Tag Archives: children

online

Closing the digital divide for Arizona students

Arizona students are back in class and in addition to notebooks and lunch boxes, some parents are packing smartphones or tablets in their kid’s backpacks. Some school districts are even requesting that kids bring their own technology to school to enhance their learning.

A recent Pew Internet & American Life study found that more than 80 percent of teachers agree that today’s digital technologies are leading to greater disparities between affluent and disadvantaged schools and school districts. When 76 percent of teachers assign online homework, teachers increasingly find themselves in the difficult position of either leaving behind students without Internet at home or holding back the other “connected students.”

What is truly troubling is that many kids throughout Arizona, even those with Internet-enabled smartphones and tablets, have no access to Internet in their homes. While the majority of Arizona homes have access to a broadband connection in their neighborhood, due to cost, some economically challenged families choose not to connect in their homes. Internet access and digital literacy are essential for today’s students to succeed and ensure that they have the tools to compete in our 21st century workforce.

Connect2Compete (C2C) was created by community leaders, the private sector and foundations to bridge the digital divide to ensure affordable access to the Internet for low-income families. As the largest Internet provider in Arizona, and a company that has a strong history of supporting broadband adoption through programs such as the Boys and Girls Clubs technology centers, it was a natural for Cox Communications to be part of this effort to ensure that affordable Internet access is available to those students most at risk of falling through the digital divide.

While the main goal of C2C is to improve student engagement and increase graduation rates, it also benefits other members of the household. Just consider this – in the U.S. today, more than 80 percent of Fortune 500 companies post their job openings online only and require online applications – the same is true at Cox Communications.

So how does it work? Families who have at least one child enrolled in the national free school lunch program are eligible for low-cost access to high-speed Internet through Connect2Compete. A consortium of hardware and software partners provide low-cost computers and digital literacy training, and Cox Communications provides a two-year commitment of Internet service for $9.95 a month, free installation and a free modem rental.

Cox Communications believes that all kids in Arizona deserve to have the same tools for learning and Connect2Compete is one important way we can do our part. For more information, visit connect2compete.org/cox/.

 

Susan Anable is the vice president of public affairs for Cox Communications Arizona and is the mother of two school-aged children.

online

Closing the digital divide for Arizona students

Arizona students are back in class and in addition to notebooks and lunch boxes, some parents are packing smartphones or tablets in their kid’s backpacks. Some school districts are even requesting that kids bring their own technology to school to enhance their learning.

A recent Pew Internet & American Life study found that more than 80 percent of teachers agree that today’s digital technologies are leading to greater disparities between affluent and disadvantaged schools and school districts. When 76 percent of teachers assign online homework, teachers increasingly find themselves in the difficult position of either leaving behind students without Internet at home or holding back the other “connected students.”

What is truly troubling is that many kids throughout Arizona, even those with Internet-enabled smartphones and tablets, have no access to Internet in their homes. While the majority of Arizona homes have access to a broadband connection in their neighborhood, due to cost, some economically challenged families choose not to connect in their homes. Internet access and digital literacy are essential for today’s students to succeed and ensure that they have the tools to compete in our 21st century workforce.

Connect2Compete (C2C) was created by community leaders, the private sector and foundations to bridge the digital divide to ensure affordable access to the Internet for low-income families. As the largest Internet provider in Arizona, and a company that has a strong history of supporting broadband adoption through programs such as the Boys and Girls Clubs technology centers, it was a natural for Cox Communications to be part of this effort to ensure that affordable Internet access is available to those students most at risk of falling through the digital divide.

While the main goal of C2C is to improve student engagement and increase graduation rates, it also benefits other members of the household. Just consider this – in the U.S. today, more than 80 percent of Fortune 500 companies post their job openings online only and require online applications – the same is true at Cox Communications.

So how does it work? Families who have at least one child enrolled in the national free school lunch program are eligible for low-cost access to high-speed Internet through Connect2Compete. A consortium of hardware and software partners provide low-cost computers and digital literacy training, and Cox Communications provides a two-year commitment of Internet service for $9.95 a month, free installation and a free modem rental.

Cox Communications believes that all kids in Arizona deserve to have the same tools for learning and Connect2Compete is one important way we can do our part. For more information, visit connect2compete.org/cox/.

 

Susan Anable is the vice president of public affairs for Cox Communications Arizona and is the mother of two school-aged children.

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Scottsdale Film Festival Intoduces New Children's Programs

The annual Scottsdale International Film Festival returns for the 13th time on October 4 at Harkins Shea 14 Theaters. The entertainment will continue until October 8.

The festival will showcase local and foreign films, which have not been announced yet. The festival will also introduce a new children’s program that is sponsored by Republic Charities in partnership with Deer Valley Unified School District.

The children’s program will include a live action and animated series of films, curated by the Northe Film Forum’s Seattle International Children’s Film Festival. Your little one can enjoy the theater on October 7 at 10:30 a.m.

“This is a great opportunity for young people to experience the wonder of great filmmaking and explore the art form deeper than a major blockbuster,” says Amy Ettinger, Executive Director of the Scottsdale International Film Festival. “Without Republic Charities belief in and support of this program, we wouldn’t be able to give these kids the chance to see the world from the view of their counterparts around the world.”

Children will hop aboard a celluloid magic carpet and take a trip all the way from the Arctic to Mozambique, with stops along the way to see animated sights in Turkey, Germany, France, Argentina, and India, through movies like Bottle, Istanbul, Chinti and much more!

Films are appropriate for all ages. Ticket will become available on September 3. Prices range from $8 to $12.

avnet express - donate car for chances for children

Wissink Elected to Childplay’s Board of Trustees

Susan Wissink, a shareholder at Fennemore Craig in Phoenix, has been elected to Childsplay’s Board of Trustees.

Wissink chairs the firm’s business and finance practice group and provides legal counsel in the areas of mergers and acquisitions, securities, general corporate law and commercial real estate leasing. She received her J.D. from Arizona State University and her B.A. in English from Northwestern University.

Founded in 1977, Childsplay is a nationally and internationally respected professional theatre company whose chosen audience is children. Over the past 36 years, Childsplay had educated and inspired more than four million young people and families.

kids.online

New COPPA Regulations: Are You Ready?

Less than two weeks remain before the effective date of amended regulations for the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”). With the new and expanded definitions under the amended regulations, COPPA may have an impact on you now, even if it didn’t previously. If you haven’t already done so, now is the time to review your processes in anticipation of compliance, as the requirements become effective July 1, 2013.

COPPA was first passed in 2000, prohibiting website operators from knowingly collecting personally identifiable information from children under the age of 13 without notice and verifiable parental consent. However, as technology has continued to advance, the FTC has recognized a need to amend the definitions under the regulation to sustain the intent of COPPA. “Personally Identifiable Information” has been expanded to include (i) geolocation; (ii) audio, photo, and video files that contain a child’s image or voice; and (iii) persistent identifiers that can recognize users over time and across different websites or online services such as IP addresses and mobile device IDs. None of these items is traditionally (at least within the United States) considered to be personally identifiable; nevertheless, under the new regulations, a website operator cannot collect them from a child under 13 years of age without parental consent, and “collection” now includes even passive tracking.

There are a few limited exceptions to this prohibition under the new regulation: No parental notice or consent is required when an operator collects a persistent identifier for the sole purpose of supporting the website or online service’s internal operations, such as contextual advertising, frequency capping, legal compliance, site analysis, and network communications. Further, under the new definitions, “collection” of personal information now permits operators to allow children to participate in interactive communities without parental consent, so long as the operators take reasonable measures to delete any personally identifiable information before it is made public.

On the other hand, with the expanded burdens on the restriction of data collection come a bit more flexibility, as the new regulations also expand the acceptable types of verifiable parental consent. The new definition of “verifiable parental consent” expressly contemplates electronic scans of signed parental consent forms, video-conferencing, the checking of government-issued IDs against known databases, and requiring a parent to use alternative payment systems such as debit cards and electronic payment systems in connection with a monetary transaction.

The new regulation also closes a loophole that had previously existed with use of third-party ad networks by expanding the definitions of “operator” and “website” to include third-party data collectors. For example, third parties will no longer be permitted to use plug-ins on kid-directed apps to collect personal information from children without parental notice and consent.

In addition to the change to the current definitions, the new regulations impose tighter data security obligations, focusing on the release of data to third parties and on stricter processes for data retention and deletion. The FTC now requires reasonable steps to ensure children’s personal information is released only to companies that are capable of keeping it secure and confidential. Finally, the regulation requires reasonable procedures for data retention and deletion to help ensure information is not kept longer than reasonably necessary and to ensure it is securely deleted.

On a final note, if you have previously applied to be, and have been approved as, a member of a COPPA safe harbor, be prepared for an audit. The FTC is requiring enhanced oversight of such organizations by requiring the self-regulatory safe harbors to audit their members.

With each new wave of internet sophistication and technology, we will likely continue to see expansion of the applicability of COPPA. More and more entities are building their business models off of “big data” and the collection and use of such data online. With that kind of business, however, comes the privacy regulations, and the FTC considers COPPA a useful tool in its toolbox to continue to enforce online data privacy.

Take a deep breath and dive into the definitions — the fully revised rule can be found at 16 C.F.R. Part 312 (http://www.ftc.gov/os/2012/12/121219copparulefrn.pdf). Contact your data privacy counsel to help you sort through the new definitions and see what your obligations might be under the new regulatory scheme. The earlier you can sort through your potential compliance issues, the sooner you will be able to minimize any potential liability and exposure, and thus protect your business, its assets, and its reputation.

For more information on data privacy issues of all kinds, contact Heather Buchta at (602) 229-5228 or heather.buchta@quarles.com, Cameron Robinson at (602) 229-5285 or cameron.robinson@quarles.com, or your Quarles & Brady attorney.

ryan

Ryan House announces new leadership

Ryan House, a Phoenix-based nonprofit that provides respite and palliative care to Arizona children facing life-threatening conditions and, as needed, end-of-life care, is pleased to announce a new Executive Director and Chairman of their Board of Directors.   The nonprofit recently selected Julie Bank as their new Executive Director and Matthew Winter has been appointed as the Chairman of the Board.

Bank comes to Ryan House with more than 25 years of experience in program planning, administration, communications and marketing experience in the nonprofit sector on both the national and local level.  She brings strong qualifications that will enhance Ryan House’s fundraising, program development, and donor relations. Bank will be responsible for a budget of $2million while overseeing the staff and work in collaboration with severalcommunity partners.

“I look forward to furthering the mission of Ryan House and to bring awareness to the good work being done through our respite, palliative and end-of-life care program,” said Bank.  “I have a passion to want to help children and will look forward to bringing my nonprofit expertise to help serve the children and families of Ryan House.”

Bank has previously worked for American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals as the Director of Education, at Maricopa County Animal Care & Control and most recently was the Executive Director at Animal Care & Control of NYC, running the largest animal welfare organization in the North East.  Bank also has spent more than eight years as a CASA volunteer helping children in the foster care system in Calif., New York and Ariz.

In addition, the Board of Directors recently elected Matthew Winter as the Chairman of the Board. He is currently the managing member ofWinter Law Group, P.L.C., founded by Winter in 2008.  He focuses his practice in the areas of commercial transactions and litigation, and has been practicing law for 20 years.

Winter is committed to serving youth through various community organizations and sports, coaching youth football and baseball and serving as an instructor at various youth sports clinics.  He joined the Board of Directors of Ryan House in 2011 to further his personal commitment to helping youth in the community.

“Ryan House truly is a unique nonprofit in our community and in the country,” said Winter.  “ I am honored to be a part of their leadership and look forward to making great strides to bring awareness to such a needed program.”

Winter currently also serves as Secretary of the Board of Directors of the Fiesta Bowl and Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl, after having served as a member of the Fiesta Bowl Committee since 1997.