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Medtronic’s Gordon Steere earns AZBio Pioneer Award

Screen Shot 2015-09-02 at 8.36.02 AM copyGordon Steere, who led Medtronic Tempe from 1997 -2008, has been selected as the recipient of the 2015 AZBio Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement by the Arizona BioIndustry Association.

“During a period of rapid growth and innovation across our industry, Gordon Steere led the Medtronic team in the creation of one of the leading life science microelectronic centers in the world” said Joan Koerber-Walker, president and CEO of AZBio. “Thanks to his vision, leadership and commitment to growing Medtronic’s presence within our life science community, today the Medtronic Tempe Campus spans over 30 acres and includes over 400,000 square feet of state-of-the-art design, development and manufacturing facilities.”

A ceremony honoring Gordon Steere will take place at the AZBio Awards on October 1, 2015 at the Phoenix Convention Center. The AZBio Awards ceremony celebrates Arizona’s leading educators, innovators and companies. Each year, AZBio honors bioindustry leaders from across the state of Arizona who are illustrative of the depth, breadth and expertise of our bioscience industry.

Beginning in 1973 as Medtronic Micro-Rel, today’s campus began as a single manufacturing facility that had previously been owned by Motorola.  Under Steere’s leadership, the campus was expanded five times helping it to reach the level of scale and sophistication that it is at today.

Medtronic Tempe is a vertically integrated manufacturing site and technology center for the world’s leading medical technology company and focuses on analog and mixed signal integrated circuit design and fabrication with a focus on ultra-low power and power management devices to support Medtronic’s global life science portfolio.

This commitment to innovation has resulted in over 190 patents by local team members and over 800 employees at Medtronic Tempe. They design, develop, manufacture and test microelectronics solutions used in Medtronic implantable devices, such as cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, devices that help patients with diabetes manage their insulin levels safely and effectively, spinal cord stimulators for pain management and deep brain stimulators that address movement disorders.   The world’s smallest pacemaker, the MicraTM Transcatheter Pacing system, and other products leveraging Medtronic’s expertise in miniaturization are also manufactured at the site.  The site produces over 1,000,000 units annually and enables approximately 20% of Medtronic’s $27.8 B revenue.

Gordon advocated for the value that the Tempe Campus’  “connected capabilities” provided to Medtronic, inspiring every employee to support Medtronic’s growth.  Even today, as a legacy coach, his dedication to the organization’s success remains.  Gordon’s steady leadership has inspired employees to reach their full potential, contributing to Medtronic’s Mission through developing new products and world class manufacturing processes.

Past recipients of the AZBio Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement include:  Roy Curtiss, III, Ph.D.  of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University,  David S. Alberts, M.D., Director Emeritus at the Arizona Cancer Center, Raymond L. Woosley, M.D., Ph.D.,  Chairman Emeritus of the Critical Path Institute, and Thomas M. Grogan, M.D., founder of Ventana Medical Systems, Inc.

For registration and more information about the AZBio Awards, go to www.azbioawards.com.

AZBio Pioneer Honoree Roy Curtiss, III, Ph.D. of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. Photo Courtesy of ASU.

AZBio honors ASU scientist Curtiss

Roy Curtiss, III, Ph.D., of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, has been selected as the recipient of the 2014 AZBio Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement by the Arizona Bioindustry Association.

“During his career, Roy Curtiss has had a profound impact on microbiology research and been a true pioneer in developing salmonella-based vaccines that are effective against a range of infectious diseases, which are still the leading cause of worldwide death,” said Joan Koerber-Walker, president and CEO of AZBio. “His contributions since being recruited to Arizona a decade ago have continued unabated, and he is now on the cusp of bringing his remarkable discoveries to the marketplace.”

“Roy’s lifelong dedication and achievements in bioscience research, education and innovation are really quite remarkable, and his efforts have inspired countless life science careers,” said Biodesign Institute Executive Director Raymond DuBois, M.D., Ph.D. “His passion and commitment in taking on the challenges of combating infectious diseases and the impact he is having on urgent societal problems make him a stellar example of the translational research spirit of the Biodesign Institute.”

Curtiss was drawn to ASU President Michael Crow’s vision of a New American University and a new state-of-the-art research enterprise, the Biodesign Institute, which opened in 2004. Shortly after arriving at ASU, Curtiss received the largest support of his career, more than $15.4 million from the Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He has also received generous and continued support from the National Institutes of Health throughout his career.

Curtiss’ primary focus is alleviating worldwide suffering and death from infectious diseases, particularly in the developing world. At Biodesign, he directs the Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, where he oversees a 130-member research team working on more than a dozen projects. He is also a professor in ASU’s School of Life Sciences and a member of the prestigious National Academy of Sciences.

One of his major projects is development of a next-generation vaccine against bacterial pneumonia. Bacterial pneumonia kills more children around the world each year than any other infectious disease, and the rising costs of vaccines has spurred researchers to develop new solutions. Curtiss and his global team are trying to perfect a safe, yet potent vaccine to fight pneumonia and can be tolerated even by newborn babies — and orally administered as a single-dose, low-cost solution. If successful, the new vaccine against bacterial pneumonia promises to outperform existing injectable vaccine in terms of safety, affordability, ease of distribution and effectiveness.

Preliminary studies have been successful, and the vaccine technology has moved forward to human clinical trials. In addition, his team is also targeting vaccine development for a host of other diseases, and to protect poultry and livestock against a broad range of bacterial marauders.

Before coming to ASU in 2004, Curtiss was the George William and Irene Keochig Freiberg professor of biology at Washington University in St. Louis, where he chaired the Department of Biology for ten years. His body of published work includes more than 250 reviewed articles. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and a doctorate from the University of Chicago.

A ceremony honoring Curtiss will take place at the AZBio Awards on September 17, 2014 at the Phoenix Convention Center. The AZBio Awards ceremony celebrates Arizona’s leading educators, innovators and companies. Each year, AZBio honors bioindustry leaders from across the state of Arizona who are illustrative of the depth, breadth and expertise of our bioscience industry.

Past recipients of the AZBio Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement include: David S. Alberts, M.D., Director Emeritus at the Arizona Cancer Center, Raymond L. Woosley, M.D., Ph.D., Chairman Emeritus of the Critical Path Institute, and Thomas M. Grogan, M.D., founder of Ventana Medical Systems, Inc.

For registration and more information, go to www.azbio.awards.com.