Tag Archives: business

Tamika Curry Smith - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Tamika Curry Smith – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Tamika Curry SmithFounder and president, The TCS Group, Inc

Curry Smith leads The TCS Group, Inc., a human resources and diversity and inclusion consulting firm. She helps clients resolve human resources and diversity-related issues that impact business and organizational performance. Before founding The TCS Group, Curry Smith was the director of diversity for both Target Corporation and Deloitte Consulting.

Surprising fact: “I’m a huge football fan. I love to watch college and NFL games and I’m usually the only woman in my Fantasy Football league.”

Biggest challenge: “People assuming I’m inexperienced due to my petite size and young-looking appearance. I overcome those perceptions by being confident, establishing credibility, then showing the value I bring.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Debbie Cotton - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Debbie Cotton – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Debbie CottonInterim director, Phoenix Convention Center

Cotton oversees daily operations of the Phoenix Convention Center, Executive Conference Center, Orpheum Theatre, Symphony Hall and five parking garages. She manages a staff of 240 employees, a budget of $47.5 million, and is the city’s chief representative to the state’s tourism and hospitality industry.

Surprising fact: “I have a bachelor’s degree in speech and hearing science from Western Illinois University and began my career working for Xerox Corporation.”

Biggest challenge: “Stepping up to manage the Phoenix Convention Center in the midst of a global economic crisis that greatly impacted the hospitality industry. Not only did I have to deal with the effects of the economic crisis, but I had to quickly learn about an industry that was new to me.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Theresa Chacopulos - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Theresa E. Chacopulos – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Theresa E. ChacopulosSenior vice president and senior financial advisor, Wells Fargo Advisors

Chacopulos was ranked among Barron’s Top 1,000 Financial Advisors for 2013 and was ranked No. 1 in the state of Arizona. Chacopulos serves high net worth clients, offering a customized approach to portfolio management. A 29-year financial services veteran, she holds the Certified Financial Planner and Certified Investment Management Analyst designations. She is insurance licensed in Arizona and has Series 7 and 66 registrations.

Surprising fact: “I started my career as a drive-in teller with First Interstate Bank.”

Biggest challenge: “In 1999, I transitioned my business, reducing my client base to a manageable number, allowing me to provide better service.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Jan Brewer - 50 Most Influential Womenin AZ Business

Jan Brewer – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Jan BrewerGovernor, State of Arizona

Brewer became Arizona’s 22nd governor in 2009, inheriting the worst budget deficit in the country. Through her support of free-market principles, competitive taxes, lean regulations and a ready workforce, she has transformed Arizona into one of the most business-friendly states in the nation.

Surprising fact: “I’m a gardener at heart. You need the right seeds, plus water and sunshine. And you have to run off the rabbits. Sounds a little like the Legislature, right?”

Biggest challenge: “Balancing my family and home life with a career in public service. While this issue can never be truly ‘overcome,’ it’s one I manage day-by-day, guided by my love of family and the people I serve.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Mara Aspinal - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Mara Aspinal – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Mara AspinalPresident and CEO, Ventana Medical Systems

Aspinal, who holds an MBA from Harvard, joined Ventana as president and CEO in 2011. She founded the European Personalized Medicine Association and advised the Obama and Bush administrations on diagnostics and genomics.

Surprising fact: “I will attend any live sporting event – from baseball to rodeo – any chance I get.”

Biggest challenge: “My approach to my first leadership role in manufacturing was that I asked lots of questions, studied our business vs. competitors and put a strong team in place. In three years, we turned the business around and had the industry’s best profit margins. The lesson for me is not to be afraid of new challenges, take the time to learn and then trust the data alongside your gut.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Diane Brossart - Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane Brossart – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane BrossartPresident and CEO, Arizona Forward

Brossart joined the nonprofit civic group — which aims to move Arizona forward environmentally, economically and socially — as a member 30 years ago. She was appointed to her leadership role in 1991, when Valley Forward focused exclusively on Maricopa County. Rebranded as Arizona Forward is 2012, its expanded statewide sustainability agenda includes: land use, transportation, air quality, energy, water and environmental education.

Surprising fact: “I believe my mother who passed away nearly 10 years ago lives as a rabbit in my backyard.”

Biggest challenge: “Taking Valley Forward statewide after 43 years as the Valley’s voice for balance. I’m bringing the best and brightest talent around Arizona together to help make the Grand Canyon State the greatest place in America to live.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Karen Abraham - Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Karen M. Abraham – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Karen M. Abraham – Senior vice president and CFO, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Abraham oversees eight departments including finance, taxes, facilities and risk. With 30 years worth of experience at BCBSAZ, she works directly with the CEO on the development of long-range plans and policies.

Surprising fact: “My mother was a bookkeeper and at an early age recognized that I liked math. By  the  8th grade, I actually knew what a CPA was and I wanted to make it my job.”

Biggest challenge: “I’ve worked through difficult economic times, operating losses and much government regulation. I have wonderful relationships with many talented colleagues who have helped me through challenging times.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Sanders & Parks attorneys honored

Sanders & Parks, P.C., an AV-rated boutique firm that prides itself on its expertise and results, announced that 11 of its attorneys have been named 2013 Southwest Super Lawyers or Rising Stars.

Sanders & Parks’ Super Lawyers are Robert Bruno, Winn Sammons, Mark Worischeck, Garrick Gallagher, Robin Burgess and Brett Hager.

Sanders & Parks’ Rising Stars are Jeffrey Smith, Arthur Eaves, Mandi Karvis, Jasmina Richter and Shanks Leonhardt.

Sanders & Parks specializes in complex legal problems in civil, business and insurance litigation, as well as in the areas of medical malpractice defense, aviation law and intellectual property and licensing. Sanders & Parks handles litigation and major transactions for clients both locally and nationwide.

Sanders & Parks attorneys honored

Sanders & Parks, P.C., an AV-rated boutique firm that prides itself on its expertise and results, announced that 11 of its attorneys have been named 2013 Southwest Super Lawyers or Rising Stars.

Sanders & Parks’ Super Lawyers are Robert Bruno, Winn Sammons, Mark Worischeck, Garrick Gallagher, Robin Burgess and Brett Hager.

Sanders & Parks’ Rising Stars are Jeffrey Smith, Arthur Eaves, Mandi Karvis, Jasmina Richter and Shanks Leonhardt.

Sanders & Parks specializes in complex legal problems in civil, business and insurance litigation, as well as in the areas of medical malpractice defense, aviation law and intellectual property and licensing. Sanders & Parks handles litigation and major transactions for clients both locally and nationwide.

Flash Websites

Stand Out in Local Search Directories

A powerful local search strategy for your business is an essential component to a well-developed local marketing plan. Local search directories have improved in recent years, with the integration of Google+ and Google Places as well as updates to directories such as Yahoo, Yelp, Bing, etc. Incorporating local search directories into your marketing mix can improve your search rankings and help your business gain higher visibility online.

Maximizing Google+ Local: The Integration of Google+ and Google Places

Google is one of the most important directories to provide accurate and up-to-date information about your business. Google has recently integrated Google Places local listings with Google+, transitioning to a seamless Google+ Local listing. This new approach to local directories provides a social component and allows businesses to capitalize on this budding social network to improve search rankings, drive more local business, and increase sales.

Tips for Managing Your Business’s Google+ Local Listing

Updating your Google+ Local profile requires just a few steps. The first step is to define the main product or service line that you offer, e.g., furniture company in Scottsdale, Arizona. With this, compile the following information about your business: brief description, photos, place of business (physical address), and link to the business website. You will enter all of these details about your business before submitting your Google+ Local listing. You will also be given the option to select categories that are relevant to your business so that Google can better determine when to display your listing to search engine users. Once you have filled out the basic information requested by the local search directories, you should also update the rest of the information on the form such as service area, payment options, operating hours, and videos.

If this is the first time you have filled out a Google+ Local listing or your address has changed, you will also need to authorize your address. After you submit your information, Google will mail you a postcard with additional instructions. Once the postcard arrives after about two weeks, complete the steps listed on the postcard to finalize your Google local search directory listing.

Claiming and Updating Other Local Directory Listings

In addition to Google, there are several other local search directories such as Yelp, Yahoo, Merchant Circle, Angie’s List, Bing, etc. that you should submit your directory listing. Be sure to use the same information that you used in your Google listing so that all of the information aligns across online directories. Consistency will help you maintain quality and will improve your local search rankings.

Do’s and Don’ts for Managing Local Directory Listings

Finally, there are a few things to remember as you complete your local directory listings.

The Do’s

  • Incentives. Local directory listings are a great place to list special offers or discounts to new customers online. List any specials that you are currently running to encourage prospective customers to try out your products or services.
  • Visuals. Upload pictures that accurately represent the products or services that you offer. This will allow search users to identify what you do quickly and easily, and it will also provide insight into how your business operates.
  • Reviews. Manage your reviews periodically to maintain a positive reputation for your business online. Respond to every review – positive or negative – in a polite and professional way. Being responsive to customer reviews about your business shows prospective customers that you care about the satisfaction of each and every customer.
  • Accuracy. Ensure accuracy across your local directory listings. Consistency is imperative to maintaining a high local search ranking for your target keywords.

The Don’ts

  • Don’t use a non-local phone number. Make sure that the phone number that you use is a local landline and not a toll-free number. Toll-free numbers can make it more difficult for the search engines to track your place of business.
  • Don’t use a P.O. Box. Make sure to use your business’s physical address and not a P.O. box, as this can also make it more challenging for the search engines to track your location.
  • Don’t change your business name. Instead of adding location keywords to your business name, make sure to keep it intact to achieve the best search results.
  • Don’t falsify reviews. Search engines are getting better at identifying false reviews so it is important to ask for reviews from your satisfied customers rather than to create mock reviews that the search engines will notice and eventually de-value.

If you would like to learn more about how local search engine optimization can help your business, please contact Net-Craft.com at 480-563-0558 for a free local SEO consultation.

 

 

 

Goldwater Institute

2013 Top Lawyers list: Business/corporate law

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Jessica Benford
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
602-440-4866
www.rcalaw.com
Benford counsels clients regarding general corporate representation, including corporate formation and governance. She also handles securities enforcement and regulation matters.

Charles E. Davis
Davis Miles McGuire Gardner, PLLC
480-733-6800
www.davismiles.com
Davis has an “AV Preeminent” rating by the Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Ratings system, which connotes the highest possible rating in both legal ability and ethical standards.

Gerald Gregory Eagleburger
Sanders & Parks, P.C.
602-532-5692
www.sandersandparks.com
Eagleburger’s practice includes all types of transactional, commercial/business and personal asset matters, including formation and governance of corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies.

Stephanie Fierro
The Frutkin Law Firm, PLC
602-606-9300
www.frutkinlaw.com
Fierro’s practice focuses on general counsel business law and estate planning. She brings the firm a wide range of experience and interests including all aspects of corporate transactional work, estate planning, and tax representation.

Jonathan B. Frutkin
The Frutkin Law Firm, PLC
602-606-9300
www.frutkinlaw.com
Frutkin is the principal attorney at The Frutkin Law Firm and brings areas of expertise in the practice areas of corporate and business law, corporate bankruptcy, and commercial litigation.

Phillip Guttilla
Polsinelli
602-650-2327
www.polsinelli.com
Guttilla Guttilla serves as general corporate counsel to his clients ranging from emerging growth companies to multi-national enterprises.

Gregory R. Hall
DLA Piper
480-606-5128
www.dlapiper.com
Hall regularly counsels clients on a broad range of corporate, securities and business-related matters and matters affecting corporate policy and strategy, including directors’ duties and responsibilities and other aspects of corporate governance.

Travis J. Leach
Jennings Strouss
602-262-5806
www.jsslaw.com
Leach focuses his practice in the area of corporate, securities, and finance. He also helps lead the firm’s Sports and Entertainment practice, coinseling professional athletes, coaches, entertainers, and ownership groups.

Brian Moll
Polsinelli
602-650-2302
www.polsinelli.com
Moll practices in the areas of corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, and commercial contracts. He has extensive experience in assisting businesses in all stages of their operations, from start-up to a mature business.

Robert A. Royal
Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.
602-255-6011
www.tblaw.com
Royal’s practice emphasizes intra-corporate dispute and director, officer and manager liability issues.

Terence W. Thompson
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8515
www.gknet.com
Thompson’s practice emphasizes corporate business acquisitions; public-private projects, including strategic joint ventures; Native American enterprises and projects; water/wastewater infrastructure development; sports facility financing; and physician-hospital contracts.

Nancy White
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
602-257-5213
www.steptoe.com
White’s practice emphasizes international and domestic transactions, including mergers and acquisitions, purchases and sales of capital assets and real property, project finance, asset-based financings, asset securitizations, and private placements of debt and equity securities..

Is Facebook Worth the Effort for Small Business?

I’m a big advocate of social media, including Facebook, but whether or not it’s right for your business depends largely upon what you expect it to do and the type of business you’re in. Having been active in social media in the B2B space for the last several years, I often compare what we’re doing on social media with some of my favorite brands (most of which happen to be B2C brands) and the audience we’re able to build, the engagement we’re able to experience, and the results we’re able to see pale by comparison to a strong B2C social media presence—but I’m pleased with the growth we see when compared to other B2B brands in our space.

We also regularly experiment with advertising on social media with limited to moderate success when compared to other direct marketing channels. Nevertheless, I’ve seen and read about the same marketing approaches reaping great results for consumer brands. In fact, I’ve even responded to adds that offered me products I might be interested in—and have even made purchases. But, I don’t want to be a focus group of one.

According to Erik Sherman, “Facebook marketing? A must according to many companies. Not worth the trouble to some. But most of the voices you hear are in the business-to-consumer space.” He continues, ” After all, people go onto Facebook for fun. But what if you’re trying to reach other businesses, making the seemingly reasonable argument that the users don’t stop being involved in business just because they’re taking a break?”

I have yet to be convinced that social media like Facebook is a viable direct marketing channel in the B2B space, but it’s definitely a good vehicle for promoting content. Social media has proven to be a good media for building an audience that’s interested in your industry, interested in learning, and willing to engage with you online. And, they often become some of your very best customers.

Three or four years ago I think it was Marketo’s Phil Fernandez who suggested that people who engaged with their social media before entering the sales process were better informed and prepared to make a purchase than those who didn’t. He suggested that it was time to stop thinking about the sales cycle and start thinking about the revenue cycle. He suggested that social media was a great vehicle for planting seeds that eventually became prospects and entered the sales funnel. He also argues that the traditional linear approach to marketing handing off a lead to sales and sales closing the deal doesn’t seem to work as well as when marketers continue to nurture, educate, and inform all throughout the revenue cycle.

I’m convinced that social media and content marketing play an incredibly valuable role within the revenue cycle. With that in mind, I believe social media is worth the effort for small business—I’m just not convinced that it makes sense to advertise there.


Small business evangelist and veteran of over 30 years in the trenches of Main Street business, Ty makes small business best practices, tips and advice accessible by weaving personal experiences, historical references and other anecdotes into relevant discussions about leading people, managing a business and what it takes to be successful. Ty writes about small business for Lendio.

social media day

Is Google+ Better for Business than Facebook or Twitter?

In the world of social networks, innovation can quickly change the field of frontrunners — remember LiveJournal?

We just saw it again as Google+ overtook Twitter to claim the No. 2 spot behind Facebook. And the new kid is already better than Mark Zuckerberg’s baby for small businesses, professional firms and entrepreneurs, says Alex Hinojosa, vice president of media operations for EMSI (www.emsipublicrelations.com).

“I knew Google+ would attract a big following because it really lends itself to business uses and SEO,” says Hinojosa, who has witnessed the value of Google+ grow exponentially in the daily operations of his PR firm.

A new Global Web Index study show Google+ grew to 343 million users globally in December, or about 25 percent of global internet users. Facebook still accounts for 50 percent of the pie.

“Facebook continues to go through self-imposed changes that are seeing mixed responses from longtime users,” Hinojosa says. “The new No. 2 has much, much more to offer than simply being an alternative to the big dog.”

Hinojosa reviews the merits of Google+ as a business tool, and why he believes the social network will continue its meteoric rise:

• Power: Google+ may be the new kid when it comes to social media – it’s not even 2 years old yet — but Google has become synonymous with anything online. The “new kid” offers something that no other social media platform can: Google power.

• Overwhelming advantage: “Google loves its newest offspring and it favors any post, article, picture and link posted on Google+,” Hinojosa says. “If you post a link on your Google+ about asthma remedies, and one of your connections is logged in to Google+ and searches for asthma remedies, your post will show up high in his Google search results.”

• In action: Let’s say you own an art gallery full of nature photos. Your website for promoting the gallery highlights “mountain photos,” “wildlife photos,” and “waterfall photos” and you’ve created matching URLs for each page, such as bobsnaturephotos. com/waterfallphotos. Now you head over to post your newest update on Google+. You post a message about the waterfall, then you add the link to your waterfall page, bobsnaturephotos. com/waterfallphotos. Now, whenever one of your connections types “waterfall photos” into a Google search, whether it’s days, weeks or months later, there you are on page 1 of the results. Your post shows up, your profile picture shows up, and your link shows up.

“Once upon a time MySpace was king, but over a period of about a year the world made a seamless transition onto Facebook, which may very well see a mass exodus of users,” Hinojosa says. “If your business or employer is not already on Google+, it’s time to make the move.”

Alex Hinojosa is the Vice President of Media Operations at EMSI Public Relations, where he oversees the creative process and execution of print (traditional & online), radio, TV and social media campaigns.  He has an extensive background in radio, working as a national talk-show host and executive producer for CBS Radio, Clear Channel Media & Entertainment and ESPN in major markets.  Alex is also a (social) media coach and fill-in talk show host for Genesis Communications Florida.

Broadway Health Center, 6550 Broadway, Mesa

Multi-Million Dollar Renovation Begins on 2 Medical Office Buildings in Mesa

 

Renovations have begun on Baywood Health Center and Broadway Health Center, two, 2-story medical office buildings in Mesa across the street from Banner Baywood Hospital.

Archway Holdings Corp. of Beverly Hills, Calif., which purchased the properties in February 2012, is implementing significant exterior and interior upgrades. Improvements to the properties include a complete redesign of their exterior façades, renovations to the interior lobbies and common areas, new garden and monument signage and water saving landscaping features.

Construction started in December 2012, with completion in March 2013. LGE Design Build is the general contractor; Cawley Architects will handle the design work.

Kelley Ahrens of CBRE’s Phoenix office will handle the leasing assignment for the property owner.

“In addition to repositioning the buildings into class A assets, Archway is providing tenants with generous improvement dollars to perform renovations to their individual office suites in order to keep up with the improvements to the buildings,” Ahrens said.

The assets are located directly across the street from Banner Baywood Medical Center, a 342-bed hospital providing complete acute care services to the East Valley communities of Mesa, Gilbert, Apache Junction, Queen Creek, Fountain Hills and areas of northeastern Pinal County. The assets are also close to Leisure World, the largest retirement community in Metro Phoenix.

Baywood Health Center, a 36,127 SF medical office building is at 6553 E. Baywood Ave. Broadway Health Center, a 25,277 SF medical office building is at 6550 E. Broadway Rd. The properties are 83% and 19% leased, respectively.

“The renovations will not only add value to these properties, they will add significant value to the surrounding community too,” Ahrens said. “The new look and upgrades will attract additional healthcare professionals to the area, which, in turn, provide more medical services and create more jobs.”

 

rsz_university_center

Cushman & Wakefield Negotiates $23.5M Sale of University Center

 

Cushman & Wakefield of Arizona negotiated the $23.5M sale of the three-building University Center to the Arizona Board of Regents. This marks an acquisition for future expansion of Arizona State University.

University Center , located at Rural Rd. and University Dr., is situated across the street from ASU. The three buildings, 1100, 1130 and 1150 E. University Dr., contain a total of 169,997 SF of space. The 1130 and 1150 E. University Dr. buildings are three-story office structures, while the 1100 E. University Dr. is a single story flex building.

University Center was constructed in 1986/1987 and is occupied by major tenants that include Arizona State University, ACS Commercial Solutions, Nationwide Recovery and Laureate College.

The Arizona Board of Regents purchased the property from Travelers of St Paul, Minn., paying approximately $138.40 per SF.

“We have had the privilege to work with Travelers and Arizona Commercial Management on University Center for over 14 years,” says Karsten Peterson with Cushman & Wakefield of Arizona. “This project has, and will continue to be, a quality location for years to come. University Center has always enjoyed a great relationship with ASU as a Tenant and we are pleased to see ASU progress this relationship into ownership.”

Peterson, Dave Seeger and Mark Gustin of Cushman & Wakefield represented Travelers in the sale negotiations. Peter Lyons of Arizona Commercial Management also assisted in representation of the seller. Curtis Brown of Ross Brown Partners represented the buyer.

 

 

social.media

10 Tips to Write a Social Media Policy in Business

Most business owners are now aware that having a social media presence is important for the success of their businesses. While social media presents unthinkable growth opportunity, it also opens the company up to risk.

Thus, it is critical for a business owner to create and implement a strong social media policy that gives the company and its employees the freedom to grow through social media, while putting a set of concrete rules and guidelines in place that will keep the troops in line.

However, when you consider that no two social media policies will be the same because different organizations will have their own unique environments, it is important to call in the experts.

Steve Nicholls, author of Social Media in Business, international speaker, and social media strategist offers 10 tips to write a clear, well-defined social media policy.

1. Create a Task Force: Opinions and ethics may vary between different people; it is preferable that all members of upper management be consulted when developing a social media policy so that all reach agreement on policy content.

2. Define Appropriate Internal Use: It is important to outline what is acceptable and what is not to your employees when it comes to using social media platforms in the workplace. How much freedom employees will have when interacting on social media needs to be clarified based on your workplace environment in order to avoid any confusion.

3. Define Appropriate External Use: As we have seen time and time again, one slip on Facebook or Twitter can ruin a career or a business. Thus, it is important to define who will be allowed to communicate with the public and put an approval process in place.

4. Confidentiality: Content posted on social media platforms need to comply with the organization’s confidentiality and disclosure of proprietary data policies.

5. Accountability: Employees need to be held accountable for everything they write on social media sites.

6. Protect Employers Reputation: Employees have the duty to protect their employer’s reputation. It would also be useful to make employees aware that competitors might read what they post and thus that sensitive information is not to be disclosed as a consequence.

7. Be Clear on Copyright issues: It is advisable to include a clause dealing with copyright, plagiarism, libel and defamation of character issues.

8. Regularly Review and Update Policy: Regular reviews need to be organized and performed. A policy is not always consistent with what is actually taking place and the company need to pay attention and adjust accordingly to make sure it is a relevant and effective policy that promotes growth and safety.

9. Work Hard, Play Less: It is important to stress that social networking sites cannot interfere with primary job responsibilities so that employees do not lose perspective

10. To Whom Does it Apply: The social media policy needs to clarify who to treat as internal staff and thus who will follow the social media policy rules when external resources are brought in.

business - best and worst

CEOs Rank Best, Worst States For Business

For the eighth year in a row, CEOs rate Texas as the No. 1 state in which to do business, according to Chief Executive magazine’s annual Best & Worst States Survey. Florida rose one spot to take the No. 2 rank, while North Carolina slipped to No. 3. Tennessee remained at No. 4 while Indiana climbed a spot to capture the No. 5 rank. CEOs named the worst states to do business as California, New York, Illinois, Massachusetts and Michigan.

Arizona ranked No. 13, down two spots from its ranking in 2011.

The Best & Worst States Survey measures the sentiment of CEOs on business conditions around the nation. For the 2012 survey, 650 CEOs from across the country evaluated the states on a broad range of issues, including regulations, tax policies, workforce quality, educational resources, quality of living and infrastructure. The survey was conducted from Jan. 24 to Feb. 26, 2012.

Louisiana was the biggest gainer in the survey, rising 14 spots to be the No. 13 most attractive state in the country to do business. The biggest loser was Oregon, which dropped nine spots to No. 42.

CEOs surveyed said California’s poor ranking is the result of its hostility to business, high state taxes and overly stringent regulations, which is driving investment, companies and jobs to other states. According to Spectrum Locations Consultants, 254 California companies moved some or all of their work and jobs out of state in 2011, an increase of 26 percent over the previous year and five times as many as in 2009.

“CEOs tell us that California seems to be doing everything possible to drive business from the state. Texas, by contrast, has been welcoming companies and entrepreneurs, particularly in the high-tech arena,” said J.P. Donlon, Editor-in-Chief of Chief Executive magazine and ChiefExecutive.net. “Local economic development corporations, as well as the state Texas Enterprise Fund, are providing attractive incentives. This, along with the relaxed regulatory environment and supportive State Department of Commerce adds up to a favorable climate for business.”

Inhospitable business environments mean less jobs, as entrepreneurs and established corporations seek more cost-efficient and tax-friendly locales, said Marshall Cooper, CEO of Chief Executive magazine and ChiefExecutive.net. “This survey shows that states that create policies and incentives are rewarded with investment, jobs and greater overall economic activity.”

For complete results, including individual state rankings on multiple criteria, methodology and more, please visit ChiefExecutive.net.

Dave Ramsey Podcast

Business Podcast: The Dave Ramsey Show 1/12/12

Dave Ramsey, a renown financial guru and speaker, delivers his daily radio show through podcasts hosted on his website and the iTunes store.

Utilizing interviews with others, call-ins from listeners, and more — Dave Ramsey gives a realistic perspective on how to properly handle your finances and the stresses that come along with doing that.

Dave RamseyFrom getting out of debt to building and maintaining wealth to managing your money, Ramsey covers practical financial topics for all demographics.

And who knows better than Ramsey?

A former debt-dependent citizen like most Americans, he sought out to broaden his financial horizons after losing everything he owned. Through his experiences, interviews and studies, Ramsey has turned into one of the most trusted financial gurus.

And he understands that the rest of America needs the same education that he has given himself, so he formed The Lampo Group in 1992.

Now, through his company and daily radio show, Ramsey aims to extend his knowledge and help those who are hurting with the same financial stresses he once had.

Take some time out of your day to tune into Ramsey’s show from January 12, 2012 by clicking the link below.

The Dave Ramsey Show – 1/12/12

7 Marketing Tips & Strategies, Entourage Marketing

7 Marketing Tips To Help Grow Your Business

Michael Hunter at Entourage Marketing provides you with seven marketing tips to help your business grow.

1. Create a catchy name and a solid brand

The naming and presentation of your brand is vital. You want to create a name that both represents your product or service and is memorable.

Recently, a new text messaging application came out for smart phones. The only reason why it was successful was because of the name. Kik Messenger did not feature any additional functionality that other applications did not have. People talked about it just because they wanted to say “Kik me later.”

Be conscious of how your brand is perceived in the marketplace. Bad names go nowhere.

2. Focus your message

Before you start writing any of your content, you must be very clear about who your audience is. Don’t try to be everything to everyone. Your message should be laser focused on your target market and demographic. When your ideal client comes to the homepage of your website, reads your brochure, hears your advertisement on the radio, etc. they should have no need to look anywhere else. Your message should expose a common problem and positioning your product or service as the solution to that problem.

Your message isn’t just your written word; it also ties into your branding and visual communication as we explained above. For example, if an investment firm had a product targeting very wealthy individuals; it would disinterest clients if their logo and branding was in big, fluffy pink letters … It doesn’t matter how great their products are, the message their brand conveys does not align with who they are trying to target. The same company would have much more success with a clean, simple logo that communicates professionalism and success.

3. Get organized

Great marketing takes time and organization. The more organization you have and the more systems you can create, the less time it will take. A timeline is a great way to stay on task and execute a multi-step marketing campaign. It’s also an effective way to set deadlines and manage a team. Multiple people working on the same project are likely to be more productive when they have clear deadlines and an understanding of how their assignments contribute to the big picture.

4. Build a database

To be successful in business you must, must, MUST build a list. Big money is in a big list. Most businesses spend 90 percent of their marketing budgets on trying to get a new customer to walk through their door or use their service, yet once that customer walks in the door, most businesses don’t collect any information on them, allowing them walk right back out with no means of future contact.  The best way to build a list is to give something good away for free in exchange for their name and contact information. The more value you provide for free, the more valuable your paid services are perceived to be. People think to themselves, “WOW, if they are giving this away for free, what do I get when I pay for something?”

5. Establish promotional partnerships

Most people that call themselves entrepreneurs are really “solo-preneurs;” Meaning, they try to do everything by themselves. Marketing is not a do-it-yourself thing. There are plenty of ways for you to leverage other people to produce great results for a minimal investment of your time. Promotional partnerships are one of these ways. Instead of lighting your hair on fire trying to make it all happen by yourself, put your mind to work and think of different people that can help you grow your business. For example, say you happen to be an expert in branding. Instead of trying to find clients and build systems to get new clients, partner with local business consultants or coaches to leverage their established relationship with their clients as a way to grow your business fast. Imagine partnering with a business consulting firm that has built solid relationships with 25, 50, or even 100+ clients.

6. Referral programs

As we all know, word-of-mouth advertising is the most powerful form of advertising there is. If your product or service is good enough, people will talk about it naturally; but why not give them an incentive? Structured client referral programs are a great way of maximizing something you are already doing to some extent, by providing great service and asking for referrals. Some of the biggest companies in the world are leveraging referral marketing tactics to grow their business by offering incentives to their employees to refer business to them. Other companies leverage and incentive-ize their customer base to bring in business. Just the other day, I saw a sign in front of a very nice apartment complex that said, “Refer a friend to us that signs a lease and get $500!”

In the online space, referral marketing is called affiliate marketing. There are many people that make a significant six-figure income simply marketing other people’s products and services. You no longer have to worry about content creation. You can market someone else’s product to make you money and vice versa; you can create a product and establish promotional partnerships with other people to take your message to the marketplace.

The bottom line is: Find a way to reward your customers for bringing their friends to you or for promoting your product or service.

7. Integrate social media into your entire marketing campaign

Social media is the new buzz word in business. Everyone knows they need to be on it, but most businesses have no idea what they are doing. Just creating a Facebook page for your business does not mean you are “on social media.” Social media (when used correctly) is the glue for your entire marketing campaign. Traditional forms of marketing like print, television and radio are great at sending a message to the masses, but lacks engagement with the recipient of the message.

Business today is all based on relationships. It doesn’t matter how great the advertisement on TV looks, if a friend tells you they had a bad experience with the product or service, chances are very high that you will not try it yourself. If a TV advertisement is terrible, you have no interest. Sometimes it’s so bad that you even change the channel. However, if your friend comes to you bubbling with excitement about their experience, chances are very good you will try it out, too. See, we like and do the things that our friends like and do; it doesn’t matter how much money someone spends on mainstream marketing. Social media is, at its core, founded on real-life relationships. Facebook just recently reached 600 million users and is still growing; Twitter has over 200 million users; LinkedIn just hit the 100 million mark. Social media is here to stay, and your business must be on it — and do it well.

The reason why social media is so powerful is because it has the ability to create a community around almost anything. Social media is a powerful marketing tool that all your other marketing materials should be driving traffic to and building a database of people that “like” your product or service.

For more information about marketing tips or Entourage Marketing, visit www.entouragemarketing.com.

The GPEC building in Phoenix - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Greater Phoenix Economic Council Profiles

Georgia Lord, GPEC Ambassador ChairwomanGeorgia Lord
GPEC Ambassador Chairwoman
Former Vice Mayor
City of Goodyear

As the wife of an Air Force officer, Georgia Lord has experienced myriad of cultures. Little did she know that while with him on assignment in Germany, she would get the opportunity to ride in a blimp bearing, coincidentally, the name of the city she later served as a city council member — Goodyear.

Lord was originally elected to the Goodyear City Council in 2005. Following her successful re-election in 2009, she was elected by the council to be vice mayor. At the end of 2010, however, she had to resign that position in order to run for mayor of Goodyear.

“I’m fortunate to be able to take complicated issues that are important to citizens, break them down in a way that allows us to address the impact of our decisions, and really consider the consequences our actions will have down the road,” she says.

Lord conducts these discussions with others outside of the Goodyear leadership, as well. In fact, she’s able to fuel her passion for Goodyear’s economic development through participation with the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, a venue that provides a sounding board for her ideas, and encourages interaction and support from other cities in the Valley.

“By working together as a team member of GPEC, we’re able to benefit from economies of scale and achieve our goals,” she says.

Lord is most specifically involved with GPEC’s Ambassador Program, which educates both the private and public sectors by highlighting the state’s strengths and the best ways to capitalize on them. Those education efforts, Lord explains, include tours of industrial facilities, workshops with industry experts, educational seminars and business training. She also participates in GPEC’s International Leadership Council, where she is able to draw on her past experiences overseas as she and other council members encourage foreign companies to invest in Arizona.


Scott Smith, mayor City of MesaScott Smith
Mayor
City of Mesa
www.mesaaz.gov

Scott Smith is not one to sit quietly on the sidelines. So, when he became increasingly frustrated with the direction Mesa was headed in, he decided it was time to “put up or shut up,” and was successfully elected mayor in 2008.

One of Smith’s greatest challenges since taking office has been the state of the city’s economy.

“It’s not allowed us to pursue some of the opportunities we would have liked to be well down the road with already,” Smith says. “We know that the only way for us to recover is to create a business environment where the economy can grow and business can thrive, so we’re working diligently to create that kind of environment.”

Smith has found that his involvement with the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) has been very helpful as he navigates the murky waters of the economy.

“Organizations such as GPEC that are focused on the region’s economic success are absolutely necessary tools for us to really experience the kind of success we think we are capable of,” he says.

The best way to build a successful environment, Smith says, is to identify a city or region’s strengths. The city of Mesa has done so through its HEAT Initiative — Health, Education, Aerospace, Tourism. Boeing, an important employer in Mesa, has received good news, Smith says, that will help solidify its position in the region, and MLB Spring Training continues to draw tourists to the state.

“If we can build upon our strengths … I think we can create a new or expanded economic base that will help us to grow in an organic and measured manner, rather than the boom-and-bust that we experience when we depend on growth as an industry,” Smith says.

Participation in GPEC and working with other cities, he adds, will be much more helpful for Arizona’s overall economy than a city trying to work its problems out on its own.

AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

A Rioglass solar facility - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Renewable Energy Tax Incentive Program Helps GPEC Bring In The Shining Stars Of Solar

It makes sense that a city with an average of more than 321 days of sunshine a year is taking the lead in solar, thanks in large part to the tireless efforts of the energy source’s biggest crusader in Arizona: the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC).

“I think if you look at comprehensively the way that we approach the utilization of solar, this is top-down the best market to do solar manufacturing,” says Chris Camacho, executive vice president of business development at GPEC.

GPEC aggressively pushed for passage of Senate Bill 1403, the Renewable Energy Tax Incentive Program, that was signed into law in 2009. The incentives include a refundable tax credit and a property tax reduction.

Since January 2010, eight companies have made the commitment to come to the Phoenix Metro area, with many more anticipated for the future.

GPEC’s hard work has led to making connections around the globe and attracting a number of high-level renewable energy companies to the Valley. One of these companies is Suntech Power Holdings, the world’s largest manufacturer of photovoltaic modules.

“Arizona can be very proud that it has GPEC as an ambassador for the region to reach out to global companies,” says Wei Tai Kwok, vice president of marketing at China-based Suntech Power Holdings. “They’re pounding the pavement to get the message out there that they want to be the solar capital.”

It was thanks to this commitment that Suntech decided to make Goodyear the location for the company’s first U.S. manufacturing plant.

“(GPEC) helped us with the financial modeling, business plan and follow-up,” Kwok says. “They were very attentive and committed to our success … and they’re still at our side and supportive of our needs.”

He also listed other important attributes that factored into the decision, including the state’s skilled work force and Arizona’s serious commitment to solar energy.

GPEC’s Camacho says that type of confidence and emphasis helps the organization differentiate itself from similar groups.

“GPEC’s brand as a group can provide the highest level of services to companies in analyzing the Western U.S. for business locations,” he adds.

The companies that have worked with GPEC can attest to its capability in assisting with relocation efforts. Rioglass Solar, a company that produces reflector components for solar thermal power plants and is a subsidiary of Rioglass Solar Holdings in Spain, worked with GPEC to establish a manufacturing facility and U.S. headquarters in Surprise.

“It was very helpful for us to have an organization that could get us the support we needed,” says Greg Armstrong, chief operating officer of Rioglass Solar. “You need a site that is constructible, has infrastructure and has a quality work force.”

Armstrong adds that the company is highly confident that due to the support of the local community, the infrastructure and GPEC, coming to Arizona will meet Rioglass Solar’s objectives.

Of course, one of the biggest benefits the expansion of the solar industry in Arizona will have will be on job creation. The more activity there is in the region, the more high-quality jobs will be available. The Suntech plant already has created 80 jobs and is expecting to increase to about 150 people within three or four years. Rioglass Solar also anticipates more than 100 positions at its Surprise facility.

While there has been plenty to celebrate since the passing of the incentive program, there are still hurdles to overcome. The catalysts for future growth of the solar industry in Arizona certainly are in place, but the economic difficulties have had an effect.

“We have seen corporations be very conservative in how quickly they move on investment decisions,” Camacho says. “We still have another 150 renewable energy companies in our pipeline. As the economy continues to recover, credit becomes more available, we will welcome more and more companies.”

It’s safe to say that Arizona is moving ahead in the sustainability industry — most notably in the solar field — and thanks to GPEC’s support, there are no signs of this industry slowing down.

“I look at sustainability alongside health care as one of the two industries that is going to drive our economic future,” Camacho says. “Without groups like GPEC, a lot of this would not exist, and I’ll attribute that to having our team be at the forefront of understanding these technology applications, understanding what drives the location decisions of CEOs, and creating an environment that’s very supportive of the (solar) industry.”

AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Aaron Matos is the founder and CEO of Jobing.com. - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Jobing.com’s Aaron Matos Talks About His First Job

Aaron Matos
Title: Founder/CEO
Company: Jobing.com

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
I was a bike mechanic at Swiss American Bicycles. I learned how to work for a boss who was demanding about service quality, timeliness and doing things right. When I was 14, I thought he was overbearing and too hard on me and others. Now, 24 years later, I realize he helped feed an insatiable desire to do excellent work.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
I was a personnel manager at El Dorado of Sun City. I learned that HR and managers can have too many rules, and that if management creates a culture where people are empowered they can accomplish great things.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
(Swiss American Bicycles) $3.35 an hour; (El Dorado of Sun City) $21,500 a year.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
Chris Gaffney, the current lead investor at Great Hill Partners. He has supported and pushed me as CEO … He has taught me that business and life have a long arc, and that you’ve got to keep your eye always focused on building a great business for your customers first and foremost.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
Focus on getting things done and accomplishing things. I always traded responsibility for pay, knowing pay would come. Too many people focus on “promotions” or “job titles.” Work to take on big projects and accomplish big important goals for your company. Not only will you learn and grow faster, but others will notice and you’ll get those promotions because you earned it.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I don’t spend energy thinking about what you could be doing instead. Too many people don’t succeed because they have their eye on another ball in a different game. Be passionate about what you’re currently doing.

Arizona Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Michelle De Blasi Partner, Quarles & Brady

Michelle De Blasi’s Passion For The Environment Carries Through All Her Work

Michelle De Blasi
Partner, Quarles & Brady

Attorney Michelle De Blasi is passionate about the work she does on issues concerning the environment.

After completing her undergraduate studies at Arizona State University, De Blasi attended law school at the University of  Washington and worked for the federal government for six years on oil spills and other environmental cases. She returned to Arizona, and worked for the attorney general’s office for one year in the environmental section.

In 2004, De Blasi joined Quarles & Brady. As a partner with the law firm she  practices in the area of environmental and natural resources law. She assists clients in getting permits, navigating enforcement actions and does renewable energy work.

De Blasi became the firm’s Valley Forward representative in 2007. She jumped right in as a board and executive committee member. De Blasi works on the entries committee for Valley Forward’s signature fall event, the Environmental Excellence Awards. Last year, she served her second term as chair of the energy committee, a new endeavor responsible for organizing meetings and events, building membership and planning educational field trips for members.

“We are involved because it (Valley Forward) provides great networking opportunities with nature business leaders in the community,” De Blasi says. “As a firm we have many clients that are members as well, and we can interact with them on a different level.”

De Blasi says the organization serves as an educational source. Valley Forward tries to take a neutral stance on environmental policies because it has such a diverse membership. Rather than take sides, Valley Forward holds educational forums where it explains what the policies are about.

“Valley Forward is such a great way to stay on top of the issues that are happening out there,” De Blasi explains.

The energy committee planned a debate in the fall with the candidates for state corporation commission. Members of Valley Forward met the candidates and talked about renewable energy credits.

“(Valley Forward) brings the most value to be able to do things I love doing, and interact with things I really like on issues I care about the most,” De Blasi says.

De Blasi adds the biggest challenge for Valley Forward is maintaining membership. When companies are faced with smaller budgets, outside memberships are usually the first thing to get cut. Despite companies cutting ties with the organization, some individuals have chosen to stay on as members because they have a passion for the organization, and believe it is important.

“Valley Forward is rare in the audience it serves, being so wide and large,” De Blasi says. “It is a great organization, and is run very well.”

Bed and breakfasts can be the perfect option for those who'd like to get away while still enjoying the comforts of home.

Bed And Breakfasts Around Arizona

Getting away for the weekend can be fun, but sometimes it’s nice to have the comforts of home available even while away on vacation.  Bed and breakfasts can be the perfect option for those who’d like to get away while still enjoying the comforts of home. Here’s a list of bed and breakfasts around Arizona for when the average hotel just doesn’t cut it.

  • A Territorial House
    65 Piki Dr., Sedona
    800-801-2737
    A two-story, Western-style ranch adorned with old-fashioned furnishings, this comfortable and peaceful inn is charming and friendly. Outdoor hot tubs, fireplaces and a great desert landscape provide a serene situation.

  • Adobe Hacienda Bed & Breakfast
    10 Rojo Dr., Sedona
    800-454-7191
    A Spanish style hacienda with handmade Mexican furniture, antiques, Native American art, fireplaces, whirlpool tubs and full breakfast is served.

  • Adobe Hacienda Bed & Breakfast
    10 Rojo Dr., Sedona
    800-454-7191
    A Spanish style hacienda with handmade Mexican furniture, antiques, Native American art, fireplaces and whirlpool tubs. Full breakfast is served.

  • Amado Territory Inn
    3001 E. Frontage Rd., Amado
    888-398-8684
    Situated near the Mexican border, this bed and breakfast is considered to be great birding country.

  • Apple Orchard Inn
    656 Jordan Rd., Sedona
    800-663-6968
    With an eclectic mix of natural wonders, skip around town enjoying music, festivals, shopping and contemporary art. Full breakfast is served on the patio. Rooms come furnished with great amenities.

  • Bed & Bagels of Tucson
    10402 E. Glenn St., Tucson
    520-760-5595
    This bed-and-breakfast, offering a pool, hot tub and five-course breakfasts, welcomes pets and children. Special diets are accommodated and Bed & Bagels is suitable for most chemically sensitive (MCS) guests. Especially well-suited for foreign visitors, as the owner speaks four languages.

  • Bedlam Bed & Breakfast
    15253 N. Skylark Crl., Fountain Hills
    480-837-9695
    High atop a hillside, this B&B offers breathtaking views of the vast desert and surrounding mountains, including Four Peaks and the Superstition Mountains. Each bedroom comes with its own private bathroom, TV, telephone and high-speed Internet access. Closed June, July and August.

  • Birders Vista Bed and Breakfast
    5147 S. Kino Rd., Sierra Vista
    520-378-2493
    Guests at Birders Vista B&B can enjoy a wide array of birds in the lush backyard. Amenities include a reading library with 1,500 books, high-speed Internet access, TV and a telescope for your birding pleasure.

  • Boots And Saddles Bed & Breakfast
    2900 Hopi Dr., Sedona
    1-800-201-1944
    Each room is decorated in unique Southwestern themes and feature air-jet tubs, private patios, telescopes for star gazing, fireplace, refrigerator, luxurious robes and free Internet access. A fresh, two-course breakfast is served every day.

  • Briar Patch Inn
    3190 N. Hwy. 89A, Sedona
    928-282-2342
    Stay in one of the 19 cottages nestled in Oak Creek Canyon and enjoy a peaceful, natural setting. Located 3 miles from shopping, dining and great views of the Sedona sunset.

  • Canyon Villa Bed & Breakfast
    40 Canyon Circle Dr., Sedona
    800-453-1166
    This two-story Spanish Mission-style inn is luxurious, outstanding and relaxing. Take in the fresh flowers and the effortless entry to Oak Creek for a morning swim.

  • Casa Tierra Bed & Breakfast
    11155 W. Calle Pima, Tucson
    520-578-3058
    This Mexican-style adobe home makes resting easy, as it is located in an isolated area and is near many local accommodations.

  • Catalina Park Inn
    309 E. 1st St., Tucson
    520-792-4541Six guest rooms are strategically placed to provide privacy that opens to a walled courtyard. Built in 1927, this two-story Mediterranean-style mansion woos guests with its mahogany woodwork and architectural nuance.

  • Cozy Cactus Bed & Breakfast
    80 Canyon Circle Dr., Sedona
    928-284-0082
    This five bedroom bed and breakfast offers guests a choice of one- or two-bedroom suites with private entrances, Red Rock views and hiking access, plus many other amenities.

  • Desert Dove Bed & Breakfast
    11707 E. Old Spanish Trail, Tucson
    520-722-6879
    This Territorial adobe bed and breakfast is situated on four acres and nestled in the foothills of the Rincon Mountains near the Saguaro National Park East. Accommodations include great porches, polished colored concrete floors, open trusses, antiques and collectibles — all of which create a unique ambience.

  • El Portal Bed & Breakfast
    95 Portal Ln., Sedona
    800-313-0017
    Going beyond the ordinary, the architecture and adobe construction of El Portal is completely authentic. Nowhere else in Sedona will you find a luxury inn or hotel with 18-inch thick adobe walls that provide both quiet and history. All rooms feature free broadband cable high speed Internet, as well as free wireless access throughout the hotel, including the courtyard.

  • Full Circle Ranch
    40205 N. 26th St., Cave Creek
    623-465-7570
    A romantic hideaway nestled in the desert, complete with horse facilities, an observation deck, pool and heated spa.

  • Graces Secret Garden Bed & Breakfast
    1240 Jacks Canyon Rd., Sedona
    800-579-2340
    Pets are welcome to come along for the stay at Greyfire. Meet and greet with the four resident Arabian horses and enjoy your stay in the Southwestern ranch home decorated with antiques and positioned on more than two acres.

  • Graham’s Bed & Breakfast
    150 Canyon Circle Dr., Sedona
    800-228-1425
    Open all year, this contemporary, Southwestern inn offers a bountiful breakfast and beautiful views.

  • Grand Living Bed and Breakfast
    701 Quarterhorse Rd., Williams
    928-635-4171
    A two-story log cabin with a wrap-around veranda and country Victorian decor. Horseback riding, fishing lakes and hiking trails exist in the surrounding area.

  • Hacienda del Desierto Bed & Breakfast
    11770 E. Rambling Trl., Tucson
    800-982-1795
    Award-winning Spanish hacienda on 16 secluded acres next to National Park. Four luxury accommodations, three with kitchenettes. TVs, business center, garden, patios, views, nature trail, birding, outdoor hydrotherapy spas.

  • Heritage Inn
    161 N. Main St., Snowflake
    866-486-5947
    Has 12 rooms with full baths, Jacuzzi tubs, gas log stoves, cable TV, wireless Internet and daily gourmet breakfast specials.

  • Hidden Meadow Ranch
    620 County Road 1325, Greer
    928-333-1000
    Includes 12 luxuriously furnished log cabins, dining room, lounge and library. There is also a spring-fed trout pond for fly-fishing and canoeing.

  • Hotel Vendome
    230 S. Cortez St., Prescott
    928-776-0900
    A quaint 1917 inn, the Hotel Vendome is nestled in the beauty of the Prescott wilderness amid Victorian architecture. A shot away from the famous Whiskey Row and a charming small town, experience the settlement and then enjoy a glass of wine in the quietly shaded veranda while watching the sun go down.

  • Inn at 410 Bed & Breakfast
    410 N. Leroux St., Flagstaff
    800-774-2008
    The Inn at 410 Bed & Breakfast is an oasis of peace and serenity amidst our stressful world. The Inn’s spacious parlor is a relaxing place to sip hot cider and curl up with a book in front of the fireplace. The gazebo and perennial gardens offer summer guests an intimate retreat for afternoon iced tea or morning breakfast. A scrumptious, healthy breakfast and afternoon tea with homemade cookies are just two of the ways our innkeepers accomplish the task of making The Inn at 410 the “Place with the Personal Touch.”

  • Inn at Castle Rock
    112 Tombstone Canyon Rd., Bisbee
    520-432-4449
    Now remodeled, it was once an 1890s boarding house for miners. Full breakfast is served and a glass of wine is offered in the evening to enjoy on the patio under the starlit sky. Dinner and lunch are available at the restaurant located on site.

  • Inn on Oak Creek, The556 Hwy. 179, Sedona
    800-499-7896
    Private creekside decks, gas fireplaces, whirlpool tubs, full breakfast.

  • Jenny Kent’s B & B
    450 S. Orange Ave., Yuma
    928-783-4520
    Stay in a charming, historic house — Jenny Kent’s Bed and Breakfast — moderately priced and conveniently located off Interstate 8. Jenny’s is nestled in the the historic Century Heights District of Yuma.

  • Jeremiah Inn Bed & Breakfast
    10921 E. Snyder Rd., Tucson
    520-749-3072
    Guest rooms feature private baths, queen beds, and other amenities.

  • Lodge at Sedona, The
    125 Kallof Pl., Sedona
    928-204-1942
    Located in the heart of Sedona, this four diamond bed & breakfast has gardens, mature pines, waterfalls, majestic red rock views, a fitness center, and many other amenities that provide a serene relaxing place to stay.

  • Log Cabin Bed & Breakfast
    3155 N. U.S. Hwy. 89, Prescott
    888-778-0442
    This three story rustic log cabin is open year-round and is located near Watson Lake/Willow Lake Recreation Area in the Granite Dells. Enjoy hiking out their back door or enjoy looking at the stars from the deck or the hot tub.

  • Maricopa Manor Bed & Breakfast
    15 W. Pasadena Ave., Phoenix
    800-292-6403
    Built in 1928, the Spanish Mission-style home offers seven suites with private facilities.

  • Noftsger Hill Inn
    425 North St., Globe
    928-425-2260
    The front rooms provide a panoramic view of the ruggedly beautiful Pinal Mountains. Rear rooms face the Old Dominion Mine, offering a picturesque view of historic mining operations.

  • Oakwood Inn Bed & Breakfast
    6558 Wagon Wheel Ln., Pinetop-Lakeside
    800-959-8098
    Oakwood Inn offers guests the opportunity to relax and enjoy common areas for their convenience. Guest rooms offer traditional decor with private baths. Home-cooked breakfasts are served family-style in the dining room.

  • Pinetop Country Bed & Breakfast
    2444 W. Jan Ln., Pinetop
    888-521-5044
    Romantic and charming, this B&B offers candlelit dinners and wine-and-cheese parties every Saturday night. The Victorian suite proves to be the most popular with its fireplace, private balcony overlooking a pond and a fire pit.

  • Pleasant Street Inn, The
    142 S. Pleasant St., Prescott
    928-445-4774
    Unwind in a 1906, two-story Victorian home with traditional English furnishings. Beautiful views and fresh flowers make this inn an enjoyable weekend getaway. Four rooms are available with private amenities.

  • Prescott Pines Inn
    901 White Spar Rd., Prescott
    928-445-7270
    Austrian lace curtains, white picket fence and grand flagstone porch create the feeling of Victorian elegance. The entrance to the guesthouse welcomes you with ivy and beautiful pink flowers.

  • Ramsey Canyon Inn Bed & Breakfast
    29 Ramsey Canyon Rd., Hereford
    520-378-3010
    A modern country inn that offers hiking trails through the hummingbird capital of the world. This B&B offers serene settings for a chance to relax amid its antiques and country furnishings.

  • Red Garter Bed & Bakery
    137 W. Railroad Ave., Williams
    928-635-1484
    A beautifully restored 1897 saloon in a Victorian Romanesque brick building with 12-foot ceilings, skylights and antique furnishings. Located in the heart of downtown Williams; sight-seeing is nearby.

  • Royal Elizabeth Bed & Breakfast Inn
    204 S. Scott Ave., Tucson
    877-670-9022
    An 1878 adobe Victorian mansion, located on a quiet street in historic Downtown Tucson. Enjoy colorful gardens, heated pool, spacious guest suites, period antiques, private baths and the services of a fine resort.

  • Sleepy Hollow Bed & Breakfast
    5522 E. Tapekim Rd., Cave Creek
    480-488-9402
    On a small knoll above a gently rising hollow, Sleepy Hollow is the perfect place to relax.

  • Spur Cross Bed & Breakfast
    38555 N. School House Rd., Cave Creek
    480-473-1038
    Offers four suites with amenities such as separate outside entrances, private baths, upgraded Southwestern furnishings, satellite TV, refrigerator, microwave and coffeemaker.

  • Sunglow Guest Ranch
    14066 S. Sunglow Rd., Pearce
    520-824-3334
    Located in the foothills of the Chiracahua Mountains, this ranch offers birding, hiking, biking, stargazing and the Sunglow Cafe for refreshing teas and mouthwatering desserts. Yoga classes available.

  • The Commons at White Mountain Lodge
    140 Main St., Greer
    928-735-9977
    The Commons at White Mountain Lodge provides guests with a choice of freestanding cabins or cottages in the historic main lodge. Both cabins and cottages in the main modge provide guests with spectacular views of the Greer Valley Meadow, Little Colorado River or Aspen Grove.

  • Touch of Sedona Inn & Retreat
    595 Jordan Rd., Sedona
    928-282-6462
    Located in the heart of uptown Sedona, and within walking distance to a wealth of fine art galleries, restaurants and easy hiking trails.

  • Valley O’ the Sun
    Scottsdale
    480-941-1281
    An authentic Irish bed-and-breakfast captured within a 1960s-style ranch home with traditional furnishings. Located near Arizona State University in Tempe.