surely has that many books for sale this weekend to satisfy anyone no matter what book you’re looking for. Head to the Arizona State Fairgrounds Exhibit Building this Saturday and Sunday starting at 8 a.m. and shop for knowledge until you can’t shop anymore.

 

“La Bayadere: The Temple Dancer” @ Ballet Arizona

This weekend, watch Ballet Arizona perform the classic story of a love that could never come into fruition. The Indian tale of a young warrior and temple dancer that only unite in death will leave your heartbroken this Valentine’s Day weekend. The Phoenix Symphony will perform alongside the ballet at the Symphony Hall. Tickets are on sale at Ballet Arizona Box Office at 2835 E. Washington St. or call 602-381-1096

 

Arizona Cocktail Week

Get your drink on starting this Friday, Valentine’s Day, for an entire week as Arizona Cocktail Week kicks off for another fun round of drinks. Visit arizonacocktailweek.com to find out which bars and cocktail lounges in the Valley are participating. Be ready to drink and have a good time all across the valley, and submerge yourself in the state’s fine cocktail culture.

 

Chocolate, Chocolate, Chocolate:

Carefree Festival of Fine Chocolates and Fine Art

Indulge in the truly finer things in life: chocolate and art. Carefree is hosting this free festival to cater to everyone with a sweet tooth and a fine sense in art this weekend. Bring the family or bring that special someone in your life and guarantee a great time. The festival kicks off on Thursday at noon and ends at 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday the event begins at 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. The festival is at 101 Easy Street on the Carefree Desert gardens and Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion.

Chocolate Lovers’ Festival

All aboard the chocolate train! Verde Canyon Railroad is filling its first class cars with chocolate with a view of the Verde Canyon. Visit verdecanyonrr.com/events/ to book your ticket for the chocolate festival that is happening this Friday-Sunday.

Chocolate, Chili and Cochineal

Head to the Heard Museum this weekend and learn of the origins of all your favorite foods that started in the Americas. Plus, learn all about the tiny insect who loves to eat prickly pear cactus and became the source of a brilliant red dye coveted by sixteenth-century Spanish conquistadors. The exhibit opens this Sunday and runs through November. Head to heard.org for more information

 

Anti-Valentines Day:

Valentine X – Candlelit Night of Horror at the 13th Floor

Dive into the other well-known side of Valentines day, the horror. 13th Floor is hosting a haunted house that is sure to leave you absolutely terrified whether you’re with a date or not. This Friday and Saturday, come to the 13th floor and feel real fear. The house opens at 7:30 and closes at 10:30 p.m., 2814 W. Bell Rd. in Phoenix

Voodoo Tines: Anti-Valentine’s Day @ Hula’s Modern Tiki

No one showing you love today? Get back at the ones who’ve wronged you with an ice cold round of revenge! Bring a picture of your ex and smack it on a custom voodoo doll as you have your revenge upon him or her this Valentine’s Day. Call 602-265-8454 for more information or come to 4700 N. Central Ave. in Phoenix

The GPEC building in Phoenix - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Greater Phoenix Economic Council Profiles

Georgia Lord, GPEC Ambassador ChairwomanGeorgia Lord
GPEC Ambassador Chairwoman
Former Vice Mayor
City of Goodyear

As the wife of an Air Force officer, Georgia Lord has experienced myriad of cultures. Little did she know that while with him on assignment in Germany, she would get the opportunity to ride in a blimp bearing, coincidentally, the name of the city she later served as a city council member — Goodyear.

Lord was originally elected to the Goodyear City Council in 2005. Following her successful re-election in 2009, she was elected by the council to be vice mayor. At the end of 2010, however, she had to resign that position in order to run for mayor of Goodyear.

“I’m fortunate to be able to take complicated issues that are important to citizens, break them down in a way that allows us to address the impact of our decisions, and really consider the consequences our actions will have down the road,” she says.

Lord conducts these discussions with others outside of the Goodyear leadership, as well. In fact, she’s able to fuel her passion for Goodyear’s economic development through participation with the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, a venue that provides a sounding board for her ideas, and encourages interaction and support from other cities in the Valley.

“By working together as a team member of GPEC, we’re able to benefit from economies of scale and achieve our goals,” she says.

Lord is most specifically involved with GPEC’s Ambassador Program, which educates both the private and public sectors by highlighting the state’s strengths and the best ways to capitalize on them. Those education efforts, Lord explains, include tours of industrial facilities, workshops with industry experts, educational seminars and business training. She also participates in GPEC’s International Leadership Council, where she is able to draw on her past experiences overseas as she and other council members encourage foreign companies to invest in Arizona.


Scott Smith, mayor City of MesaScott Smith
Mayor
City of Mesa
www.mesaaz.gov

Scott Smith is not one to sit quietly on the sidelines. So, when he became increasingly frustrated with the direction Mesa was headed in, he decided it was time to “put up or shut up,” and was successfully elected mayor in 2008.

One of Smith’s greatest challenges since taking office has been the state of the city’s economy.

“It’s not allowed us to pursue some of the opportunities we would have liked to be well down the road with already,” Smith says. “We know that the only way for us to recover is to create a business environment where the economy can grow and business can thrive, so we’re working diligently to create that kind of environment.”

Smith has found that his involvement with the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) has been very helpful as he navigates the murky waters of the economy.

“Organizations such as GPEC that are focused on the region’s economic success are absolutely necessary tools for us to really experience the kind of success we think we are capable of,” he says.

The best way to build a successful environment, Smith says, is to identify a city or region’s strengths. The city of Mesa has done so through its HEAT Initiative — Health, Education, Aerospace, Tourism. Boeing, an important employer in Mesa, has received good news, Smith says, that will help solidify its position in the region, and MLB Spring Training continues to draw tourists to the state.

“If we can build upon our strengths … I think we can create a new or expanded economic base that will help us to grow in an organic and measured manner, rather than the boom-and-bust that we experience when we depend on growth as an industry,” Smith says.

Participation in GPEC and working with other cities, he adds, will be much more helpful for Arizona’s overall economy than a city trying to work its problems out on its own.

AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

University of Arizona Customized Executive Education - AZ Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

University of Arizona Targets Niche Markets For Customized Executive Education

The Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona has a customized executive education program that targets highly skilled professionals with advanced degrees in the industries of medicine, bioscience and engineering, and who are called upon to lead key divisions within the company.

These leaders frequently have had little or no formal training in essential business concepts and strategies. This “gap” between technical expertise and business training is widely recognized by the executives affected. Customized executive education can be designed to successfully bridge this gap, and specifically target an organization’s unique learning goals and performance objectives. The Eller College business of medicine, business of bioscience, and business of technology programs present topics and address issues specific to the client organization.

All executive education certificate programs are categorized as non-degree. Many Eller College business of medicine programs qualify for Category 1 Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit for physicians, in partnership with University of Arizona Health Sciences.

Step 1: Exploratory meetings
The director of executive education meets with the organization’s executives and key stakeholders to review the company’s strategic goals and objectives. A preliminary needs assessment facilitates a better understanding of the company’s challenges, which leads to the identification of specific learning objectives. Based on the outcome of these meetings, a proposal outlining the suggested curriculum is presented for discussion and review. Once the proposal has been refined and the contract executed, the project moves into the development phase.

Step 2: Program development

The proposed curriculum is fleshed out in detail using Eller’s 3-Cs of customized executive education development: content, context and critical mass. The content of each session, or module, must be results-driven, i.e. what action, behavioral change or deliverable is the ultimate goal? Next, how can the material be given context through embedding unique/specific corporate data, projects or activities into the module design? The third C is critical mass. The college believes that in order to effect behavioral change, or create momentum strong enough to enhance and influence actions beyond the classroom, there must be sufficient participation to create consensus, as well as critical mass within that organization.

Eller executive education programs are designed for a minimum of 15 participants and a maximum of 50. Faculty and industry experts are selected based on their formal areas of expertise, as well as specific industry knowledge or experience particularly relevant to the audience. The client’s key stakeholders or planning team collaborates with the executive education team and UA faculty in developing the curriculum. Optimal results are achieved when instructors have ready access to key personnel within the organization during the development process for purposes of discussion and feedback. Also needed is access to pertinent data and internal reports relevant to the topics covered, and the overall learning objectives of the company. To ensure confidentiality, a non-disclosure agreement is put in place at the beginning of the development process.

Step 3: Program delivery

Custom programs are a minimum of one day in length and may be considerably longer based on the needs of the organization. Typical programs consist of multiple sessions or modules, with each module being one-and-a-half days to two days in length. Classes are dynamic and participatory; attendees engage in inter-session activities and exercises designed to transfer knowledge back into the organization after formal sessions are concluded. Participants are expected to complete advance readings prior to each session, and may be asked to complete specific activities following the module or between (multiple) modules. Classes may be conducted at either of the Eller College locations in Scottsdale or Tucson, or at a client-designated facility.

Step 4: Program feedback, evaluation and review

Following the conclusion of each module, program participants and other key stakeholders are asked to complete an evaluation designed to rate the process, instructors, content and deliverables. All evaluations and feedback, both formal and informal, are jointly reviewed by the Eller executive education team and the company’s management team. Specific activities or follow-up sessions are frequently assigned at the conclusion of each module to reinforce content, action items and deliverables.

Executive education as an investment

Customized executive education is an investment in a company’s single most important asset, its people. Every company is faced with the challenge of successfully developing, motivating and retaining top employees. This applies equally to current executives and high-potential individuals who are key to the company’s future success. An investment in executive education can pay significant dividends in many different ways, whether it is adding value that visibly impacts the bottom line or one that substantively enhances a company culture that believes in promoting excellence through continuing professional development.

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010