Tag Archives: community

Spreeman Piano Innovations

Michael Spreeman, Owner Of Spreeman Piano Innovations

Michael Spreeman
Spreeman Piano Innovations
Title: Owner | Est.: 2004
www.spreemanpianoinnovations.com

From an early age, Michael Spreeman knew he was meant to work with pianos. Beginning at age 18, he experienced nearly every aspect of the industry — from servicing pianos for recording studios and artists, to technical consulting, to working as a high-end piano re-builder.

That young mindset has now come full circle with the establishment of Spreeman Piano Innovations. The company offers two models of pianos, a 7-foot-3-inch piano and a 9-foot concert grand piano. Each piano is custom built based on the client’s preferences, requiring an average of 5,000 hours of labor.
Creating a business within an industry with long-standing brand loyalty was a difficult task, but for Spreeman, it was a no-brainer.
“There is always a market for exclusive, high-quality product,” Spreeman says.

It all began when world-class pianist and composer Bob Ravenscroft asked Spreeman to redesign a piano for him. After receiving positive feedback from Ravenscroft, Spreeman went ahead with his dream of launching his own custom high-end piano building business. A five-year process of designing the ultimate piano — taking conventional technology and amplifying it — eventually resulted in the Ravenscroft 9-foot model.

The pianos are built with the finest materials, including flawless exterior cabinetry and cast iron frames that hail from one of the oldest manufacturing operations in Germany. The soundboard wood used in some of the pianos is sourced from the same forest used to create the famous Stradivarius violins. After finalizing the design for the pianos, Spreeman and his team showcased it to others in the industry. “Concerts and venues have given our pianos recognition as (a) high-end performance instrument, acceptance and support from the technical community, and has helped to secure our position in the market with other high-end manufacturers,”Spreeman says.

The transition from turning his passion into a successful business hasn’t beenan easy one, but it’s a journey that Spreeman has been more than happy to take. Instead of trying to do everything on his own, he has learned to seek assistance and advice fromthe business community. “By expanding my thinking to more of a ‘team’ or ‘collaborative effort’ approach, I have been able to assemble a core team whose skill sets are complementary,” Spreeman says.

The company employs Spreeman’s son, Andrew; Stephanie, the receptionist; and Robert Springer, who utilizes his high-tech skills to optimize the performance of the piano’s mechanical action. “As with any artist, I constantly seek out opportunities to further the knowledge base for my craft and interface with other successful business associates and artists,” Spreeman says. “Ultimately though, I’m just a guy with a dream, who is willing to take a risk and do whatever is necessary to fulfill it.”

Earth and climate change

Arizona Businesses Brace For Greenhouse Gas Regulations Under Western Climate Initiative

As the Arizona Legislature convenes, a Democratic governor heads to Washington, and a Republican governor takes the reins, state businesses find themselves deeply concerned about what will happen to Arizona’s environmental policy and the consequences associated with these unprecedented and troubled economic times.

Many legislators want Secretary of State Jan Brewer, who soon will take over the governor’s office, to rescind executive orders entered by outgoing Gov. Janet Napolitano. Rumors also abound about efforts to eliminate the Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ). Meanwhile, the regulated community is left wondering what will be next for such large-scale regulatory efforts as the Western Climate Initiative (WCI), which was largely championed by Napolitano and ADEQ Director Steve Owens.

The WCI is a collaboration among seven U.S. governors and four Canadian premiers that Napolitano and others created to reduce greenhouse gases in the region using a market-based, cap-and-trade system. The member jurisdictions include: Arizona, California, New Mexico, Montana, Oregon, Utah, and Washington, as well as the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. Together, these seven states and four provinces represent more than 20 percent of the U.S. economy and 70 percent of Canada’s. Thirteen other U.S. and Mexican states and Canadian provinces have joined as observers.

Arizona entered the WCI in February 2007, following reports indicating that Arizona’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were increasing. There were also predictions that by 2020, the state’s GHG emissions would increase by nearly 150 percent over the 1990 levels if Arizona neglected to reduce them. Arizona has played a vital role in the WCI since its beginning, with Owens serving as co-chair during the time the initial policy was developed. The first major accomplishment occurred with Owens at the helm, when the WCI released its design recommendations for the Regional Cap-and-Trade Program in late September.

Political changes and the design itself indicate that the WCI likely will affect Arizona regardless of whether the state stays in or exits the WCI. For example, as applied to electricity, the regulations will apply to the first jurisdictional deliverer (FJD). For sources within WCI jurisdictions, the FJD is the generator. For power generated outside the WCI jurisdictions (including federal and tribal lands) for consumption within a WCI partner jurisdiction, the FJD is the first entity that delivers that electricity, over which the consuming WCI partner jurisdiction has regulatory authority. Thus, if Arizona remains in the WCI, regulations will apply to generators of electricity; if Arizona leaves the WCI, any business or entity that seeks to deliver electricity to any jurisdiction that is a member will be subject to the regulations. In addition to electricity generators and suppliers, the WCI will regulate other sources of emissions such as industrial, residential and commercial sources, as well as industrial fuel combustion at facilities and transportation fuel combustion.

Details still must be developed, but the initial emission threshold triggering regulatory compliance is estimated to be 25,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents annually. The design was tailored to specifically allow the scope of the cap-and-trade program to expand over time to add new sources to the system, raise or lower the cap as necessary, and to integrate it into other programs.

This may be critical sooner rather than later, as many expect a federal program from President Barack Obama’s administration. Certainly with 20 percent of the U.S. economy regulated under WCI, in a region with critical energy supplies and high levels of emissions, the WCI is poised to become amodel. Additionally, calling this the Western Climate Initiative is a misnomer since Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec are included, extending the WCI boundaries to the Atlantic. In fact, the WCI covers the largest geographical area of any regional initiative. Moreover, with Napolitano in the Obama cabinet, Owens is predicted to land a federal regulatory role, and the WCI publicly states that it plans to promote and influence federal GHG emission reduction programs consistent with its design principles.

For now, Brewer is taking a cautious approach, noting that she currently plans to remain involved to get information and see what can be done in Arizona, but that given the economy, she is not yet ready to take a position on the planned cap-and-trade program. If Arizona remains in the WCI, mandatory reporting will begin with measurement and monitoring this time next year. The start date for cap-and-trade is Jan. 1, 2012. Regardless of whether Arizona is in or out of the WCI, a new regulatory regime now appears imminent and the only real questions moving forward seem to be how to influence outstanding issues and prepare for compliance and increased costs.

Celebrity Fight Night

Nonprofits And Corporations Continue To Work Together As The Economy Falters

Ravaged by the effects of a devastating disease, boxing legend Muhammad Ali can still draw a crowd. Fans who remember the former heavyweight boxing champ in his prime as the handsome, graceful pugilist with the mile-a-minute mouth, still flock to catch a glimpse of this now frail man.

That’s helped turn the annual Celebrity Fight Night into one of the most successful charity events in the Valley. The creation of Jimmy Walker, president of Walker Financial, an estate planning and wealth management firm, Celebrity Fight Night has raised millions for the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at the Barrow Neurological Institute.

Celebrity Fight Night is a perfect example of where corporations and philanthropy intersect. However, that intersection is now threatened.

Corporate philanthropy pumps millions of dollars into Arizona nonprofits every year, but there is concern that a troubled economy will result in some restraints on giving.

Cutbacks could occur, even though businesses see philanthropy as a win-win: Organizations that benefit from corporate generosity are able to continue to do all the good things they do, and at the same time, corporations reap the benefits of good PR. They are seen as good citizens giving back to the community. Of course, tax write-offs generally enter into the philanthropic picture.

Even though corporate donations that support myriad causes are estimated at about 20 percent of the total, with individuals giving by far the lion’s share of philanthropic dollars, nonprofits agree that they couldn’t survive without corporate help. Which means it will be up to nonprofits to be more creative and innovative in telling their story.

Robin Dunn, CEO of the Make-a-Wish Foundation of Arizona and president-elect of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Arizona Chapter, cannot emphasize enough the importance of corporate philanthropy.

“We have a lot of corporate alliances,” Dunn says. “Our brand is one that companies like to use for cause-related marketing. As a result, quite a bit of income comes from corporate philanthropy.”

Make-A-Wish’s mission is to grant the desires of children with life-threatening medical conditions.

“It lets the community know that a company is helping a charity, which ultimately helps the company,” Dunn says. “We could not do what we do without corporate philanthropy.”

Despite that, Dunn says cutbacks in giving are a distinct possibility.

“I think it’s obvious to think people are being more frugal and maybe a little more tentative,” she says. “I think it’s too soon to say whether that’s going to impact overall giving, but I think there’ll be some impact.”

Patricia Lewis, senior professional in residence at the Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation at Arizona State University, expects a slowdown in corporate philanthropy.

“So much of our community is tied up with the financial markets, so it’s bound to have an impact. I think we are already beginning tosee a decline in support for nonprofit events and activities,” says Lewis, who is a former president and CEO of the Association of Fundraising Professionals. “That includes direct support, as well as support in buying a table at an event. The economy is having an impactful trickle-down effect.”

Perhaps the fundraiser with the most star power is Celebrity Fight Night. Since its inception in 1994, it has raised more than $52 million, primarily for the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Sean Currie, executive director of the Celebrity Fight Night Foundation, says the event last spring pulled in $6.5 million.

Ali clearly is the draw. Entertainers, including Celine Dione, Garth Brooks, Diana Ross and Rod Stewart, are among those who have performed at the fundraiser. Some 50 to 60 celebrities attend each year.

What It Takes To Form A Nonprofit Or Tax-Exempt Organization

It usually starts with a phone call from a client, or maybe another attorney in your office. Someone wants to set up a nonprofit corporation, usually a tax-exempt charity, often on behalf of a pro-bono client, and assumes it should be pretty easy.

Unfortunately, it’s not.

First, “nonprofit” is not the same as “tax-exempt,” although many people use the terms interchangeably. Nonprofit is a state law concept and is governed by the relevant state statute for nonprofit corporations. In Arizona, that would be Article 10, Chapters 24-40 of the Arizona Revised Statutes. Tax-exempt usually refers to being exempt from federal income tax under section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code. Furthermore, there are different types of tax-exempt organizations. The most common are 501(c)(3) organizations such as schools, hospitals, museums, community foundations, etc. But there are also other types of 501(c) organizations such as trade associations, which are exempt under section 501(c)(6), and social welfare organizations, which are exempt under section 501(c)(4).

Second, although the state filings to establish a nonprofit corporation are not unduly burdensome, there are a number of technical requirements that need to be followed. Also, the IRS exemption application, Form 1023, is not a simple one-page form; instead, it requires anywhere from 12-20 pages of information depending on the nature of the organization. With few exceptions, such as churches, an organization must file Form 1023 and receive a determination letter from the IRS in order to be tax-exempt, and cannot represent to potential donors that it is tax-exempt until such time as it receives such letter.

State law requirements for Arizona nonprofit corporations
In order to create the corporation under state law, an Arizona nonprofit corporation must file articles of incorporation. These will contain the name, purpose, powers and directors of the corporation, as well as the statutory agent for the corporation. The articles will also state whether the corporation will have members. Nonprofit corporations are not required to have members; in the absence of members, the directors will govern the corporation. However, if there are members, the members will elect the directors and will vote on major corporate actions. The procedure for electing members, and the rights of such members, is often set forth in the articles, but can also be contained in the bylaws of the corporation.

The articles are signed by the incorporator of the organization and are filed with the Arizona Corporation Commission. The filing fee is $40 ($75 if expedited treatment is desired). The articles are accompanied by a certificate of disclosure, which must be signed by the incorporator and any individuals who are directors or officers at the time the articles are filed. The articles must then be published (within 60 days after the articles are filed) in a newspaper of general circulation in the county in which the corporation carries on its business for three consecutive publications.

Once incorporated, the organization must file annual reports with the Arizona Corporation Commission and the Charities Division of the Secretary of State. The filing fees for such reports are nominal.

IRS tax-exempt filing (Form 1023)
IRS Form 1023 requires fairly extensive information about the operation of the organization. The two most important sections are Part IV (narrative description of activities) and Part IX (financial data). The IRS will want to know, in some detail, what activities the organization will carry on. In order to qualify under section 501(c)(3), the organization must be operated “exclusively for religious, charitable, scientific … literary, or educational purposes.” The narrative description should go into some detail (at least a page) outlining the exempt purposes of the organization and why such purposes qualify under Section 501(c)(3). If possible, prior IRS rulings relating to similar organizations should be cited as evidence that the new organization qualifies as exempt.

In Part IX, assuming the organization in question is a new organization, Form 1023 asks for projected budgets for the current year, plus the next two years. These budgets require both income information Ñ expected contributions, investment income, operational income Ñ and expense information, such as outgoing grants, fundraising expenses, wages, rent, interest and professional fees. The organization should make a good-faith attempt to be as detailed and accurate as possible, even though it is understood that actual operations may diverge from the projections. The IRS is simply interested in understanding the scale of magnitude of the organization’s operations, as well as the relative allocation between internal administrative expenses, and expenses directly used to carry out the exempt purposes of the organization.

The filing fee is currently $750 (reduced to $300 if the organization expects its annual receipts to be under $10,000). The form should be filed within 27 months of its date of incorporation and, if approved by the IRS, will be retroactive to the date of incorporation. The IRS review time will vary substantially depending on the complexity and size of the organization. For a simple charity with no complications, IRS approval may only take six to eight weeks. However, if the organization has substantial activities or is expected to be involved in significant transactions with private parties, such as an organization focused on community development, it may take six to 12 months for IRS approval. If the IRS has any questions or concerns, it will contact the organization in writing while the application is pending and will normally give the organization 21 days to respond.

Once approved, the organization will be required to annually file Form 990 disclosing the income and expenses of the organization, the compensation paid to officers, directors and key employees, and other information. Form 990 does not normally require the payment of any tax, but is an information return for the IRS to monitor the activities of the organization. Form 990, and Form 1023, are publicly available documents and must be disclosed if someone contacts the organization requesting copies. Thus, organizations should keep such potential disclosure in mind when preparing the forms.

Conclusion
Forming a nonprofit and securing tax-exempt status is a little bit more involved than simply filing two pieces of paper with the state and with the IRS. Anyone working with a new nonprofit should also work with an accounting or legal professional that is familiar with the state and federal requirements pertaining to such organizations.

Michael G. Meissner is a partner at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey’s Cleveland office. He works with the firm’s Phoenix office on tax issues. Meissner can be reached at (216) 479-8593 or at mmeissner@ssd.com. The firm’s Phoenix office can be reached at (602) 528-4000.

Blood Systems Inc

Blood Systems Inc. Succeeds With A Delicate Balancing Act

When donating blood, many people probably only have a vague understanding of how the entire process works. Most donors certainly don’t understand how complex the mechanisms are that take blood to its final destination, or about the people who make it all happen.

“The general public does not understand what goes on behind the walls of a blood bank,” says Susan Barnes, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for Blood Systems Inc. “I actually had someone say to me, ‘Oh, you’re the guys who take my blood, don’t give me anything for it and then sell it to the hospitals and make a fortune.’ I said, ‘There’s a lot in between that you don’t know.’ ”

Founded in 1943 as the Salt River Valley Blood Bank, the nonprofit Blood Systems is one of the nation’s oldest and largest blood service providers with operations in 18 states. Blood Systems is also a high-tech, efficiently run company entrusted with a life-or-death mission.

“We budget very carefully to return to the bottom line just enough to allow us to re-invest in our facilities, in processes that the FDA requires, and to keep things state-of-the-art so we can make sure we always provide the quality of blood product that the community expects,” Barnes says. “Not everyone understands that we can’t have a zero bottom line just because we’re a not-for-profit. It’s important to make money to re-invest, because if you don’t re-invest in the organization, you can’t continue the mission.”

Blood Systems mission is “to make a difference in people’s lives by bringing together the best people, inspiring individuals to donate blood, producing a safe and ample blood supply, advancing cutting-edge research and embracing continuous quality improvement.”

To keep such a noble mission in these trying times is a difficult balancing act, says Blood Systems President and CEO Dan Connor.

“In this particular environment that we have now with the economy, we see many companies laying off folks, so there are fewer people available to donate blood and that makes our job more difficult,” Connor says. “Our hospitals are less able to withstand any new tests or new procedures or new costs that we might have to pass along. As a result, we are trying to do that balancing act between doing everything we can to ensure an ample and safe blood supply, while also understanding the limitations that hospitals face as far as paying a reasonable cost for the blood products that are provided to their patients. That’s particularly difficult right now.”

Thanks to Barnes’ financial acumen, Blood Systems has built up a strong bottom line in its cash reserves.

“These reserves allow us to proceed with projects and expenditures, as well as still give our employees a cost-of-living increase in those years that we are not going to generate as much cash,” Barnes says. “There are also those years that we know our customers (hospitals) cannot afford to absorb our entire increased costs, and these reserves allow us to hold some of these new costs without our usual reimbursement.”

Perhaps Blood Systems greatest strength to its bottom line is its diversification, which has helped the company create new and needed revenue streams. That diversification is centered on four main divisions.

The Blood Centers Division is a network of more than a dozen regional blood centers and about 70 donor centers stretching from the West Coast to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Canadian border to the Rio Grande. The centers are operated through United Blood Services and Blood Centers of the Pacific, and serve patients in more than 500 hospitals. Last year, nearly 700,000 people donated blood an average of 1.5 times through the Blood Centers Division.

The Blood Systems Research Institute in San Francisco has conducted scientific research into transfusion medicine for more than 50 years, studying infectious diseases such as HIV and the West Nile virus. A second institute is located in Tempe.

Blood Systems Laboratories operates two of the most highly rated and high-volume blood-donor testing and infectious disease reference laboratories in the nation. The labs in Tempe and the Dallas area tested about three million donations in 2007, with two-thirds of the blood coming from other nonprofit blood centers.

BioCARE distributes plasma derivative therapies available to patients 24 hours a day, every day of the year at more than 200 locations across the country.

Blood Systems is also extending its reach internationally. For about the last four years, Connor says Blood Systems has sent the plasma portion of blood donations to the United Kingdom in order to help that country reduce the risk of transmitting the human form of Mad Cow disease.

But diversification alone hasn’t made Blood Systems a company that just recently received an upgraded ‘A’ stable credit rating from Standard & Poor’s at a time when many other companies are being downgraded. Blood Systems has instituted performance-improvement efficiency standards such as Six Sigma and LEAN tools, which have resulted in the reengineering of processes in the Blood Centers Division and Blood Systems Laboratories. That in turn has improved efficiencies and ushered in cost savings of more than $2.5 million throughout the organization in 2007 alone.

Blood Systems is also investing in its human capital by developing its own program to produce specialists in blood banking.

“We were having trouble finding qualified blood banking specialists to staff our laboratories,” Barnes says. “We partnered with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (at Dallas), and wrote the actual online modules to train the students and taught them through the University of Texas to become specialists in blood banking.”

Blood Systems graduated its first class of specialists in blood banking in 2007.

“It’s basically growing our own blood banking specialists,” Barnes says. “We have the opportunity to put our own staff through the course and allow them to earn the certification. This enhances their careers while staffing our laboratories with the most qualified specialists.”

Making such long-term investments in its employees’ futures has helped Blood Systems decrease turnover by more than2.5 percentage points from 2006 to 2007, with the average length of service now up to almost seven-and-a-half years. And then there’s the mission.

“When I interview a candidate for a job here at Blood Systems,” Barnes says, “one of the things I always make a point of telling them is it doesn’t matter whether you’re collecting blood from a donor, or volunteering to give the donor a cookie and juice afterward, working in our testing laboratory, or working in accounting and finance — everyone who walks in the door every morning understands and is proud of the fact that they’re helping to save a life that day.”

For the first time, Dial Corp.'s research and development will be housed with the company's headquarters.

Dial Corp. Gets Ready To Move Into Its New Headquarters

By year’s end, Dial Corp. expects to have moved into a new 350,000-square-foot national headquarters in Scottsdale, and for the first time it will house its research and development operations under the same roof.

What’s more, Dial Corp. will be the first tenants in One Scottsdale, a luxury retail and lifestyle community at the northeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Loop 101. In addition to Dial’s presence, One Scottsdale will consist of high-fashion retail shops, upscale restaurants, boutique hotel rooms, office space and a diversity of residential housing.

The move from existing facilities in North Scottsdale was set in motion in 2005.

“Faced with an expiring lease at the end of 2008 on its R&D facility, Dial began searching for a new location,” says Natalie Violi, director of corporate communications for Henkel of America Inc., Dial’s parent company. “The goal was to purchase a large enough parcel of land to house a world class R&D facility and at the same time be located in a desirable location for our employees.

“It was during this process that Dial decided to also move its headquarters to the same location as its R&D facility to inspire collaboration between our scientists and businesses.”

Dial’s current R&D facility is located at 15101 N. Scottsdale Road in Scottsdale, where it has been for 32 years. It is near its current headquarters for the past 11 years at 15501 N. Dial Blvd. in Scottsdale. The current research center across from Kierland Commons likely will be razed as the new Scottsdale Quarters project takes shape. The owners of the existing headquarters building are looking for new tenants.

Violi says housing the headquarters and R&D facility under one roof is a first for Dial, including its former location on North Central Avenue in Phoenix, and before that in Chicago.

The amenities Dial employees enjoyed as neighbors of the Kierland Commons mixed-use development were a factor in choosing the new site, says Brad Gazaway, vice president and corporate counsel, who is the Dial executive in charge of the new building project.

“Finding a location that would afford similar — and possibly more — amenities was an important consideration in our selection process,” Gazaway says. “We believed this not only for the convenience that nearby hotels, restaurants, homes and retailers offer our employees and business on a day-to-day basis, but also the fact that such amenities and creative architecture and surroundings found in mixed-use developments can foster inspiring innovation and development that will bring about increased business productivity and results. Such environments also serve as a valuable platform for employee recruitment and retention.”

By relocating to One Scottsdale, Gazaway says, the move enables Dial to be “a part of an exciting and innovative environment in which our employees will thrive and flourish.”

Total cost of the project, says Gazaway, is “north of $100 million.”

Dial is looking for LEED certification for its new home. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified buildings are healthier work and living environments, which contribute to higher productivity and improved employee health and comfort.

Going “green” may add somewhat to the cost, but should result in savings and other benefits in the long run. The building has many “green” aspects, such as workstations designed to be safe, healthy, comfortable and functional.

Gazaway mentions other “green” features. Natural lighting is emphasized, and a roof garden on the fourth floor with trees and benches is ideal for employee use at lunchtime, and for parties and receptions, he says. All of the wood used in construction is from recycled material. Excess materials were separated — wood in one pile and paper products in another — for recycling. Sundt Construction, the project’s general contractor, spearheaded the recycling effort, Gazaway says.

Furthermore, an enhanced heating and air-conditioning system meets LEED standards for performance. Additionally, Dial will provide special parking spaces for carpoolers, spaces for bicycles, changing rooms and a fitness room.

“In today’s environment, Dial wants to be in the forefront of consumer products as far as sustainability measures,” Gazaway says. “We want to show that we’re building a new facility and we are taking our environment seriously. We want to provide a building that our employees can enjoy for years to come. It’s important for us to take a leadership role in establishing new buildings. We’re falling in line with the city of Scottsdale’s mandates. Scottsdale wants all new buildings to fall under this LEED certification. It sets the right tone.”

Violi adds that being environmentally conscious is a core value of Dial’s parent company, Henkel of America.

BrucePearson

Q & A With John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital’s New CEO Bruce Pearson

Bruce Pearson took over the CEO role at John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital in Phoenix in April. AB met with him to find out more about his goals for the hospital, as well as his insight on various issues the health care industry is facing.

What is your background in the health care industry?
I grew up in the Northwest and I had a Master’s in Business Administration, and I had a desire to get into hospital management. I moved to Arizona to go back to school at Arizona State University — they have a master’s program in health services administration. So I came here for an MHA degree and I went to work for a local health care organization and I just loved it here. So we moved here 26 years ago, and I’ve had the opportunity to work at several facilities/hospitals around different parts of the Valley — the central Valley, the West Valley, the East Valley — and now it’s my opportunity to work in the North Valley.

What prompted your move?
John C. Lincoln has an excellent reputation for clinical care as being a place that people want to work for, and one of its designations is as a magnet hospital for nursing. It was actually the first hospital in the state of Arizona to become a magnet hospital … What that means is they met the criteria that had been established at a national level to receive a designation as a hospital that truly is a magnet to attract and retain professional nurses. … Also, the organization is truly unique among hospital organizations in its level of commitment to the local community here. We not only provide hospital and health care services, but John C. Lincoln also has demonstrated a tremendous commitment to other community-oriented services through our Desert Mission, which was actually started over 80 years ago in the area. We have a food bank, we have the Lincoln Learning Center (a nationally accredited child-care facility), a community health center, a children’s dental clinic … providing free dental care, the Marley House (a family resource center that helps stabilize families in crisis) and a neighborhood renewal program.

What are your goals for the hospital?
It’s already a great organization, but my goal as the CEO is to work with the team of people who are here to continue to make improvements in the quality of care that we deliver, in our technologies (continue tobring in the latest technology and applying it), working with the physicianswho are here and with new physicians who come in and bring new skills, and to continue to make this agreat place for patients toreceive care, for staff to work and for physicians to practice medicine.

What is the greatest dilemma facing hospitals in Arizona?
One of the challenges nationally for hospitals is a shortage of health care professionals, and nursing would be a great example of that. The John C. Lincoln organization has a very successful nursing program in partnership with Grand Canyon University and we work with them and other universities and colleges to help train nurses. It is a problem, but John C. Lincoln is also part of the solution.

West-MEC provides career and tech training

West-MEC Provides Career And Tech Training To West Valley Teens

Keeping with its goal of enhancing the education system in the West Valley, WESTMARC is a major proponent of West-MEC — the Western Maricopa Education Center District. West-MEC is a public school district that provides Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs to more than 21,000 high school students in the West Valley. West-MEC was formed in 2002 after eight west side communities voted to form the Western Maricopa Education Center. Today, 12 districts and 39 high schools make up the West-MEC district. Not only is WESTMARC a business partner with the school district, but also, President and CEO Jeff Lundsford is on West-MEC’s governing board.

Greg Donovan, West-MEC superintendent, says combining efforts and expenditures allows West-MEC to offer students more than any one district could offer alone.

“Some career and technical education programs require a lot of very expensive equipment,” he says. “Individual districts may not have the space, money or expertise to offer such programs, so we help fund the programs and provide the necessary equipment.”

West-MEC programs include classroom instruction, laboratory instruction and work-based learning. Some of the career and technical education programs offered include business, finance, marketing, technical and trades, and health occupations. A school district works with local business and industry to build educational links to employment and continuing educational opportunities. Business leaders such as Mike McAfee, director of education for the Arizona Automobile Dealers Association (AADA), which represents and supports all new car dealers in the state, work with the school district. They help determine employment sectors to focus on the type of programs and equipment needed for training.

McAfee helped Peoria High School become the first high school in the West Valley to earn NATEF Certification from the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) and offer a class that teaches brakes, steering suspension, electrical and engine performance. High school students in the West-MEC district can take the same automotive classes at Glendale Community College. Ford, GM and Chrysler provide new vehicles and equipment for the program at no cost to the college so students can train on new vehicles. Gateway Community College has the same type of partnership but with Toyota, Honda, Nissan and Kia.

“With more than 230 million cars and trucks on the road today, demand for highly skilled techs is going to continue,” McAfee says. “So when we employ students in their junior and senior years, we want them to continue their education.”

Experienced technicians typically earn between $30,000 and $60,000 annually in metropolitan areas. Incomes of more than $70,000 are not unusual for highly skilled, hard working master technicians, according to the AADA.

Stephanie Miller, a graduate of Willow Canyon High School in Surprise, wanted to explore a career in health care, so she took a two-part, CTE lab class during her senior year. When the class was over she was certified as a phlebotomist in Arizona. Miller’s certification landed her a job at Sun Health Del E. Webb Memorial Hospital, where she works as a part-time phlebotomist. She also attends Arizona State University and is taking classes to earn a degree in physical therapy.

“This is my first job and I make well over $10 an hour so I consider myself lucky,” Miller says.

Justin Rice, 19, a graduate of Centennial High School in Peoria, took automotive and medical CTE classes during his senior year. The Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) classes were held at Glendale Community College. Since Rice was in high school, he did not have to pay the $800 tuition for the EMT classes.

“If I hadn’t had this opportunity, I would still be saving to take the classes today,” he says.

Rice now works as a part-time EMT for First Responders Inc., which provides medical support during Arizona Diamondbacks and Phoenix Suns games, and for Little League games.

West-MEC opened a new cosmetology training center in July for students who attend high school in the West-MEC district. The 10,000-square-foot facility in Peoria is operated through a partnership between West-MEC and Gateway Community College’s Maricopa Skill Center. The center opened with 240 students and next year, enrollment will increase to 480 students, which is the center’s capacity. Students who complete the state-required minimum 1,600 hours of instruction will be eligible to take the state cosmetology board exam to become certified cosmetologists.

Chris Cook, West-MEC’s director of marketing and public relations, said the two-year cosmetology program costs $1,200 instead of $8,000 to $15,000 for the same program after high school.

A 2007 survey conducted by the National Accreditation Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences showed that owners of Arizona salons are hoping to hire more than 6,800 individuals this year.

“Students benefit greatly from these programs,” Cook says. “It’s a stepping stone to a career or post-secondary education.”

Mr.WestValley

John F. Long Didn’t Just Build Houses In The West Valley, He Also Built A Community

About the only person who would disagree about calling the late John F. Long the father of the West Valley would be John F. Long. For more than 60 years, the man described by friends and colleagues as quiet and unassuming, held the vision that transformed the West Valley from fields to thousands of homes for soldiers returning from World War II to emerging cities.

The legacy of John F. Long will live forever,” says Jack Lunsford, president and CEO of WESTMARC. “Unlike footprints in the beach sand, which are eventually washed away, John’s are cast in concrete. And that doesn’t just mean buildings. He left us foresight and philanthropy, all with humility and without fanfare, simply because he loved the area, he loved people, and he wanted to make the West Valley a great place for families to live.”

Long died in February at the age of 87, but his legacy in the West Valley — indeed the entire Valley — will live on, not just in the communities he built, but also in the people whose lives he touched.

“His vision and reality of building a master-planned community is certainly important,” says his son, Jacob Long, who is chief operating officer for the company his father founded, John F. Long Properties. “Not only was he providing an affordable place to live for so many, he was also providing jobs for so many people. A lot of those people not only stayed here, but they are an integral part of helping the West Valley grow as business and community leaders. At least once a week I meet someone who says, ‘Because of your father, my family or I was able to buy a solid home at a great price. It helped me build equity.’ ”

A Phoenix native, John Long got his start in the building industry with a G.I. loan, his own hammer and other tools he borrowed from his stepfather. He first set out to build a home for his new wife, Mary. Instead, he ended up selling the home for twice what it cost to build.

By 1954, John Long was thinking big. He set out not only to build a collection of tract homes in one area, but also to create a community with schools, churches, hospitals, shopping centers and parks. Long created the state’s first master-planned community and named it Maryvale, after his wife.

By applying mass production techniques to homebuilding, Long was able to offer a three-bedroom, two-bath house with a swimming pool for less than $10,000. Houses began selling at a rate of 100 per week, and John F. Long Properties was born.

Despite his success, Long never forgot who he was building the homes for, says Diane McCarthy, director of business partnerships and legislative affairs for West-MEC. For example, when Long first began constructing homes, he realized the VA loans didn’t cover such essentials as refrigerators and stoves. So Long trekked to Washington, D.C., and went before Congress to change the scope of the VA loans.

“He didn’t do it to make money. Making money was a sidebar to what he was doing,” McCarthy says. “He wanted to build communities. He knew with all those returning servicemen after World War II who had served out here either at Williams or Luke, he knew they were going to come West and he wanted an affordable place for them to live.”

Already hailed as an innovator for his assembly line methods of homebuilding, Long adopted sustainable methods years before it became popular. In 1988, John F. Long Homes was chosen by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop, construct and test a demonstration model home featuring roof-mounted photovoltaic solar cells. His Solar One became the world’s first solar subdivision. The 24-home subdivision in Glendale has almost all of its power needs met by ground-mounted photovoltaic cells.

“I think John was probably one of the greatest entrepreneurs and innovators, at least in the housing end, in water conservation, in just general development,” says Rep. John Nelson, (R-Phoenix). “He was a step ahead of everybody in those areas.”

John F. LongFor Long, finding new ways to build homes was just one part of his vision. He was interested in building a community; more specifically, he wanted the West Valley to be a place where people lived and worked. Rather than resent the fact that the West Valley was perpetually in the East Valley’s shadow, Long took the East Valley model and used it to reshape the West Valley. To that end, WESTMARC was born

“WESTMARC wouldn’t have happened without him. It’s just that simple,” says McCarthy, who first met Long in 1992, when she became the first director of WESTMARC. “He provided a lot of the seed money for us to get started, and in addition to the money, he talked to a lot of people. When you’re starting up an organization like that, you don’t have a lot of credibility because you don’t have a track record. He was willing to talk to other people and say, ‘Look, I really believe in what this organization can do and we have to give it a chance. And we all have to be willing to roll up our sleeves and get involved and help make a lot of these things happen.’ ”

Making things happen was a John Long specialty. He was always quick to donate money, land or services to make sure his beloved West Valley would continue to grow and be a place where people could raise families and build communities. A very small portion of what he gave includes the labor and material to fill potholes on 550 miles of West Phoenix streets; building and donating 21 townhouses to the city’s Affordable Housing Program; and when the Milwaukee Brewers were looking for a new Spring Training home, donating 60 acres of land for the Maryvale Baseball Park – as well as lending the city $10 million for construction.

Besides giving out of his own pocket, Long made sure others with the wherewithal gave as well.

“Dad was born and raised in Phoenix,” Jacob Long says. “This makes a huge difference. You have that sense of ownership and pride. He always was looking for ways to help others help themselves, who in turn might have the same feelings and be inspired. That is how true communities flourish.”

John Long had a standing challenge to other developers who built in the West Valley, Nelson says.

“He’d say, ‘I’ll do this if you do that,’ ” Nelson adds. “If you took a look at the developers who took a project on the West Side, they always had that challenge with John to put a project in pace that had benefits for those who lived there.”

McCarthy recalls a time when the library and senior center just north of Indian School Road and 51st Avenue badly needed repairs. Long made sure money for the upgrades was included in a bond measure. The measure succeeded, but when he found out the renovations weren’t scheduled until years later, Long took matters into his own hands.

“He went to the city and said, ‘Here’s the check for $10 million. Get it done sooner and pay me when the bond proceeds come in,’ ” McCarthy says. “So that beautiful, beautiful library and senior center he lived to see done.”

Exactly how much Long gave to the community is not exactly known, as most of his work was done behind the scenes and with no fanfare.

“Both parents instilled in us the need to be aware of someone who truly needs help and is experiencing a tough time through no fault of their own,” Jacob Long says. “One such person, a teenager, experienced a very bad athletic accident. He was confined to a wheelchair and his parents didn’t have the resources to modify their home. Dad read about this in the newspaper and he contacted the family and offered to remodel their home to accommodate the son’s special needs. This way he could be with his family. No one asked (my Dad) to do this.”

His philanthropy was not a recent development. In fact, he established the John F. Long Foundation, a nonprofit group supporting local charities, schools, education events and general community needs, in 1959. Long was generous in the extreme, but he was still a businessman and he would fight to protect his interests and those of the community he loved.

“He had a heart of gold and was tough as nails when he had to be,” Nelson says. “John sued the living daylights out of the city of Phoenix (in 1986) because they sold water to Palo Verde (Nuclear Generating Station). That was another side of John; he was not afraid to fight. If he felt he was right, he’d drag you to court. He didn’t care who you were.”

In 2000, WESTMARC created a lifetime achievement award and named it after Long. Despite all of his years working for the West Valley, the honor came as a surprise to him, McCarthy says.

“We told him we named it after him and I had never seen him speechless up to that point,” she says. “He was so thrilled at that. And then every year, I would take a couple of names to him and ask him, ‘Who do you think should get it?’ And he’d pick out the one and say, ‘That’s the one.’

“He never, ever flaunted anything. He was the most humble person. He would walk into a room and quietly sit down and unless you knew John Long, you wouldn’t know it was him,” McCarthy says. “I miss him. He was always somebody to call if you had an idea and he was willing to call you if he had an idea. And that’s how things get done.”