Tag Archives: David Krumwiede

Freeport Distribution Center, WEB

Lincoln Property Co. acquires Freeport Distribution Center

Lincoln Property Company (LPC) has acquired the two-building, 219,240-square-foot Freeport Distribution Center industrial project in southwest Phoenix. Freeport Distribution Center is located at the northwest corner of Buckeye Road and 51st Avenue, just minutes from the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

The project is a close-in infill site offering immediate connectivity to the I-10, I-17 and Loop 303 freeway. It boasts a strong tenant roster that includes Nestle North America and two Canadian-based, construction industry credit tenants: Moulding & Millwork (a subsidiary of Metrie) and Hardwoods Specialty (a subsidiary of Hardwoods Distribution, Inc.)

LPC purchased Freeport Distribution Center from Atlanta-based IDI Gazeley Brookfield Logistics Properties and California-based BlackRidge Real Estate Group. Brett Tremaine, Anthony Brent, Ryan Martin and Tom Simmons from HFF represented the seller. LPC will provide exclusive property management services for the new acquisition.

“Phoenix’s southwest Valley is an extremely sought-after industrial real estate submarket,” said Lincoln Property Company’s Executive Vice President David Krumwiede. “Freeport Distribution Center is a great example of the submarket’s strength and its potential to become even stronger as its key assets continue to stabilize.”

Krumwiede quickly engaged LPC’s property management team to capitalize on the project’s potential, and is looking for additional opportunities across the Southwest to do the same. “As a medium-size bay project, Freeport provides a nice balance to our regional portfolio. It is a welcome part of our company’s continued growth.”

“Freeport Distribution Center allows LPC to do what we do best, which is to bring a good asset up to its maximum value,” added Lincoln Property Company’s Director of Management Services Alisa Timm, who oversees a more than 6.5 million-square-foot management portfolio for the company’s Desert West Region. “We do this by providing the services that today’s owners need most: financial savvy, positive relationships and creative ideas that keep tenants and buildings at the top of their game.”

Located on approximately 11 acres at 5240 and 5302 W. Buckeye Road in Phoenix, Freeport Distribution Center includes one 135,114-square-foot industrial building and one 84,126-square-foot industrial building. The project features 25 – 28-foot clear heights, ESFR sprinkler system, front-load configuration and 240 – 260-foot shared truck court.

Dick's Sporting Goods distribution warehouse, Goodyear

Industrial Evolution: West Valley poised for land grab

Dick’s Sporting Goods built a 720KSF distribution center in Goodyear to service its West Coast stores.

A California-based investor erected a 400KSF spec shell in Surprise’s Southwest Railplex business park.

Corporate giants, Macy’s, Amazon, Sub-Zero, Marshall’s/TJ Maxx, Southwest Products and WinCo have landed or expanded their vast West Valley industrial operations within the last two years.

Even more companies are eyeing potential stakes in the burgeoning industrial parks springing up in once sleepy bedroom communities west of Phoenix.

With the recession in their rear-view mirrors, local, national and international companies are revving up manufacturing and distribution operations, and the West Valley is poised to be a big beneficiary of their expansion plans.

Justin LeMaster, Cushman & Wakefield

Justin LeMaster, Cushman & Wakefield

Available and affordable land, a deep labor pool, business-friendly state and local governments and top-notch transportation corridors contribute to the West Valley’s desirability, said Justin LeMaster, Cushman & Wakefield’s director for industrial properties.

Farsighted developers are already master-planning vast spreads of land, setting up infrastructure and even building large-scale spec structures that can accommodate another industrial giant or get sliced and diced to accommodate several smaller operations.

The developers — along with city and state economic development specialists — want their properties primed to snag the business when the lookers become movers, LeMaster said.

“Smart, creative developers will make the West Valley a successful high-growth market for years to come,” he said.

The numbers confirm the trend.

An impressive 4.5 MSF — nearly 94 percent of the metro area industrial construction started or completed in 2013 — is in the West Valley, according to Jones Lang LaSalle’s Q4 Industrial Report.

Q4 absorption was 1.96 MSF, and only 15.3 MSF of the West Valley’s 90.7 MSF total industrial inventory was still available at year’s end.

Nevertheless, 4.5 MSF is a significant amount of new inventory for a post-recession market, and, in fact, it boosted Valleywide industrial vacancy rates above 12 percent.

Anthony Lydon, Jones Lang LaSalle

Anthony Lydon, Jones Lang LaSalle

Industry experts aren’t worried.

“The new, grown-up, industrial tenants coming to market right now are looking for 300KSF, 400KSF and above,” said Anthony Lydon, Jones Lang LaSalle managing director for Supply Chain & Logistics Solutions.

Less than half of the West Valley’s available space meets that criteria, and a few big employers could snatch that up in a flash, he said.

Like LeMaster, Lydon expects that to happen sooner rather than later.

“Over the next 24 to 36 months, the Valley, and the West Valley in particular, will see significant new job creation,” he said.

So what makes the West Valley suddenly so attractive to the industrial users?

“Economics and location,” said Pat Feeney, CBRE senior vice president for industrial services.

Cost is key
Of the metro area’s three major industrial hubs ­— the airport area, the Tempe/Chandler corridor and the West Valley — the first two are nearly out of developable land, Feeney said. And scarcity makes that land pricey, especially for a large user.

Pat Feeney, CBRE

Pat Feeney, CBRE

A skilled and diverse labor force that moved west when the home builders did is another major factor, he said.

“Nearly 70,000 people live in Goodyear, but only 14,000 or 15,000 work in Goodyear,” Feeney said.

When big employers like Sub-Zero, Amazon and Macy’s held job fairs for their new West Valley digs, they typically attracted eight to 10 qualified applicants for every position, he said.

“They all shared that they were so happy they could pick the cream of the crop,” Feeney said. “It’s a really big draw.”

David Krumwiede, Lincoln Property Company

David Krumwiede, Lincoln Property Company

Staffing a large warehouse is a major economic concern, especially for companies with labor-intensive, e-commerce picking systems, said David Krumwiede, executive vice president for Lincoln Property Company, which owns 6 MSF in its four-state Desert West Region, 2.4 MSF of that in the West Valley, including Goodyear AirPark and 10 Lincoln.

Arizona’s main competition for the big industrial users looking to establish or expand operations in the West is California’s Inland Empire, Krumwiede said.

While the Inland Empire’s construction costs are comparable to Arizona’s, labor costs in Arizona, a right-to-work state, are much lower, he said.

“We are extremely competitive with California’s Inland Empire if a user has more people than trucks,” Krumwiede said.

And big energy consumers, such as companies employing sophisticated e-commerce logistics technology, can save as much as 30 percent to 40 percent in operating costs by locating in Arizona instead of California, Lydon said.

But possibly the biggest economic incentive for many industrial users is Arizona’s much more favorable tax basis, Krumwiede said.

All of the West Valley’s large planned business hubs have designated areas that are Foreign Trade Zone capable, and that’s a big selling point for companies that do significant international business in parts or products, Krumwiede said.

“If a company qualifies, it can see a 72 percent reduction in property taxes,” Feeney said. “It’s a tremendous benefit.”

And a benefit none of the nearby states can offer, he said.

Such issues make Arizona, especially the West Valley, where land is available and affordable, a clear economic winner over California.

Location, location, location
Second only to the West Valley’s attractive economics, is its advantageous location, less than half-a-day’s drive from the southern California ports — a major consideration for retailers and e-commerce leaders like Amazon, as well as manufacturers like Sub-Zero, according to the experts.

Rob Martensen, Colliers International

Rob Martensen, Colliers International

“If you can get out of traffic and get closer to the ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach, you can make that in six hours,” said Rob Martensen, Colliers International vice president.

That means truck drivers can log a round trip and still stay within federal guidelines regarding length of time on the road, a feat not so easy to accomplish from the East Valley.

And for companies distributing products regionally — Macy’s or Dick’s Sporting Goods, for example — the completion of the Loop 303 will forge the final freeway link that can speed trucks to and around cities and states north and west of Phoenix.

“It will open the gateway,” LeMaster said. “Companies want to be in Phoenix, and the West Valley will be the industrial hub of Phoenix with the (Loop 303/I-10) interchange.”

Overall, the combo of favorable attributes will ensure the West Valley lands on the short list for large and small industrial users for the next decade or so, Krumwiede said.

“The companies that are already out there — Amazon, Target, Costco, PetSmart, Staples, Macy’s — are all household names. It’s a great start. We’ll see more of those,” he said.

“My vision is that a lot of that vacant land will be put into production in the next five to 10 years.”

M

Lincoln Property Company Sells Project Near Sky Harbor Airport

Lincoln Property Company announced the sale of Lincoln Sky Harbor to LTJ Skyline/Grand Stable and Carriage.  Lincoln Sky Harbor is situated on 7.57 acres and consists of three buildings totaling approximately 130,000 SF.  The property is located at the northwest corner of 16th Street and Interstate 17, in Phoenix, and neighbors Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport is ranked as one of the nation’s top 10 busiest airports for passenger traffic with a $79M daily economic impact. “Being adjacent to one of the nation’s top ten busiest airports has been a key factor to the success of the development,” said David Krumwiede, Executive Vice President, Lincoln Property Company.

Noted as a successful in-fill project, the industrial project was developed by Lincoln Property Company in partnership with INVESCO, a leading independent global investment management firm operating in more than 20 countries.

“Lincoln Sky Harbor is an attractive investment for many reasons, including the stable tenant base, the freeway exposure and proximity to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport,” continued Krumwiede.  “This infill project is one of many Lincoln projects that have capitalized on under-utilized properties.”

Lincoln Property Company was awarded the “Spec Industrial Development of the Year – 100,000 to 250,000 SF” for the Lincoln Sky Harbor project by the Arizona Chapter of the National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP).

The property is 93.4% occupied with tenants such as GardaWorld, one of the top 10, fastest-growing security companies globally. GardaWorld is headquartered in Montreal, Canada, and provides business solutions and security services around the world.  Other tenants include Premier Lighting, 1-800-Flowers and The Synthetic Grass Store. Lincoln Property Company will continue to manage the property under the new ownership.

“LPC is pleased to continue serving as the property manager,” said Alisa Timm, CPM, Director of Management Services, Lincoln Property Company.  “Lincoln is known for managing properties with the philosophy of making decisions as if the asset was our own.  LPC will continue to provide the highest level of management service to the new ownership.”

Lincoln Property Company was represented by Daniel P. Calihan, Pat Feeney, Joe Porter III, and Rusty Kennedy of CBRE.  LTJ Skyline/Grand Stable and Carriage negotiated on their own behalf.