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ACC Awards 2012

ACC Awards 2012 Finalists: N-T

Effective corporate counsel has never been more important than it is now. Arizona Business Magazine is recognizing the important and vital role that in-house counsel plays in the success of a business with the Arizona Corporate Counsel Awards, ACC Awards 2012. The 27 finalists and winners were honored Thursday, January 12 during a ceremony and dinner at the Ritz Carlton Phoenix. Here are the finalists in alphabetical order, N through T.


ACC Awards 2012 Finalists, N through T:

Dennis Naughton
General counsel
Danny’s Family Companies

ACC Awards 2012Naughton accepted the position of general counsel with Danny’s Family Companies just as the nation was beginning to understand the extent of the economic destruction resulting from the great recession. It soon became apparent that the company would need to restructure if it was to survive. Naughton masterfully navigated the company through the perilous and complex legal waters of a Chapter 11 corporate restructuring. The company’s continued success and emergence from Chapter 11 is due in part to Naughton’s insight and legal leadership. He is a native of Arizona and graduate of Brophy College Preparatory in Phoenix.


ON Semiconductor
In-house legal department

ACC Awards 2012On Jan. 1, 2011, the acquisition of SANYO Semiconductor increased the ON law department from 29 to 47 legal professional. Still, the law department remains the smallest department in the company and consistently benchmarks favorably for cost expenditures for similarly situated in-house law departments. In recognition of the law department’s significant role in closing the SANYO deal, the M&A Advisor awarded the deal with the Major Transaction of the Year award for mergers and acquisitions from $500 million to $1 billion. On a personal note, department members participate in a wide variety of community service projects — from youth programs to animal rescue.


Karen Paul
General counsel
MD Helicopters

ACC Awards 2012According to David Kash, a partner at Ryley Carlock & Applewhite in Phoenix, Paul did a “great job for a company in an economy under very trying times.” Paul’s great work paid off in 2011 as MD Helicopters was awarded a $186 million contract by the Army to build rotorcraft for training exercises in Afghanistan. Among her duties:
* Contract negotiation and drafting — national, international, sales, distribution, procurement, U.S. government, complex commercial and intellectual property licensing, ownership, transfers and development.
* Regulatory compliance.
* Intellectual property and contracts portfolio and systems development and management.


Jessica M. Pena
General counsel
Tekco Management Group, LLC

ACC Awards 2012In three years at Tekco, Pena has fundamentally reinvented the company’s approach to enforcing its intellectual property rights. Pena’s innovative use of unfair competition claims in conjunction with copyright enforcement is just one example of her ability to find new ways to tackle old, entrenched problems. Additionally, Pena’s innovative approach to intellectual property rights enforcement ignited a renewed effort against online copyright infringement in the adult entertainment industry. Due to her innovative and successful approach to stopping online copyright infringement in her industry, Pena was invited to organize and moderate a panel at the 23rd North American Entertainment, Sports & Intellectual Property Law Conference.


Amy Rasor
Deputy general counsel
American Traffic Solutions

ACC Awards 2012Colleagues say Rasor has what it takes to create and maintain a well-oiled legal team as an in-house counsel. Some of her accomplishments include:
* Leading the legal aspects of two company acquisitions and countless lawsuits.
* After joining the legal team at ATS as the first associate general counsel, she was promoted to deputy general counsel the following year. She works with two other attorneys and two paralegals.
* Colleagues say Rasor is unequalled in her ability to foresee potential legal issues and head the off before they become a real problem for the company.


Michael Reagan
Executive vice president and general counsel
Kahala Corp

ACC Awards 2012Reagan has been Kahala’s general counsel since January 2000. From 1993 to 1995, he served as a senior accountant with Deloitte & Touche in Phoenix in its audit division. He is currently a licensed attorney, as well as a licensed Certified Public Accountant (CPA), in the state of Arizona. Reagan holds a B.S. in accounting from the University of Arizona and a J.D. from Arizona State University. In Reagan’s 12 years at Kahala, the company has grown from a handful of employees to more than 250, from one brand to 14 brands, and the legal department has grown from one lawyer to six lawyers and 10 paralegals.


Mark Rodgers
Associate general counsel
Insight Enterprises, Inc.

ACC Awards 2012Rogers’ responsibilities include corporate governance work, SEC reporting, mergers and acquisitions, financing, design and implementation of compliance programs, internal investigations, negotiation of contracts and litigation and labor and employment management. He sits on Insight’s Disclosure Committee and currently chairs the Investment Committees for the company’s 401(k) and Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation plans. Rogers was named a “Super Lawyer” in the 2007 Southwest Edition of Law & Politics Magazine and was the only in-house counsel named as a Super Lawyer in the edition. He is admired by colleagues for his great judgment, a key asset to outside counsel when analyzing facts and the law to develop strategies.


Cindy Sehr
Senior counsel
Catholic Healthcare West (Chandler Regional Medical Center)

ACC Awards 2012Sehr has 25 years of experience as an attorney and 20 of those years have been devoted to healthcare law. Working in the healthcare field, there are many components that a legal department has to take into consideration to abide by regulations set by the state and federal governments. Sehr has made those regulations easier for everyone on the CHW staff to understand. Through Sehr’s leadership and expertise, the medical centers have been able to navigate and overcome hurdles with a strong sense of support, guidance and leadership toward the correct and proactive steps that need to be made.


Thomas F. Tollison
Senior assistant general counsel — marketing group
U-Haul International, Inc.

ACC Awards 2012Colleagues say Tollison is an inspiration to those around him. “He inspires us to work hard and improve our craft,” said Isaac P. Hernandez, an associate at Ballard Spahr. “He inspires us to be leaders and to be involved with our communities. He reminds us to take a moment to smell the roses and enjoy life.” Among Tollison’s professional accomplishments is the negotiation of a multi-million-dollar asset/stock purchase of a telecommunications company, as well as providing lead counsel to the largest division on U-Haul — its marketing group.


Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

50 Largest Employers in Arizona - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

50 Largest Employers In Arizona

These are the 50 largest employers in Arizona, including public and privately held companies and not-for-profit corporations, ranked by the number of employees based on full-time equivalents of 40 hours per week and based on industry research.


50 Largest Employers in Arizona

Walmart Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 30,634
Employment change since 2010: Added about 300 jobs
2010 revenue: $421.8 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Bentonville, Ark.
Phone: (479) 273-4000
Website: www.walmart.com

Banner Health

Arizona employees in 2011: 28,353
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1911
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 747-4000
Website: www.bannerhealth.com

Wells Fargo & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 14,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $93.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1852
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 411-4932
Website: www.wellsfargo.com

Bank of America Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 13,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,000 jobs
2010 revenue: $150.5 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1904
Headquarters: Charlotte, N.C.
Phone: (800) 944-0404
Website: www.bankofamerica.com

McDonald’s Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 12,770
Employment change since 2010: Added about 955 jobs
2010 revenue: $22.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1955
Headquarters: Oakbrook, Ill.
Phone: (800) 244-6227
Website: www.mcdonalds.com

Apollo Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 460 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1973
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (480) 966-5394
Website: www.apollogrp.edu

Kroger Co. *

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 400 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.7 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1883
Headquarters: Cincinnati
Phone: (623) 936-2100
Website: www.frysfood.com
* Includes Fry’s Food Stores and Fry’s Marketplace

Raytheon Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 11,500
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $25.2 billion
Company’s focus: Missile manufacturing
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: Waltham, Mass.
Phone: (520) 794-3000
Website: www.raytheon.com

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 10,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $102.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1799
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (602) 221-2900
Website: www.chase.com

Honeywell International Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,716
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 700 jobs
2010 revenue: $33.4 billion
Company’s focus: Aerospace manufacturing
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Morristown, N.J.
Phone: (602) 231-1000
Website: www.honeywell.com

Intel Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,700
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $43.6 billion
Company’s focus: Semiconductor manufacturing
Year founded: 1968
Headquarters: Santa Clara, Calif.
Phone: (480) 554-8080
Website: www.intel.com

Target Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $65.4 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Phone: (612) 304-6073
Website: www.target.com

US Airways

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,926
Employment change since 2010: Added about 150 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.9 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1981
Headquarters: Tempe
Phone: (480) 693-0800
Website: www.usairways.com

Catholic Healthcare West

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,291
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1986
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (602) 406-3000
Website: www.chw.edu

Home Depot Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 8,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 350 jobs
2010 revenue: $66.2 billion
Company’s focus: Home improvement
Year founded: 1978
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (714) 940-3500
Website: www.homedepot.com

Walgreen Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,750
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $63.3 billion
Company’s focus: Retail drugstores
Year founded: 1901
Headquarters: Deerfield, Ill.
Phone: (847) 940-2500
Website: www.walgreens.com

Safeway Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,500
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $41.1 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1926
Headquarters: Pleasanton, Calif.
Phone: (480) 894-4100
Website: www.safeway.com

American Express Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,465
Employment change since 2010: Added about 200 jobs
2010 revenue: $30.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1850
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (623) 492-7474
Website: www.americanexpress.com

Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 7,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 935 jobs
2010 revenue: $19 billion
Company’s focus: Mining
Year founded: 1834
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 366-7323
Website: www.fcx.com

Pinnacle West Capital Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,900
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 earnings: $330.4 million
Company’s focus: Electric utility
Year founded: 1985
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 250-1000
Website: www.pinnaclewest.com

Bashas’ Supermarkets

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,641
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 1,800 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1932
Headquarters: Chandler
Phone: (480) 895-9350
Website: www.bashas.com

Scottsdale Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,556
Employment change since 2010: Added about 55 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 882-4000
Website: www.shc.org

UA Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: About 6,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,050 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 694-7737
Website: www.u.arizona.edu

Circle K Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 590 jobs
2010 revenue: $16.4 billion
Company’s focus: Convenience stores
Year founded: 1951
Headquarters: Laval, QC, Canada
Phone: (602) 728-8000
Website: www.CircleK.com

General Dynamics

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,026
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,810 jobs
2010 revenue: $32.5 billion
Company’s focus: Defense, communications
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Falls Church, Va.
Phone: (480) 441-3033
Website: www.generaldynamics.com

Boeing Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,800
Employment change since 2010: Added about 100 jobs
2010 revenue: $64.3 billion
Company’s focus: Aircraft manufacturing
Year founded: 1916
Headquarters: Chicago
Phone: (480) 891-3000
Website: www.boeing.com

Carondelet Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 124 jobs
2010 revenue: About $601 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1880
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 872-3000
Website: www.carondelet.org

Mayo Foundation

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 138 jobs
2010 revenue: $7.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1864
Headquarters: Rochester, Minn.
Phone: (480) 301-8000
Website: www.mayo.edu

CVS Caremark Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 50 jobs
2010 revenue: $96.4 billion
Company’s focus: Pharmaceutical services
Year founded: 1993
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (615) 743-6600
Website: www.caremark.com

Salt River Project

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,346
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 392 jobs
2010 revenue: $2.7 billion
Company’s focus: Utility supplier
Year founded: 1903
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 236-5900
Website: www.srpnet.com

Costco Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,151
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.2 billion
Company’s focus: Membership discount stores
Year founded: 1976
Headquarters: Issaquah, Wash.
Phone: (602) 293-5007
Website: www.costco.com

Abrazo Health Care *

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,089
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $1.5 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (602) 674-1400
Website: www.abrazohealth.com
* A division of Vanguard Health Systems

Albertsons Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 450 jobs
2010 revenue: $5.9 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery and drug stores
Year founded: 1939
Headquarters: Boise, ID
Phone: (602) 382-5300
Website: www.albertsons.com

FedEx Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,918
Employment change since 2010: Added about 330 jobs
2010 revenue: $34.7 billion
Company’s focus: Delivery, copy centers
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Memphis, Tenn.
Phone: (866) 477-7529
Website: www.fedex.com

Southwest Airlines Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,857
Employment change since 2010: Added about 259 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.1 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Dallas
Phone: (602) 304-3983
Website: www.southwest.com

Marriott International

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 722 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.7 billion
Company’s focus: Resorts and hotels
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters: Bethesda, Md.
Phone: (301) 380-3000
Website:  www.marriott.com

Qwest Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,200
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 190 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.3 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1896
Headquarters: Denver
Phone: (800) 244-1111
Website: www.Qwest.com

United Parcel Service

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,170
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 48 jobs
2010 revenue: $49.5 billion
Company’s focus: Package delivery
Year founded: 1907
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (888) 967-5877
Website: www.ups.com

John C. Lincoln Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,166
Employment change since 2010: Added about 539 jobs
2010 revenue: $551 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters:  Phoenix
Phone: (602) 870-943-2381
Website: www.jcl.com

USAA

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,045
Employment change since 2010: Added about 74 jobs
2010 revenue: $17.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: San Antonio
Phone: (800) 531-8111
Website: www.usaa.com

Charles Schwab & Co. Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,001
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1974
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 435-4000
Website: www.schwab.com

Freescale Semiconductor

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.5 billion
Company’s focus: Microchip manufacturing
Year founded: 1953
Headquarters: Austin
Phone: (512) 895-2000
Website: www.freescale.com

IBM Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $95.8 billion
Company’s focus: Technology services
Year founded: 1924
Headquarters: Armonk, N.Y.
Phone: (800) 426-4968
Web site: www.us.ibm.com

Cox Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,997
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 67 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.1 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (623) 594-0505
Website: www.cox.com

TMC HealthCare

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,966
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 84 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1943
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 327-5461
Website: www.tmcaz.com

Verizon Wireless

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,901
Employment change since 2010: Added about 201 jobs
2010 revenue: $63.4 billion
Company’s focus: Wireless provider
Year founded: 1984
Headquarters: Basking Ridge, N.J.
phone: (480) 763-6300
Website: www.verizonwireless.com

Cigna HealthCare of AZ

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,865
Employment change since 2010: Added about 401 jobs
2010 revenue: $21.3 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1972
Headquarters: Philadelphia
Phone: (602) 942-4462
Website: www.cigna.com

Grand Canyon University

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,818
Employment change since 2010: Added about 537 jobs
2010 revenue: $385.8 million
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1949
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 639-7500
Website: www.gcu.edu

Starbucks Coffee Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,783
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,003 jobs
2010 revenue: $10.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Seattle
Phone: (602) 340-0455
Website: www.starbucks.com

Go Daddy Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,754
Employment change since 2010: Added about 441 jobs
2010 revenue: $741.2 million
Company’s focus: Internet services/technology
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 505-8800
Website: www.GoDaddy.com

These are the state’s 5 largest government employers, ranked by the number of employees.

State of Arizona: About 49,800 employees
City of Phoenix: About 15,100 employees
Maricopa County: 12,792 employees
Arizona State University: 11,185 employees
Mesa Public Schools: 8,376 employees

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Arizona Heart Walk - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Arizona Heart Walk Encourages Businesses, Individuals To Lead Healthy Lifestyle

Achieving corporate health: American Heart Association’s Arizona Heart Walk encourages businesses, individuals to change the way they think about their health

Richard Schulz, CEO of HealthSouth in Scottsdale and chairman of the American Heart Association’s Arizona Heart Walk, knows a healthy lifestyle doesn’t happen by accident.

It takes work.

And something else.

“You have to make it fun,” Schulz says.

In his chairman duties, Schulz meets with representatives from companies to participate and to secure sponsorships for the Heart Walk.

The Heart Walk is a non-competitive 5K walk/run and 1-mile walk at Tempe Town Lake. The event, in its 20th year, celebrates those who have made lifestyle changes and encourages others to make changes to feel better and to live longer.

It also serves as the Phoenix chapter’s of the American Heart Association’s major fundraiser, spokeswoman Jessica Brown says. The goal this year is to raise $900,000 for research, outreach and education, Brown said.

About 15,000 people are expected to take part in the walk.

Large health-related employers tend to big players in the event, Brown says. For example, Banner Health, which runs 14 hospitals, three research centers and other properties in Arizona, had nearly 1,000 registered Heart Walk participants in 2011. Catholic Healthcare West, which operates three hospitals in the area, had 1,023.

Besides the walk, Schulz encourages companies to make a commitment to making becoming fit companies.

As part of that commitment, HealthSouth, Banner and Catholic Healthcare West have engaged in a program with the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association called “My Heart. My Life.” The program is designed to change the way Americans think about their health. It’s about embracing an overall healthier lifestyle to improve cardiovascular health.

This movement is a national rallying cry for change, Brown said, through simple behavior adjustments that help people feel better and live longer. The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association has developed a number of activities under the umbrella of My Heart. My Life. Among them: increased health education, advocacy for better public policy in important health areas such as anti-smoking laws, and helping communities find ways to eat healthier and stay physically active.

“We see examples every day at work,” Schulz says. But other kinds of companies are also climbing on the wellness bandwagon, he says.

One such company is Scottsdale Insurance. A subsidiary of Nationwide Insurance, Scottsdale Insurance specializes in excess and surplus policies as well as specialty insurance.

If you run a fund-raising golf tournament with a car as a prize for hitting a hole-in-one, Scottsdale Insurance will write a policy so that one lucky shot doesn’t submarine your charitable intentions.

Scottsdale Insurance employs about 1,400. Most are in the Valley, but the company has agents across the country.

The parent company encourages community involvement. Pete Harper, vice president of finance and CFO, was drawn to the American Heart Association because some relatives had suffered from cardiovascular problems. The Heart Walk promoted awareness of the need for fitness at the company, which has increased.

“Now, you’ll see groups of walkers at lunchtime,” he says.

Harper said that as the company became more health conscious, he did, too.

“Before, about the only thing I did was play racquetball,” he says.

A healthier workforce is more productive and experiences lower absenteeism, Harper says. Although some of the benefits are difficult to quantify, others are not.

“We’ve seen slower growth in our health care-related costs than other companies,” he says.

And heart health is at the heart of the matter. Heart disease was the No. 1 killer in the U.S. in 2009 (the most recent year that figures are available), the Centers for Disease Control reported. Stroke was No. 4.

“Heart disease is an area we have some control over,” HealthSouth’s Schulz says. “There are some hereditary factors, but there’s a great deal of literature that shows we can reduce risk with lifestyle changes.”

The good news is mortality rates from heart disease started declining around 1950 and have continued to decline, CDC figures show.

The bad news is there are some alarming developments that if they go unchecked would reverse that trend. The American Heart Association reports that about one-third of children in the United States are overweight or obese. Most experts believe childhood obesity increases the risk of heart disease and stroke in adulthood.

The American Heart Association has established a standard of ideal cardiovascular health. Right now, 1 percent of U.S. population meets that standard. Among children 12-19, the percentage is zero.

And many people are kidding themselves about the healthy lifestyle they lead, Brown said. In an American Heart Association survey, 39 percent of Americans questioned thought they were in ideal cardiovascular health.

The American Heart Association set a goal to in improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent by 2020 and came up with My Heart. My Life.

The idea is to make simple changes that can make a big difference, such as eating healthier, exercising 30 minutes a day, controlling cholesterol and blood pressure. The organization offers online trackers for walkers and, of course, an application for smart phone users to create walking paths.

Education and awareness are important, but for a company to encourage its employees to pay more attention to cardiovascular fitness, a dose of healthy competition can boost motivation, Schulz says.

“You can have different groups compete and see who can lose the most weight,” Schulz says.

Making wellness enjoyable is key. Sharon Opitz, wellness director at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, says the wellness program at the Catholic Healthcare West facility includes zumba and yoga sessions, a farmer’s market and cooking demonstration classes.

Catholic Healthcare West tries to incorporate spirituality and stress reduction in its wellness programs, says Robert Lichvar, wellness director at Chandler Regional Medical Center and Mercy Gilbert Medical Center.

20th Heart Walk

When: Feb. 25 at 9 a.m. At 10 a.m., the Heart Healthy Festival begins, and features live music, interactive booths and giveaways.
Where: Tempe Beach Park
Cost: Free, though participants qualify for a T-shirt by raising $100
Purpose: Supports the American Heart Association’s research programs and initiatives that promote the prevention, treatment and better patient care in the areas of cardiovascular disease, the leading killer in the United States.
Website: phoenixheartwalk.org
Participants: About 15,000 people participate each year
Fundraising goal for 2012: $900,000
Where does the money go: To fund research, educational programs and community outreach
Who are some of the biggest corporate participants: Banner Health, Catholic Healthcare West, Scottsdale Insurance, HealthSouth

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

 

Arizona SciTech Festival - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

SciTech Festival Spotlights Arizona As Growing Power In Science, Technology

Techno party: SciTech Festival will put spotlight on Arizona as a growing power in science and technology

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer says there is no better way to launch the state’s second century than by creating future leaders in industries that Brewer sees as crucial for the state’s economic vitality.

“Arizona is an emerging world leader for advances in aerospace, aviation and defense, semiconductor and electronics information technology, optics, life science, health science, renewable energy and telecommunications,” Brewer says. “Now, we must focus on ushering in the next generation of great scientific and technological leaders and must cultivate the scientific talents of all its students.”

To cultivate and inspire that talent, the Arizona Technology Council Foundation, Arizona State University and the Arizona Science Center have teamed up to create the First Annual Arizona SciTech Festival, a grass roots collaboration of more than 200 organizations in education and industry — including major employers like Microchip, Catholic Healthcare West, Raytheon and Orbital — designed to showcase how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) could drive the state’s economy over the next 100 years.

“The SciTech Festival will be the perfect way for Arizona to start rebranding itself around science and technology,” says Chuck Vermillion, chief executive officer and founder of Scottsdale-based OneNeck IT Services.

According to Jeremy Babendure, a biomedical scientist and director of the festival, officials expect more than 100,000 people to attend more than 300 festival-related activities that will take place throughout the state over a six-week period.

“I went through the Arizona school system and then went to ASU,” Babendure says. “But when it came time for me to engage in scientific research, I went out of state. This festival will show the next generation of Arizona scientists what is going on their back yard and show them that it is possible to stay in Arizona and engage in meaningful scientific work.”

Festival organizers hope to showcase the state as a national leader in science, technology, and innovation. Activities will include workshops, conversations, debates, exhibitions, concerts, and guided tours for young people and adults.

“The festival will offer a high-profile way for Arizonans to appreciate the rich base of sophisticated research and technology in our state,” says Sethuraman Panchanathan, deputy senior vice president and chief research officer at ASU.

In addition to the three founding partners, sponsors of the SciTech Festival include, Cox, Avnet, SRP, Boeing, the Arizona Commerce Authority, the Flinn Foundation, US Airways, DPR Construction, Maricopa Community Colleges, Creative Engine and the Helios Education Foundation, which committed $50,000 to the festival.

“By supporting the (festival), Helios believes more Arizonans will become aware of the role STEM plays in our economy,” said Dr. Jo Anne Vasquez, vice president and program director, Arizona Transition Years; Teacher and Curriculum Initiatives. “In order for Arizona to be a player in the new global economy, Helios supports educational initiatives that create a college-going culture with an emphasis on academic preparation in STEM education.”

Getting Arizona’s young people interested in science and technology at a young age is one of the primary goals of the SciTech Festival, says Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO of Arizona Science Center.

“The problem we are having now, is that many of the students in Arizona who are interested in the STEM subjects in school, aren’t staying here after they graduate,” Humphrey says. “We need to find a way to get students interested in science and technology at a younger age and figure out a way to keep our talented young people here. Once we do that, we will have a better chance of attracting great minds and great companies to our state.”

Having a solid resource of home-grown talent is a topic often raised by employers looking to move to Arizona, Panchanathan says.

And for companies like Microchip Technology Inc. in Chandler, a leading provider of microcontroller and analog semiconductors, the idea of inspiring students that could become part of a home-grown workforce is one of the benefits that will be derived from the festival for generations to come.

“This is the kind of thing that can start to change the culture and get young people excited about science and engineering,” says Michelle Ragsdale, senior public relations specialist for Microchip, which is participating in three SciTech Festival events. “They will get an opportunity to see how math, science and technology shape our lives. they will have the opportunity mingle with innovators who are making a difference. They will be able to say to themselves, ‘Hey, if I take science, I will be able to do this.’”

Babendure says festival events include a Tech Crawl in Chandler, the “Science of Baseball” in Scottsdale, the “Science of Chocolate” in Glendale, and the “Science of Galileo” as part of the Arizona Renaissance Festival. All of the events, Babendure says, are meant to get Arizona resident excited about science and technology.

“The festival is designed to help the public better understand the strong relationship between the state’s current, outstanding research and technology and the immense potential it offers for Arizona’s future,” said Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “State and local leaders … support this initiative as a powerful vehicle for leveraging productive synergy among stakeholders in the scientific, educational, and business communities leading to increased output of future innovators in STEM and resulting in more jobs and increased economic stability.”

Brewer agrees that celebrating science and technology with events like the SciTech Festival is “critical to raising student and public awareness of the impact science and technology have on our lives and to inspire the next generation of scientific leaders.”

One of the events that Microchip is excited to be involved with, Ragsdale says, is the FIRST Robotics Duel in the Desert on Feb. 18. At the duel, FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) high school teams will hold a scrimmage testing out their robots for the upcoming FRC (FIRST Robotics Competition) Arizona Regional. Those that watch the Duel in the Desert will get to meet the teams, talk to the teachers, and see the robots in action.

“Events like this will show young people that you don’t have to be a sports star or TV star to be famous,” Ragsdale says. “It will elevate the excitement about STEM education and open up a new world of opportunities for them.

“But in the bigger picture, the festival will put the focus on Arizona as a location and showing the world that we are paying attention to STEM education,” Ragsdale says. “Hopefully, companies will start to see Arizona not just as a place to come for the great weather, but because we are serious about creating and inspiring the next generation of innovators.”

For more information on the Arizona SciTech Festival and a complete schedule of events, visit azscitechfest.org.

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

 

2011 Most Admired Companies, AZ Business Magazine September/October 2011

2011 MAC Workplace Culture: CHW Arizona

The 2011 Most Admired Companies Awards recognized CHW Arizona for having a unique workplace offering employees benefits and perks, and emphasizing diversity and other qualities — making the company a great place to work.

CHW Arizona, 2011 Most Admired Companies Winner

CHW Arizona

Category: Workplace Culture
Headquarters: San Francisco
Year Est.: 1961
No. of Employees in AZ: 8,682
Recent Award: 2011 Joint Commission Certified Primary Stroke Center Award
www.chwhealth.org | www.stjosephs-phx.org | Facebook | Twitter

The most successful organizations, like all our MAC winners, create company cultures where people matter. Where employees trust management, are proud of their work, and enjoy their jobs. Clear company values and a shared mission create the cornerstone of a positive company culture.

Our spotlight winner in Workplace Culture — CHW Arizona — is a mission-based organization that has been recognized numerous times locally and nationally for best practices that demonstrate their values of dignity, collaboration, justice, stewardship and culture. It’s not just a job; it’s about improving the quality of life. This organization encourages their employees to live their lives with purpose.  

In Catholic Healthcare West of Arizona’s work environment, employees can take free zumba, yoga and other fitness classes, choose which medical plan they prefer, and enjoy an employee appreciation night at a Rattlers game.

 

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About CHW West:

Excellent care, delivered with compassion, for all in need. It’s what we stand for.

We are dedicated to delivering high-quality, affordable health care services in a compassionate environment that meets each patient’s physical, mental and spiritual needs. Upholding the core values of dignity, justice, stewardship, collaboration, and excellence, our healing philosophy serves not just our patients, but our staff, our communities, and our planet.

At Catholic Healthcare West (CHW) a family of more than 60,000 caregivers and staff are delivering excellent care to diverse communities across Arizona, California and Nevada. Founded in 1986 and headquartered in San Francisco Catholic Healthcare West (CHW) is the fifth largest hospital provider in the nation and the largest hospital system in California.

Through teamwork and innovation, faith and compassion, advocacy and action, we endeavor every day to keep you happy, healthy, and whole.

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2011 Most Admired Companies Awards - Workplace Culture


View the entire list of 2011 Most Admired Companies winners.

Order your official 2011 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies plaque.

 

best of the best 2011, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Best of the Best Awards 2011: Health Care

Winner: St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center

St. Joseph's Hospital, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center is a not-for-profit hospital that has evolved over the last 115 years to become a destination hospital for the most complex medical cases from throughout the United States and around the world. The hospital provides a wide range of health, social, and support services, with special advocacy for the poor and underserved. It also is nationally recognized for quality tertiary care, medical education and research. St. Joseph’s includes Barrow Neurological Institute, the Heart & Lung Institute and a Level 1 Trauma Center. U.S. News & World Report routinely ranks St. Joseph’s among the nation’s top 10 best hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery.
Year Est: 1895
Principal(s): Linda Hunt
Physicians: 1,277
St. Joseph's Hospital Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011350 W. Thomas Rd.
Phoenix, AZ 85013
602-406-3000
www.stjosephs-phx.org



Finalist: Delta Dental of Arizona

Delta Dental, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

For more than 39 years, Delta Dental of Arizona has been delivering quality dental insurance to Arizona residents. As a leading dental insurance provider, it is always looking for new and innovative ways to promote oral health and wellness by offering affordable dental plans throughout the community. Delta’s individual dental plan is tailored to meet the needs of uninsured and underinsured individuals and families. Its individual plan provides four different options, all with the same access to an extensive provider network of more than 3,000 dentists, servicing more than 5,700 locations. Delta is also offering DeltaVision, a fully insured group vision plan and an integral part of health care and wellness programs.

Year Est: 1972
DDS: 3,045
Principal(s): Allan Allford
Delta Dental Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 20115656 W. Talavi Blvd.
Glendale, AZ 85306
602-938-3131 www.deltadentalaz.com



Finalist: Chandler Regional Medical Center

Chandler Medical, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011Chandler Regional Medical Center has been an important part of the East Valley for 50 years. Since opening its doors as Chandler Community Hospital with 40 beds and 25 employees, Chandler Regional has grown to 225 beds. It continues to expand with construction plans on two major projects, adding a new patient tower and expanding the existing cardiac cath lab. The combined projects will add more than 200 jobs and over 100 new patient beds. With over 2,000 employees and a medical staff of 850 in all major specialties, Chandler Regional is part of Catholic Healthcare West (CHW), the eighth-largest health care system in the nation and the largest nonprofit health care system in the West.
Year Est: 1961
Principal(s): Patty White
Physicians: 850
Chandler Regional Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011475 S. Dobson Rd.
Chandler, AZ 85224
480-728-3000
www.ChandlerRegional.org


Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

St. Joseph's Hospital/Medical Center

Phoenix Bishop Revokes St. Joseph’s Catholic Endorsement

Phoenix Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted revoked his endorsement of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center as a Catholic hospital today following a heated debate over an abortion performed at the Catholic Healthcare West (CHW) hospital.

“Though we are deeply disappointed, we will be steadfast in fulfilling our mission,” said Linda Hunt, president of St. Joseph’s. “St. Joseph’s Hospital will remain faithful to our mission of care, as we have for the last 115 years. Our caregivers deliver extraordinary medical care and share an unmatched commitment to the well-being of the communities they serve. Nothing has or will change in that regard.”

Olmsted, of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix, said in a statement that the decision was made after months of discussions between CHW, St. Joseph’s and the Phoenix Diocese.

At issue was the termination of an 11-week pregnancy to save the mother’s life in November 2009. Hunt said it was not possible to save both the lives, and the decision was made to terminate the pregnancy.

“We continue to stand by the decision, which was made in collaboration with the patient, her family, her caregivers, and our Ethics Committee. Morally, ethically, and legally, we simply cannot stand by and let someone die whose life we might be able to save,” Hunt said.

The Phoenix Diocese viewed the situation differently.

“When I met with officials of the hospital to learn more of the details of what had occurred, it became clear that, in the decision to abort, the equal dignity of mother and her baby were not both upheld; but that the baby was directly killed, which is a clear violation of ERD #45,” Olmsted said in his statement.

ERD stands for the Ethical and Religious Directives of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, which are the moral guides for Catholic hospital and health care institutions.

The nurse who terminated the pregnancy was excommunicated privately, but Olmsted said St. Joseph’s had “not addressed in an adequate manner the scandal caused by the abortion.”

This “only eroded [his] confidence” in St. Joseph’s commitment to the church’s ERDs, he added.

Olmsted said the hospital’s Mercy Care Plan, which includes “voluntary sterilization,” contraceptive counseling and abortions due to the mental or physical health of the mother, or when the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest, helped him come to the conclusion that St. Joseph’s was not complying with the church’s standards.

“In light of all these failures to comply with the Ethical and Religious Directives of the church, it is my duty to decree that, in the Diocese of Phoenix, at St. Joseph’s Hospital, CHW is not committed to following the teaching of the Catholic Church and therefore this hospital cannot be considered Catholic,” he said in his statement.

Although St. Joseph’s will not change its name or its mission, the Blessed Sacrament has been removed from the hospital’s chapel, and Mass will no longer be held there.

“St. Joseph’s will continue through our words and deeds to carry out the healing ministry of Jesus,” Hunt said. “Our operations, policies, and procedures will not change.”

A 697-bed hospital in Phoenix, St. Joseph’s is a part of CHW, a Catholic network of hospitals and medical centers. St. Joseph’s is a not-for-profit hospital that provides a wide range of health, social and support services.

St. Joseph’s And Phoenix Children’s Announce A Strategic Alliance - AZ Business Magazine June 2010

St. Joseph’s And Phoenix Children’s Announce A Strategic Alliance

Two major forces in the Valley’s health care industry are joining together to ensure the future of quality pediatric care in Arizona. St Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and Phoenix Children’s Hospital are in the process of negotiating a strategic alliance that will make Arizona a medical destination for young patients with complex and acute health care needs.

“Phoenix is the fifth-largest city in the country and it deserves to have a children’s hospital that is top tier in the country with the same breadth of programs, depth of resources and reputational scores for quality as children’s hospitals in other major markets,” says Robert Meyer, president and CEO of Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH).

Under the proposed alliance, St. Joseph’s will transfer a substantial portion of its pediatric service line to PCH. The collaboration will result in a full-service pediatric hospital, bringing together the best both hospitals have to offer. If an alliance is reached, much of the two hospitals’ pediatric medical staff, nurses and other staff will be united by mid-2011. At that time, the construction on PCH’s new 11-story hospital tower is expected to be complete, making Phoenix home to the second largest children’s hospital in the nation.

Under a current, non-binding memorandum of understanding, St. Joseph’s would continue to operate its neonatal intensive care unit and treat pediatric patients in its trauma unit, as well as patients age 15 and older. In addition, St. Joseph’s would be a minority member of Phoenix Children’s, with limited representation on PCH’s board of directors.

“When we brought our strengths to the table we became a tremendous force in the care of kids in this country,” says Linda Hunt, service area president of Catholic Healthcare West Arizona and president of St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center. “We have leaders in pediatric care, advocacy and research that we can bring together to make this incredible force and improve kids’ care in the Southwest.”

Along with creating a powerhouse pediatric hospital, the shifting of services will enable St. Joseph’s to fulfill its strategic plan to become a destination hospital for patients from across the nation and around the world. To that end, Hunt says St. Joseph’s is expanding specialty programs such as neurosurgery, neurology, cardiology and pulmonology.

The two entities already have collaborated on specific programs, including physician cross-coverage for the Children’s Heart Center and a National Institute of Health grant that’s part of PCH’s Heart Center, housed at the Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s. In spite of the various joint programs, no large-scale alliance had ever been attempted. PCH initially approached St. Joseph’s about a wider-ranging alliance, and the timing proved to be just right. Due to state budget issues, capacity constraints St. Joseph’s is facing, and the expansion already underway at PCH, the collaboration seemed like the natural progression.

“When I approached Linda Hunt in 2008 about revisiting a formal collaboration, we agreed to discard the baggage of failed collaborations of the past and brought fresh thinking to the discussion,” Meyer says. “What we found is that we are more alike than different. We share a common vision and very similar values. We are equally committed to excellent medical care, (and) both need to grow.”

The challenges facing these two health care leaders are daunting. Phoenix is one of the fastest-growing regions in the nation, and medical centers and hospitals must be prepared to face a large influx of young patients in the future. However, with both noted hospitals banding together, incredible progress can be made.

“By combining our pediatric programs, we can achieve a level that would be on par with the leading children’s hospitals in the country more quickly and efficiently than doing so alone,” Meyer says.

Among other things, the alliance will improve access to higher quality pediatric health care services in a cost-effective manner, enhance recruitment and resources for services and programs, accelerate the development of research programs, maintain and improve medical services for the under-served and more, Meyer adds.

The process of finalizing the proposed alliance is ongoing. At this time, presentations outlining the plans for the alliance have been made to physicians and staff at both hospitals. In addition, feedback programs have been created to field any questions or concerns employees may have. The process of assembling work groups with representatives from both hospitals participating in the integration plans also has begun.

“We believe this strategic alliance with CHW/St. Joseph’s will enable us to achieve our bold vision to be recognized as a national leader in pediatric health care,” Meyer says. “This community benefits from the strength of two of the leading providers of children’s medical care, because we’re better together than alone.”

www.phoenixchildrens.com | www.stjosephs-phx.org

Arizona Business Magazine June 2010

2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

2010 HCLA – Health Care Administrator

Honoree: Kathleen Dowler, RN, BSHA

Kathleen Dowler, RN, BSHA
Director, Community Integration
Catholic Healthcare West

Kathleen Dowler, RN, BSHA Director, Community Integration Catholic Healthcare WestAs director of Community Integration for Catholic Healthcare West’s two hospitals in the East Valley, Kathleen Dowler’s role is defined by the hospitals’ missions of serving the poor and disenfranchised, and collaborating with colleagues in the community.

Dowler manages six departments at Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert medical centers, employing a staff of 65, including several managers, nurses, administrative staff, and program coordinators. She is directly involved in creating outreach programs to provide health care services to children and families who would otherwise not be able to receive that care. Dowler also builds relationships with the local social services community to discover ways the hospitals can partner with them.

A registered nurse since 1984, Dowler worked for many years in various maternal child health roles for Chandler Regional Medical Center. In 2002, she became manager of community education, and was promoted to director of community integration in 2006. In just three years, she has expanded existing programs and developed new ones, including a diabetes center, sick kid care, new mom and breastfeeding support groups, a safe sitter class, and prenatal education for teens and Spanish-speaking mothers-to-be.

As part of working with the community, Dowler also is a member of such groups as the National Association of Maternal Child Nursing and the Safe Kids Car Seat Safety Coalition. Last year, she was named the March of Dimes Nurse of the Year.

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Finalist: Bryan Gibson

Bryan Gibson
President, South and Southwest Region
Southwest Ambulance/Rural Metro

Bryan Gibson President, South and Southwest Region Southwest Ambulance/Rural Metro

Bryan Gibson, president of the South and Southwest Region for Southwest Ambulance/Rural Metro, directs multi-region operations and provides valuable management insight to more than 5,700 personnel.

He also implements innovative business development plans and performance measures, and has earned a reputation as a significant contributor to business growth. A certified paramedic, Gibson has more than 24 years of experience in emergency medical services dating back to the start of his career in Booneville, Miss. Under Gibson’s leadership, Southwest Ambulance improved customer service to hospitals, care facilities, fire departments and communities. He introduced a system whereby all medical supplies on an ambulance are sorted into sealed bins and replaced at the start of every shift. Gibson also finds time to volunteer. He is an Explorer Program leader for the Boy Scouts of America and serves on the Mesa Arts Center Foundation Board.

[stextbox id=”grey” image=”www.swambulance.com”]www.swambulance.com[/stextbox]

Linda McCoy, R.Ph., Pharm.D.
Director of Pharmacy
Yavapai Regional Medical Center

Linda McCoy, R.Ph., Pharm.D. Director of Pharmacy Yavapai Regional Medical CenterAs director of pharmacy for Yavapai Regional Medical Center, Linda McCoy coordinates and implements patient-focused pharmacy services, is responsible for the department’s daily operations and manages 39 employees.

McCoy’s vision for her department, her hospital and Arizona’s patients is creating an effective and safe environment in which patients can heal. Although she heads the pharmacy department, McCoy maintains a broad knowledge of operations throughout the hospital, including the continuing development of medical and nursing policies and procedures, medical staff bylaws and medical staff committee structures. Throughout her career, which began at Brown County General Hospital in Georgetown, Ohio, McCoy has seized every opportunity to improve patient safety and ensure that Arizonans receive the best care. In addition, McCoy also devotes significant time outside of her workday to advance patient safety initiatives.


[stextbox id=”grey” image=”www.yrmc.org”]www.yrmc.org[/stextbox]

18th Annual Start! Phoenix Heart Walk Set To Break Attendance Record

Have a heart and take a walk on Saturday, Feb. 27, at Tempe Beach Park, at the Start! Phoenix Heart Walk, sponsored by Health Net of Arizona.

This fun, 5K and 1 mile, family fitness event energizes the Valley to step up in the fight against heart disease and stroke. The walk is sponsored in part by FOX 10 and My 45. Join Ron Hoon, anchor of FOX 10’s Arizona Morning, along with KEZ’s Marty Manning, and more than 15 thousand walkers to help eliminate cardiovascular disease. Top walkers and corporate sponsors will have exclusive access to this year’s VIP tent. The beautiful VIP area is created by local interior design guru Anita Lang, Allied Member ASID of Interior Motives Inc.

The American Heart Association’s signature event will feature entertainment, exercise and lots of fun. The event wouldn’t be possible without outstanding community partners that include Health Net of Arizona, Marketside by Walmart, Weight Watchers, Catholic Healthcare West, Maricopa Integrated Health Systems, Abrazo, Mayo Clinic, 99.9 KEZ, Clear Channel Outdoors and Movin 97.5.

Participants earn incentive prizes by collecting donations. Money raised helps to fund life-saving research and community education programs supported by the American Heart Association. After the walk, the Wellness Village is in full swing, packed with heart-healthy activities, presentations, screenings, games, a live band and celebrity appearances.

Survivors: The heart behind the walk
Heart disease and stroke survivors are a very important part of the Start! Heart and Stroke Walk. All heart disease survivors are recognized with a red cap, and all stroke survivors with a white cap. “In tribute to” stickers also are available for participants walking in celebration of a survivor or in memory of a loved one lost to heart disease or stroke. So mark your calendars. We hope to see you.

Start! Phoenix
February 27, 2010
Tempe Beach Park
Rio Salado Parkway and Mill Avenue

8 a.m. — Registration and Opening Ceremonies
9 a.m. — 5K Walk and 1-Mile Stroke Walk
10 a.m. — Wellness Village and Entertainment

Registration Information:
www.phoenixheartwalk.org
(602) 414-5320

 

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010

Hospitals And Health Care Organizations Are Making Tough Decisions To Ride Out The Recession

Hospitals And Health Care Organizations Are Making Tough Decisions To Ride Out The Recession

After a decade of significant growth, the Valley’s health care industry has become an economic driver for the state. During this severe economic downturn, however, the health care industry busted the myth of being recession proof. But that doesn’t mean it’s recession battered.

Health care organizations have weathered the economic turmoil better than most industries in Arizona. For example, the Arizona Department of Commerce reports that in July, year-over-year job losses in health services stood at 1 percent, or 3,200 jobs. That was the slowest rate of loss of any major industry group in the state.

Nonetheless, hospitals and other health care organizations are feeling the effects of the recession and are working diligently to match revenue with expenses.

“Overall, the financial picture for Arizona’s hospitals is somewhat improved from the third and fourth quarters of 2008, despite decreases in volume,” according to Jim Haynes, vice president, finance, and Chief Financial Officer for the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association. “That improvement is not due to better payment from payers, like the federal and state governments. It is directly linked to the steps hospitals took in late 2008 to contain and cut costs in response to the economic environment.”

Case in point: Linda Hunt, service area president for Catholic Healthcare West Arizona, which includes Chandler Regional Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert Medical Center and St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, says many local hospitals are facing state and federal funding cuts, as well as dealing with growing numbers of people who are uninsured. In addition, admissions in some specialty areas are down because people are waiting longer to seek health care and are canceling or putting elective surgeries on hold.

Catholic Healthcare West also has seen a decrease in donations. Many donors are either curtailing their commitments or making smaller donations.

“The health care industry is strained just like any business,” says Hunt, who continues to serve as president of St. Joseph’s. “Financially we’re facing cuts, plus we don’t know what health care reform is going to bring, so we don’t know what our future is going to be. That’s stressful for the industry across the board.”

To deal with the economic slowdown, Catholic Healthcare West started making cutbacks and implementing cost-saving measures last September. St. Joseph’s reduced travel and catering expenses by 35 percent for a cost savings of $780,000 in fiscal year 2009. The hospital also became more diligent about the use of linens and replaced disposable pillows with sanitary reusable pillows, saving $90,000 in FY 2009. The hospital’s management team also took a 2 percent or more pay cut to help save jobs.

“We met with all the employees and they came up with great money-saving ideas,” Hunt says. “When all was said and done, employee suggestions helped save us more than $3 million a year. We are back on budget and that was our goal.”

Phoenix Children’s Hospital also has been prudent in pushing expenditures back. It cut administrative and advertising costs and stopped using traveling nurses, a move that saved the hospital $7.5 million a year. Bob Meyer, president and CEO of Phoenix Children’s Hospital, says they also have taken a hard look at attrition over the past eight months and have backfilled only 30 of 100 open positions. Phoenix Children’s $588 million expansion, which kicked off in 2008, has been scaled back, as well. Plans now call for shelling 1.5 floors of the 11-story tower for future growth.

“Given the economy and Medicaid reimbursement uncertainty (about 50 percent of kids in Arizona are on Medicaid), we have to be more conservative and push expenditures back,” Meyer says. “But even shelling floors will increase the number of beds we have from 345 to 486 when we open, which is what we need. Our patient volume is growing 15 percent a year and every bed in service is occupied almost 100 percent of the time.”

The tower’s first four floors will be completed in late 2010. Occupying the floors will be a cafeteria, kitchen, clinics, an imaging center and a retail pharmacy. The remaining floors of the tower are dedicated to the hospital’s Center’s of Excellence, clinical programs and private patient rooms. They will be finished in late 2011.

To keep Scottsdale Healthcare moving forward, President and CEO Tom Sadvary cut expenses and re-focused capital spending on medical technology, information systems and refurbishing projects. He also streamlined the management and executive team structure, creating fewer layers and a more agile organization. Green measures also were implemented at Scottsdale Healthcare’s three hospital campuses. Examples of the efforts include:

  • Replacing 40 pickup trucks with electric vehicles at all three hospital campuses.
  • Installing energy efficient lighting in three parking garages, saving approximately $82,000 annually.
  • Reducing natural gas consumption by 10 percent at its power plants.
  • Replacing 300 copier machines with new models that use 40 percent less energy.
  • Eliminating printed payroll notices, saving approximately $150,000 annually and some 200,000 printed notices.

Sadvary contends that Arizona’s health care industry remains healthy and strong despite reimbursement challenges, nursing and physician shortages, and the abrupt changes the health care industry has faced over the past two years.

“I’ve been in Arizona 23 years and I’m proud of the health care industry here and what we’ve done to grow talent, capacity and to improve the size and sophistication of services for patients,” he says. “Arizona knows how to step up and we will continue to do that despite challenges along the way. The health care industry is sensitive to the budgetary issues the state is facing. And while we are all trying to be efficient and frugal with resources, our costs are going up. We’re doing the best we can to manage and provide great care with no more dollars coming in from the state.”

Banner Health President and CEO Peter Fine is a firm believer that major changes are coming down the pike in reimbursement formulas for Medicaid and Medicare that will cause more pressure on local hospitals. If that happens, he says, hospitals will have to make very difficult choices on what services to provide and what services they can no longer afford to provide.

“With rising costs and so many cutbacks in health-care spending, it’s amazing that hospitals and physicians can prosper today, as well as forecast for the future,” Fine says. “Companies have to be flexible enough to embrace change and move with what’s happening environmentally. Banner demonstrates flexibility by making investments grow and starting new programs. We also have great leaders at all levels and we invest in talent management, so our people are developed and prepared to lead us through tumultuous times.”

In spite of the economy, Phoenix-based Banner Health is continuing to make investments and grow in the communities it serves. Banner recently invested $289 million to build a new, seven-floor, 200-bed patient tower and emergency room at Banner Thunderbird Medical Center in Glendale. It also invested $12 million to rebuild the old Banner hospital in Mesa and create the Banner Simulation Medical Center, the largest simulation training center in the nation. The 55,000-square-foot center opened in August and has 20 full-time employees who will train 1,200 to 1,500 medical professionals (nurses, physicians, surgeons, respiratory therapists) annually. The simulation medical center occupies the bottom nine stories of the building, with the top eight housing Banner offices.

Students at the simulation center train on high-fidelity, electronic mannequins that look like human patients and come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The mannequins have a heartbeat and they talk, burp, sweat and bleed. They also have medical maladies such as strokes and heart attacks, as well as give birth and “die.”

“Banner Simulation Medical Center is basically a hospital where we can train nurses to work and interact with 20 patients on a floor at a time,” says Dr. Marshall “Mark” Smith, senior director for simulation and innovation at Banner Health. “Nurses that graduate from medical school can manage one patient, not multiples. We now have the ability to train new nursing graduates to care for multiple patients without putting them at risk or overwhelming them. ”

www.chwhealth.org
www.phoenixchildrens.com
www.shc.org
www.bannerhealth.com
www.azhha.org

nurses, healthcare, doctors

The State’s Health Care Industry Is Strong, But The Recession Is Taking A Toll

Although I have only been in Arizona 11 years, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center has been providing high-quality care to Valley residents since 1895. And for the past century, St. Joseph’s has been known for two primary missions: Service to the poor and underserved; and outstanding care, particularly in the neurosciences, driven by groundbreaking innovation.

In the past 25 years, the innovations at St. Joseph’s have been significant, and other hospitals in the state have seen significant growth and expansion of services, as well. We have had unprecedented growth in the Metro Phoenix area, and hospitals have tried valiantly to keep up with the demand for acute care services. In the past 25 years, we have seen many new hospitals built, particularly in the suburban areas, and central hospitals have continued to expand.

Arizona was the very last state in the country to adopt a state Medicaid program in the early 1980s, but the Arizona Healthcare Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) has since been considered a national model of cost effectiveness. We missed out on substantial federal funds for the Medicaid system by being the last state to join, but we have nonetheless run an efficient system with the public dollars Arizona has received.

The health care system has continued to evolve in very interesting ways during the past quarter century. We have seen a clear movement to reduce the length of hospital stays, and many procedures are done in outpatient settings that were once only performed in hospitals.

We have made extraordinary progress in diagnostics and minimally-invasive procedures, which help people recover faster and get treated earlier when disease occurs. In a past era, patients who needed lung surgery had to have their ribcage cracked open and had weeks of extended recovery; now they have it laproscopically and are up walking around the very next day. Cancer used to be a death sentence; now it is often a chronic illness that can be virtually cured. We are better at treating chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease, and we now know how important prevention is to limiting the impact of disease.

But significant challenges still remain. We have evolved into a system of “sick care” not “health care,” and although we know prevention pays dividends, that is not what physicians and hospitals are reimbursed for. The system rewards us when we treat the sickest patients, but not always for keeping them well.

In America, the concept of employer-sponsored health care is considered foundational to our economy. Yet, more than 46 million Americans do not have health insurance, and many of them are vulnerable children. In Arizona, the majority of employees work for small businesses that are under a tremendous strain to provide affordable health insurance. When people transition to public insurance, the reimbursements are declining so much that community physicians are refusing to accept new Medicaid and Medicare patients, while safety-net hospitals struggle to treat all who present themselves at their doors.

The boom-and-bust cycle is hard on the economy, but it is also hard on health care providers. We face a physician shortage in the Valley and a dearth of key sub-specialists for a region this size. In a recession, more people turn to public assistance at the same time the state is trying to cut budgets to compensate for diminished reserves.

Still, I remain hopeful for our state and our industry. Health care continues to be a strong economic engine for Arizona; good paying jobs, great career paths for a wide variety of disciplines and many avenues for innovation. Catholic Healthcare West, of which St. Joseph’s is the flagship hospital, is actively working with the new president and Congress to help shape health care reform so all Americans can have affordable and accessible health coverage. I believe there has never been a time when so much good is possible, and that change can help all of us live better.