Tag Archives: china mist

Greg Guglielmino

Investment Specialist Greg Guglielmino Joins Colliers' Phoenix Office

 

Colliers International in Greater Phoenix announced that Greg Guglielmino, senior associate, has joined the Phoenix office.

Guglielmino specializes in the acquisition and disposition of single- and multi-tenant office and medical investment properties for private and institutional clients. He partners with Marcus Muirhead, associate vice president of investments. Guglielmino is also a member of Colliers’ National Healthcare Services Group.

“Greg is a skilled professional and a great addition to our team,” said Bob Mulhern, managing director of Colliers. “His experience in office and medical investment sales will complement and enhance the capabilities of our established investment professionals. We are pleased to welcome Greg to Colliers.”

Guglielmino has more than 5 years of experience as an investment specialist, focusing on medical office property sales. He is an expert in financial modeling, property evaluation, detailed market research, and submarket trend analysis.

His experience includes working on behalf of private investors and institutional lenders in the sale of REO assets and investment properties involving closed listings and buyside opportunities. Prior to joining Colliers, Guglielmino was an investment associate with Marcus & Millichap’s Phoenix office.

“There are a lot of great individuals at Colliers and Marcus Muirhead is one of those individuals,” Guglielmino said. “With our similar investment backgrounds and the team approach encouraged within the organization, it is a natural fit to team with him. Together, our abilities and skill sets will add value for our clients and expand on Marcus’ positive track record for success and client satisfaction.”

He adds that the strong camaraderie within Colliers provides a positive, collaborative environment that reflects a commitment to achieving clients’ goals.

“The Colliers’ culture, management and people are refreshing and I am excited to be a part of the team.”

Guglielmino holds a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies in Small Business and Psychology and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Arizona State University.

 

Chandler Innovation Center

Nominate Your Favorite for a Spirit of Enterprise Award

Want to help honor your favorite Arizona company? Nominate it for a 2013 Spirit of Enterprise Award.

The awards from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University recognize some of Arizona’s best businesses for creating jobs, boosting our economy and treating customers right. Past winners include well-known names like Cold Stone Creamery, China Mist, Ollie the Trolley and Total Transit (Discount Cab), as well as rapidly growing businesses, such as GlobalMed and WebPT.

“We’re looking for firms that demonstrate ethics, energy and excellence in entrepreneurship,” says Gary Naumann, director of the Spirit of Enterprise Center at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “They should have a great story and a positive culture internally, and be exemplary community partners in terms of how they give back.”

You can nominate any company that is:

* A for-profit enterprise in business for at least four years;
* Incorporated, headquartered or having a majority of its business operations in Arizona;
* Employing at least three or more full-time workers;
* Able to demonstrate profitability over the last three years combined.

In addition, one minority-owned business will receive the Gary L. Trujillo Minority Enterprise Award sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona.

Once a company is nominated, it will have until July 31 to complete an awards application.

The winners of the 17th annual Spirit of Enterprise Awards will be announced at a luncheon at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa in Phoenix on Nov. 22. Hundreds of Arizona business and community leaders attend this annual event.

For more information on nominating a company, applying for the awards, or attending the luncheon, call (480) 965-0474 or visit spiritofenterprise.org.

These awards are just one focus of the Spirit of Enterprise Center, which helps hundreds of businesses each year. The center offers companies the chance to recruit and meet with top student talent, while also allowing students to get hands-on business experience. In addition, companies can use the center to access other ASU business resources. The center is self-funded and utilizes community sponsorships and volunteers to sustain its activities.

First Press Fine Wine Auction

First Press Fine Wine Auction Benefits KJZZ Youth Media Project

The 10th Annual First Press Fine Wine Auction will benefit the KJZZ Youth Media Project. All proceeds from the auction go to the youth media program that allows KJZZ reporters to mentor high school students in the areas of journalism and reporting.

The 10th Annual First Press Fine Wine Auction

First Press Fine Wine AuctionThe 10th Annual First Press Fine Wine Auction, presented by Molina Jewelers, will take place on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012.

More than 30 wineries are scheduled to participate, including the Robert Craig Winery from Napa Valley. President Robert Craig will serve as this year’s honorary chair, and Peter Sagal, the voice of the popular NPR game show “Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!,” will be the evening’s host presented by National Bank of Arizona.

The evening will have live entertainment by Alice Tatum and the Alice Tatum Band, a gourmet five-course meal and a high-end live auction of rare vintages, culinary experiences and vacation packages.

But the most important part of the evening will be about the fundraising. Funds raised from the auction will benefit Friends of Public Radio of Arizona and the KJZZ Youth Media Project. Last year, the First Press Fine Wine Auction raised more than $170,000 for their benefiting organizations.

The KJZZ Youth Media Project

The KJZZ Youth Media Project is an educational outreach program designed to mentor “at risk” youths in the areas of broadcast journalism and digital media production. The program was started in 2007 and initially worked with 14 students from South Mountain High School. This year the program is expanding to approximately 20 students from all high schools who qualify.

The students complete an application and go through a verbal interview process to see if they can fit the six-month core curriculum into their time frame. The projects curriculum consists of elements developed by the Radio Television National Association.

“[The] kids will work in all aspects of digital media,” says Louis Stanley, the executive director of Friends of Public Radio Arizona. “Then they will specialize and continue to work on content development, while also helping to mentor new kids starting the program.”

The ultimate success of the students is what the program is all about. Stanley shares a success story from Ann Miles, an employee at the South Mountain High School Communications department.

“Ann Miles said, ‘Many of my students who a participate in the KJZZ Mentorship program at South Mountain have gone on to college to study journalism. They return to tell me how much the experience with KJZZ not only prepared them for college journalism classes, but they also feel that they are ahead of their peers,’ ” Stanley says.

KJZZ’s Youth Media Project

[stextbox id="info" caption="What To Know If You Go:"]
The 10th Annual First Press Wine Auction
When: Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012 at 6 p.m.
Where: Westin Kierland Resort and Spa
Tickets: $250 per person or $2,500 for a table of 10. Guests seeking guaranteed table seating with a vintner and marketing exposure can purchase a table sponsorship starting at $5,000.
[/stextbox]

 

Rommie Flammer President and CEO China Mist Tea Brands - AZ - Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

China Mist’s Rommie Flammer Talks About Her First Job

Rommie Flammer
Title: President and CEO
Company: China Mist Tea Brands

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
At 12 years old, a friend and I got together a bucket, soap and a sponge, then went door to door asking if we could wash our neighbors’ cars. When they would ask “how much,” we would say “whatever you want to pay us.” I quickly learned my first business lesson, which is have an idea of what your service is worth before heading out. This job was short lived after we knocked on the door of Vern and Claudia Lipp, who bred and showed Himalayan cats. When we asked if we could wash her car she replied, “No, but I have a bunch of litter boxes that need cleaning and cats that need grooming.” …  For the next three years I cleaned and groomed cats, a job that could have definitely earned a spot on the Discovery Channel’s “Dirty Jobs with Mike Rowe!”

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
My first industry job was at China Mist right around the time I turned 16 years old. Over the course of 26 years, I have learned an incredible number of lessons and I still learn something everyday. … The most important lesson is to surround yourself with truly great people because your team is your greatest asset. Average employees don’t last long at China Mist. Next, is to always challenge the norms of your industry. … Indeed, it is the people who continually strive for a better product, better process, etc., who set themselves and their companies apart from the rest. Finally, focus on what you do best.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
When I started at China Mist, I earned minimum wage, which was around $3.35 per hour at the time. I cannot recall my hourly wage at Hotlipps Cattery, but the memories are priceless.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
I have had many mentors along the way, but would have to say that Mignon Latimer has been the biggest in my career. Mignon is the wife of a consultant hired by China Mist some years ago. I was an 18-year-old general manager at the time I started working with her. She taught me how to read and interpret financial details important to the company and precisely why they mattered. She gave me a truly sound financial base from which to build.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
While the barrier to entry is quite low, the competition is strong, so be sure you have a strong point of differentiation.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?

I really cannot imagine doing anything else, but if I had to pick a new industry it would be something in real estate.

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010