Tag Archives: cvb

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CVB Markets Scottsdale as 'Home for the Holidays'

“The weather outside is delightful” during the holiday season in Scottsdale, and the Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau is enticing visitors to book their trip and enjoy the warm weather, rates and activities the destination has to offer.

From mid-October through mid-January, the campaign will reach potential holiday visitors across the United States and Canada. Playing off of four popular holiday jingles, including “The Weather Outside is Delightful,” “Baby It’s Warm Outside,” “Let It Glow,” and “Hiking in a Winter Wonderland,” the campaign highlights resort and activity deals on ScottsdaleHolidayExperience.com. The page features more than 50 resort, golf, dining and attraction offers. Additionally, the site showcases seasonal events.

The bureau’s “holiday jingles” campaign aims to increase visitation from Nov. 15 through Jan. 15, a need-time period for the local tourism industry. This campaign is targeted at visitors who may not have traditional holiday plans and are looking for a convenient, warm-weather destination where they can enjoy holiday activities with a Sonoran Desert twist.

“Changing a holiday traveler’s mindset from beach to desert isn’t easy, but that’s why we have invested in this three-year program,” said Caroline Stoeckel, vice president of marketing at the bureau. “Scottsdale has great rates, warm weather, and an abundance of activities, which all make the destination a perfect holiday getaway.”

Promotional elements include print, online, direct mail and email, which will be marketed in both primary and secondary feeder markets.

This is the second year of a three-year campaign to increase holiday visitation in Scottsdale. Last year, the campaign resulted in over 28 million impressions and garnered a 139 percent return on investment for the bureau.

Soleri Bridge2(1)

CVB Markets Scottsdale as 'Home for the Holidays'

“The weather outside is delightful” during the holiday season in Scottsdale, and the Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau is enticing visitors to book their trip and enjoy the warm weather, rates and activities the destination has to offer.

From mid-October through mid-January, the campaign will reach potential holiday visitors across the United States and Canada. Playing off of four popular holiday jingles, including “The Weather Outside is Delightful,” “Baby It’s Warm Outside,” “Let It Glow,” and “Hiking in a Winter Wonderland,” the campaign highlights resort and activity deals on ScottsdaleHolidayExperience.com. The page features more than 50 resort, golf, dining and attraction offers. Additionally, the site showcases seasonal events.

The bureau’s “holiday jingles” campaign aims to increase visitation from Nov. 15 through Jan. 15, a need-time period for the local tourism industry. This campaign is targeted at visitors who may not have traditional holiday plans and are looking for a convenient, warm-weather destination where they can enjoy holiday activities with a Sonoran Desert twist.

“Changing a holiday traveler’s mindset from beach to desert isn’t easy, but that’s why we have invested in this three-year program,” said Caroline Stoeckel, vice president of marketing at the bureau. “Scottsdale has great rates, warm weather, and an abundance of activities, which all make the destination a perfect holiday getaway.”

Promotional elements include print, online, direct mail and email, which will be marketed in both primary and secondary feeder markets.

This is the second year of a three-year campaign to increase holiday visitation in Scottsdale. Last year, the campaign resulted in over 28 million impressions and garnered a 139 percent return on investment for the bureau.

Soleri Bridge2(1)

CVB Markets Scottsdale as ‘Home for the Holidays’

“The weather outside is delightful” during the holiday season in Scottsdale, and the Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau is enticing visitors to book their trip and enjoy the warm weather, rates and activities the destination has to offer.

From mid-October through mid-January, the campaign will reach potential holiday visitors across the United States and Canada. Playing off of four popular holiday jingles, including “The Weather Outside is Delightful,” “Baby It’s Warm Outside,” “Let It Glow,” and “Hiking in a Winter Wonderland,” the campaign highlights resort and activity deals on ScottsdaleHolidayExperience.com. The page features more than 50 resort, golf, dining and attraction offers. Additionally, the site showcases seasonal events.

The bureau’s “holiday jingles” campaign aims to increase visitation from Nov. 15 through Jan. 15, a need-time period for the local tourism industry. This campaign is targeted at visitors who may not have traditional holiday plans and are looking for a convenient, warm-weather destination where they can enjoy holiday activities with a Sonoran Desert twist.

“Changing a holiday traveler’s mindset from beach to desert isn’t easy, but that’s why we have invested in this three-year program,” said Caroline Stoeckel, vice president of marketing at the bureau. “Scottsdale has great rates, warm weather, and an abundance of activities, which all make the destination a perfect holiday getaway.”

Promotional elements include print, online, direct mail and email, which will be marketed in both primary and secondary feeder markets.

This is the second year of a three-year campaign to increase holiday visitation in Scottsdale. Last year, the campaign resulted in over 28 million impressions and garnered a 139 percent return on investment for the bureau.

Steve Moore, president and CEO of Visit Phoenix; Andrea Streat, director of meetings and events for the American Alliance of Museums; Alyssa Kolat, conference manager for the International Association of Fire Chiefs; and James Jessie, senior vice president of sales at Visit Phoenix.

Visit Phoenix spearheads sales blitz in D.C.

Commuters hailing a cab or waiting for public transit in Washington, D.C. this month are likely to get a glimpse of iconic Phoenix imagery before their trip commences.

Visit Phoenix (CVB) is blitzing the D.C. area with a transit-based advertising buy that includes mini-billboards atop taxis and digital posters in transit stations. The ads showcase Visit Phoenix’s “This is Phoenix” ad campaign, which is built around dramatic photography of Greater Phoenix outdoor activity in the Sonoran Desert.

The ad blitz coincides with a sales mission in the Washington D.C. area by Visit Phoenix, the Phoenix Convention Center, and nine of the city’s largest hotels and resorts. The convention sales mission delegation will meet with professional associations and national trade unions, hundreds of which are headquartered in and around the nation’s capital.

Visit Phoenix staff just completed its fiscal year with a 30% increase in Phoenix Convention Center future year bookings and a strong rebound in resort/hotel leads and bookings. Continuing this momentum, the Phoenix convention sales delegation will meet with more than 250 DC convention planners and association executives through sales appointments, reception-trade shows, and a meeting planner forum during its three-day sales mission.

“Washington is a hotbed for meetings and conventions, and our sales team maintains a strategic presence there with in-market offices and annual events,” said Melissa Gogel, vice president of marketing, communications and tourism for Visit Phoenix. “To support those sales efforts, we’re placing our new ‘This is Phoenix’ ads in some high-traffic transit locations. The goal is to increase the exposure of the Visit Phoenix brand in one of our most important markets, and to do it at a time when our sales team is saturating the market with face-to-face calls.”

The delegation of sales professionals from Phoenix will host four events during the next three days, with one event each in Washington, Alexandria, VA and Chevy Chase, MD.

Phoenix was ranked No. 10 in the list of the “Top 50 U.S. Cities for Conventions in 2013,” according to Cvent, a technology company that connects event planners with more than 200,000 venues in destinations across the United States. Phoenix earned its top-10 destination based on its weather, its air-travel accessibility, its spectrum of meeting-friendly hotels and resorts, and its newly expanded convention center.

“The Phoenix Convention Center was expanded with big association groups in mind,” Gogel said. “It has the space and sophistication to host the biggest of them, or to host smaller ones concurrently. Our focus is to keep the convention center, the hotels and resorts, and the destination as a whole at the top of mind for meeting planners in D.C. and beyond.”

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Greater Phoenix CVB promotes 3 as part of reorganization effort

The Greater Phoenix Convention & Visitors Bureau, the nonprofit organization that markets metropolitan Phoenix as a visitor and meeting destination, has promoted Michael Mooney to the position of Executive Vice President.

Mooney, who previously held the title of Chief Operating Officer, will continue to serve in that role. He joined the Greater Phoenix CVB in 1997. In the 16 years since, he has risen in rank and responsibility, from Director of Information Technology to Chief Financial Officer to his new position as the CVB’s No. 2 executive.

Prior to joining the Greater Phoenix CVB, Mooney served as the senior financial and technology officer for a private enterprise that operated in the tourism-related realms of aviation, hotel lodging, restaurants, ground transportation and golf in Arizona, Washington, Hawaii, California and Nevada. Immediately preceding that career path, Mooney developed computer software for the casino industry, specializing in timekeeping, slot accounting and guest tracking.

Born in New Jersey, Mooney has called Phoenix home since his high school days.

Mooney’s promotion follows two other recent reorganization moves at the Greater Phoenix CVB: Melissa Gogel was promoted to Vice President of Marketing, Communications and Tourism; and Scott Dunn was elevated to Senior Director of Marketing and Communications.

Gogel, who has worked at the Greater Phoenix CVB since 2000, takes the supervisory reins of three departments: marketing (which is responsible for the CVB’s advertising, branding and website); communications (which coordinates media relations efforts); and tourism (which markets Phoenix to travel agencies and tour operators).

A native of Nashville, Gogel had previously served as Director of Marketing. She began her career at the CVB as an assistant in the Membership Department. Prior to coming to Phoenix she worked as a marketing analyst for Harold’s clothing stores in Norman, Okla.

Dunn, also a native Tennessean, has worked at the Greater Phoenix CVB for six years, serving as Communication Manager and Associate Director of Communication. Before coming to Phoenix he spent 14 years in the journalism industry, working as a reporter and editor at newspapers in Utah, New Mexico and South Carolina.

Steve Moore, GPCVB, AZ Business Magazine May/June 2011

Q&A Steve Moore, President & CEO of Greater Phoenix Convention and Visitors Bureau

Steve Moore
President and CEO
Greater Phoenix Convention and Visitors Bureau

What is the outlook of tourism in Arizona and the Valley as you see it?

Tourism is a $17 billion industry here, and it is strong enough to have absorbed some body blows over the past couple of years. The recession hurt. The “AIG effect” hurt. Backlash from SB 1070 hurt. People are still worried about the economy, and large groups are still a little trigger shy.

But we are seeing a few positive signs. Business travel is inching upward. Room rates are rising a little. In Phoenix, the metric we use to assess the financial performance of our hotels indicated improvement in 2010 versus 2009. So far this year, the BCS Championship Game gave the Valley’s hotels a boost in January, spring training provided its annual injection of visitors in March, and the MLB All-Star Week is going to be a huge asset for us in July. But the outlook is not as rosy as it’s been painted in some media accounts. We still have a lot of ground to make up.

How is the Greater Phoenix CVB performing in this environment, and how would you define the CVB’s role in the local economy?

In fiscal year 2010, our sales staff booked over 400,000 future delegates into the convention center and hotels across the Valley. These delegates will spend over $525 million when they get here — that’s direct spending, and it doesn’t include what the family and friends who accompany them will spend. If you were to look at the CVB’s future bookings in terms of corporate portfolio, that “portfolio” would be valued at $2.4 billion. That’s how much direct spending is attached to the future delegates we’ve booked, and that’s the price you could expect to get for the CVB if it were “sold.” Of course, we’re not for sale — we’re a nonprofit. But I think the analogy helps people get their heads around how vital the visitors industry is to the local economy.

What obstacles are currently facing the visitors industry, and what are some future challenges for the Greater Phoenix CVB?

The economy’s signs of recovery give us reason for optimism — but that optimism has to be tempered with a measure of caution. Group business may gradually climb back to pre-recession levels, but spending probably will rise at a slower rate. In that way, this recovery will somewhat mirror the industry’s post-9/11 recovery, albeit with a more gradual climb out of the bottom, because the recession affected all industries, not just ours.

Also, as the cost of oil continues to rise, so does the cost of air travel. Airlines have gradually decreased their capacities, switching to smaller planes and fewer flights. This can increase the cost of air travel and inflate travel times, both of which factor into a business’ decision about where to hold a meeting or convention. It’s something we play close attention to because Phoenix is a fly-in destination. Another challenge for us arose this past September, when the GSA recommended that federal agencies substitute teleconferencing and webcasts for face-to-face meetings whenever possible. Suppliers will likely follow suit, and that’s not good for our industry.

Within the CVB itself, one of our greatest challenges is budgetary. The formula funding we created back in 1998 will yield a million dollars less for us in the next fiscal year than it did in this fiscal year. We have lost four sales people this year, and we have not been able to replace them. We also lost half of our Prop 302 funds to the Legislature, which hinders our ability to market the destination to a national and international audience.

Has the Greater Phoenix CVB seen improvements since the passing of SB 1070? How so?

It’s been about a year since SB 1070 was passed, and in that time we’ve lost six definite conventions. We’ve lost only two since last July, when (federal) Judge (Susan) Bolton’s ruling blocked some of the bill’s most controversial provisions. Our sales team spent a lot of time and energy holding onto some of our large conventions and rebooking others. It’s the pipeline we are most concerned about, and at the close of the calendar year, our booking pace had slowed by 36 percent over last year’s pace — and last year was a recession year.

The fact that 19 other states have introduced immigration bills similar to SB 1070 has taken a little of the heat off us. It’s hard to quantify how much convention business we aren’t even getting considered for due to concerns over the bills. We do know that large, diverse associations are more risk averse than smaller, corporate meetings. Those smaller meetings have started to return to the Valley.

How will the All-Star Game and the MLB FanFest at the Phoenix Convention Center impact Phoenix’s economy and tourism?

The All-Star Game and the events surrounding it — the Home Run Derby, the Legends & Celebrity Softball Game, and FanFest at the convention center — are expected to inject $67 million of direct spending into Arizona’s economy. This estimate does not include local production expenses by national and international broadcast media, nor does it take into account hospitality expenditures by sponsors for receptions, parties and banquets.

The fact that All-Star Week arrives in town during summer, our traditional low season, magnifies its economic benefit to the community and provides us a grand-scale opportunity to show leisure travelers and meeting groups that visiting Phoenix in summertime is fun. And it’s the latest in a growing list of mega sporting events whose presence here proves that large and diverse groups and events are welcome and successful in Arizona.

What are your thoughts on the Arizona Office of Tourism’s “In One Word — Arizona” marketing campaign that launched in November?

Well, using just one word is economical, and that’s a good thing. Seriously, though, it’s a beautiful campaign that dramatically captures the beauty of our state. The existence of such a campaign is absolutely essential. Tourism is a $17 billion asset for Arizona. That asset must be trumpeted; that asset must be leveraged; that asset must be cared for. We all know AOT has been devastated by state budget cuts. If there’s one word that should be applied to AOT’s funding, that word is “restoration.”

What are your thoughts on the new Westin Phoenix Downtown and the rest of the downtown hotels and how they can potentially attract more tourists and business travelers?

Westin is a trusted brand, and the new hotel is a wonderful addition to downtown. Many of the conventions we book at the CVB are what we call “citywide conventions.” What that means is, they are big enough so that their attendees and their families spread out to multiple hotels. With the addition of the Westin, there are now more than 2,700 guest rooms within walking distance of the convention center. And more are on the way: A boutique Kimpton hotel — another trusted brand — is scheduled to open in CityScape early next year. So we’ll have the Sheraton, the Hyatt, the Wyndham, the Westin and the Kimpton right in the city’s core, all near the convention center, all near stops for the light rail, all near CityScape. For years we tended to talk about downtown in the future tense — as in, “It’s going to be great.” Downtown is now all about the present tense. It is great, and the catalyst to making it that way was the visitors industry.

Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2011