Tag Archives: CEO

data.center

Established CFO Brings Tech Experience to IO

IO, a global leader in software-defined data centers, today announced Michael Berry has joined the company as Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Berry will be responsible for financial planning and analysis, accounting, operations, treasury activities and investor relations, and will report to CEO and Product Architect, George Slessman.

“I am very happy to have Mike join IO,” said Slessman. “His experience as a proven operational leader and technology executive will support IO’s growth and provide a solid financial and operational foundation for the organization.”

Berry joins IO from SolarWinds, a publicly held international provider of IT management software with approximately $300 million in annual revenue and over $3.5 billion in market capitalization where he was Executive Vice President and CFO.  He overhauled the company’s financial planning process and was instrumental in completing ten acquisitions and leading the maintenance renewal team to strong and consistent revenue growth. From a financial perspective, during Mr. Berry’s tenure the company achieved non-GAAP operating profit of greater than 50 percent for eleven straight quarters, and increased operating cash flow by 33% while growing total revenue by 28% on an annualized basis. Prior to SolarWinds, Berry was CFO at i2 (NASDAQ: ITWO), a publicly held, international provider of supply chain software and services. At i2, he rebuilt and scaled the finance and investor relations organizations, led the implementation of several financial planning systems, and played a key role in several strategic initiatives including the acquisition of i2 in January 2010 by JDA Software.

“I could not be more excited about joining IO,” said Michael Berry, IO’s new CFO. “Our leadership position in the foundation technology of the cloud, visionary leadership, marquis enterprise customers and disruptive technology, combined with my experience building the financial and operational foundation for proven technology companies, is a once in a lifetime opportunity.  It is truly a great fit that aligns very well with my personal and professional goals and objectives.”

Prior to his CFO experience, Berry served in various executive roles at The Reynolds and Reynolds Company, a provider of software and services to the retail automotive industry, most recently as Senior Vice President of Solutions Management, Development and Operations. He has also held executive management positions at Comdata Corporation and Travelers Express Co. (now MoneyGram International). Berry is currently a Member of the Board of Directors and Audit Committee Chairman for Rapid7, a privately-held security software company based in Boston, Mass.

Arizona School Choice Trust

Boys Hope Girls Hope Elects New Board Members

John Eldean, Senior Vice President of Commercial Real Estate at Alliance Bank of Arizona, Sentari Minor, Arizona Humane Society Development Officer, and Paul Mulligan, CEO of Catholic Education Arizona, have been elected to three-year terms on the Boys Hope Girls Hope Board of Directors.

Boys Hope Girls Hope helps academically capable and motivated children-in-need to meet their full potential by providing value-centered, family-like homes, opportunities and education through college.  Since 1991, 100 percent of Boys Hope Girls Hope graduates have gone on to post-secondary education and have maintained a college-retention rate between 89 and 94 percent.  The national average is 66 percent.

Eldean has ten years experience in commercial real estate banking with Alliance Bank and JP Morgan Chase. He also served a two-year term on the Kingman City Council, a community where he also coached youth hockey and soccer teams.

Sentari oversees fund development initiatives and programs at the Arizona Humane Society.  Previously, he was a program specialist at the Rodel Foundation of Arizona.  He currently serves on the boards of Social Venture Partners, the Welcome to America Project, Phoenix Collegiate Academy, Young Nonprofit Professionals Network and handles communications and marketing for Seattle-based nonprofit Community Arts Create.

Mulligan, a Phoenix native and Brophy Prep alum, earned a Master’s in Theological Studies from John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family in Washington, D.C.  Since 2007, he has directed Catholic Education Arizona, the state’s largest school tuition organization.  Since its inception, Catholic Education Arizona has provided more than $110 million in needs-based funding to low-income families at 40 Diocese of Phoenix Catholic schools and to Boys Hope Girls Hope scholars.

For more information about Boys Hope Girls Hope, visit www.bhghaz.org.

Stressed lady in office

How do you Address Rampant Employee Disengagement?

An alarming Gallup poll published earlier this year is still sending shockwaves throughout the business community: Most American workers either hate their jobs or don’t care one way or the other about them.

Less than a third of Americans are actively engaged in their work, meaning they’re passionate about it, enthusiastic and energetic. They’re consistently productive, and high performing.

Gallup estimates the 20 million who are “actively disengaged” – openly negative and unhappy have a staggering effect on the economy, costing the United States $450 to $550 billion each year in lost productivity.

“To engage the 70 percent of non-committal or ‘actively disengage’ employees,  business managers need to change how they view human capital,” says Trevor Wilson, CEO of TWI Inc., a global corporate speaker, human equity strategist and author of “The Human Equity Advantage,” (humanequityadvantage.com).

“Engaging employees is an issue I’ve been working on for more than two decades, and there is a solution. I call it human equity — the unique assets each individual brings to the workplace that are often unrecognized. Recognizing and leveraging your own human equity, as well as that of your employees, addresses not only the incredible waste of human capital illustrated in the recent poll, but also related concerns business leaders share, including the constant need for innovation. These challenges are not unique to the United States.”

There is a reason why executive royalty, such as Warren Buffet and former General Electric CEO Jack Welsh, sought talent beyond traditional criteria like knowledge and skills, which are also important, says Wilson. He offers a method for uncovering valuable intangibles in employees; he calls it the SHAPE V Talent model:

• Strengths: Consider strength as defined by the 1999 Gallup StrengthsFinder study, which includes “consistent near-perfect performance in an activity.” The study identifies 34 qualities, which can be innate and, unlike skills, are not learned. Individual employees and managers should not force a square peg into a round hole; if an employee’s near-perfect, near-effortless strength is in research and analysis, but not so much in data management, managers should allocate this resource accordingly.

• Heart: Have you ever wondered what comes first, whether you’re good at something because you like it, or you like it because you’re good at it? The chicken-or-egg question aside, what matters is the passion one has for a talent. This includes activities a worker would do even if he or she didn’t have to do it on the job. If a talented manager won the lottery and decided to quit his job, for example, he might be inclined to manage people in a local political campaign or take the helm of his son’s little league team.

• Attitude: There are three general attitudes an employee might have, according to a branch of study in positive psychology. First, there are those who approach their work as a job, who seek only a paycheck and benefits. The second group includes those with a career perspective who seek advancement. The third group views their work as a calling and deeply connects with what they do every day.

• Personality: In 2009, nearly $500 million was spent on personality testing in North America alone. A reliable test isn’t valuable in so much as it reveals differences among workers, which are most likely already apparent. The value of these tests is in showing how and where differences lie. Understanding differences can lead to an appreciation for how and why coworkers perform and improve the synergy of teams.

• Experience: Who is the person you’re sitting next to at work; who is she when she’s not making business-to-business calls, scheduling meetings or troubleshooting technical problems? How does her race, religion, economic background, family situation and overall lifestyle influence – or not influence – her work life? More importantly, how might her life beyond work offer diversity of thought in the workplace? Life experience should not be overlooked when assessing talent.

• Virtue: “Value in action, that’s virtue,” Wilson says. Candor, temperance, courage – these traits preempt problems like public scandals, harassment and discrimination and foster a positive moral pragmatism among coworkers and practical wisdom among leaders. With social media continuing to expose bad behavior and employee morale revealed to be at a stunning low, this is a significant quality in the on-going search for the best talent.

roosevelt row arts district

Scottsdale Cultural Council CEO Resigns

Scottsdale Cultural Council President and CEO William H. Banchs has announced his resignation from the nonprofit organization effective August 31. Banchs plans to return to Miami to pursue new professional opportunities.

“During Bill’s five-and-a-half-year tenure he worked successfully to completely restructure and reorganize the Cultural Council’s governance and management, and to strengthen its development programs,” remarked Ellen Andres-Schneider, chair of the board of trustees.

“This was all done in accordance with a new strategic plan he helped to create. These positive developments took place during an unprecedented recession, which occupied the majority of Bill’s tenure. On behalf of the board of trustees, I want to thank Bill for his persistence and determination in bringing about these positive outcomes, which have helped pave the way toward a bright future for the Cultural Council,” Andres-Schneider added.

“I have been very fortunate to have served one of the most comprehensive cultural organizations in the nation. The artistic experiences I have had at the Scottsdale Cultural Council have been on par with the best I have ever seen or heard anywhere,” noted Bill Banchs. “I particularly wish to thank the City of Scottsdale for its commitment to the arts, the Cultural Council staff for its dedication to such high standards of artistic excellence, and the board of trustees for its active engagement and participation in our efforts to strengthen the organization and broaden its audiences and base of private-sector support.”

Banchs began his position with the Scottsdale Cultural Council in January 2008. He previously served as president of the Miami-based National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts for 17 years.

The Cultural Council will appoint an interim CEO and begin a national search for a new president and CEO.

The Scottsdale Cultural Council is contracted by the City of Scottsdale to manage the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA) and Scottsdale Public Art.

Kirk McClure

McCarthy Building Companies Hires Kirk McClure As Director Of Business Development

 

McCarthy Building Companies recently hired Kirk McClure as Director of Business Development for the Southwest division. His primary focus will be on municipal, higher education and commercial construction projects.

In this position, McClure will play a key role, providing more than a decade of industry expertise with a diverse, well-rounded background in project management, commercial development and planning, and strategic planning.

He has been engaged in a broad range of business development and project management positions throughout his career, most recently as Vice President of Business Expansion for the Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA), the state’s leading economic development organization.

McClure, a LEED accredited professional, has a critical understanding of the commercial real estate industry. Prior to his position at the ACA, he worked in land planning,project management and business development for Langdon Wilson, Atwell-Hicks, Graef and The Brooks Companies.

“Kirk has a passion for the commercial real estate industry and is extremely active within business circles here in Arizona,” said Bo Calbert, president of McCarthy Southwest. “The relationships he’s built through his previous positions and his volunteer activities will serve him well in his new role at McCarthy.”

McClure serves on the board of directors for the Arizona Association of Economic Development (AAED), and is the chair for their annual golf tournament. He is also a member of National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP), SouthwestChapter of American Association of Airport Executives (SWAAAE) and has been an active member of CoreNet Global, Valley Partnership, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the American Planning Association (APA), and the Urban Land Institute (ULI).

He is also the founder and organizer of the monthly A/E/C Golf Invitational at Grayhawk Golf Club,which includes a league of professionals that work and support the development industry. He is also a USA Hockey-Certified youth hockey coach and has been coaching for more than 13 years, most recently with Desert Youth Hockey Association (DYHA).

He earned his MBA from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University (ASU) and also holds a bachelor’s degree in Urban Planning and Design, also from ASU.

 

Greg Guglielmino

Investment Specialist Greg Guglielmino Joins Colliers' Phoenix Office

 

Colliers International in Greater Phoenix announced that Greg Guglielmino, senior associate, has joined the Phoenix office.

Guglielmino specializes in the acquisition and disposition of single- and multi-tenant office and medical investment properties for private and institutional clients. He partners with Marcus Muirhead, associate vice president of investments. Guglielmino is also a member of Colliers’ National Healthcare Services Group.

“Greg is a skilled professional and a great addition to our team,” said Bob Mulhern, managing director of Colliers. “His experience in office and medical investment sales will complement and enhance the capabilities of our established investment professionals. We are pleased to welcome Greg to Colliers.”

Guglielmino has more than 5 years of experience as an investment specialist, focusing on medical office property sales. He is an expert in financial modeling, property evaluation, detailed market research, and submarket trend analysis.

His experience includes working on behalf of private investors and institutional lenders in the sale of REO assets and investment properties involving closed listings and buyside opportunities. Prior to joining Colliers, Guglielmino was an investment associate with Marcus & Millichap’s Phoenix office.

“There are a lot of great individuals at Colliers and Marcus Muirhead is one of those individuals,” Guglielmino said. “With our similar investment backgrounds and the team approach encouraged within the organization, it is a natural fit to team with him. Together, our abilities and skill sets will add value for our clients and expand on Marcus’ positive track record for success and client satisfaction.”

He adds that the strong camaraderie within Colliers provides a positive, collaborative environment that reflects a commitment to achieving clients’ goals.

“The Colliers’ culture, management and people are refreshing and I am excited to be a part of the team.”

Guglielmino holds a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies in Small Business and Psychology and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Arizona State University.

 

joint

St. Luke’s Designated an Aetna Institute of Quality

St. Luke’s Medical Center announced it has been once again been designated an Aetna Institute of Quality® Orthopedic Care Facility for total joint replacement. St. Luke’s is the only hospital in Arizona to receive this specific level of distinction.

Aetna makes information about the quality and cost of health care services available to its members to help them make informed decisions about their health care needs. In line with this goal, Aetna recognizes hospitals and facilities in its network that offer specialized clinical services for certain health conditions. Facilities are selected for consistently delivering evidence-based, safe care.

“St. Luke’s Medical Center is pleased to receive this esteemed distinction from Aetna, in the area of total joint replacement,” said Ed Myers, CEO, St. Luke’s Medical Center. “Our medical professionals strive for excellence by giving each and every patient high quality, consistent health care day in and day out.”

As leaders in high quality, specialized orthopaedic care, surgeons on the medical staff at St. Luke’s Medical Center offer innovative procedures designed to meet the individual needs of patients. The dedicated orthopedics unit at St. Luke’s Medical Center features 20 all-private, spacious rooms with breathtaking views of both the city skyline and the surrounding mountains. The newly remodeled until also includes four state-of-the-art nursing stations designed to keep nurses near their patients for optimum care. For more information about the orthopaedic services offered at St. Luke’s Medical Center, visit AZMoreMotion.com or call toll-free 1-855-931-MORE (6673).

D_Openden 2013

Openden Named SARRC President and CEO

This month, Daniel Openden, Ph.D, BCBA-D, begins as the new president and CEO of the Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center (SARRC), a move announced earlier this year as part of SARRC’s leadership succession plan. Dr. Openden has served as SARRC’s vice president and clinical services director since 2007.  He succeeds Jeri Kendle as president.

“With 1 in 64 children in Arizona impacted by autism and 1 in 88 across the U.S., our work at SARRC is in greater demand than ever before. We are modifying our treatments to meet the developmental needs of younger children since the field is rapidly progressing at identifying infants and toddlers with autism. At the same time, children with autism quickly become adults with autism, so SARRC will continue to be a leader in the development of innovative programs that support independence and inclusion in the community,” said Openden.

The next 100 days represent an exciting and historic time as the organization explores the replication of SARRC’s nationally recognized best practices pre-school program; support the unique and unmet needs of adult women with autism through a women’s empowerment program; grow SARRC’s social enterprise programs, such as the Beneficial Beans Café at the Scottsdale Civic Center Library; and advance plans for an adult residential transition program. SARRC’s research team is also underway on 13 pharmaceutical trials and developing a web-based application accessed through smartphones—the Naturalistic Observation Diagnostic Assessment (NODA)—to accelerate early diagnoses, particularly for families that live outside of large metropolitan areas.

Dr. Openden was recruited to SARRC from the renowned Koegel Autism Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Since beginning at SARRC, he has created financial sustainability and growth across SARRC’s clinical programs. In addition, he has developed an innovative, cutting-edge inclusive preschool program recognized as a “best practices” model by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS); initiated SARRC’s Remote Telemedicine Program to provide services to families living outside of Maricopa County; and serves the autism community nationally through his leadership on the Scientific Council of the Organization for Autism Research (OAR) and Autism Speaks Family Services Committee. He is also a founding member of the Council on Autism Services (CAS), a networking organization that brings together presidents, CEOs, executive directors, clinical directors, and program directors to share high level information and identify gaps facing autism service delivery organizations.

“It is truly an honor to lead such an outstanding team and, together with our Board of Directors and the generosity of SARRC’s donors and partners, serve the autism community. We are all committed to providing individuals with autism and their families with greater hope through our research, programs and services,” said Openden.

Kendle, who served as SARRC’s president since 2009, has been part of SARRC since its inception, formerly serving on SARRC’s Board of Directors and as its Vocational & Life Skills Academy director. Kendle is continuing her involvement with SARRC as Social Enterprise Strategist and will focus on the establishment, expansion and replication of SARRC’s innovative social enterprise programs.

Mara Aspinal - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Mara Aspinal – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Mara AspinalPresident and CEO, Ventana Medical Systems

Aspinal, who holds an MBA from Harvard, joined Ventana as president and CEO in 2011. She founded the European Personalized Medicine Association and advised the Obama and Bush administrations on diagnostics and genomics.

Surprising fact: “I will attend any live sporting event – from baseball to rodeo – any chance I get.”

Biggest challenge: “My approach to my first leadership role in manufacturing was that I asked lots of questions, studied our business vs. competitors and put a strong team in place. In three years, we turned the business around and had the industry’s best profit margins. The lesson for me is not to be afraid of new challenges, take the time to learn and then trust the data alongside your gut.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Diane Brossart - Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane Brossart – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane BrossartPresident and CEO, Arizona Forward

Brossart joined the nonprofit civic group — which aims to move Arizona forward environmentally, economically and socially — as a member 30 years ago. She was appointed to her leadership role in 1991, when Valley Forward focused exclusively on Maricopa County. Rebranded as Arizona Forward is 2012, its expanded statewide sustainability agenda includes: land use, transportation, air quality, energy, water and environmental education.

Surprising fact: “I believe my mother who passed away nearly 10 years ago lives as a rabbit in my backyard.”

Biggest challenge: “Taking Valley Forward statewide after 43 years as the Valley’s voice for balance. I’m bringing the best and brightest talent around Arizona together to help make the Grand Canyon State the greatest place in America to live.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Mark H pics 012

CRA’s CEO Wins Gold Stevie Award

Mark S. Hanley, Chief Executive Officer of Clinical Research Advantage, Inc. (CRA), was the recipient of a Gold Stevie® Award in this year’s American Business Awards. Hanley was recognized as the “Maverick of the Year” in the Business Services category.

Hanley was honored for his innovative vision and leadership, which included acquiring Radiant Research in 2012 to create the country’s largest and most therapeutically diverse integrated network of clinical trial sites. “It is an honor to receive this award,” said Hanley. “But, this is really an award for the entire CRA team. It is through all of their hard work and dedication that we have accomplished so much in the past 12 months.”

The American Business Awards are the nation’s premier business awards program. All organizations operating in the U.S.A. are eligible to submit nominations – public and private, for-profit and non-profit, large and small. Stevie Award winners were selected by more than 320 executives nationwide who participated in the judging process this year.

Nicknamed the Stevies for the Greek word for “crowned,” the 11th annual award ceremony was held on June 17th in Chicago, Illinois. This year, the judges reviewed more than 3,200 nominations from organizations of all sizes and virtually every industry.

 

Mark H pics 012

CRA's CEO Wins Gold Stevie Award

Mark S. Hanley, Chief Executive Officer of Clinical Research Advantage, Inc. (CRA), was the recipient of a Gold Stevie® Award in this year’s American Business Awards. Hanley was recognized as the “Maverick of the Year” in the Business Services category.

Hanley was honored for his innovative vision and leadership, which included acquiring Radiant Research in 2012 to create the country’s largest and most therapeutically diverse integrated network of clinical trial sites. “It is an honor to receive this award,” said Hanley. “But, this is really an award for the entire CRA team. It is through all of their hard work and dedication that we have accomplished so much in the past 12 months.”

The American Business Awards are the nation’s premier business awards program. All organizations operating in the U.S.A. are eligible to submit nominations – public and private, for-profit and non-profit, large and small. Stevie Award winners were selected by more than 320 executives nationwide who participated in the judging process this year.

Nicknamed the Stevies for the Greek word for “crowned,” the 11th annual award ceremony was held on June 17th in Chicago, Illinois. This year, the judges reviewed more than 3,200 nominations from organizations of all sizes and virtually every industry.

 

Banner Good Samaritan Hospital

Banner Health Center preview on June 29

West Valley residents can tour the new Banner Health Center in Goodyear from 8 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 29.The Center is designed to support high quality, convenient health care for the entire family.

Attendees will hear remarks by Banner Medical Group CEO Jim Brannon and Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord at 8:30 a.m., followed by a celebration including food, tours, giveaways, children’s activities and information about Banner Health facilities and services. Community members are invited to meet physicians and staff and even make an appointment.

“We want to become part of the fabric of the community by becoming the medical home residents look to for help in keeping their families healthy,” said Jim Brannon, chief executive officer of Banner Medical Group. “This Banner Health Center is designed to provide primary care to the entire family in one space. We want it to be the place you would choose for prevention, wellness, basic and complex medical care and the advice you need to thrive with chronic health conditions.”

At opening on July 10, staff physicians will include family practitioners and pediatricians. Banner Health Centers accept most insurance plans. The Center will be open extended hours from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Same-day appointments will also be available. Laboratory and X-ray services are also on-site.

Banner Health Center in Estrella will also be the gateway to the incredibly comprehensive services offered throughout Banner Health system, including Banner Estrella Medical Center and specialty facilities such as Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Cardon Children’s Medical Center and Banner Concussion Center.

This location at 9780 South Estrella Parkway joins the existing Banner Health Centers offering health care where you want it and how you want it in Gilbert, Queen Creek, Surprise, Verrado and Maricopa, Ariz. as well as South Loveland, Colo. For more information on the Banner Health Center in Estrella, visit www.BannerHealth.com/HealthCenterEstrella.

CEO_ZTejas_01

First Job: Steven Micheletti, CEO, Z’Tejas

What was your first job?
Delivering bread on my uncle’s bread delivery route at the age of 11. I worked every Saturday from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. for two years.  When I became a teenager, it just didn’t seem like a cool job to be talking to your friends about, so I moved on to work in a fast-food restaurant called Spaghetti Bowl. Instead of serving buckets of chicken and fries, we served buckets of spaghetti and meatballs. My job was to make 500 pounds of meatballs every Saturday. It took me several months to stop longing for delivering bread.

Do you remember how much you earned at that first job?
I think my uncle paid me $5 a day and I also got tips from his customers. He had over 100 stops, so I made about $25 dollars in tips, which was a lot of money as an 11 year old.

What did you learn from your first job that still impacts you today?
Consistency. Folks expected to have their delivery occur at the same time every day and they would get quite upset if their delivery was late. Oddly enough, the consistency of time mattered almost as much as the quality of bread that was being delivered. You have to deliver on the promises you make to your guests and your team consistently or they start looking elsewhere.

You started your career as an attorney. What made you decide to evolve into the restaurant industry?
I have always worked in restaurants. My first bartending job was down the street from The Palm restaurant in Washington, D.C.  I had the worst shift, but I learned to love it because all the staff from The Palm would come in and eventually they took an interest in my classes. Eventually, if I told them I had an upcoming test, I would give them my notes and they would quiz me. It was pretty funny to see a bunch of waiters asking me question about constitutional law. When I finally graduated from law school and started practicing, I had this ache every so often and I eventually figured it out that my true vocation was being in the restaurant business.

What was your first job in restaurant management?
While studying for the bar exam, I become a weekend manager for a great little bar in D.C. called PW’s Saloon on 19th Street. The PW stood for the nicknames of the two owners, the Prince and the Walrus. I’ll leave the explanation of the nicknames to your imagination.

What is the biggest difference between the legal and restaurant industries?
This is an easy answer. Practicing law is an adversarial process; someone wins, someone loses. Someone is happy, someone is not. Restaurants exist to satisfy and please. When you do it right, it’s a win-win for just about every stakeholder.

What has been your biggest challenge and how did you overcome it?
My biggest challenge was admitting that the restaurant I opened in Portland, Maine was failing and needed to close. It wasn’t just about the money that I had lost, but the passion that went into creating it. It took me years to get over. For me, it was worse than being dumped by your first true love. Time heals all wounds and you analyze what went wrong and you learn to start over again.

If you weren’t doing what you are doing now, what would you like to be doing?
I originally thought when I finished law school I would go and work for a movie studio in L.A. because I have always loved spending time in movie theaters. So I guess that would be an acceptable alternative even today. I truly believe that you are where you are because that’s where you’re supposed to be. I love the restaurant business and wouldn’t change anything.

1

CEO Series: Jeri Jones

Az Business: How is being CEO of UnitedHealthcare different from being CEO of another company?
Jeri Jones, CEO, UnitedHealthcare: In the healthcare industry today, where we have been portrayed somewhat as the evil-doers of healthcare and increased costs, we spend a lot of time trying to educate those in the marketplace about what drives healthcare. That may be different from what a manufacturing company has to do every day. I also find myself more involved with legislators than I think I would expect in a different industry.

Video by Cory Bergquist

AB: How do you like working with legislators?
JJ: I have worked in two markets — Colorado and Arizona. Legislators in Colorado seem a little more reasoned in terms of making decisions. Last year, the Arizona Legislature seemed to be very caught up in not wanting to have anything to do with the Obamacare Act, as they saw it. It’s very unfortunate because they missed the boat on some opportunities and made some decisions in 2012 that hurt the industry in terms of keeping some federal dollars out of Arizona that would have helped the hospitals and kept some costs from being shifted to the business market.

AB: What qualities does an effective CEO need to possess?
JJ: Leadership. If you have strong integrity and the ability to inspire people to do what they love to do, that is the key to being a good CEO. You also need to build a good team around you, have the right people in the right roles, and help them be the best that they can be in that role.

AB: What qualities do you have that helped take you to the top of your industry?
JJ: One of the things I have been able to do over the years is be a an effective coach and mentor. I am pretty strong in finding good people and helping guide them so they can realize their full potential and advance in their career.

AB: Did you have a coach or mentor?
JJ: My father was a big influence on me. He taught me the importance of having integrity, speaking my mind and being honest. His example has helped me remain forthright throughout my career.

AB: What’s been the biggest change you’ve seen in your industry since you started?
JJ: The old days of the HMO where everyone paid a $15 co-pay, compared with today, where it’s very consumer driven. Part of the reason healthcare got as expensive as it has over the years is that no one paid attention to what the cost was. Now, they have to.

AB: Health insurance exchange (HIX) is one the horizon. How is that going to impact UnitedHealthcare?
JJ: We see it as an additional avenue to sell our business. Hopefully, it will be in a way that aligns all of the carriers with very simple comparisons so everyone will be selling the same benefit plans and all the individuals looking will be able to identify quality versus value on the exchange and it will be a simpler tool for them to purchase. The advantage of the exchange in Arizona is that people will be able to move in and out of plans depending on their financial situation, but they will be able to stay with UnitedHealthcare.

AB: What advice would you give to other women who aspire to be in your position?
JJ: Stand strong, be confident, love what you’re doing and you’ll definitely succeed.

AB: If you weren’t doing what you’re doing, what would you like to do?
JJ: I would be traveling the world and having a good time, but I’ve got a few years to go before I’m ready to do that.

VITAL STATS: JERI JONES
> Holds a B.S. degree in accounting from Northern Arizona University and is a C.P.A.
> After graduating from college, she traveled the country doing joint-venture audits of oil companies.
> Before returning to Arizona in 2011, she spent 21 years in Colorado.
> Member of the board of directors of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

child.hospital

UnitedHealthcare Children's Foundation Offers Grants

The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan.

Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 per grant to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids.

To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to UHCCF at www.uhccf.org. Donations are used for grants to help children and families in the region in which they are received.

“The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation is dedicated to improving a child’s health and quality of life by making it easier to access needed medical-related services. The grants enable families to focus on their children’s health instead of worrying about how they’ll pay their medical bills,” said Jeri Jones, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona. “Eligible families are encouraged to apply online for a medical grant today and take advantage of this valuable resource.”

In 2012, more than 36 grants totaling more than $95,000 were awarded to families in Arizona. Nationwide, more than 1,300 grants, worth more than $4.1 million, were awarded for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy. As successful fund-raising efforts continue to grow, UHCCF is hoping to help more children and families in 2013.

child.hospital

UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation Offers Grants

The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan.

Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 per grant to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids.

To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to UHCCF at www.uhccf.org. Donations are used for grants to help children and families in the region in which they are received.

“The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation is dedicated to improving a child’s health and quality of life by making it easier to access needed medical-related services. The grants enable families to focus on their children’s health instead of worrying about how they’ll pay their medical bills,” said Jeri Jones, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona. “Eligible families are encouraged to apply online for a medical grant today and take advantage of this valuable resource.”

In 2012, more than 36 grants totaling more than $95,000 were awarded to families in Arizona. Nationwide, more than 1,300 grants, worth more than $4.1 million, were awarded for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy. As successful fund-raising efforts continue to grow, UHCCF is hoping to help more children and families in 2013.

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Hispanic Chamber names Guerra Woman of the Year

The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is honoring BioAccel CEO and Co-Founder MaryAnn Guerra as the Woman of the Year on Saturday at its 55th Annual Black & White Ball and Business Awards.

Guerra is being recognized for BioAccel’s leadership role in economic development and its ongoing effort to start new companies and create jobs in Arizona. The gala, which honors three other community leaders and a business, is being held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel, 330 N. Third Street.

“The centerpiece attraction of our gala is the Hispanic Chamber’s prestigious business awards, and we’re extremely proud this year to salute the achievements of MaryAnn Guerra, one of our the state’s innovative figures, by awarding her the 2013 Woman of the Year Award,” said AZHCC President & CEO Gonzalo A. de la Melena, Jr.

Guerra is known for creating novel programs to accelerate the transfer of technology from the lab into new business opportunities. She has spent much of her career operating successful and progressive health, science and technology businesses. Guerra is an expert at business development initiatives that create organizations poised to deliver commercial outcomes. Since the launch of BioAccel in April 2009, 10 companies have been successfully launched with products close to commercial availability. Additionally, BioAccel recently partnered with the City of Peoria to create the first medical device accelerator, embedding the BioAccel model into its operations to ensure positive economic impact.

“I’m honored and humbled by this award,” Guerra said. “BioAccel is a new kind of accelerator model in Arizona dedicated to creating knowledge-industry jobs and new companies that drive our state’s economy. It’s inspiring and invigorating work, and a privilege to work with a staff, board and industry leaders committed to realizing a big bio vision for Arizona.”

Prior to founding BioAccel, Guerra served as President of TGen Accelerators, LLC, and Chief Operating Officer at TGen. While at TGen, she facilitated the start-up of six companies and was involved in the sale of three of those yielding significant profits for the organization. As TGen’s former COO, she grew the organization from $30 million to $60 million in fewer than three years.  Guerra also served as the executive vice president of Matthews Media Group where she was responsible for developing and implementing commercial strategic business plans that expanded and enhanced services and extended relationships with the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. She had an impressive career at the National Institutes of Health in various senior level positions including executive officer at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and deputy director of management & executive officer at the National Cancer Institute.

Guerra has received numerous awards for her work including Arizona Business Magazine’s 2013 Fifteen Women to Watch. Last year, BioAccel received the State Science and Technology Institutes’ Most Innovative New Initiative Award, a first time national recognition for BioAccel and the state of Arizona. Currently Guerra is a board member of Planned Parenthood of Arizona and the Mollen Foundation as well as a Commissioner of the Arizona Skill Standard Commission. In addition, she serves on the advisory board for ASU School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Guerra earned an undergraduate degree from The Ohio State University and an MBA from George Washington University in Science, Innovation and Commercialization.

The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s 55th Annual Black & White Ball and Business Awards event is the state’s longest running formal gala and honors the achievements of business and community leaders statewide. More than 1,200 of Arizona’s most notable business and community leaders attend every year.

The Chamber will present awards during the gala in four other categories. This year’s winners are:

• Lattie F. Coor, Legacy Award

• Alfredo J. Molina, Man of the Year

• Israel G. Torres, Entrepreneur of the Year

• Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Corporation of the Year Award

Gehan Homes in AZ - rendering hi res.

Texas homebuilder Gehan enters Arizona market

Gehan Homes, a Dallas-based homebuilder, announced the grand opening of its first community in Arizona, Hacienda at Greer Ranch in Surprise. One of the top 30 builders in the U.S., Gehan Homes is introducing a new series of homes targeted to the move-up homebuyer. A model home is now open at 11520 N. 156 Lane in Surprise where homebuyers can see the six new floor plans and 18 new front elevations that are exclusive to the Phoenix market.

“Our opening at Greer Ranch is a vote of confidence in the Phoenix market, which has clearly rebounded and where we see positive signs for the longer term health of the housing market,” said Tim Gehan, CEO of Gehan Homes. Gehan Homes will build in four Valley-wide communities during 2013.

The award-winning builder is drawing on more than 25 years of experience to meet buyers’ everyday living needs. Committed to delivering homes that are “Designed for Your Life,” Gehan offers a broad selection of hundreds of design options for discerning buyers.

“A Gehan home is one that fits the energy and flexibility of modern life,” Gehan said. “The new floor plans at Greer Ranch are designed for today’s lifestyles and feature open floor plans that better connect family members, three car garages and flexible spaces that can be personalized to meet a variety of individual needs.”

Homebuyers can choose from 66 homesites at Gehan Homes’ Hacienda at Greer Ranch community with energy-efficient floor plans ranging from 2,001 to 3,947 sq. ft.  Gehan Homes chose to build in Greer Ranch for several reasons, including its proximity to hiking trails, parks, shopping and more. Streetscapes are tree-lined and all of the homes are within walking distance of the Excelling Sonoran Heights Elementary School in the Dysart school district. With prices starting at $247,990, Gehan’s stylish Greer Ranch homes are perfect for active families who value being able to personalize a new home to fit their lifestyle.

Similar upscale homes will be built in the Vistancia, Palm Valley and Bridges of Gilbert communities by the end of 2013.

For information about Hacienda at Greer Ranch, call (623) 584-0903 or visit www.gehanhomes.com.

gaia

Biltmore Bank Sponsors Start-Up Competition

Biltmore Bank of Arizona, a premier community bank headquartered in Arcadia along the Camelback Corridor that is focused on the needs of the small and medium-sized business, announced that it has joined Tallwave, a lean business accelerator and venture management firm also located in Scottsdale, for the first-ever “High Tide” Start-Up Competition.  High Tide is focused on commercializing new sustainable ventures in Arizona by bringing validated companies to willing and motivated capital sources.

“High Tide is the only startup competition in the Southwest, applying lean business and design validation principles to identify, develop and commercialize rapid-growth startups,” said Jeff Gaia, CEO and president of the Biltmore Bank of Arizona. “Through our sponsorship of this innovative program, we believe we can help connect the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Arizona as well as assist startups in becoming become viable, scalable and sustainable growth companies.”

Thus far in the competition, High Tide has selected and celebrated 20 companies throughout the Southwest to participate in its “Phase One: Validation” program, which examines viability of each venture. Six of these 20 companies have since been announced as finalists and have now moved to the “Phase Two: Acceleration” program, which assesses product-market fit and go-to-market commercialization.

The finalists – four of whom are from Arizona – are:
Convrrt from Chandler
Creative Allies from Santa Monica, California
GreenRx from Denver, Colorado
HiringSolved from Chandler
LocalWork.com from Phoenix
SaveOnCouriers.com from Phoenix

Each High Tide finalist will receive a cash grant of $15,000 for use in company operational expenses and an additional $35,000 in scholarships for either “Product Market Fit” or “Go To Market” services from Tallwave. There is no cost to entrepreneurs selected to participate in the High Tide program. For more information, visit www.TallwaveHighTide.com.

“As a High Tide sponsor, Biltmore Bank has visibility into Arizona’s most exciting and promising startup and early-stage ventures,” said Jeffrey Pruitt, Tallwave chairman and CEO. “Entrepreneurs need the help of community leaders such as Biltmore Bank and we applaud their support of the next captains of industry.”

Delta Dental names Director of Legal Affairs

Delta Dental of Arizona is pleased to announce the hiring of Anne Bishop as the dental insurance company’s Director of Legal Affairs and Compliance.

“We are thrilled to welcome Anne to the Delta Dental team,” said Allan Allford, CEO for Delta Dental of Arizona. “Her expertise in health care law will be an asset as we prepare for the launch of private dental exchanges and other aspects of the Affordable Care Act.”

A magna cum laude graduate of Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, she has extensive commercial and healthcare litigation experience. Prior to joining Delta Dental, Bishop served as an associate attorney for Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. in Phoenix, where she focused on health care services, health care transactions, compliance and regulatory matters.

Bishop’s expertise includes seven years of experience analyzing and researching legal issues in healthcare, advising clients on HIPAA and other healthcare compliance issues, and coordinating intra-company fraud investigations. In addition, Bishop spent nearly 14 years with the National Security Agency, where she received more than a dozen awards for outstanding performance and exceptional contributions to the intelligence community. Bishop also holds a bachelor of arts in international relations from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Heard Museum Names New CEO

James Pepper Henry has been named as the Heard Museum’s director and CEO. Henry comes to the Heard after a successful six-year tenure at the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Alaska’s premier art, history and science institution. There, he oversaw the completion of the museum’s $110 million, 80,000-square-foot expansion, including the debut of the new Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center exhibition hall and the new Imaginarium Discovery Center.

“We are very pleased to announce that Jim Pepper Henry will become the new director of the Heard Museum,” said Heard Museum Board of Trustees Chair Mark Bonsall. “An extensive national search was conducted to find the person who will lead us into the future.”

Bonsall adds, “Jim brings a wealth of museum experience; he comes to us from his current post as director and CEO of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center and has also held leadership positions at several other museums, both Native and non-Indian. Jim is a sculptor in his own right and an enrolled member of the Kaw Nation. We are thrilled to announce his appointment as the executive director of our beloved Heard Museum, and very much look forward to his leadership of this preeminent institution.”

“I am honored to have been selected as the next director and CEO of the Heard Museum, one of the premier institutions of American Indian art and culture and an American treasure,” said Pepper Henry. “I look forward to working with the board, staff and community to present exciting exhibitions and programs, expand its audiences and steward the Heard into a new era.”

Pepper Henry formerly served as an associate director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) where, for nearly 10 years, he managed a wide variety of American Indian community-oriented programs, services, and traveling exhibitions. Pepper Henry played a pivotal role in the establishment and launch of NMAI, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., that opened to the public in 2004.

Pepper Henry served as the founding director of the Kanza Museum in Kaw City, Okla.; interim curator of American Indian Art at the Portland Art Museum; gallery director at the Interstate Firehouse Cultural Center in Portland, Ore.; and gallery director for the Institute of Alaska Native Arts in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Pepper Henry is a member of the Kaw Nation of Oklahoma and Muscogee Creek Nation. He is co-founder and president of the Kanza Ilóshka Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to the perpetuation of the cultural life-ways and traditions of the Kaw people. Pepper Henry is also an active American Indian traditional dancer and is co-founder of the Kaw Nation Traditional Dance Society.

He is a graduate of the University of Oregon and a recipient of the University’s prestigious Council for Minority Education Leadership Award.  He is also a graduate of the Museum Leadership Institute at the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California.

Pepper Henry has contributed essays to various publications including Stewards of the Sacred, co-published by the American Association of Museums and Harvard University, and Native Universe: Voices of Indian America, co-published by the Smithsonian Institution and the National Geographic Society.

Pepper Henry will assume his duties on August 5.

Business Management

Mobile Mini names Olsson as its CEO

Portable storage container company Mobile Mini has named Erik Olsson as its president and CEO.

Olsson succeeds Steven Bunger, who stepped down as chairman, president and CEO at the end of 2012. In October Mobile Mini Inc. said that lead independent director Michael Watts would become chairman once Bunger left the company.

Olsson, 50, served as president, CEO and a director at rental equipment provider RSC Holdings Inc. from 2006 until the company was acquired by United Rentals Inc. in April 2012. He previously served as RSC’s chief operating officer and chief financial officer.

Olsson will also serve as a Mobile Mini board member, pushing the board’s total back up to eight members.

Mobile Mini is based in Tempe.

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Narang named CEO of Banner Good Samaritan

Steve Narang, MD, chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, Ariz., has been named chief executive officer at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, effective April 26. He will assume the role from current CEO Larry Volkmar, who will continue to serve as CEO until April 25.

Banner Health Arizona West Region President Kathy Bollinger said Dr. Narang will have the opportunity over the next several weeks to work closely with Volkmar to ensure a smooth hand-off of responsibilities. “The collaboration between these two Banner leaders will ensure a smooth transition,” she said.

Dr. Narang, a pediatric physician, has served as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s since June 2011. Prior to coming to Banner Health, Dr. Narang served in a variety of medical director and teaching positions in Louisiana, including medical director of graduate medical education and medical director of pediatric emergency services at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

“I’m looking forward to working with an outstanding team at Banner Good Samaritan,” said Dr. Narang. “We will work together to take its distinguished history of excellent clinical care, teaching and research and create a distinct value proposition around the delivery of high-value and innovative academic medicine in one of the country’s highest performing health systems.”

Bollinger said that Dr. Narang distinguished himself during the interview process as a visionary leader that is highly driven to deliver results. She said Dr. Narang’s impressive relationship-building strengths will be focused on engaging employees, physicians and the community around the excellence that is the foundation of Banner Good Samaritan’s 100-year legacy. “These strengths, combined with Steve’s background as a practicing physician, will be particularly effective in Steve’s engagement with the graduate medical education program,” she said.

Bollinger said it makes her especially proud that Dr. Narang’s selection reflects Banner’s commitment to internal opportunities for growth, development and promotion.
“In his experience as a physician, teacher, medical director and, most recently, as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center, Dr. Narang has amply demonstrated leadership attributes that are critical to Banner’s future as a leading health system in the nation,” she said. “The future is indeed very bright.”

Dr. Narang received his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and completed his pediatrics residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He has a master’s degree in health care management from Harvard University in Boston.