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AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

Sustainable Energy in Arizona - AB Magazine November/December 2011

Boone named interim dean of School of Sustainability

Christopher Boone, professor at Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability (SOS) and School of Human Evolution and Social Change, has been named the interim dean of the School of Sustainability, effective July 1, 2013. Boone has served as the associate dean for education of the school since July 2010.

“Chris Boone is an outstanding scientist and scholar whose extensive work in urban sustainability and world poverty exemplifies the very mission of the school,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “As associate dean he has helped lead the efforts to educate a new generation of students whose passion is to find solutions to some of the most pressing environmental, economic and social challenges of the world. With Chris as interim dean the school is well-positioned to further enhance its academic programs and help students create solutions that will reshape our quality of life.”

Boone succeeds Dean Sander van der Leeuw, who will continue to further the school’s research and academic interests. Van der Leeuw will return as a member of the board of directors for the Global Institute of Sustainability and continue to serve as co-director of the Complex Adaptive Systems Network, as well as chair of the Consortium for Biosocial Complex Systems. He also retains intellectual responsibility for the Global Institute of Sustainability Climate Impact and Adaptation Center.

“Chris Boone has been an important figure in the development of the School of Sustainability, the first such school in the country, and he will be an important leader of the next stage of development of this unique academic unit,” said Elizabeth D. Phillips, ASU executive vice president and provost.

Boone joined ASU in January 2006 as an associate professor and gained full professorship in April 2010. His research centers on urban sustainability, environmental justice and vulnerability, urban socio-ecological systems, global environmental change, human-environmental interaction, geographic information systems (GIS) and public health.

“I’m honored to have the opportunity to serve the School of Sustainability,” Boone said. “I see this as a really important continuation of the work Professor Van der Leeuw did to strengthen the school. ASU serves as an international model for blending sustainability education and research with practice. I am confident we will continue to be a leader in sustainability.”

Gary Dirks, director of ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability, said he is excited about working with Boone, having “enjoyed working with him previously on sustainability concepts. I consider him to be a scholar of the highest caliber and deeply committed to sustainability and sustainability education. He, Rob Melnick and I will make a great team to lead GIOS and SOS in the coming years.”

Boone is the recipient of grants from prestigious organizations, including the National Science Foundation and the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. In addition to his academic pursuits, he is a member of the executive committees of SOS and GIOS.

In 2009, Boone headed a provost’s committee to develop a minor in sustainability. He also serves on the supervisory board for the Social Sciences and Health, and Global Health programs. He is a member of the Scientific Steering Committee of the Urbanization and Global Environment Change program, and the Steering Committee of the Workshop on Climate Change in U.S. Cities in Support of the National Climate Assessment.

Boone currently serves on the editorial boards of journals such as International Journal of Sustainable Urban Development and Environmental Justice. He is also the associate editor of the nature-society section of the journal Current Research on Cities and co-editor of a new book series called New Directions in Sustainability and Society.

Boone received his graduate and doctoral degrees in geography at the University of Toronto before pursuing a post-doctoral fellowship at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability is the first comprehensive degree-granting program of its kind in the United States with a focus on finding real-world solutions to environmental, economic, and social challenges. Established in spring 2007, the School is part of the Global Institute of Sustainability, which is the hub of ASU’s sustainability initiatives. The institute advances research, education and business practices for an urbanizing world. The School of Sustainability offers undergraduate and graduate programs and minors, as well as doctoral and professional leadership programs. Visit http://www.schoolofsustainability.asu.edu.

Amy-Hillman

Hillman Named Dean of W. P. Carey School of Business

Amy Hillman has been named dean of Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business, effective March 1, 2013. The school’s current executive dean, Hillman has served as second-in-command at the school since 2009, playing a key role in its growth and success.

U.S. News & World Report currently ranks the school Top 30 in the nation for undergraduate business, full-time MBA and part-time MBA programs.

Hillman succeeds retiring dean, Robert Mittelstaedt, who helped vault the W. P. Carey School of Business into one of the largest and highest-ranked business schools in the world, with more than 10,000 students. He will remain at ASU as dean emeritus and professor of management.

“Amy Hillman is a devoted teacher, a noted researcher and a gifted administrator,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “She has been an integral part of the W. P. Carey School management team that has had so much success during the past decade. We are fortunate that Amy has agreed to move into the school’s deanship to further enhance the school’s excellence.

“I wish to thank Bob Mittelstaedt for his leadership of the W. P. Carey School, and I am delighted that Bob will continue to serve ASU by doing special projects and advising me and the provost.”

Said Executive Vice President and Provost Elizabeth D. Phillips, “Amy Hillman is a top scholar in her field, and she is a creative and flexible administrator well-suited to lead the W. P. Carey School in a time of very rapid change in higher education.”

Hillman is a world-renowned management professor and holds the Rusty Lyon Chair in Strategy at the W. P. Carey School. She has won numerous national awards as an outstanding reviewer and researcher. She was editor of Academy of Management Review, the world’s top management journal in terms of citation impact, and her research has been featured in USA Today, The Washington Post and U.S. News & World Report.

“I’m excited to have the opportunity to lead a terrific group of faculty, staff, students, alumni and our friends in the business community forward,” said Hillman. “The W. P. Carey School of Business is on a steep trajectory toward becoming one of the world’s finest institutions committed to making meaningful contributions to the lives of our stakeholders and also to the future of business practice.”

Students and colleagues consider Hillman to be an exceptional teacher, having honored her with two Outstanding Professor Awards and two Outstanding Teacher Awards. She was also voted one of the most popular professors in Businessweek’s rankings of MBA faculty in 1998.

Before her impressive tenure in academia, Hillman worked as general manager of a small retail and manufacturing business, and she now plays a key role in promoting entrepreneurship at the W. P. Carey School. For example, she helps to advance the school’s Spirit of Enterprise Center, which helps hundreds of businesses each year.

Hillman previously taught at the University of Western Ontario, Michigan State University, Johannes Kepler University in Austria, Texas A&M University and Trinity University. She has a Ph.D. from Texas A&M, where she was also named Outstanding Doctoral Alumni.

Mittelstaedt joined the school in 2004 and will semi-retire after spending about 40 years in academia, including various leadership positions at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

deal

ASU program helps leaders of small businesses

The fifth annual Small Business Leadership Academy at the W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU helps small business owners and executives learn how to improve efficiency, streamline operations and raise profits.

“Classes are held just one night per week, so they fit right into busy executives’ schedules,” said Dawn Feldman, executive director of the W. P. Carey School of Business Center for Executive and Professional Development, which hosts the program. “Participants not only take away great business knowledge, but also a new support network of peers that will exist long after the program is over.”

Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding co-sponsor, offers a number of scholarships to its current suppliers and small business customers.

“The academy offers an outstanding opportunity for small business owners to gain knowledge from highly acclaimed professors and establish lasting relationships with other community small business owners,” said Carrie Young, senior director, corporate operations services for SRP. “The partnership we have with ASU, coupled with the sponsorship and scholarships we offer to the academy, is a natural fit for SRP in supporting economic development within our own community.”

As part of a larger partnership with ASU focused on small business support, JPMorgan Chase is also a top sponsor, providing 15 scholarships to the academy.

“As Arizona’s number one SBA lender, we know how important small businesses are to our economy,” said Joe Stewart, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase in Arizona.

Participants must come from companies that have been in business for at least three years; have annual revenues between $1 million and $10 million; and have fewer than 100 employees.

For more information, call (480) 965-7579, e-mail wpcarey.execed@asu.edu or visit wpcarey.asu.edu/sbla.

speakers

Hear from Top Business Leaders in the New ECP Season

Top leaders from Sam’s Club, Intel, the United Services Automobile Association (USAA), and the Arizona Diamondbacks are among those taking the stage during the current season of the Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series. Every year, Phoenix-area audiences are invited to attend the club’s luncheons and hear from some of the biggest names in the business world.

“We want Valley businesspeople to be able to hear from the heads of major local companies and top executives from international firms,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “This series brings leaders from a variety of industries to talk about what’s happening in their own companies, as well as in the business arena as a whole.”

The Economic Club of Phoenix (ECP) was founded by a group of prominent business executives called the Dean’s Council of 100, in conjunction with the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. The club is now the preeminent Arizona forum for the exchange of ideas about business and the economy. Its monthly luncheons and other activities offer business leaders and others opportunities to network and engage.

This season’s speaker lineup (subject to change) is:

Thursday, Nov. 8 – William Toler, chief executive officer, AdvancePierre Foods; Matt Wilson, managing director, Oaktree Capital Management
Wednesday, Jan. 23 – Derrick Hall, president and chief executive officer, Arizona Diamondbacks
Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 – Charles Redfield, executive vice president of merchandising, Sam’s Club
Tuesday, March 19 – Doug Davis, vice president and general manager, Arizona fab/sort manufacturing site, Intel Corporation
Thursday, April 25 – Maj. Gen. Josue Robles Jr., president and chief executive officer, United Services Automobile Association (USAA), Dean’s Council of 100 Executive of the Year
Thursday, May 16 – Annual Economic Outlook Luncheon

All luncheons run from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The November event will take place at JW Marriott’s Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, with the rest of the locations still to be announced.

Non-members are welcome for a $75 luncheon fee. Funds in excess of the cost of lunch are used to support scholarships and faculty research at the W. P. Carey School of Business.

For more information about the club or to reserve seats, call (480) 727-0596, e-mail wpcarey.ecp@asu.edu or go to www.econclubphx.org.

education.business

Executives look to broaden knowledge base

The economic downturn created new levels of pressure that businesses never experienced.
Costs had to be contained. Operations had to be streamlined. The workforce had to be as lean and as efficient as possible.

It created pressure and questions for employees, too, as they questioned whether or not they had the skill sets necessary to survive and thrive during any economic crisis.

“We have seen a number of people enter our Ken Blanchard Executive MBA and MBA program as a response to the most recent (economic) downturn,” says Kevin Barksdale, dean of the Ken Blanchard College of Business at Grand Canyon University. “Some have done so because they had become unexpectedly unemployed.  Others as a hedge against that possibility.”

One thing educators say you can bank on, though, is that in the wake of the recession, fewer firms are paying for school.

“The current economic conditions have created more of a ‘hirers’ market and firms are looking for more educated people for their talent pool,” says Bill Berry, dean of the University of Phoenix School of Business. “These firms are paying less for education, but still want a well-educated workforce.”

As a result, Valley educators who cater to executives who aspire to prepare themselves for new levels of leadership have had to learn to become more nimble and adaptable with their curriculum and methods.

“The environment has been so unstable and change has become so constant,” Barksdale says, “that we have had to be willing to move quickly to support our executive students.”

One new program that is catering to the changing demands of the workforce and need for immediacy in the business community is the Master’s in Management (MiM) program at Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business. The program launches this semester.

(MiM) degrees are shortened programs that cost less, don’t require years of work experience, and provide recent graduates with the business fundamentals they will need to launch themselves into the workforce faster than MBA programs. A survey by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) reports a 69 percent spike in applications for MiM programs in the United States.

“GMAT takers and MBA applicants are getting younger and have less experience, signaling an increased demand for graduate business training without the work experience typically associated with an MBA,” says Dawn Feldman, executive director of the Center for Executive and Professional Development at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “In addition, employers have been indicating they need employees with strong problem-solving skills and fundamental business knowledge. Our MiM program is just nine months long and helps new grads to complement their existing knowledge from other fields with a basic business foundation. MiM programs already have a long record of success with students and employers in other areas of the world, such as Europe. We’re enthusiastic about the diversity of our incoming class.”

ASU’s MiM program is designed to take aspiring entrepreneurs and students from non-business backgrounds and teach them real-world skills that can immediately be translated and applied to a professional work environment and give them an edge in the competitive job market.

The University of Phoenix also offers its own Master of Management degree.
“Because University of Phoenix adapts our course curriculum based on changing industry trends and skills employers are looking for in their workforce,” Berry says, “the Master of Management degree is best fitting with the stated needs of today’s employers focusing on the skills required to work in a highly collaborative and culturally diverse organization.”

While those entering the workplace are looking for an edge on the competition, developing talent already working in the trenches was something that was a luxury during the economic downturn.

But as the economy transitions from recession to recovery mode, businesses are starting to focus on positioning themselves for future growth and developing internal talent.

“In the last six months we’ve seen a real increase in the number of organizations inquiring about leadership development opportunities for their employees,” Feldman says. “They know that their internal efforts alone aren’t enough. They’re seeking opportunities to develop people by exposing them to the business perspectives and practical knowledge that faculty at the W. P. Carey School of Business are uniquely positioned to share.”

With that in mind, the Center for Executive and Professional Development created the Leadership Development Workshops, a series of five standalone courses on topics that range from driving employee engagement to leading effective team processes. The workshops are designed for managers, project or team leaders, and those looking to advance into management roles. They can also provide a strong foundation for seasoned professionals who have little formal management education.

“W. P. Carey faculty are recognized worldwide for their research and thought leadership,” according to Gerry Keim, chairman of the department of management. “Yet it’s their skill at bringing new trends and best practice discussions into the classroom, focusing on the practical application of concepts in the current business environment, that makes the W. P. Carey School an incredible resource for managers and executives.”

The 2012 workshop topics include Driving Employee Engagement, Effective Negotiations, Inspiration and Motivation as Leadership Tools, Harvesting Knowledge From Frontline Employees, Leading Effective Team Processes. Topics for the 2013 workshops are being developed.

“Whether individuals attend all five or just one workshop, they will come away with new skills and approaches to business practices that will ultimately positively affect their employees and their organization’s bottom line,” Feldman says.

Regardless of what route business executives take to get there — whether it’s a workshop or going back to school to get and MBA — educators say the current focus of executive education is on the practical application of knowledge.

“Executives want learning opportunities that build capabilities and immediately allow participants to do their jobs better,” Feldman says. “Second, technology has given us the opportunity to build engaging learning experiences that connect people regardless of location, so online programs mirror the way work is done in today’s global business environment.”

The availability on online education has made it easier than ever for executives to expand their knowledge base.

“Our eMBA is an accelerated and blended model with face-to-face interaction during three distinct residencies and online learning in between,” Barksdale says. “Our MBA programs are offered face to face — traditional style — and online.”

In addition to the online options available, Barksdale says he has observed another change in executive education.

“I think the biggest shift has been the increased desire on the part of the student to learn more about themselves, their personal styles, and subsequently their leadership skills,” Barksdale acknowledges. “We have found executive learners to be more open than ever to receiving critical feedback with respect to how they lead and what might need to change.”
While executives may see furthering their education as a solo endeavor, educators urge them to seek out the guidance of others before embarking on their journey.

“Seek advice from your personal board of directors,” Barksdale says. “Discuss the reasons you want to go back to school. What would you do with the new knowledge?  Talk to students in the programs you are considering. Ask them questions around the curriculum, the learning environment, and the learning culture. Consider whether the programs you are looking at devote significant time to leadership development or not. This to me is critical in the life of an executive.  Finally, some people might suggest to choose a program that fits your lifestyle.  While this is not bad advice, I might add that if you are looking for the MBA or graduate degree to be a transformational journey, perhaps you might consider a program that intentionally alters your lifestyle. The disruption can be a good thing if you use it to re-focus and re-center your career and life trajectory.”

The W. P. Carey School of Business contributed to this story. To learn more, visit knowwpcarey.com.