Tag Archives: college student

Educational Partnership - Maricopa Community Colleges & University of Phoenix

University of Phoenix Forms Educational Partnership With Maricopa Community Colleges

Alliance creates career pathways to address workforce skills gaps

University of Phoenix, the nation’s largest private university and leader in educating today’s working learner, today announced an educational partnership with Maricopa Community Colleges that will provide new educational opportunities in manufacturing, healthcare, business, and hospitality. The new partnership was announced at a special signing ceremony at Rio Salado College.

“This new partnership will provide a transition from associate’s to bachelor’s degree in areas like manufacturing, hospitality and business, where we know we need skilled workers and need them now.”

Through the new partnership, University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges will work with area business, academic and diversity leaders to identify workforce needs and develop focused curriculum and specific career pathways to meet those area workforce skills gaps. Students will have the opportunity to earn an associate’s degree at any Maricopa Community College and then seamlessly transition to a bachelor’ degree program at University of Phoenix.

“We agree with President Obama—community colleges are critical in developing our next generation of skilled workers—and that’s why we continue to invest in these types of partnerships,” said Dr. Bill Pepicello, President, University of Phoenix. “When two education providers like University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges come together to present education solutions, the benefit to students, employers and the local economy is that much greater.”

As part of the partnership, Maricopa Community College students will have the opportunity to potentially convert prior training and work experience into college credit through Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) at University of Phoenix. Through a new University of Phoenix transfer policy, credits earned through an associate’s of arts degree at Maricopa Community Colleges will transfer to University of Phoenix and satisfy general education course requirements so students can immediately begin working towards their bachelor’s degree in their field of study. University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges will also explore transfer trends to ensure the partnership is meeting local employer demands.

“The Maricopa Community Colleges are committed to helping our students reach their educational goals, and part of that commitment is ensuring that they have as many ways as possible to achieve success,” said Dr. Rufus Glasper, Chancellor of the Maricopa Community Colleges. “This new partnership will provide a transition from associate’s to bachelor’s degree in areas like manufacturing, hospitality and business, where we know we need skilled workers and need them now.”

[stextbox id="alert" bwidth="1" bcolor="000000" bgcolor="e0e0e0" image="null"]For more information on this educational partnership go to Maricopa Community Colleges  or University of Phoenix.[/stextbox]

Diane Brossart -Describes Her First Step In The Industry, 2008

Diane Brossart – Describes Her First Step In The Industry

Diane Brossart

President, Valley Forward Association

diane_brossart 2008

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
My very first job was a part-time stint in high school at Jack in the Box. I learned to take people at their word. I was held up at gunpoint one afternoon when working the cash register and didn’t believe the perpetrator was serious. Another employee and I thought the guy was joking, so we refused to give him the money and chuckled at the idea of being robbed. It soon became apparent the heist was for real. I quit that job the next day.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
My first job as a journalism graduate from Wayne State University was as a reporter for a weekly newspaper in Gross Pointe Shores, Mich. I learned that no matter how thorough you think you are, you need to double and triple check your facts. In covering a political story that ran on the front page of the newspaper, I referenced one of the state’s legislators but mistakenly used his brother’s name. It turned out that both brothers held office, an honest error, but a major faux pas for a journalist.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
I made minimum wage at Jack in the Box — a little over $2 an hour (I’m a dinosaur).
I turned down a trip to Europe with some of my college buddies to take the reporting job right out of school (big mistake) and earned about $10,000 a year.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
After the journalism stint in Michigan, I moved to Phoenix and sold my soul (according to my journalism school friends) and went into public relations. I got a job as an account coordinator with one of the largest agencies in town (it no longer exists today). It was there that I met Bill Meek, president of WFC Public Relations and my biggest mentor. Bill was and still is a curmudgeon, but he’s a loveable one and among the smartest people I know. I used to sit across from him, on the other side of his expansive glass desk, and take notes as he pontificated on every subject under the sun. He’d peer at me with penetrating blue eyes that seemed to defy the bifocals, which rested at the end of his nose, creating an intimidating image that Bill undoubtedly enjoyed. I learned all about Arizona history and every issue of significance to the state, from water management and health care to transportation and economics. He taught me about politics, how to run a public affairs campaign and who the movers and shakers were that influenced decisions in our fast-growing region. He encouraged me to get involved in the community, and it was through his prodding that I joined Valley Forward Association in 1982, the environmental public interest organization that I later became president of and have now served for the past 17 years. Bill has played a huge role in my life and I continue to learn from him. We have lunch at least once a month, but he doesn’t intimidate anymore.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
Be proactive, get experience (even if it means offering yourself for free as an intern) and follow your heart. Find something you like to do and it will never be work — it will become a passion and give you immense gratification.Always be nice and treat people with respect — you never know when you’ll need them on your side. Listen a lot and be open-minded. Network and build relationships. Articulate your goals, believe in yourself, work hard and always have fun.

cover_october_2008

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
Probably consulting with the ultimate goal of supporting world travel. After 17 years of managing a nonprofit organization, I can’t see myself in the corporate world. As the years go by, it’s about balance for me. Professionally, I advocate for a balance between economic growth and environmental quality. Personally, I strive to work hard and make a difference while balancing a busy family and maintaining an active social life. If I weren’t doing this, I’d find another way to collect great memories.