Tag Archives: Case Shiller

fulton

Home prices increase by most in 7 years

U.S. home prices jumped 12.1 percent in April from a year ago, the most since March 2006. More buyers and a limited supply of available homes have lifted prices in most cities across the country, a sign of a broad-based housing recovery.

“The increase in the number of people looking for a new home often runs parallel to a jump in home prices,” said Doug Fulton, CEO of Fulton Homes. “We are seeing steady growth in all of our communities, so it was no surprise to see the data from this new report. It’s great that more people are buying new homes, but it’s even more encouraging that more people are visiting our communities and showing serious interest in our homes.”

The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index released Tuesday also rose 2.5 percent in April from March, the biggest month-over-month gain on records dating back to 2000.

All cities except Detroit posted gains in April from March. That’s up from only 15 cities in the previous month.

Prices rose from a year earlier in all 20 cities for the fourth straight month. Twelve cities posted double-digit gains. San Francisco, Las Vegas, Phoenix and Atlanta all had price increases over the past year of more than 20 percent, while Detroit and Los Angeles showed gains of nearly that much. Minneapolis posted a 15 percent gain.

The housing recovery is looking more sustainable and should continue to boost economic growth this year, offsetting some of the drag from higher taxes and federal spending cuts. Steady job gains and low mortgage rates have encouraged more people to buy homes.

David Blitzer, chairman of the index committee, said the housing recovery should continue even with mortgage rates rising. Borrowing rates have jumped after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said last week that the Fed could slow its bond-purchase program, which is intended to keep long-term interest rates low.

“Home buyers have survived rising mortgage rates in the past,” Blitzer said, “often by shifting from fixed rate to adjustable rate loans.”

Blitzer said the bigger issue for the housing market is banks’ willingness to lend. A recent survey by the Fed suggested some banks are easing credit standards.

Still, Stan Humphries, chief economist at real estate data provider Zillow, said rising rates and an increase in the number of sellers should temper price gains in the coming months.

“The national housing recovery is strong and sustainable, but pockets of volatility will emerge,” he said. “Buyers expecting home values to continue rising at this pace indefinitely may be in for a shock.”

The index covers roughly half of U.S. homes. It measures prices compared with those in January 2000 and creates a three-month moving average. The April figures are the latest available.

Prices are rising because demand is up and fewer homes are available for sale. That’s made builders more optimistic about their prospects, leading to more construction and jobs.

housing.prices

Bankers: Don't try to time the market

Timing is everything.

But when it comes to buying a house, Valley banking leaders says it’s best not to rely too much on timing.

“Potential buyers who are still on the sidelines waiting for housing prices to decline further may see themselves priced out of the market if interest rates rise,” says Carl Streicher, regional sales executive at Bank of America. “Timing the market is risky in that we never really know when the bottom has hit until it has passed us by. Also, buyers should be sure they are ready financially and personally to own a home before they purchase, so timing the market shouldn’t be the sole driver of a home purchase.”

According to Streicher, home affordability is at an all-time high, interest rates are at historic lows and home values are increasing. According to a Case-Shiller report released in December, Phoenix home prices have increased nearly 22 percent, leading the nation and indicating that the real estate market is on the rebound.

“Interest rates are starting to rise and home prices are rising due to greater demand, a relatively low supply of homes for sale and foreclosure sales falling,” says Kevin Sellers, executive vice president with First Fidelity Bank in Arizona. “So, if you’re able to take advantage of the lower current market with still affordable homes and historically low mortgage rates, chances are you’ll be making a good investment.”

Valley bankers are warning potential buyers that if they are waiting for home prices to “hit bottom,” they may miss the chance to be a homeowner altogether; prices may rise before we realize they were at their lowest point; or a rise in interest rate could potentially price buyers (particularly first-time buyers) out of the market.

“Trying to time the market when it comes to the purchase of a home is very difficult in any environment considering the complex market dynamics,” says Robert Winter, Arizona manager of mortgage lending for Mutual of Omaha Bank. “For example, if you try to time the market when it comes to home pricing, you risk missing a low interest rate environment. If you try to time the market when it comes to interest rates, you risk purchasing something you don’t necessarily like and possibly paying more than necessary. This doesn’t even take into consideration the fact that not all transactions close successfully, potentially leading to a loss of the time invested.”

While the real estate market and lending are starting to find their new normal, it depends on where you’re positioned as to whether we are currently experiencing a buyer’s market or seller’s market, Winter says.

“The market advantage differs depending on the price point,” Winter says. “In general, the market favors sellers. However, the advantage shifts to buyers when it comes to higher priced homes.”

If you are in a position to take advantage of the favorable climate in the real estate market, Streicher says to ask yourself a few questions before getting started in the home buying process:
• Are you ready to settle in one location for a while?
• What is the total cost of home ownership?
• Is your job stable?

“Buyers should also research their target neighborhood to establish a baseline for local selling prices and the amount of time properties in their target area stay on the market,” he says. “For those considering an upgrade to a larger home, there are still good options available to purchase higher-end properties using jumbo loans. Bank of America continues its jumbo financing, and offers competitive rates, when many other lenders were forced to discontinue these loans due to a lack of a secondary market.”

While bankers say it’s not wise to try to time the market, they agree that working with a mortgage professional and real estate professional to help meet your real estate goals and objectives is a sure-fire formula for success.

Affordability is great,” says Tim Disbrow, senior vice president, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. “Rates are incredibly low. It is a great time to buy as long as it meets your financial needs.”

housing.prices

Bankers: Don’t try to time the market

Timing is everything.

But when it comes to buying a house, Valley banking leaders says it’s best not to rely too much on timing.

“Potential buyers who are still on the sidelines waiting for housing prices to decline further may see themselves priced out of the market if interest rates rise,” says Carl Streicher, regional sales executive at Bank of America. “Timing the market is risky in that we never really know when the bottom has hit until it has passed us by. Also, buyers should be sure they are ready financially and personally to own a home before they purchase, so timing the market shouldn’t be the sole driver of a home purchase.”

According to Streicher, home affordability is at an all-time high, interest rates are at historic lows and home values are increasing. According to a Case-Shiller report released in December, Phoenix home prices have increased nearly 22 percent, leading the nation and indicating that the real estate market is on the rebound.

“Interest rates are starting to rise and home prices are rising due to greater demand, a relatively low supply of homes for sale and foreclosure sales falling,” says Kevin Sellers, executive vice president with First Fidelity Bank in Arizona. “So, if you’re able to take advantage of the lower current market with still affordable homes and historically low mortgage rates, chances are you’ll be making a good investment.”

Valley bankers are warning potential buyers that if they are waiting for home prices to “hit bottom,” they may miss the chance to be a homeowner altogether; prices may rise before we realize they were at their lowest point; or a rise in interest rate could potentially price buyers (particularly first-time buyers) out of the market.

“Trying to time the market when it comes to the purchase of a home is very difficult in any environment considering the complex market dynamics,” says Robert Winter, Arizona manager of mortgage lending for Mutual of Omaha Bank. “For example, if you try to time the market when it comes to home pricing, you risk missing a low interest rate environment. If you try to time the market when it comes to interest rates, you risk purchasing something you don’t necessarily like and possibly paying more than necessary. This doesn’t even take into consideration the fact that not all transactions close successfully, potentially leading to a loss of the time invested.”

While the real estate market and lending are starting to find their new normal, it depends on where you’re positioned as to whether we are currently experiencing a buyer’s market or seller’s market, Winter says.

“The market advantage differs depending on the price point,” Winter says. “In general, the market favors sellers. However, the advantage shifts to buyers when it comes to higher priced homes.”

If you are in a position to take advantage of the favorable climate in the real estate market, Streicher says to ask yourself a few questions before getting started in the home buying process:
• Are you ready to settle in one location for a while?
• What is the total cost of home ownership?
• Is your job stable?

“Buyers should also research their target neighborhood to establish a baseline for local selling prices and the amount of time properties in their target area stay on the market,” he says. “For those considering an upgrade to a larger home, there are still good options available to purchase higher-end properties using jumbo loans. Bank of America continues its jumbo financing, and offers competitive rates, when many other lenders were forced to discontinue these loans due to a lack of a secondary market.”

While bankers say it’s not wise to try to time the market, they agree that working with a mortgage professional and real estate professional to help meet your real estate goals and objectives is a sure-fire formula for success.

Affordability is great,” says Tim Disbrow, senior vice president, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. “Rates are incredibly low. It is a great time to buy as long as it meets your financial needs.”

housing.prices

Phoenix home prices jump 18.8% in year

Home prices rose in August in nearly all U.S. cities, and many of the markets hit hardest during the crisis are starting to show sustained gains. The increases are the latest evidence of a steady housing recovery.

The Standard & Poor’s/Case Shiller index reported Tuesday that national home prices increased 2 percent in August compared with the same month a year ago. That’s the third straight increase and a faster pace than in July.

The report also said that prices rose in August from July in 19 of the 20 cities tracked by the index. Prices had risen in all 20 cities in the previous three months.

Cities that had suffered some of the worst price declines during the housing crisis are starting to come back. Prices in Las Vegas rose 0.9 percent, the first year-over-year gain since January 2007. Prices in Phoenix are 18.8 percent higher in August than a year ago. Home values in Tampa and Miami have also posted solid increases over the period.

Seattle was the only city to report a monthly decline. Still, prices there fell just 0.1 percent in August from July and are 3.4 percent higher than a year ago.

Prices in Atlanta have fallen 6.1 percent over the 12 months that ended in August, the largest year-over-year decline. But Atlanta has posted the largest price gain among the 20 cities over the past three months, according to Trulia, a housing data analysis firm.

“The sustained good news in home prices over the past five months makes us optimistic for continued recovery in the housing market,” David Blitzer, chairman of the Case-Shiller index, said.

The steady increase in prices, along with the lowest mortgage rates in decades, has helped many home markets slowly rebound nearly six years after the housing bubble burst.

Rising home prices encourage more people to put their homes on the market. They may also entice would-be buyers to purchase homes before prices rise further.

The S&P/Case-Shiller index covers roughly half of U.S. homes. It measures prices compared with those in January 2000 and creates a three-month moving average. The August figures are the latest available.

The figures aren’t seasonally adjusted, so some of the gains in August reflect the benefit of the summer buying season.

Stan Humphries, chief economist at the housing website Zillow, expects the monthly price figures will decline in the fall and winter.

“This doesn’t mean the housing recovery has been derailed,” he said. “This is exactly what bouncing along bottom looks like.”

Other recent reports show that the housing market is improving, albeit from depressed levels.

Home builders started construction on new homes and apartments at the fastest pace in more than four years last month. They also requested the most building permits in four years, a sign that many are confident that home sales gains will continue. Home building is still far below the pace that economists say is consistent with a healthy housing market.

New home sales jumped last month to the highest annual pace in the past two and a half years.

Sales of previously-occupied homes dipped in September but have risen steadily in the past year.