Tag Archives: chief operating officer

football

Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Announces Board

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announces its Board of Directors for Super Bowl XLIX. The board of directors is comprised of business leaders that volunteer their time to drive the state’s efforts for Super Bowl XLIX.

The Host Committee is a private, non-profit Arizona corporation. The mandate of the Host Committee is to galvanize local stakeholders in a united approach to hosting the largest single-day sporting event by maximizing positive media exposure, fueling the economic engine of Arizona and leaving a lasting legacy long after the excitement of the Big Game. The board was assembled in 2013 to begin planning and to garner local corporate support and sponsors.

Board members include:
● Board Chair David Rousseau, president, SRP

● Brad Anderson, executive vice president, brokerage office services, CB Richard Ellis

● Michael Bidwill, president, Arizona Cardinals

● Jose Cardenas, senior vice president and general council, Arizona State University

● David Farca, president, ToH Design Studio

● Jim Grogan, chief operating officer, International Capital Investment Company

● Michael Haenel, executive vice president, Cassidy Turley

● Mike Kennedy, partner, Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A. (chairman, Super Bowl XLII Host Committee in 2008)

● Dan Lewis, senior vice president, Sovereign Finance

● Jeffrey Lowe, president, MidFirst Bank

● Mary Martuscelli, regional president for the private client reserve, U.S. Bank

● Andrew McCain, vice president and CFO, Hensley Beverage Company

● Patrick McGinley, vice president of property management, Vestar

● Steve Moore, president and CEO, Greater Phoenix CVB

● Jodi Noble, partner, Deloitte

● Jay Parry, president and CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee

● Earl Petznick Jr., president and CEO, Northside Hay Company

● Ken Van Winkle, managing partner, Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP

● KJ Wagner, president and CEO, Willis of Arizona, Inc.

● David Watson, co-founder and managing partner, mybody and president and managing partner, Revolution Tea

● John Zidich, CEO, Republic Media Publisher, The Arizona Republic

“We have an impressive group of business leaders working together to meet the fundraising goals for Super Bowl XLIX and to maximize the opportunity to build the Arizona brand in this unparalleled global spotlight,” said David Rousseau, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee chairman. “We want to promote Arizona as an ideal destination for businesses and tourists well beyond Super Bowl XLIX.”

Super Bowl XLIX is scheduled to be played at University Of Phoenix Stadium on February 1, 2015, marking Arizona’s second Super Bowl in seven years. In Super Bowl XLII at University of Phoenix Stadium on February 3, 2008, The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots 17-14. Arizona’s first big game, Super Bowl XXX, was held at Arizona State University’s Sun Devil Stadium in 1996, with the Dallas Cowboys beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 27-17.

For more information on the Board of Directors, please visit http://azsuperbowl.com/about-us/meet-the-team/

clinical research advantage

Clinical Research Advantage Receives 5 STEVIE Awards

Tempe-based Clinical Research Advantage, a community-based network of clinical trial sites, was honored with three Silver and two Bronze STEVIE Awards at the 10th Annual American Business Awards held on June 18th in New York City. The American Business Awards are the nation’s premier business awards program. This year, more than 3,000 nominations from organizations of all sizes and in virtually every industry were submitted for consideration in a wide range of categories.

Clinical Research Advantage received the following awards:

  • The Silver Award for Company of the Year in the Pharmaceuticals category.
  • A Bronze Award for the Fastest-Growing Company of the Year in the Pharmaceuticals category.
  • David Bruggeman, CRA’s President and Chief Operating Officer, was honored with Silver Awards for Executive of the Year in both the Pharmaceuticals and the Health Products and Services categories.
  • Casey Orvin, CRA’s Vice President of Business Development and Amanda Drake, CRA’s Director of Business Development were honored with a Bronze Award for Management Team of the Year in the Pharmaceuticals Category.

“David Bruggeman, Casey Orvin, Amanda Drake and all of CRA’s employees have made 2012 a remarkable year for our company. Each employee is dedicated to our mission of enhancing patient care by bringing drugs to market more quickly and efficiently, and I would like to congratulate them on achieving this level of recognition from the STEVIE® Awards,” said Mark S. Hanley, CRA’s Chief Executive Officer.

Clinical Research Advantage, Inc. (CRA) is a provider of a range of research services to pharmaceutical companies and clinical research organizations. As a leading trial management organization, CRA operates from 33 sites across 17 geographic markets nationwide, helping trial sponsors bring drugs to market more quickly and efficiently. Founded in 1992, CRA has successfully completed more than 1,800 clinical trials on behalf of its clients. For more information, visit www.crastudies.com.

For more information about Clinical Research Advantage, visit their website at crastudies.com

Rick Welts, President and Chief Operating Officer of the Phoenix Suns

Rick Welts, President Of Phoenix Suns, Discusses His First Job

Rick Welts
President and Chief Operating Officer, Phoenix Suns

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
My very first job was in the exact same industry that I am in now, and the exact same league. I was a ball boy for the Seattle SuperSonics, which I started doing in 1969. I was a team attendant, just like you see ball boys and ball kids running around today doing it, just doing what needed to be done around the locker room and during the games.

I go back to that a lot when I talk to people about what I do, because it’s very rare that anybody gets the opportunity to be in the environment of a professional sports team locker room, and there are dynamics that go on there that actually help me very much in my current job in terms of the relationships between players, the coaching staff, the training staff, the media, and where that interaction happens.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
It was called then the public relations director — it’s now usually called media relations director — of that same team, the Seattle SuperSonics, which I started doing in 1977. That was very valuable to me in that we ended up, the Sonics, in the two years that I had that position going to the NBA finals both years and winning a championship the second year, which was 1979. … It was really a fast education in my first two years in that position to really be the focal point of our league in the championship series both times and to win a championship.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
I think with the ball boy job I got $10 a game and two tickets with which my parents became regular attendees of Sonics’ games. My starting salary as public relations director, which started in 1977, was $15,000.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
One that everybody knows would be the current commissioner of the NBA, David Stern. … I ended up spending 17 years working directly for him, the first couple in his role as executive vice president and the last 15 as commissioner of the NBA. He truly would be my most important mentor in learning. …

My two others would be my second boss at the Sonics, a guy by the name of Dave Watkins, who was head marketing and public relations person for the Sonics at the time. I really learned the value of how much creativity you could bring to a job and how important communications skills are in business. … (Then) I went into business with a guy who had been our assistant general manager with the Sonics. His name was Bob Walsh. Bob had left the Sonics to start a sports marketing firm in Seattle, and from Bob I learned to value the role personal relationships play in being successful in business …

What advice would you give to a person entering your industry?
In addition to looking for the right organization and the right opportunity, if you can pick a good boss, you’re probably going to learn more and probably advance your career better than you could if that wasn’t the case.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I actually wanted to be a journalist or at least be in the journalism industry. When I was in college I was actually in communications school. I was going during the time of Watergate when journalists really were heroes. … I still have great admiration for people who have that as their lives’ work.