Tag Archives: city of surprise

Surprise Fine Art & Wine Festival

Surprise Fine Art & Wine Festival Featuring 100+ Artists, Wine Tasting

Thunderbird Artists has partnered with the City of Surprise to host the Surprise Fine Art & Wine Festival, which will take place on February 1-3, 2013 at the Surprise Recreation Campus.

The festival will feature more than 100 world-class, jury-selected artists from around the world and more than 2,000 pieces of fine art in a variety of mediums — including batiks, copper, glass, clay, stone, metal and wood sculptures, photography, jewelry and more — and subjects matters. Attendees will also have the chance to meet and speak with the artists during this three-day event.

Participating artists at the Surprise Fine Art & Wine Festival include the following:

  • Raleigh Kinney,
  • Sarah Foster,
  • Paul Nzalamba,
  • Meg Harper,
  • Susan Zivic,
  • 
Steven Boyd,
  • Sharon Brening,
  • Dan Hale,
  • Don & Jeanne Cassanova,
  • Robert Hughes and many more.

One of the featured artists is Jim Prindiville, known for his contemporary Indian and horse paintings. And, live entertainment will be provided by Skyelark Productions’ John Jacobs, playing the hammered dulcimer, and Aaron Mesenberg, progressive flamenco classical guitarist. Top chefs will also be on-site, demonstrating how to cook an array of four-star dishes.

The Surprise Fine Art & Wine Festival will feature an extension collection of fine wines, both domestic and imported. During the fine festival portion of the event, attendees will have the opportunity to learn how to taste wine like the pros. For $10, patrons will receive an engraved souvenir wine glass and six wine tasting tickets.

Admission into the festival is $3 per person, and parking is free.

Surprise Fine Art & Wine Festival

When: February 1-3, 2013 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day
Where: Surprise Recreation Campus, 15960 N. Bullard Ave., Surprise
Admission: $3 per person
Contact: (480) 837-5637
Online: thunderbirdartists.com

 

SL-DigitalMagazine

Scottsdale Living Magazine – Winter 2012

Winter 2012 Issue

Health | Beauty | Lifestyle
Oh So Retro

Only in Arizona will you find people stocking up on sunblock and tanning by the pool — in April. And at the Hotel Valley Ho, it was evident during our swimsuit photo shoot in March, which couldn’t have arrived soon enough as the OH Pool was already swarming with guests.

And here we thought it was too soon to dedicate this side of the magazine to swimsuits.

This spring issue is all about prepping for the upcoming summer season by taking a step back into the past — decades back. During your swimsuit hunt, I’m betting you’ll be hit with a splash of neon, a ripple of ruffles and a wave of retro-themed suits. But which is for you? Don’t worry; we’ll cover that, too, and so much more.

Go for the Monroe or be bold with a Betty; retro is in, and it has never looked better.

Kristine Cannon,
Associate Editor

Home | Garden | Design
Remodeling Memories

Gossie SignatureMichael Gossie,
Managing Editor

Before I moved to Arizona, I owned an old home in Corning, N.Y., with a third floor that had become — over the course of the home’s 100-year history — a glorified attic. After I bought the house, the wasted space of that third floor bothered me. So I gutted it to give it a loft feel, installed a fireplace and bar, and turned it into a place where my friends gathered for Super Bowl parties, fight nights and epic poker games.

Memories from that third floor are what I remember most from that home.

Kristine Cannon’s story in this issue of Scottsdale Living about David and Brooke Ide’s transformation of a spare bedroom into a nursery reminded me about how a simple — or in my case, somewhat complicated — remodeling project can create space that will help your family and friends create memories.That is what turns a house into a home. Or, in my case, a money-making venture, because I ALWAYS won my friends’ money in our epic poker battles. How do you think I paid for the remodel?

Take it with you! On your mobile, go to m.issuu.com to get started.

AZ TechCelerator - AZ Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

Business Incubator AZ TechCelerator Works To Create Viable Companies In The West Valley

In an effort to boost its economy and shake its reputation as a bedroom community, the city of Surprise has launched AZ TechCelerator, a business incubator for budding entrepreneurs. The incubator offers well-below market rent, administrative support and access to experts who can help the entreprenuers “graduate” in three to five years, and thus bring their products and services to the marketplace.

The incubator comes in handy, especially in dire economic times. There are always entrepreneurs hoping to develop products or services. But in a slow economy, when people have been laid off and are unable to find gainful employment, Az TechCelerator gives those people an opportunity to test their ideas and innovations.

Of course, Surprise officials hope these startups will set up shop in their city once they emerge from AZ TechCelerator. A rule of thumb among business incubators is that 60 percent to 75 percent of these entrepreneurs do graduate, and about 75 percent of those will indeed remain in Surprise.

Jack Lunsford, president and CEO of WESTMARC, applauds Surprise’s effort.

“It’s an approach that our communities need to take as they seek and advance a knowledge-based economy,” he says. “I commend them for their innovation. We need more of these incubators. The high-paying jobs that come from spin-offs of these entrepreneurships is great.”

Mike Hoover, economic development coordinator for Surprise, gives the initial group of businesses high marks.

“They are exceeding our own expectations on quality and the amount of business going on in there, especially the anticipated growth and success of some of the businesses,” he says.

The AZ TechCelerator is located at 12425 W. Bell Road, in a four-building complex that formerly served as the Surprise City Hall. It totals nearly 60,000 square feet, which is four times the size of a typical incubator. Hoover says it can accommodate up to 15 businesses, depending on their size.

Three types of businesses are considered likely participants — those that deal in sustainability, such as solar technologies; life sciences and/or health care; and information technology.

One of the businesses in the incubator is MD 24, a medical service company that developed advanced software for home health care. It enables doctors to receive lab results, for example, while seeing patients in facilities that provide care for the elderly. Another company, Solar Jump AC, is developing more efficient cooling systems using solar thermal heat; and Athena Wireless Communications offers software for banking, telemedicine and other industries.

“These businesses are not yet commercially viable, needing assistance through a collegial supportive atmosphere that the city provides,” Hoover says.

In addition to offering space at a below-market rental rate, the city also provides an array of support services, including mail, copying and other administrative functions that each business needs.

The city’s most important service, Hoover says, is being able to link incubator businesses with various associations and support groups that can provide assistance with their specific needs.

“Whether they need help on putting together a marketing brochure, protecting intellectual property, or understanding how to put together a business plan for the company covering the next three to five years, they are able to get help,” Hoover says. “Anything that is identified inside of a strong and stable business, the city helps these businesses reach out to groups that can help them.”

Another way the city prepares businesses for graduation is by ratcheting up the low rents the longer the company remains in the incubator.

“It prepares them for the commercial world,” Hoover says. “There’s no sticker shock. At the end of their stay here, they are closer to commercial viability because they are paying closer to a commercial rent.”

Surprise started preparation work for the incubator in June 2009, began marketing it in September, and accepted its first tenants around the start of November.

One of the side benefits of the AZ TechCelerator is that it occupies the former City Hall complex that otherwise might have remained vacant. When the city moved to its new municipal facility at 8401 W. Monroe St., several hundred people left the old site on Bell Road.

“Restaurants and other businesses in the area were suffering,” Hoover says. “The choices were to leave that space dormant, or reprogram it into an economic engine. We turned a nonperforming asset into an economic starter.”

Surprise hopes to keep the expense of running the incubator as close to break-even as possible, supported by rent and common area fees, Hoover says.

“Our purpose is for business and job creation,” he says. “There are no retail projects inside. They are all some type of service or product development. They’re not competing with retail outlets on the outside.”

www.surpriseaz.com

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010