Tag Archives: company

Greg Guglielmino

Investment Specialist Greg Guglielmino Joins Colliers' Phoenix Office

 

Colliers International in Greater Phoenix announced that Greg Guglielmino, senior associate, has joined the Phoenix office.

Guglielmino specializes in the acquisition and disposition of single- and multi-tenant office and medical investment properties for private and institutional clients. He partners with Marcus Muirhead, associate vice president of investments. Guglielmino is also a member of Colliers’ National Healthcare Services Group.

“Greg is a skilled professional and a great addition to our team,” said Bob Mulhern, managing director of Colliers. “His experience in office and medical investment sales will complement and enhance the capabilities of our established investment professionals. We are pleased to welcome Greg to Colliers.”

Guglielmino has more than 5 years of experience as an investment specialist, focusing on medical office property sales. He is an expert in financial modeling, property evaluation, detailed market research, and submarket trend analysis.

His experience includes working on behalf of private investors and institutional lenders in the sale of REO assets and investment properties involving closed listings and buyside opportunities. Prior to joining Colliers, Guglielmino was an investment associate with Marcus & Millichap’s Phoenix office.

“There are a lot of great individuals at Colliers and Marcus Muirhead is one of those individuals,” Guglielmino said. “With our similar investment backgrounds and the team approach encouraged within the organization, it is a natural fit to team with him. Together, our abilities and skill sets will add value for our clients and expand on Marcus’ positive track record for success and client satisfaction.”

He adds that the strong camaraderie within Colliers provides a positive, collaborative environment that reflects a commitment to achieving clients’ goals.

“The Colliers’ culture, management and people are refreshing and I am excited to be a part of the team.”

Guglielmino holds a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies in Small Business and Psychology and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Arizona State University.

 

Broadway Health Center, 6550 Broadway, Mesa

Multi-Million Dollar Renovation Begins on 2 Medical Office Buildings in Mesa

 

Renovations have begun on Baywood Health Center and Broadway Health Center, two, 2-story medical office buildings in Mesa across the street from Banner Baywood Hospital.

Archway Holdings Corp. of Beverly Hills, Calif., which purchased the properties in February 2012, is implementing significant exterior and interior upgrades. Improvements to the properties include a complete redesign of their exterior façades, renovations to the interior lobbies and common areas, new garden and monument signage and water saving landscaping features.

Construction started in December 2012, with completion in March 2013. LGE Design Build is the general contractor; Cawley Architects will handle the design work.

Kelley Ahrens of CBRE’s Phoenix office will handle the leasing assignment for the property owner.

“In addition to repositioning the buildings into class A assets, Archway is providing tenants with generous improvement dollars to perform renovations to their individual office suites in order to keep up with the improvements to the buildings,” Ahrens said.

The assets are located directly across the street from Banner Baywood Medical Center, a 342-bed hospital providing complete acute care services to the East Valley communities of Mesa, Gilbert, Apache Junction, Queen Creek, Fountain Hills and areas of northeastern Pinal County. The assets are also close to Leisure World, the largest retirement community in Metro Phoenix.

Baywood Health Center, a 36,127 SF medical office building is at 6553 E. Baywood Ave. Broadway Health Center, a 25,277 SF medical office building is at 6550 E. Broadway Rd. The properties are 83% and 19% leased, respectively.

“The renovations will not only add value to these properties, they will add significant value to the surrounding community too,” Ahrens said. “The new look and upgrades will attract additional healthcare professionals to the area, which, in turn, provide more medical services and create more jobs.”

 

housing.prices

Phoenix Leads U.S. in Median Home Price Gains

ZipRealty, Inc., the leading online technology-enabled residential real estate brokerage company, has released the most accurate and complete MLS data showing that Phoenix median home prices have increased more than any other market in the U.S. on a year-over-year basis. Median home prices rose 36 percent in the Phoenix MSA from November 2011 to November 2012. The Silicon Valley recorded the second-highest price increase during that time at 30 percent, while Tampa prices rose 26 percent. Rounding out the list at No. 4 and No. 5, respectively, were San Francisco’s East Bay and the city of San Francisco, which jumped 24 percent and 23 percent, according to MLS data.

Phoenix median home prices increased from $116,000 to $158,000 from November 2011 to November 2012. “There are likely a few different factors contributing to this surge, including decreased housing inventory, lower unemployment numbers, high-tech job growth, steady population gains and increased investor activity, especially from out-of-area buyers,” says Lanny Baker, Chief Executive Officer and President of ZipRealty, Inc.

“Phoenix saw a strong run-up in housing prices from 2004 through 2006,” says Daniel Leboffe, Director of Agent Development at ZipRealty and a Phoenix area Realtor since 1997. “Phoenix was one of the leading markets for price increases during the real estate boom fueled by affordable housing, population growth, relaxed lending standards, zero-down financing and investor/speculator interest. Conversely, it was one the hardest hit areas during the Great Recession, resulting in a strong spike in foreclosures and short sales. Now, a number of these cities within Greater Phoenix are seeing some of the biggest rebounds,” he adds.

With investors acquiring foreclosures and the mortgage delinquency rate declining, the inventory of distressed homes in Phoenix has decreased, according to Leboffe. “As a result, many buyers –especially first-time buyers – are being priced out of the existing housing market, and turning to newly built properties. To meet this new demand, developers have acquired large tracts of land to build new homes,” notes Leboffe.

Leboffe observes that, once again, strong interest from out-of-area investors has impacted housing prices in Phoenix. “Out-of-area investors have ramped up home buying activity during the past three years or so, which has placed upward pressure on prices,” he says. “Because of the mild local weather, relatively cheap cost of housing and favorable currency exchange, Canadians have been a notably active segment of the local market. They typically pay cash and actively purchased foreclosed homes for both investment and as second homes, which helped relieve market distress,” he shares.

“As the local economy strengthens and as newly built homes come to market easing relatively low levels of resale homes, more people should have the ability to purchase a home in Phoenix, in spite of still-tight underwriting standards being implemented by the lending community,” notes Leboffe.

Rommie Flammer President and CEO China Mist Tea Brands - AZ - Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

China Mist’s Rommie Flammer Talks About Her First Job

Rommie Flammer
Title: President and CEO
Company: China Mist Tea Brands

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
At 12 years old, a friend and I got together a bucket, soap and a sponge, then went door to door asking if we could wash our neighbors’ cars. When they would ask “how much,” we would say “whatever you want to pay us.” I quickly learned my first business lesson, which is have an idea of what your service is worth before heading out. This job was short lived after we knocked on the door of Vern and Claudia Lipp, who bred and showed Himalayan cats. When we asked if we could wash her car she replied, “No, but I have a bunch of litter boxes that need cleaning and cats that need grooming.” …  For the next three years I cleaned and groomed cats, a job that could have definitely earned a spot on the Discovery Channel’s “Dirty Jobs with Mike Rowe!”

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
My first industry job was at China Mist right around the time I turned 16 years old. Over the course of 26 years, I have learned an incredible number of lessons and I still learn something everyday. … The most important lesson is to surround yourself with truly great people because your team is your greatest asset. Average employees don’t last long at China Mist. Next, is to always challenge the norms of your industry. … Indeed, it is the people who continually strive for a better product, better process, etc., who set themselves and their companies apart from the rest. Finally, focus on what you do best.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
When I started at China Mist, I earned minimum wage, which was around $3.35 per hour at the time. I cannot recall my hourly wage at Hotlipps Cattery, but the memories are priceless.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
I have had many mentors along the way, but would have to say that Mignon Latimer has been the biggest in my career. Mignon is the wife of a consultant hired by China Mist some years ago. I was an 18-year-old general manager at the time I started working with her. She taught me how to read and interpret financial details important to the company and precisely why they mattered. She gave me a truly sound financial base from which to build.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
While the barrier to entry is quite low, the competition is strong, so be sure you have a strong point of differentiation.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?

I really cannot imagine doing anything else, but if I had to pick a new industry it would be something in real estate.

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Patent

Failing To File Patent For New Technology Could Cost Company More Than Money

It is arguably one of the most exciting moments for a technology entrepreneur — seeing that invention for the first time. Whether it’s a new software program, mechanical device or a breakthrough biotech discovery, the feeling is always the same, pure elation. If you’re a technology entrepreneur you know the feeling. You spend months, possibly years, working toward this moment. Now that you’re here, you’re ready to turn this exciting innovation into a business. But before you take that costly leap of putting together a company and going to market, consider one very important step that can save you, and your company, everything you’ve worked for — the elusive patent.

Who needs it?
Many technology companies and entrepreneurs initially think they don’t need, or just can’t afford, patent protection at the very initial stages of their business development. “No one else could develop this right now in the exact same way we have,” or “It’s already protected by trade secret laws,” or “It’s going to cost a lot of money right now, so we’ll wait until the product is making us a profit.” The truth is, not filing a patent to protect your proprietary technology could cost a great, great deal more in the end, and might even make your company less attractive to investors and business partners.

What kind of companies should file for patent protection?
Companies in a wide variety of technology fields increasingly rely on patents as a key tool to protect their technology. For example, companies in the high-tech industry (software, semiconductors, etc.), the low-tech industry (consumer gadgets, etc.) and the life sciences/biotechnology industry (pharmaceuticals, medical devices, etc.) are spending more and more money on research and development and, thus, are increasingly looking to patents as a mechanism for protecting this expensive investment.

If you’re a typical technology startup, you will likely need to find early-stage, mid-stage and, eventually, late-stage investors for capital to continue to fund your research and development, and pay the tremendous costs associated with commercializing your products and services. Every kind of investor, from angels to venture capitalists, will scrutinize the adequacy and strength of a company’s intellectual property assets as a part of the investor’s decision to invest in that company. More than ever, investors are expecting a company to have either filed for patent protection or already have some patents. Another significant ramification of failing to obtain adequate patent protection is that investors may place a significantly lower valuation on your company. Thus, taking steps to file for patents, and then eventually obtaining patents, is often a critical and significant step in proving credibility to any kind of investor.

Another major benefit of patent protection is using your patents as a legal mechanism to protect your company’s most critical proprietary technology from infringement by competitors and others. Competition is fierce in the technology and biotech/life sciences industries and your competition may knowingly, or inadvertently, use your technology to gain market share. Your patent is often the most valuable tool to combat these serious situations and could be a key factor that differentiates your company from your competition.

How patents pave the way to new markets?
Many technology companies, particularly startups, are not in a position to commercialize their technology in every country in the world and in every “field of use.” A solution to this problem is to find business partners who can be given a license to use these technologies in other markets, both here in the U.S., and globally. Taking steps to file for patent protection can increase your company’s ability to find proper licensees who will scrutinize the technology and opportunity as much as any investor. Patent protection can also increase your negotiating leverage when entering into contracts with licensees and could have a significant impact on the level of royalties and other compensation that licensees agree to pay you for the use of your technology. Indeed, potential licensees who still want rights to your technology very often negotiate significantly lower royalty payments if you have failed to obtain proper patent protection because the licensee deems your technology to simply be unprotected “trade secrets.” As a bottom line, taking steps to obtain proper patent protection can potentially increase the revenue stream to your company from others who want to use your technology.

Motivate Employees

Keeping Employees Motivated In A Troubled Economy Is Critical

The Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) figures that it can cost up to one-third of an employee’s annual salary to recruit and replace that employee. For the most part, it is to the employer’s advantage to retain and maintain their skilled work force in a tumultuous marketplace.

Uncertain times, family issues and unstable financial situations all compete with the workplace for balance. Couple that with the constant barrage of dismal employment news of company cutbacks, bailouts and failures, and understandably there’s not much motivation left for the workplace. Many people are wondering how secure their job really is and if they need to be on the lookout for the next opportunity.

How do you get your employees to step “up” and stay optimistic when it seems like so many things are falling apart around them? Here are a few quick steps to keep your employees engaged and positive.

Be honest and open
Communication is one of those things that you just can never get enough of — but it does take work. The worst thing you can do for morale is to paint a rosy picture one week, only to have the bottom drop out of their world the following week. No one likes workplace surprises, especially your employees. Regular and transparent communication is essential to maintaining your employees’ trust. Also, remember to let your team members know how much you appreciate them and their personal contributions to the company.

Partner with your workers
Let them be part of the solution. Good old-fashioned brainstorming and suggestion boxes are excellent ways for employers to engage and encourage their employees to use their expertise to help the company reduce costs and increase revenue. Remember to recognize those contributors whose ideas are implemented with either public praise and/or non-monetary perks, such as a certificate or a preferred parking space.

Build up your team
Creating a sense of community does wonders to build team morale. By encouraging positive working relationships through bonding, walls come down and individuals work together toward solutions. Staff development, lunchtime personal growth workshops, community service projects, or even a staff potluck lunch or get-together, are ways to promote team cohesiveness.

Reward creatively
Although a pay raise or some other cash award would be nice, it just may not be feasible for the company right now. But, that shouldn’t stop you from recognizing and rewarding hard work. A covered parking space in the dead of summer in Arizona or in the snowy winter in Ohio certainly is a major perk. A dress-down day when certain business goals are achieved would be welcomed. Even a handshake and “job well done” during a staff meeting can show appreciation without breaking the bank.

Help your employees create work-life balance
Work-life balance seems to be everyone’s hot button these days. Flexible schedules are one way of helping your employees realize it. Depending upon business needs and the employee’s position, flexible schedules can allow your employees to have the work-life balance they need. Telecommuting, job sharing, compact work weeks and flexible start times can be just the motivator the employee needed.

In moving forward, keeping employees motivated is truly a necessity in these uncertain times. Not only will your employees’ motivation be on target, but you’ll see positive results in your ROI as well.

Onboarding Employees

The Critical Process Of Onboarding Your New Employees

You’ve sorted through stacks of resumes, interviewed the best and selected the perfect candidate. Now what? Once you’ve made the job offer and it has been accepted, it is time to start thinking about your onboarding process.

Onboarding is the term used to describe the process of integrating a new employee into your organization, and there are three steps to consider.

Be prepared
It is very unpleasant for an employee to show up to a new job, excited about the possibilities, and end up with the feeling that she was not expected and the company is surprised to see her. Since that is not the kind of surprise you want for your newest “most valuable asset,” it is important to prepare in advance for her arrival. Take into consideration such factors as:

The workspace — Is it properly equipped? Is it cleaned up, with the remnants of the prior occupant removed? Include a small “welcome” gift.

Name badge — If your staff wears name badges, be sure your new hire has one on her first day of work.

Time — Be sure the new hire’s manager has taken the necessary time to make introductions with co-workers. Your new hire should not be treated like he is an inconvenience to a busy schedule.

Welcome
Many employees make the decision about whether they are going to stay at their new organization within the first week. Since we only have a short period of time to make a good and lasting first impression, take these important steps to make him feel welcome:

Be sure your front desk personnel are trained to welcome new hires in the same way they welcome your customers. The welcome should say, “We’ve been expecting you and are glad you are here!”

Give your new hire a tour upon arrival. Be sure to point out the restrooms, drinking fountain, coffee maker, vending machines and break room, in addition to her workspace, the copier, supply room and other important rooms in your building. Remember, you want to make a good impression, so team her up with someone who is a great spokesperson for your organization.

The road to success
You want to set your new hire up for success from the start, so consider the following when laying out the roadmap for her first several months onboard:

If you have a formal job description, make sure your new hire receives a copy of it on her first day of work. The manager, or a co-worker who is knowledgeable about the job, should review the job duties and clearly define what is expected for each task. Define “success” up front, so your new hire knows what will be expected of her.

If the manager for the new hire is often in meetings or off-site, assign another “go to” person for your new hire. Since new hires decide early on if they are going to “fit” at this organization, it is important they feel comfortable asking questions and seeking assistance when needed.

We all have things to learn when starting a new job. Be sure your new hire is trained on all aspects of his job, from the mundane to the complex. Depending on your environment, it may be best to wait until a couple of days after the start of the new job to train on more complex matters. Give enough information for your new hire to go home loving his new job on the first day, and not so much information that he wonders how he will ever remember it.

Onboarding is a six-month to one-year process depending on the complexity of the work you do. Check in often with your new hire to make sure she has received the training she needs, has the proper equipment to do her job, understands your corporate culture and has made a few friends with whom she feels comfortable.

Since you have made a significant investment in selecting and hiring your newest “asset,” you want to do everything possible to get them onboard and keep them onboard. An effective onboarding process will set everyone on the right track.

AZ Big Media 25 years

Arizona Business Magazine Celebrates Its 25th Anniversary

An important lesson in the launch of any business or new product is to learn everything you can about your target consumer, and that’s exactly what Mike Atkinson did when he bought the Office Guide to Phoenix 25 years ago. He approached leaders in the community in such industries as health care and law, and asked them what they wanted and needed from a local business magazine.

“I took reams of notes and what came out of it was Arizona Business Magazine,” Atkinson says. “The research led me down a path of this is how it should look and read.”

Atkinson was inspired to enter the publishing arena because it presented the chance to exercise his artistic abilities. He wanted to create “a product that was fundamentally art-related and a product that could help inspire, excite and help educate,” he explains. “I’m an artist at heart, so the magazine’s pages were like my mini-canvases.”

Initially, Atkinson was the sole employee of the publication — he wrote the stories, shot the photos and sold the ads. Today, however, the company has increased to nearly 30 employees and publishes an additional six titles, including AZRE: Arizona Commercial Real Estate, Ranking Arizona, Experience AZ, People to Know, Creative Designer and Scottsdale Home & Design. The flagship publication has also undergone many changes over the years, including its frequency, which has gone from quarterly to bimonthly, and in February 2008, to monthly. The company has evolved as well, and last year was re-named AZ Big Media.

Atkinson didn’t limit his creativity to the magazines, however. In 1991, the company launched its first Arizona Home & Building Expo, which is now in its 18th year. AZ Big Media also hosts a series of awards and events that honor various segments of the business community, from health care to finance. In March 2009, the company held its inaugural Southwest Build-it-Green Expo & Conference. AZ Big Media’s newest venture, the Home & Design Idea Center, opens this summer. The company is also building a strong presence online with its new Web site, www.azbigmedia.com, where readers can find many of the stories featured in each magazine.

“If you go to our Web site, you’ll see ‘online’ is where we’re heading in the future,” Atkinson says. He adds that the future will include more home shows when the market is ready for them. He also hints of possibly even adding a radio station.

If he could go back in time and change one thing, Atkinson says, it would involve the company’s interaction with its audience online.

“At the time, we were just learning about the Internet, and I remember one of my editors came in my office and said ‘Guess where I was today? I was on the computer and I was talking to people all the way in Italy!’ and he began to describe how it took him to different places,” he says. “I thought that was pretty cool, but I didn’t have the foresight to say, ‘This computer Web thing just might turn out to be something really big!’ ”

Looking back on the past 25 years, Atkinson says his success is due to two key things: “Hard work and surrounding myself with the right people.”

Here’s to one day cashing in this 25-year silver achievement for gold.

visual workspace

Office Designs Can Spark Employee Creativity

We have all seen, or at least heard about, “off-the-charts” office design that is not only cool, but also inspires its work force. Companies such as Google, Pixar, Herman Miller, Red Bull, and even one blogger in her vintage trailer, have been recognized for their creativity in the workplace. These companies have shown us that designing an office that is “cool” is about embracing your company culture and projecting a contagious attitude.

Your corporate culture says a lot about the way your office should look and function. What do you want to project? What are your core values? What kind of clients do you want to attract? Cool office design is more than a flat panel TV and retro furniture in your lobby. It’s your company’s essence — its physical presence. And we all know what they say about first impressions.

Creating spaces that keep employees engaged and that support the way they live, work and play will stimulate productivity and result in a much happier staff. This will naturally lead to higher client satisfaction and greater return on your investment. So, how do you get started?

Keep in mind a few simple starting points:
Involve everyone in the office in a brainstorming session. What are employees looking for from their workspace? How do they want it to feel and function? Is privacy important? What do your employees wish for in their environment? Choose a point of contact to champion these ideas with your interior designer.

Be flexible, because it is the key to planning a successful work environment. Allowing people to have choices and variety in the way they work and collaborate enhances the experience of the workplace.

Provide opportunities for impromptu meeting and spaces that allow workers to get away from the monotony of sitting at their desks all day.

A connection to nature is an important factor in productivity. People need to be able to see the blue sky, get fresh air and soak up the sun. Oftentimes, we see offices that block the view by installing opaque high panels and storage above eye level, creating depressing “cubicle farms.”

Don’t forget about public and common areas. There are endless opportunities to bring out your company’s brand, culture and differentiation. These spaces also offer a place to relieve stress and to get away from the daily grind.

Creating a cool office in hot Arizona is not as difficult (or as expensive) as it may seem. It all revolves around defining who you are and having fun with it. You’ll know that you’ve achieved “office nirvana” when your clients start asking to have their meetings in your office.

Spreeman Piano Innovations

Michael Spreeman, Owner Of Spreeman Piano Innovations

Michael Spreeman
Spreeman Piano Innovations
Title: Owner | Est.: 2004
www.spreemanpianoinnovations.com

From an early age, Michael Spreeman knew he was meant to work with pianos. Beginning at age 18, he experienced nearly every aspect of the industry — from servicing pianos for recording studios and artists, to technical consulting, to working as a high-end piano re-builder.

That young mindset has now come full circle with the establishment of Spreeman Piano Innovations. The company offers two models of pianos, a 7-foot-3-inch piano and a 9-foot concert grand piano. Each piano is custom built based on the client’s preferences, requiring an average of 5,000 hours of labor.
Creating a business within an industry with long-standing brand loyalty was a difficult task, but for Spreeman, it was a no-brainer.
“There is always a market for exclusive, high-quality product,” Spreeman says.

It all began when world-class pianist and composer Bob Ravenscroft asked Spreeman to redesign a piano for him. After receiving positive feedback from Ravenscroft, Spreeman went ahead with his dream of launching his own custom high-end piano building business. A five-year process of designing the ultimate piano — taking conventional technology and amplifying it — eventually resulted in the Ravenscroft 9-foot model.

The pianos are built with the finest materials, including flawless exterior cabinetry and cast iron frames that hail from one of the oldest manufacturing operations in Germany. The soundboard wood used in some of the pianos is sourced from the same forest used to create the famous Stradivarius violins. After finalizing the design for the pianos, Spreeman and his team showcased it to others in the industry. “Concerts and venues have given our pianos recognition as (a) high-end performance instrument, acceptance and support from the technical community, and has helped to secure our position in the market with other high-end manufacturers,”Spreeman says.

The transition from turning his passion into a successful business hasn’t beenan easy one, but it’s a journey that Spreeman has been more than happy to take. Instead of trying to do everything on his own, he has learned to seek assistance and advice fromthe business community. “By expanding my thinking to more of a ‘team’ or ‘collaborative effort’ approach, I have been able to assemble a core team whose skill sets are complementary,” Spreeman says.

The company employs Spreeman’s son, Andrew; Stephanie, the receptionist; and Robert Springer, who utilizes his high-tech skills to optimize the performance of the piano’s mechanical action. “As with any artist, I constantly seek out opportunities to further the knowledge base for my craft and interface with other successful business associates and artists,” Spreeman says. “Ultimately though, I’m just a guy with a dream, who is willing to take a risk and do whatever is necessary to fulfill it.”

Lisa Nisleit of Color Repro Consulting

Color Repro Consulting

Lisa Nisleit
Color Repro Consulting
Title: President
Est.: 2001 | www.colorrepro.com

Lisa Nisleit was working for a large format printing company in 2001, when a client suggested she branch out on her own. She liked what she was doing and her accounts were satisfied with her performance, but Nisleit was frustrated that all the services she wanted to offer her clients weren’t available.

That’s when she decided to take the leap and launch her own business.

“The first thing I did was go out and visit as many accounts as I could. I wanted them to know that I would be the one-stop contact,” Nisleit says.

Color Repro Consulting’s primary services include printing for large format projects, trade shows, pamphlets and any other printing needs. Instead of customers dealing with a variety of vendors, Color Repro is responsible for every aspect of the project, from recognizing the types of services needed to completing the job and locating the suppliers and products, to printing and finishing the job on time.

“It’s project management, not just printing,” Nisleit says.

Her determination and focus on vendor-client relationships has helped transform her idea into a successful business.

“We depend on (vendors) to assist us with taking care of our clients. They depend on us to bring them work. Our clients depend on us to complete their project on time and on budget. Everyone is happy,” Nisleit says.

After holding a variety of jobs, including positions in retail and even in the semiconductor industry, running her own business was not something Nisleit expected to do.

“I’m still amazed that I’m still here after all this time. At the beginning, it was a week-to-week thing, but I’m still here,” she says.

The early hurdles of running a business, such as cash flow problems, were something Nisleit encountered but overcame. Now, Color Repro has developed a reputation as a dependable printing company that will work hard to meet its customers’ needs.

“We find ourselves always being the go-to people. So many projects are last minute. One of the biggest industries we deal with is construction and architecture. These companies put together their proposal projects to submit, and then we’ve only got a couple hours to print it,” Nisleit says.

Delivering on her promise to get the job done on time and on budget is a key ingredient to the success of Color Repro.

“It is our job to know who is in this town who can turn things quickly on a budget,” Nisleit says.

Through hard work and determination, Nisleit was able to lead her company to success. Her future plans for the business include moving to a new, larger location and hiring more employees.

For all the potential entrepreneurs out there, Nisleit has these simple words of wisdom: “Take the risk. If it’s something that you really want to do and it’s something that you love, you’re going to be successful at it.”

Evolution Tea Team

David Watson Revolutionizes Tea Industry

Revolution Tea — the name of the company says it all. In the late 1990s, after watching a rise in tea plarity at his wife’s tea room in Scottsdale, Larry DeAngelis recognized that the tea industry would soon experience a transformation, and he wanted to get involved prior to the “revolution.”

In 2001, he was joined by David Watson, who acquired majority ownership. Today, DeAngelis continues to serve as CEO, while Watson is chairman.

Watson is no stranger to making a company successful. He has dipped his hand in several industries, including real estate and cosmetics. In fact, he was president of BioMedic Clinical Care, which was sold to L’Oreal in 2001.

Watson says that when he joined Revolution Tea, he “saw what Starbucks did for coffee has happened (for tea at Revolution Tea).”

The company revolutionized the industry with its Infuser tea bag, which contains full-leaf teas and a carefully researched blend of natural fruits, herbs and spices. The special bag produces a fuller-bodied flavor due to its larger size and material. It now has 26 flavors to choose from; the five best-selling blends are Tropical Green, Sweet Ginger Peach, White Pear, English Breakfast and Earl Grey Lavender. They even have several organic flavors, including Organic Scottish Breakfast Tea and Organic White Chai Tea.

“The biggest challenge,” Watson says, “was educating the consumer they can have better packaged tea.”

They not only educated the consumer – they changed an industry. Today, more than three-dozen companies use the Infuser bag.

In May, the company continued making headway with the launch of Revolution 3D, which was introduced, Watson says, as a healthier alternative to soda and energy drinks. The canned beverage is a blend of fruit juice, multivitamins, and white tea, and is available in green apple, blueberry, mango and pomegranate. It is currently only available in Arizona and California, but it will be rolled out to the rest of the U.S. over the next 18 months.

The company has experienced rapid growth since 2002. In both 2005 and 2006, it grew 40 percent and its 40 employees work in a 37,000-square-foot warehouse in Phoenix. Watson is quick to give credit where credit is due, and says Revolution Tea would not be where it is today without all of its employees.

“Surround yourself with experts,” he recommends to other entrepreneurs. “Be humble to know what you’re not good at.”

The company also works out of contract warehouses in three other states that help distribute the products throughout the U.S. and to more than 40 countries worldwide. In addition, the products can be found in approximately 2,500 restaurants and 6,000 grocery stores. Every new product launched, however, is initially only offered in Arizona and California.

“Arizona historically has been a testing ground for new products and services,” Watson says. “It has a makeup of diverse constituencies. … If (a product) will work in Arizona, it will work anywhere.”